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REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Primary School Curriculum

Instructional Toolkit

Standard 4-5

Curriculum Development Division


Table of Contents
Introduction.6
Standard 4 Integrated Learning Units and Learning Plans .......................... 10
Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
LEARNING UNIT 1: Exploring Media .............................................................. 11
Topic: Getting the Message Across...................................................................................... 13
Topic: Deconstructing texts .................................................................................................. 18
Topic: Media Evolution ........................................................................................................ 23
Topic: Getting the Message in the Media ............................................................................ 32
Topic: Application of Media .................................................................................................. 37
LEARNING UNIT 2: Creativity In Digital Learning ......................................... 42
Topic: Thinking On Your Feet............................................................................................... 44
Topic: Media in Everyday Life(Part 1) .................................................................................. 48
Topic: Media in Everyday Life (Part 2) ................................................................................. 51
Topic: Media In Everyday Life (Part 3) ................................................................................ 53
Topic: Agritech ..................................................................................................................... 55
Topic: Powered Media.......................................................................................................... 60
LEARNING UNIT 3: Being A Responsible and Skilful Digital Learner ......... 67
Topic: Media and Choices ................................................................................................... 69
Topic: Shaping the Way Through Media ............................................................................. 73
Topic: Showcasing Media .................................................................................................... 76
Theme: The World of Change: Understanding Change
LEARNING UNIT 1: Nature of Change ............................................................ 79
Topic: Changes in the Individual ......................................................................................... 82
Topic: Changes in Animals .................................................................................................. 90
Topic: Changes in Plants .................................................................................................... 95
Topic: Changes in our Culture ........................................................................................... 104
Topic: Changes in our Melting Pot ..................................................................................... 113
LEARNING UNIT 2: Investigating Change ................................................... 116
Topic: Family Life .............................................................................................................. 118
Topic: Structures and Stability ........................................................................................... 123
Topic: Making Choices ...................................................................................................... 127
LEARNING UNIT 3: Fostering Positive Change .......................................... 131
Topic: Impact on the Individual .......................................................................................... 133
Topic: Impact on the Family .............................................................................................. 139
Topic: Items in the Environment ......................................................................................... 148
Topic: Impact on Society .................................................................................................... 153
Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
LEARNING UNIT1: Promoting Patriotism .................................................... 159
Topic: Patronizing Our Local Produce ............................................................................... 162
Topic: Respecting Food Choices...................................................................................... 165
Topic: Celebrating Our Achievements ............................................................................... 170
Topic: A Nation is Born ...................................................................................................... 173
Topic: Developing Civic Efficacy ....................................................................................... 176
LEARNING UNIT 2: Becoming More Responsible....................................... 180
Topic: When Disaster Strikes ............................................................................................ 182
Topic: Making the Right Choice..185

Topic: My Money, My Responsibility............201

LEARNING UNIT 3: Preserving Our Environment ....................................... 203


Topic: A Season for Change ............................................................................................. 205
Topic: Food for Life ........................................................................................................... 214
Core Skills: Agricultural Science ................................................................. 219
LEARNING UNIT: Rearing one class of animals ......................................... 220
Topic: Needs of Animals ................................................................................................... 222
Topic: Preparation of an animals home ............................................................................ 223
Topic: Caring for the animal .............................................................................................. 225
Topic: Ailments and treatment of animals ......................................................................... 227
Topic: Record Keeping ...................................................................................................... 228
Topic: Disposal of the animal ............................................................................................ 229
Topic: Disassembly and storage of equipment .................................................................. 230
Core Skills: English Language Arts ............................................................. 232
Topic: Whats A Clause? ................................................................................................... 233
Topic: Coordinating Conjunctions...................................................................................... 235
Topic: Colon-izing the Sentence!........................................................................................ 237
Topic: Medium or Larger? ................................................................................................. 240
Topic: Target: Me .............................................................................................................. 242
Topic: May I Question Please?.......................................................................................... 244
Topic: My Thoughts Matter ................................................................................................ 247
Topic: May I Question Please?.......................................................................................... 252
Topic: My Thoughts Matter ................................................................................................ 255
Topic: Writing Instructions .................................................................................................. 260
Topic: Writing Instructions .................................................................................................. 262
Core Skills: Science ...................................................................................... 263
Topic: Keep me dry ........................................................................................................... 264
Core Skills: Social Studies ........................................................................... 267
Topic: Celebrating our Early Pioneers (Social Studies) ..................................................... 268
Topic: Communicable Diseases ......................................................................................... 272
Core Skills: Visual and Performing Arts

