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Assignment 1: Part One) Appendices

Appendix A: Preliminary Scope and Sequence

Appendix B: Concept Map

Appendix C: Assessment Schedule


WEEKS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Stag
e6
Mo
der
n
Hist
ory
Sco
pe
and
Seq
uen
ce
201
7
TERM 1 Transition Case Study 1 Case Study 2
2015 to Year 11 Decline and Fall of the Romanov Dynasty Civil Rights Movement in the US
Course (Outcomes: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P3.1, P3.2, P3.3, P3.4, P3.5, P4.1, P4.2) 1950s and 1960s
Overview- Source (Outcomes: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P3.1, P3.2,
Skills P3.3, P3.4, P3.5, P4.1, P4.2)
Analysis

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

TERM 2 Half Yearly exams Case Study 3


2015 Personality Study: Pol Pot
Case Study 2 (Outcomes: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P3.1, P3.2, P3.3, P3.4, P3.5,
Civil Rights Movement in the US 1950s and 1960s P4.1, P4.2)
(Outcomes: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P3.1, P3.2, P3.3, P3.4, P3.5, P4.1, P4.2)

Historical Investigation
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

TERM 3 Yearly Exams


2015 Source
Core: World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century Analysis
(Outcomes: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P3.1, P3.2, P3.3, P3.4, P3.5, P4.1, P4.2)
in class
exam
Historical Investigation
Historical Investigation timeline 2017 (breakdown for the Scope and Sequence)
** Continuation of the Scope and Sequence **

Week Students Learn About Strategies

1 Students Learn about research techniques Students are shown how to effectively use the library in
order to do their investigation.
Students are provided documentation on how to correctly
create a bibliography.
Students provided with notes on how to write a historical
essay what MUST be included, what COULD be included,
what SHOULD NOT be included.
2
Students Learn about the topics they can Students are given the historical investigation booklet,
choose which will on submission, be their RESEARCH LOG BOOK.
Students begin researching
3-7 Students begin Historical investigation
Research and collecting of information and sources (using
library as main source)

8 Students learn how to put together research


material Students working in pairs focusing on working out the
historical fact and historical opinions of their research
tasks use other students to guide them as well as
teacher. This will assist students in writing their essays.

9 Essay Writing Students complete draft essays, ask for feedback from
teacher and students within their class.

10 Presentation of Investigation Students present their investigation. (Research Log Book,


Written submission (essay) and Oral Presentation.
Concept Map:
Assessment Component Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Task 4 Task 5 Assessment
Yearly Exam Weighting

Source Analysis Half-Yearly Exam Extended Response Source Analysis Final Exam

Term 1 Term 2 Term 2 Term 3 Term 3

Week 8 Week 2-3 Week 8 Week 6 Weeks 9-10

P1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 3.2, P1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 3.2, 3.3, P1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 3.4, P3.1, 3.2, 3.5, 4.1, 4.2 All
3.3, 4.1, 4.2 3.4, 4.1, 4.2 3.5, 4.1, 4.2

Knowledge &
Understanding of course 5% 10% 5% 20% 40%
content

Source-based skills
15%
10% 5% 5% 20%

Historical inquiry and


research
5% 20%

Communication of
historical understanding in 10% 5% 20%
appropriate forms

Marks

15% 15% 20% 20% 25% 100%


Assignment 1: Part Two

Assessment Task / and Assessment Notification

Unit Outline

PRE Lesson

POST Lesson

Justification
Historical Source Analysis
EXAMINATION TASK NOTIFICATION

Course: Modern History (the world at the beginning of the 20th Century)

Assessment Task Number: 4 Value of this task: 20%

Exam Date: Term 3 Week 6 Exam Date: Term 3 Week 6

Your classes examination day and date: ..

Outcomes being assessed:

P2.1 identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and
Continuity from the eighteenth century to the present
P3.2 locate, select, and organise relevant information from different types of sources
P3.3 comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability
P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

General Instructions:
You are provided 55 minutes of your 60-minute lesson to undertake this task.
5 minutes reading time
50 minutes writing time
Attempt all questions
Use Black or Blue pen only
Ensure you are on time to class. Late arrivals will not be provided any additional time.
If you are away, you are required to bring a Doctors Certificate to your teacher on your
FIRST back at school (regardless of whether you have a History class or not).

Exam Details:
This exam focuses on The World at the Beginning of the 20th Century topic only.
The exam is broken up into 2 sections.

Section 1:
Examining 4 Sources. (Worth 10 Marks TOTAL)

Section 2:
Extended response of a source. (Worth 10 Marks TOTAL)
Sample High School Modern History In Class Exam
The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

ANSWER BOOKLET

Name...........................................................

Date ..