Topic: Structure .................................................................................................................. 277


Topic: Making a Mobile ..................................................................................................... 279
Topic: Making a Narrative Drawing ................................................................................... 281
Core Skills: Values, Character and Citizenship Education

Topic: Advocates for Change Making a Difference ........................................................ 284


Topic: Healthy Engagement ............................................................................................... 288
Standard 5...................................................................................................... 292
Core Skills: Agricultural Science ................................................................. 293
LEARNING UNIT Issues Affecting Agriculture ............................................ 294
Topic: Sensitization of World Food Day ............................................................................ 296
Topic: Identifying the issues .............................................................................................. 297
Topic: Exploring possible solutions ................................................................................... 299
Topic: Evaluating and presenting agricultural solutions ..................................................... 300
Core Skills: Science ...................................................................................... 302
Topic: An Ideal house ......................................................................................................... 303
Topic: Experimenting with Inclined Planes ........................................................................ 306
Topic: Exploring Energy Efficient Devices through IDEATE .............................................. 313
Topic: Keep Me ................................................................................................................. 318
Core Skills: Spanish ...................................................................................... 320
LEARNING UNIT: Hispanic Connections ..................................................... 321
Topic: Describe Yourself! .................................................................................................. 323
Topic: Dress Up!................................................................................................................ 326
Topic: Traditional Hispanic Clothing .................................................................................. 328
Topic: E-pals Wanted! ....................................................................................................... 333
Topic: Name That Flag ...................................................................................................... 337
Topic: Lets Link Up! ........................................................................................................... 340
Topic: Our Spanish Day ..................................................................................................... 342
Introduction
Welcome to the Instructional Toolkit: a companion piece to the Curriculum Guide and
Teachers Guide which have been developed to help you implement the National Primary
School Curriculum of Trinidad and Tobago.
In order to maximise your students learning experiences, it is recommended that you
familiarise yourself with all of the documents in the series. The key features of each document
are outlined in the figure below:

Instructional Toolkit

Integrated Learning Units and Learning Plans for all Themes


Core skills Learning Plans in Subject Area
Scope and Sequence: Mathematics
Scope and Sequence: Science
Assessment Rubrics for general performance areas
Assessment Rubrics for subject specific skills and tasks

Figure 1: The National Curriculum Documents

Using the Toolkit


This Instructional Toolkit comes in two forms: a printed version and a digital version
found in an accompanying CD. The main feature of both versions of this toolkit is the collection
of learning units, learning plans and other resources that have been developed to maximise
learning in the classroom.

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The Printed Version of the Toolkit
The printed version of this toolkit is divided as follows:
Section 1: Integrated Learning Plans, which contains all of the integrated learning plans,
arranged by year level and themes. Table 1 presents all of the themes arranged according to
terms.

Section 2: Core Skills Learning Plans, which contains learning plans arranged according to
subject as follows:
Agricultural Science
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies
Visual and Performing Arts (Dance, Drama, Music, Visual Arts)
Values, Character and Citizenship Education (VCCE)

The Digital Version of the Toolkit


The digital version of this toolkit contains more resources than the printed version since
it contains not only learning units and learning plans (integrated and core skills), but also other
resources not found in the printed version such as additional sample worksheets, observation
checklists, photos and Power Point Presentations. In most cases, worksheets and checklists
appear immediately after the respective learning plans. The other resources appear in labelled
folders.
The digital toolkit found on an accompanying CD is organised so that teachers can
navigate through various folders. Figure 2 illustrates the organisation of the digital toolkit.
Table 1 also gives and overview of the themes that inspire the learning units and plans
in a suggested sequence. Teachers are free to adjust this sequence to suit the needs of their
students. It is hoped that this toolkit will provide many hours of exciting and enriching
experiences for our nations children. Happy exploring!

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Introduction
01 Toolkit
Overview

Theme

Theme
02 Learning
Units Year Theme
& Level
Learning Plans Agri. Science
Theme

Theme ELA

Mathematics

Phys. Ed.