Teacher

INSTRUCTIONS

MATERIALS:

Use the enclosed lined paper for your answers


You should have at least 1 pen and a highlighter
There is a SEPARATE booklet containing the sources

TASK:

Please ensure you write your name on the front of this booklet
Answer ALL questions from Section A and Section B
ALL written answers are to be written in English
You have 5 minutes of Reading Time
You have 50 minutes of Writing Time

AT THE EN OF THE TASK:

Please submit all materials and wait for dismissal instructions


Do not remove any materials after the examination

1. READ these instructions carefully


2. This is a CLOSED book exam
3. Allocate your time wisely
4. Use Black or Blue pen ONLY
5. If you finish the examination early, check your work. You CAN NOT leave early
6. No calculators are permitted
Section 1: 10 MARKS

YOU are required to write between 200 250 words on each of the following FOUR
sources, which relate to your core topic, the world at the Beginning of the Twentieth
Century. For each source you are required to discuss the usefulness of the source for a
historian. To determine the usefulness of the source you should consider both the
PERSPECTIVE and RELIABILITY of each source. You may also wish to consider the following
points on your responses.

ORIGIN
MOTIVE
CONTENT
LIMITATIONS
AUDIENCE

SECTION 1:

..
.

Section 2: 10 MARKS

YOU are to choose ONE of the FOUR sources from Section 1 and in 800-1000 words
explain using your own knowledge how Europe was changing at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century.

SECTION 2:

Sample High School


2017 Modern History
Sources Booklet
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET

DO NOT REMOVE THIS BOOKLET FROM THE


EXAMINATION ROOM

SOURCE 1: World War I

SOURCE 2: Industrial Revolution


SOURCE 3: July Crisis 1914
SOURCE 4: Schlieffen Plan 1914
It may be safely assumed that the next war will be a war on two
fronts. Of our enemies, France is the most dangerous and can
prepare the most quickly. Accounts must be settled with her very
soon after deployment. Should the defeat of the French be
achieved quickly and decisively, it will also be possible to make
forces available against Russia.
General Von Moltke Schlieffen Plan Memorandum 1914

DEFINITIONS TO ASSIST YOU:

SOURCE 1: World War 1


Callous: showing or having disregard for others (heartless, uncaring)
Great Coat: a long heavy overcoat
Parapet: a low protective wall

Source 4: Schlieffen Plan


Decisively: ability to make decisions quickly and effectively
Sample High School Modern History In Class Exam The World at the
Beginning of the Twentieth Century
TEACHERS MARKING CRTIERIA 2017

PART 1: Short responses x 4 sources.

Makes sophisticated judgements on all FOUR sources usefulness. 9-10


Provides comprehensive consideration of reliability and clear understanding of
perspective

Makes clear judgements on all FOUR sources usefulness. 7-8


Provides detailed consideration of reliability and clear understanding of
perspective.

Attempts an assessment of judgement on all FOUR sources usefulness. 5-6


Provides some consideration of reliability and clear understanding of
perspective.

Generalised about usefulness with few links to reliability and perspective. 3-4

Some reference to usefulness. 1-2


Simple description of reliability and perspective.

PART 2: Extended Response x 1 source.

Addresses question asked with a sound attempt at an argument with demonstrating 9-


well-developed knowledge. 10
Well-structured and relevant response.
Provide detailed and accurate historical knowledge using historical terms and
concepts appropriately.
Addresses question with relevant but largely narrative response. 6-8
Contains implied understanding of issues of the source.
Clear and relevant response.
Provides accurate historical knowledge using historical terms and concepts
throughout.
Presents narrative/ descriptive response which is largely relevant yet incomplete. 3-5
Presents simple response, with some identification key features.
Limited historical knowledge.

Attempts narrative, generally relevant 1-2


May be disjointed
Provides limited historical knowledge.

Exam Source Reference List:

Source A: Congreve, B. (2014). Armageddon Road (1st ed.). Havertown: Pen and Sword.

Source B: English Factory Slaves. Retrieved from: http://www.art.com/products/p14032121-sa-i2844521/cartoon-


by-robert-cruikshank-s-english-factory-slaves-their-daily-employment.htm

Source C: The Prelude to war. Retrieved from: http://alphahistory.com/worldwar1/july-crisis/

Source D: General Von Moltke on the Schlieffen Plan (1911). Retrieved from:
http://alphahistory.com/worldwar1/von-moltke-schlieffen-plan-1911/
UNIT OUTLINE
Subject: Modern History Stage 6 Number of Weeks 10
Course: Preliminary Course
Unit title: World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century

Key Concepts/ Big Ideas The importance of this learning


Autocracy, capitalism, Students lay the foundations for their twentieth-century studies by
communism, decolonization, investigating the forces and ideas for change and continuity that
democracy, feminism, shaped the early twentieth- century world using the methods of
globalization, imperialism, historical inquiry.
industrialization,
internationalism, liberalism,
nationalism, pan-nationalism,
racism, revolution, sectarianism,
self-determination, socialism,
terrorism
Unit context within Scope and Syllabus Outcomes
Sequence
P1.1 describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of
selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present
P1.2 investigate and explain the key features and issues of selected
studies from the eighteenth century to the present
P2.1 identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in
contributing to change and continuity from the eighteenth
century to the present
P3.1 ask relevant historical questions
P3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different
types of sources
P3.3 comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and
reliability
P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past
P3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations,
analysing and synthesising information from different types of
sources
P4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
P4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical
features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral
and written forms