Core Skills Science

Social Studies

VAPA

VCCE

General Rubrics
03 RUBRICS

Subject Rubrics

Figure 2: Organisation of Digital Toolkit

Figure 2: Organisation of Digital Toolkit


Table 1: Themes Distributed By Terms

Class Term 1 Term 2 Term 3


Infants One: People: Places: Home, School, Activities: I Learn, I
Me and My World Myself, My family, My Community Play and I Work
Friends
Things: The Things
Around Me

Celebrations Celebrations Celebrations

Health and Well-being

Infants 2: Mapping: My My Built Community: Food: The Things I


My Sense of Immediate Worlds Places I go Eat
Belonging

Transportation: How I People: Heroes in My


Get Around Life
Celebrations Celebrations Celebrations

Standard 1: The Past Leisure, Work and The Culture


My Country The The People Entrepreneurship
People and Cultures
of T & T

Standard 2: Land Water The Economy


My Country: The
Environment of T & T

Standard 3: Waters that Link and Different But the Same In an Interdependent
Our Region The Divide Us World
Caribbean

Standard 4: The Media and Information Understanding Change Making choices


World of Change

Standard 5: Global Citizenship


Pulling it All
Together Projects
and Subject Learning

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Standard
4
Integrated Learning
Units and
Learning Plans
LEARNING UNIT 1: Exploring Media
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Estimated frame: 10 days
Context: Media refers to the various forms of communication. The exploration of media
would enable students to make informed choices in the creation of meaning
fostering effective communication.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

ascertain that the mass media are the channels for information-sharing in
any society and that what is reported affects ones choices and
disposition
demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which effective
communication helps to maintain trust within relationships: describe
elements of effective communication Know when it is acceptable to
disclose secrets and to whom secrets should be disclosed
identify selected media forms and explain how they are used to create
meaning (e.g. media texts designed to reach a very wide audiences:
signs, posters, billboards, movies, television, podcasts)
reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators
name basic forms of media in Spanish
state in Spanish how they use different forms of media
know how to use the 5ws+h to gain meaning from aural texts
know how to use strategies that assist in simultaneous listening and
analysing activities
deduce ways in which food security contributes to regional development
recognize, represent, model, compare and order numbers up to 1 000
000 with reference to place value
develop an understanding of rounding to thousands
solve problems involving number sentences with one unknown
know that a message should be analysed before its acceptance
apply appropriate phonic skills and strategies to reading
use critical and strategic reading strategies to read competently
use before, during and after reading strategies
know the structure of the simple and compound sentences
identify features integral to a dance performance
critique dance performances
aurally identify characteristic rhythmic and melodic patterns of popular
music genres in the Caribbean
know that literary texts are written by different people from varying
countries with diverse cultures
know that a subject must agree with a verb in number
know to apply spelling rules correctly when writing; syllabication rules,
phonics, inflectional endings

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distinguish between weather and climate
design survey(s) to solve problem(s) that involves the use of statistical
data
gather, classify, organize and display data using tables, tally charts and
graphs (pictographs, block graphs and bar graphs) and interpret results.
1. Getting The Message Across
Learning 2. Deconstructing texts
Plans: 3. Media Evolution
4. Getting the Message in the Media
5. Application of Media

Resources: Learning Plan 1: copy paper or bristol board, coloured pencils, markers,
crayons, dance video (YouTube), computer, flyers, appendix1 (sentences ie),
place value mat, base ten blocks, chalk (for drawing place value mat on floor),
cut outs of numerals, box or basket for cut outs, sentence strips (simple
sentences for game), cut outs of conjunctions.

Learning Plan 2: pictures of various forms of media, paper, pencils, toys, cell
phone, computer, digital projector, grade level texts, base ten blocks, place
value mats.

Learning Plan 3: plain paper, pencils, colour pencils, crayons, markers,


computer, printer, CD player, copies of the story Techno Mans Plight, guided
questions, selected stories from various cultures - search words World of tales,
songs of music genres that are popular in the Caribbean (Traditional calypso,
Reggae, Chutney and Parang).