Literacy Focus Numeracy ICT Focus


Focus Differentiation
Students will Students will Students will Please refer below for a weekly breakdown
engage with engage with engage with of the ways differentiation has been
sources and dates, data and videos, incorporated.
create extended timelines to websites,
responses enhance their online
numeracy skills methods of
research
Week/ Syllabus Content Teaching and Learning Strategies Resources Differentiatio
Sequenc including assessment for learning. n
e
Source Skills Introduction Video Crash course: https://www Definitions of
Testing Skills and Sources YouTube .youtube.co perspective,
reliability and m/watch?v= reliability,
1 usefulness of Perspective, Reliability and TgU1BcDStK usefulness,
sources Usefulness of Sources 0 motive,
Definitions, discussion and audience
explanation of how to test sources Textbook (etc) are
for reliability and usefulness listed around
Online the room for
Read Article Whose View Skew Article additional
the News Discuss implications
learning
Sources support
Types of sources
Handout
Analysis of different types of
sources and their strengths and
weaknesses for historical
investigation (source analysis
investigation and practice)

Source Work Skills


Practice answering reliability and
usefulness questions using sources
Students collaboratively construct an
answer using the computer and smart
board

The nature of Introduction Video Crash course https://www Visual and


European Beginning 20th Century YouTube .youtube.co interactive
2 society / The m/watch?v= videos are
world at the DVD Age of Hope - Students list _XPZQ0LAlR utilised to
start of the 20th main changes and ideas of the 4&list=PLXny enhance
Century early 20th century Helr6SOhK6Y engagement
HS-
Rich and Students to use Google docs to cO7AnCiXpY
poor research and create glossary of Si1NJ Use of ICT
terms (upload to Moodle for class
Urbanisa incorporated
to share) DVD (ICT)
tion and
industrial
Map exercise on the World in 1870
isation Google Docs Moodle used
and 1900 with details of Europe
Social and the Mediterranean. for students
change Butchers to be
Forms of Construct a timeline of political
Paper interactive
governm and international events to with content
ent overview trends. Discuss what Text book at different
Women events stand out and why. (Pre times (at
rights knowledge on what students Student home, lunch
and know) Workbook time in the
economi library) this
c growth Students identify the main Internet method also
problems and issues of the working allows
class in European countries in this students to
period and explain how each of the print notes if
following offered solutions: they have
socialism, Marxism, anarchism, issues with
trade unionism (work booklet handwriting
activities).

Students research the changes to


Group work
women and their economic value.
incorporated
Students presented with sources
(both visual and text) and ask to
with mixed
determine the usefulness of the ability groups
sources looking at their reliability being created
and perspective. ADAMANT

Students to begin research task Students are


using sources. Students are given a provided
worksheet which outline key issue with work
of the world of the 20th century sheets to
students are to research these further
issue and then to present to the scaffold their
class the presentation will be learning to
done as a Google slides start their
research for
the
presentation

Emerging forces Indrodction Video Crash https://www Use of videos


3 and ideas / An Course Overview of Europe .youtube.co
overview of (Socialism, Marxism, m/watch?v=
Europe in 1914 nationalism) YouTube Cd2ch4XV84 Group work
s utilized again
New Students are to continue
political researching their issue as Internet
ideas and mentioned above in week 2.
Group mock
institutio Moodle trial give
ns) - The Great Powers of Old
Europe- Students assess (in students
Politics of Student opportunity
groups) the relative strengths
the Workbook to build
and weaknesses of the great
working knowledge
powers. (Group work) students
class: to upload their finings to together and
socialism Moodle. Teacher to name all use their
, trade the Great Powers and individual
unionism randomly assign a great power strengths to
, group to groups of students. present
Marxism
Anarchis Students are to focus on 1
m particular country and to hold a Source
Nationali mock League of Nations Analysis:
sm meeting, which will deal with Examples
Internati the issue they have been
given first to
onalism, researching.
help students
globalisat understand
ion Presentation to class mock
requirements
Democra League of nations meeting
students assigned a nation in
(scaffolding)
cy, - USE OF
groups to research
liberalis ADAMANT
m Source analysis tasks on the
Great Powers of Old Europe
(looking at usefulness through
reliability, perspective, origin,
motive, content and
limitations).

Long and short Introduction Video Crash Course https://ww Tangible and
4 and 5 term causes Long and Short Term causes w.youtube.c visual
of World YouTube om/watch?v learning
War I =_pFCpKtwC through
Students examine the long-term kI creating a
Nati causes of WWI through an
poster
onal examination of primary and
secondary sources. Emphasis is
Student
ism Workbook
placed on the understanding and
Imp (primary
use of key historical terms. Cartoon
erial and
Nationalism study to help
ism
Imperialism secondary grasp
Allia
Traditional Diplomacy /Alliances source students
nce
The Arms Race documents)
Syst
em
Students to create a poster Textbook
Mili Mapping
that examines one of the
taris above 4 dot points and 300 activity
m word response on HOW there are 2
versions of
Cartoon study on development the content
of alliance system: students to be read
record key developments on a first
timeline. depending
http://www.historywiz.com/all on how the
iance.htm
teacher feels
the students
Students read extract on
imperialism in the 1900s from will engage
Guest, Lawrence and Eshuys,
World War I: Causes, Course
and Consequences and Group work
complete mapping activity to
identify imperialist tensions in
Africa and the Middle East. (2
Timeline
versions of the reading)
students
Students investigate the have option
emergence of nationalism to create
using source-based questions timeline
on literature, the press, how they
education, and social want (on
movements at the turn of the computer,
century. In groups, students draw it) etc.
present their findings in one of
the following formats: posters
play extracts, fiction extracts,
newspaper articles, etc. The Authentic
key findings are summarised learning
on a scaffold and uploaded to experiences
Moodle for all students to (excursion)
access.

Using texts and primary


sources, students construct an
annotated timeline on the
development of militarism.
Complete comprehension and
source analysis activities.

HISTORY EXCURSION TO
POWERHOUSE MUSEUM

International International Crises and the Use of


Crises Coming of World War One 1905- https://www interactive
1914 .youtube.co video to
6 m/watch?v= excite
Introduction video Crash Course y9HjvHZfCUI students and
Arms Race (YouTube) Internet provide them
with brief
Groups research one crisis. They Worksheet understandin
report back to the class on a) what g of
happened (verbally) and b) impact Mapping international
of the crisis on international
activity crisis
relations (notes to be shared via
handout
Moodle).
Alliance Group work
Students read The Balkans
worksheet, and write 4 paragraphs system
on the significance of the Balkans. pages in
Then class discussion on the work booklet Writing
significance. exercises is
Handout of scaffolded for
Map activity: students identify key text second students who
locations involved in the Balkan Moroccan require it
crises 19081912 and 1913. crisis with
Extracts on Tangier Crisis from instructions
Condon and Greenwood to on what the
illustrate how interpretations by paragraphs
historians may differ slightly. should
include
Students compare and contrast
information
these two interpretations of the
wise.
contribution of alliance system,
imperialism and nationalism to
increasing international tension.
Teacher provides scaffolding by Teacher
providing students options on their scaffolding
compare and contrasts. instructions

Students read texts on Second


Moroccan Crisis and construct an Students
HSC-style question modelled on provided
past core questions. Students examples of
exchange their questions and draft past HSC
and discuss their responses. Class questions to
discussion to follow. assist them.
** Student practice for week 8
source analysis in class
examination.

Schlieffen Plan Introduction video Schlieffen Plan https://www Interactive


War Plans as (YouTube) .youtube.co video
7 a cause of m/watch?v=
war with In groups students plan a German KRSI_JRo54
special victory. Students assess each M Group Work
emphasis on groups plan and make conclusions
the about Germanys strategic Internet
Schlieffen dilemma. (Problem Solving)
Mini mock
Plan Textbook debate
War Plans - Students examine how
the development of war plans mixed ability
Student teams
contributed to the outbreak of
Workbook
war.
Diagrams and
Students assess the strengths and kinasetic
weaknesses of the Schlieffen Plan. learning
Students are broken up into 2 techniques
groups to have a mini mock used
debate.

Using annotated diagrams,


students use the playground to
reconstruct German and French
plans for war. Students use the
understanding gained from this
activity to discuss the contributions
of war plans to the outbreak of
war.

Students to write an extended


response on what they learnt from
undertaking the playground
reconstruction.

July Crisis Introduction video: Crash Course https://www Video and ICT
July Crisis YouTube .youtube.co use
8 m/watch?v=
Create a timeline of the July 1914 Cd2ch4XV84
crisis. Students can be as creative s Student
as they wish with this task constructed
Narrative time line
Assassination in Sarajevo Class passage students have
reads the narrative and speculates
multiple ways
about the implications what Internet in which they
might happen next? (YouTube) can create
for song fall this task
Song All for you Sophia by Franz
for you
Ferdinand what does this song
Sophia
signify / tell us?
Music used
Student
Study Guide on how the
assassination of Franz Ferdinand Workbook
lead to war. Textbook activities 1 Feedback
9 to be completed. Retroactive provided
Textbook from exam
Mock League of Nations
Conference. In groups representing
the 5 great powers students (1)
attribute blame (2) rebut attacks
(iii) make a final statement.

Go over feedback from Source


Analysis. Creative writing activity
based on WWI.

Historiography Final video summation of https://www Use of ICT


9 on Origins of WW1 Historians Views .youtube.co
WWI m/watch?v=
Analysis of various historians _XPZQ0LAlR Students get
views. Students to select historians 4&list=PL- to watch a
who they mostly and least agree b6BqXQgEFo video and
with. 88XFZ2r- take notes
DQmN-
Video The Necessary War c5W5W9u-
Watch the section that deals with
the causes of the war. Ask students Peer
Internet assessment
whether they are convinced by the
arguments presented. What might
Textbook
a member of the German
government in 1914 have said in
response? Student
Workbook
Conflicting interpretations of the
causes of WWI. As class discuss
how interpretations can alter
viewpoints. Break class up into
small groups, read interpretation
document, and get groups to select
and share the interpretation that
best represents their
understanding of the causes.
Lead to class discussion.

Skills Work Explicit teaching on


how to answer a question
requiring students to combine
their own knowledge with
information extracted from specific
sources

Source Analysis Practice Peer


Assessment

EXAM WEEK EXAM WEEK EXAM WEEK EXAM WEEK


10
Assessment Details Outcomes
Source Analysis in class Can accurately analyse sources regarding The
examination, weight: 20% Beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Students provided 55
minutes to complete.
P2.1 identify forces and ideas and explain their
significance in contributing to change and
Continuity from the eighteenth century to the present
P3.2 locate, select, and organise relevant information
from different types of sources
P3.3 comprehend and analyse sources for their
usefulness and reliability
P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past
Evaluation of the Learning Indicators of Learning
and Teaching
Kahoot Students are able to respond to different questions
Informal in class exam about this topic,
Mock debate Students can undertake source analysis
Lesson Plan (Pre Lesson)

Topic area: The world at the beginning of the 20th Century Stage of Learner: Stage 6

Date: XX-XX-XXXX Location Booked: Classroom Lesson Number: 17/30

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students 25 Printing/preparation:


Source Analysis handouts

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to

Syllabus outcomes Analyse sources The nature of European Evaluating the usefulness
society and reliability of sources
P2.1 identify forces and ideas and
explain their significance in Emerging Forces and ideas Accounting for and
contributing to change and assessing differing
Continuity from the eighteenth Imperialism perspectives and
century to the present interpretations of significant
Causes of World War I events, people and issues at
P3.2 locate, select, and organise the beginning of the
relevant information from twentieth century
different types of sources
Presenting the findings of
P3.3 comprehend and analyse investigations on aspects of
sources for their usefulness and the period, analysing and
reliability synthesising information
from different types of
P3.4 identify and account for sources
differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past

Life Skills outcomes N/A

Subject specific concepts

Urbanisation and industrialisation


Social change
Forms of government
Politics of the working class: socialism, trade, unionism, Marxism
Anarchism
Nationalism
Internationalism, globalisation
Democracy, liberalism
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking


Intellectual Quality
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, 1.2 Deep understanding 1.5 Metalanguage
substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as something
that requires active construction and requires students to engage in higher-order 1.3 Problematic 1.6 Substantive
thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are learning. knowledge communication

2.1 Explicit quality criteria 2.4 Social Support


Quality Learning Environment
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers work 2.2 Engagement 2.5 Students self regulation
productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy sets high and
explicit expectations and develops positive relationships between teacher and students 2.3 High Expectations 2.6 Student direction
and among students.

3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity


Significance knowledge
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important to 3.5 Connectedness
students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students prior knowledge and 3.2 Cultural knowledge
identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all 3.6 Narrative
cultural perspective. 3.3 Knowledge
integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

Students are looking at sources and understanding to correctly identify the source as well as
it reliability and usefulness (encouraged to address multiple [perspectives).
Problematic
Knowledge

Students are provided a lesson on how to correctly and efficiently interact with sources and
successfully complete their upcoming examination.
High
Expectations
This lesson is built on a strong support for learning and students have an opportunity to
work in groups to identify the sources and enhance their understanding of source analysis.
Social Support
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred

T/S

5 Teacher welcomes in students and asks them to Teacher: At the front of the
take a seat. room, marking the roll and
looking up to acknowledge each
Teacher reads out the roll. student as they answer
Students unpack for todays lesson. Student: At their desk, T
Teacher to give a brief overview of what todays preparing themselves for
lesson will include. todays lesson and answering as
their names are called out.

Resources: roll, smart board,


whiteboard / smart board

5-10 Teacher reinforms students that they will be Teacher: Speaking to the class,
having an upcoming in class examination on handing out exam notification
source analysis for the topic: The world at the
Student: at their desk, quietly
beginning of the 20th Century.
receiving upcoming exam
Teacher asks for quiet as she hands out the notification. T
upcoming exam notification task.
Resources: exam notification.
Teacher goes through it with students following
on and asking questions.

10- Teacher explains to the class that this lesson they Teacher: At front of the class
20 will be looking at 2 sources in depth and going explaining the sections of
over them to help build the students knowledge todays lesson.
and skills on how to analyse sources.
Student: at their desk, listening
Teacher tells the students that the two sources to lesson instructions and
relate to content they have already studied to commencing work on source 1.
help their familiarity; T/S
Resources: Smart board to view
Civil Rights Movement of the US (Stage sources, student devices,
6) and writing books.
World War II (Stage 5).
Source 1: Civil Rights movement is put up on the
board. Students are given 5 minutes to
individually analyse the source and write notes
before class discussion. Students are reminded to
assist their analysis they can use ADAMANT.

20 - Class comes back together to as a group, Teacher: initiating conversation


30 collectively analyse the source. Teacher asks about source 1, providing
open-ended questions to give students an insight, information and
opportunity to provide details, insight and answering questions made by
information. students.

Teacher concludes the source. Student: participating in class


discussion regarding source 1,
and taking new notes down S
from other student and teacher
responses.

Resources: Smart board to view


sources, student devices,
writing books.

30 - Teacher introduces the second source WW2 and Teacher: Introducing the second
35 asks students to individually analyse the source. source.
Students are given 5 minutes to individually
analyse the source and write notes before class Student: individually analysing
discussion. Students are reminded to assist their the source and writing notes.
analysis they can use ADAMANT.
S
Resources: Smart board to view
sources, student devices,
writing books.

35- Class comes back together to as a group, Teacher: initiating conversation


45 collectively analyse the source. Teacher provides about source 2, providing
less instruction in this source to promote higher insight, information and
order thinking and higher student engagement answering questions made by
and involvement. students.

Teacher concludes the source. Student: participating in class


discussion regarding source 1, T/S
and taking new notes down
from other student and teacher
responses.

Resources: Smart board to view


sources, student devices,
writing books.

45- Students are now given a worksheet with 4 more Teacher: Handing out source
55 sources in it for them to start and complete at worksheets (refer below
home to help further assist their source analysis document) and introducing this
skills. Students are given the rest of the lesson to next activity.
work in pairs to complete these 4 sources.
Student: At their desk, receiving S
source handout

Resources: student devices,


writing books, source handout.
55- Teacher thanks students for their efforts today Teacher: Front of class,
60 and asks if there are any last minute questions, thanking students for todays
queries. lesson.

Students pack up and wait for the bell. Student: At their desks, packing
up. T
Resources: N/A.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

Students can be overwhelmed with assessments, especially when it is coming up to the end of their
schooling career. From this lesson plan I have learnt the importance of teachers being flexible in
their teaching approaches to allow for lessons to be incorporated which help to further scaffold the
learning of their students.

This lesson provides students the opportunity to further develop their skills, and work with
classmates to help their confidence going into their upcoming source analysis examination.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

P3.3 Students are able to successfully analyse the


presented sources and determine whether the source
is reliable, useful, as well as determining the
perspective of the source.

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating
and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the standard.

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards

2.2 This lesson is created to strategically help students progress through tasks
to build upon their knowledge in order to be competent for their upcoming
exam.
2.3 Students have the ability to utilise this lesson to help clarify the
requirements for the upcoming exam.

WHS

What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the key
WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

WALKWAY:
Ensure no bags or loose items are on the floor that could pose a tripping hazard.

INTERNET:
Ensure a block is placed on all websites that should not be visited during school hours.
Teacher to be diligent that students only access appropriate websites.
CORRECT POSTURE:
Reinforce to students the importance that they are seated correctly, to ensure they are not
straining their backs and eyes.

References

You must list all references that you have used for the content and resources of this lesson in this
space.

Source 1: Civil Rights Movement. Retrieved from: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/herblocks-


history/animal.html

Source 2: World War II. Retrieved from: https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/ARTV00141/

Source 3: Treaty of Versailles. Retrieved from:


https://ashweetha.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/treaty-of-versailles-cartoon-analysis-3/

Source 4: Cold War: Retrieved from: http://aboutthecoldwar.weebly.com

Source 5: Freedom rights. Retrieved from: http://www.fdrfourfreedomspark.org/blog/2015/dr-


seuss

Source 6: Retrieved from: Australian Nurses in Gallipoli (1915). Retrieved from:


https://www.communityheritage.net.au/australian-nurses-gallipoli-1915

University of Western Sydney. (2017). Learning Guide Week 5, 102090 Secondary Curriculum 2
Modern History, Kingswood Campus NSW.

Resources Attached: Please refer below.


PRE LESSON DOCUMENTS
ADAMANT

Author
Date
Audience
Message
Agenda
Nature
Techniques
SOURCE 1: Civil Rights Movement
SOURCE 2: World War II
Now attempt these by yourself! Dont forget to use
ADAMANT as a guiding tool in analysing the
sources below
Source 3:

Source 4:
Source 5:
Source 6:

Answer here:
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Lesson Plan (POST lesson)

Topic area: The world at the beginning of the 20th Century Stage of Learner: Stage 6

Date: XX-XX-XXXX Location Booked: Classroom Lesson Number: 22/20

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students 25 Printing/preparation:


MARKED student Exam papers

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Feedback on Exam The nature of European Evaluating the usefulness
society and reliability of sources
P2.1 identify forces and ideas and
explain their significance in Emerging Forces and ideas Accounting for and
contributing to change and assessing differing
Continuity from the eighteenth Imperialism perspectives and
century to the present interpretations of significant
Causes of World War I events, people and issues at
P3.2 locate, select, and organise the beginning of the
relevant information from twentieth century
different types of sources
Presenting the findings of
P3.3 comprehend and analyse investigations on aspects of
sources for their usefulness and the period, analysing and
reliability synthesising information
from different types of
P3.4 identify and account for sources
differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past

Life Skills outcomes N/A

Subject specific concepts

Urbanisation and industrialisation


Social change
Forms of government
Politics of the working class: socialism, trade, unionism, Marxism
Anarchism
Nationalism
Internationalism, globalisation
Democracy, liberalism

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas


1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
Intellectual Quality
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, 1.2 Deep understanding 1.5 Metalanguage
substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as something
that requires active construction and requires students to engage in higher-order 1.3 Problematic 1.6 Substantive
thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are learning. knowledge communication

2.1 Explicit quality criteria 2.4 Social Support


Quality Learning Environment
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers work 2.2 Engagement 2.5 Students self regulation
productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy sets high and
explicit expectations and develops positive relationships between teacher and students 2.3 High Expectations 2.6 Student direction
and among students.

3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity


Significance knowledge
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important to 3.5 Connectedness
students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students prior knowledge and 3.2 Cultural knowledge
identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all 3.6 Narrative
cultural perspective. 3.3 Knowledge
integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

Substantive Students receive explicit feedback in their source analysis exam. Students are to take notes
communication from teacher dialogue for students to address moving forward into their HSC course.

Engagement Students engagement is essential in this lesson s the feedback provides student assistance
in moving forward (higher order thinking) to develop their skills when it comes to
accurately analysing sources.

Student Self In this lesson students must show autonomy in completing the source analysis task.
Regulation Through active student participation they receive valuable information regarding source
analysis for their HSC Course.
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred

T/S

5 Teacher welcomes in students and asks them to Teacher: Front of class marking
take a seat. roll and introducing todays lesson.

Teacher reads out the roll. Student: sitting at their desk,


preparing for today's lesson.
Teacher gives an introduction of todays lesson, T
which will focus on feedback from the recent Resources: roll, smart board,
source analysis exam and a creative task based on whiteboard / smart board
WWI.

5-25 Teacher hands back the MARKED source analysis Teacher: Hands out MARKED
exam to the students. exam, provides whole class
feedback and goes over the exam.
Teacher spends this time going over the exam in
detail by providing feedback to the students and Student: looking at their individual
mentioning areas where students thrived, and comments, listening to teacher
areas that require some more work. Students feedback and taking notes.
follow along with this and ask questions as T
Resources: MARKED source
required.
analysis exam, student book to
Students are also required to look at their take notes.
individual comments and ask questions if
necessary before the teacher moves on to activity
2.

25- Teacher introduces Activity 2 CREATIVE TASK Teacher: Introducing activity 2 and
55 (refer below document). Teacher provides explicit grouping the class into pairs,
information on what the students need to achieve handing out creative task
for the rest of todays lesson. This activity is a document.
PARIED activity (Mixed Ability Grouping) is used
to ensure all students can connect with the task. Student: moving into their teacher
appointed group and commencing
**Additional scaffolding is provided for EALD creative task. S
and Low SES students (please refer below) they
receive an example-writing task to help promote Resources: Creative task handout,
a connection with what they need to achieve in student devises, workbooks.
this lesson.

55- Last minute questions before class dismissed. Teacher: Thanks students for their
60 efforts in today's lesson and
congratulates them on their
efforts with the exam. T
Student: listening to teacher and
packing up.

Resources: N/A.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

Reflection and feedback are important aspects of a students educational learning and
growth. This lesson draws on the importance of feedback as a way to encourage students to
critically analyse their own work, reflect on ways to improve their future tasks and look at
ways to adapt and/ or adjust their learning strategies. This lesson plan has also made me
aware of the importance of utilising different tasks for assessment throughout the year. This
task is a great example of a black and white task with no room for risk taking,
experimentation or creativity which may be areas where some of my students are more
confident in expressing themselves and their historical knowledge. Eg. Design a poster, short
video, create a poem etc.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

P3.5 Plan and present the findings of Looking at the sources in the feedback lessons
historical investigations, analysing and and analysing the sources usability, perspective
synthesising information from different and reliability.
types of sources

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are
demonstrating and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the
standard.

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards

2.5 Literacy Students are provided with feedback on how they can develop and / or
and Numeracy improve their historical skills. This involves receiving feedback on literacy
Strategies and numeracy strategies that need to be focused on.
3.5 Use This standard is evident in the class discussion about the source analysis
effective exam. Students and teacher use effective classroom communication to
classroom discuss the exam and address any required areas.
communication

WHS

What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in
this lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy-
Outline the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

Ensure there is no tripping hazards on the floor and students follow correct protocol
regarding where to place bags.

Ensure only appropriate websites are accessed during class.

Ensue students sit correctly to eliminate injury and bad posture / eyesight issues.

References

You must list all references that you have used for the content and resources of this lesson
in this space.

Example Soldiers Letter: Retrieved From: Judkins, K and Judkins, D,. (2014). Dearest Kitty,
Letters from a World War II sailor to his girl back home. iUniverse, IN.

Example Diary Entry. Retrieved from: https://newrepublic.com/article/120230/soldiers-


vivid-candid-diary-like-fight-world-war-ii

Example Radio Interview, (Willa Sell). Retrieved from:


http://www.dock.net/green/uswwIIinterviews.htm

Resources Attached:

Please refer below.


Post Lesson Documents
The World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century: World War I

Creativity Task

You are to create your own PRIMARY WRITTEN historical source.

To successfully undertake this task you need to image that you are alive during
WWI, and that you are a British Soldier.

You have THREE creative options for this task:

Write a letter to a family member or friend


Write a diary entry
Write a script for a radio interview

You MUST include information about your experiences of war, your job and daily
activities, what you are witnessing. Call upon your historical knowledge to help
provide you dates and details.

You need to demonstrate your understanding and knowledge that you have learnt
throughout this topic.

Minimum: 500 words


Example of Letter:

Example of Diary Entry:

Example of Radio Interview:


Justification:
This assessment was created for the Stage 6 Preliminary course of Modern History,
focusing on the Core Topic of The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. This
assignment was expanded from the New South Wales Education Standards Authority (NESA)
Modern History Syllabus to successfully transition students into their HSC course, as well as
establish historical thinking within the students. The following justification showcases
motivations and processes involved in my choices in creating the documents within Part 1
and Part 2.

The produced unit outline acts as a guide of educational goals that are required to
be met through the successful and effective teaching of the unit, the world at the beginning
of the twentieth century. It is imperative that when creating a unit outline, to successfully
scaffold the learning to be relative to the needs of the students as well as scaffolding to the
requirements stipulated by NESA. To successfully achieve both, it is important to provide
differentiation. Differentiation is a fundamental component of teaching competency and
also a requirement of the Australian Teaching standards as stipulated by NESA especially,
Teaching Standard 1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students
across the full range of abilities (Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW
[BOSTES]. 2012). To differ the learning of students, Tomlinson (2014) notes the importance
of devising strategies for maximum student growth and individual success.

Within this assessment unit outline, differentiation methods have been targeted at EALD
(English as a language Dialect) and catering to the needs of students from low socio
economic background (low SES). The reasoning these two categories for differentiation are
focused on was established due to the area of which SAMPLE HIGH SCHOOL is located, and
also the Backgrounds of students of this area. In order to be an effective teacher, the
created documents for this assessment have been created to not segregate students from
an EALD or low SES background but to focus on inclusivity. Inclusivity is highlighted
throughout the unit outline with numerous group and pair tasks (including mixed ability),
PowerPoint activates, movies and written tasks to help increase inclusivity within the
classroom. Folioing on from this, the differentiation column established that should there be
times where the categorised students of EALD or low SES backgrounds were feeling
pressure; there were activities that they could undertake to alleviate the pressure. The need
to differentiate for students is concluded discussed by Darling-Hammond (2006) as an
important characteristic of teachers as they must understand a wide array of learning, social
and cultural contexts of teaching to be able to serve the increasingly growing number of
students from EALD and Low SES backgrounds. Providing differentiation for students his
successfully noted within the source analysis examination. The examination includes a
glossary of terms for students, which can assist them if they need when looking at the
written sources. This helps provide a bridge for students to actively connect with the exam.

The use of assessments is an important element of a students learning process, as it


acts as a catalyst of linking learning outcomes and teaching and learning activities together.
The use of a summative assessment such as a source analysis in class examination invites
students to demonstrate their mastery of knowledge of course content. Apart from this, the
use of summative assessments are also a useful method for teachers to see how effective
their teaching strategies have been, as well as providing evidence should changes to the
content need to be made to further assist future classes (Dylan, 2011).

In order for students to be successful in undertaking this assessment task it is


important to provide them with navigation and guidance prior to undertaking the actual
task, to allow them to be successful. The pre lesson takes form from the work of Ausubel
1963 and the theory of Meaningful Learning (Okada, Buckingham Shum, & Sherborne, 2014).
The pre lesson provides students the opportunity to grasp a deeper understanding of the
requirements for their upcoming source analysis examination, and make logical order of the
learning material. The successful implementation of Ausubels meaningful learning theory
provides a visual roadmap showing pathways that can be taken to connect meanings of
concepts. Houff (2012) further discusses the importance of fostering knowledge in pre
lessons as providing teachers an opportunity to guide student growth.

The emphasis on the post lesson lies within providing students feedback on their
assessment, which is described as the most powerful single moderator that enhances
achievement (Hattie, 2007). This is followed by Nicol (2010) who establishes feedback as a
way to identify and reward students quality of work, develop and motivate them, and guide
them in improvements. As such, the post lesson takes shape by going over the assessment
task, highlighting areas of student excellence and educating students on where
improvements can be made. Utilizing a lesson to go over the assessment allows students the
ability to discuss and act on feedback, which Nicols highlights is just as important as the
quality of feedback itself.

In summation it is evident that a number of pedagogical theories and education


approaches were incorporated throughout the components of this assessment to create a
constructivist approach to the teachings of preliminary stage 6 classes. Throughout the
successful integration of theory and skill, it is hoped that this assessment and its inclusions
will enable students to successfully meet the stipulated outcomes of the Stage 6 preliminary
course and effectively integrate into their final year of secondary study within the Higher
School Certificate. Through a well-executed integration of the above-required documents, it
is anticipated that students will be supplied with a meaningful and engaging experience with
the world at the beginning of the twentieth century content. From this, it is ultimately hoped
that this meaningful integration allows them the knowledge and skills to progress into their
Higher School Certificate course.

Reference List:

BOSTES Teacher Accreditation - Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. (2017).


Nswteachers.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 8 March 2017, from
http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/publications-policies-
resources/publications/australian-professional-standards-for-teachers/

Darling-Hammond, L. (2006). Constructing 21st-Century Teacher Education. Journal of


Education for Teaching. 57:3, 300-314. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022487105285962 de
Jong, E. (2014). Preparing Mainstream Teachers for Multilingual Classrooms. Association of
Mexican American Educators Journal. 7:2.

Dylan, W., 2011. Embedded formative assessment. Hawker Brownlow Education.

Hattie, J. A. (2007).. Influences on student learning (Inaugural professorial address,


University of Auckland, New Zealand). Retrieved from
http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/staff/index.cfm?P=8650

Nicol, D. (2010). From monologue to dialogue: improving written feedback processes


in mass higher education. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 35(5), 501517.

Okada, A., Buckingham Shum, S., & Sherborne, T. (2014). Knowledge cartography (1st
ed.). London: Springer-Verlag.

Tomlinson, C. (2014). The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All


Learners, 2nd Edition (1st ed.). ASCD.