Learning Plan 4: advertisement sample, markers, computer, digital projector,


grade level texts, graphic organizer, sentence strips

Learning Plan 5: paper, pencil, markers, ruler, eraser, white board, coloured
pencils, computer, printer, projector, search words wunderground

Assessments:
Worksheets
Collaborative activities
Oral presentations
Graphic organizers
Peer evaluation
Drawings
Teacher observation
Checklist for survey design
A rhythm is played and students identify the genre or teacher gives the
genre and students play the rhythm
Reflective log

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UNIT ONE: Exploring Media
Learning Plan: 1 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Getting the Message Across
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Students need to know that there are various ways of
communicating which include some of their daily activities. If they HFLE:
are sensitized they can be more appreciative and aware of the Creative Thinking
vast communication network that we term media. Decision Making
Outcomes:
At the end of the learning experience students will be able to: Literacy
identify at least three important features of a performance Reading
(e.g. number of dancers, type of space, costuming, lighting, Writing
accompaniment and impact of performance) Oral
critique the performances viewed, giving at least three Communication
supporting statements Literary
identify and assess the effects of words and phrases in Appreciation
messages which are used for persuasion. Media &
represent numbers up to 1 000 000 concretely, pictorially Information Literacy
and symbolically, using multiple models and connect to
numeral and number names Numeracy
use spelling rules correctly in writing: Produce the following Problem Solving
correctly: Critical thinking
o for action words that end in ie, change the ie to a Communication
y before adding an ing e.g. lie-lying Representation
use a conjunction to join two main clauses to make a Reasoning
compound sentence (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)
Activities: ICT Skills

Whats a message? Differentiated


Instruction
1. Students are asked what they think the term, message
means. Elicit from students that a message is any Assessment for
information or idea that someone wants to send. learning
2. Students are asked to identify different ways that
messages are sent. Students are asked to consider that
messages can come in many different forms.

Conveying Messages through Performance: a Dance Critique

1. Students view a dance performance (preferably one that


tells a story). If possible, a video can be shown. If not, a
series of photos capturing different movements in a dance.

2. Students are divided into groups. Each group is

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responsible for making one observation about one aspect
of the performance (e.g. the costumes, the space, the
lighting, the music/sound effects.).

Some possible guiding questions:


The dancers:
- How many dancers are there?
- What are they wearing?

The type of space


- Is the space formal e.g.: community centre, N.A.P.A etc.,
or informal once a space has to be created for the
performance. e.g.: backyard

The Lighting
- how were the lights used e.g.: were lights dimmed for night
time, were extra lights used e.g.: coloured lights

Music and Sound Effects (if a video is viewed)


- What kind of music/sound effects were there?
- Students write at least three statements on one of the
dance performances viewed.

3. Students write down their observations and share with the


class.
4. A discussion is held on the message that the dance
portrayed and how the different elements came together to
send that message.
5. Students are asked to share their feelings on three
elements of the performance. Students needing support
could be given prompts such as, I liked/disliked the
costumes because ______; I enjoyed/did not enjoy the
music/sound effects because.

Examining Flyers

6. Students discuss the notion that messages can also be


sent through various kinds of printed material. They are
informed that they will be looking at flyers that convey
different meanings.
7. Students are asked to note the persuasive words and
phrases used in the flyers. They also observe words and
phrases that represent facts and opinions. (A mini lesson
on the difference between facts and opinions may be
necessary.) Students also pay attention to colour, font size,
graphics etc. and whether or not they help to make the

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flyer more interesting.

Creating Flyers

8. Students create flyers to advertise an event of their choice.


They focus on using persuasive words, facts and opinions.
(Use Bristol board, computers, copy paper etc.). Students
may work in groups or individually.

(Persuasive words e.g.: advantage, superior, confident, best,


convenient, definitely, worthwhile, effectively, expect, interesting,
most, popular, profitable, recommend, should, superb,
tremendous, truly).

Numbers convey messages too: Find your place 1


9. Students use place value mat and base ten blocks to
represent specific numbers, given by the teacher up to one
million.
10. Students write the numerals and number names for the
given numbers.
11. In small groups, students give numbers between 100 000
1 000000 to represent the number of viewers on YouTube
who might have seen the dance performance. Groups
exchange numbers and represent them on the place value
mat using base ten blocks. They write the numerals and
their number names. The teacher observes the groups and
assists where necessary.

Find your place 2


12. The class gives a number orally. One group of students
selects cut outs of numerals from a box that would
represent the numeral given. They stand in their respective
place value positions on a place value mat drawn on the
floor. Other groups take turns. The teacher observes the
groups and assists where necessary.

Rapping with ie
13. Students listen and observe as the teacher demonstrates
the changing of ie to y before adding ing to some
familiar verbs. The rule is given to the students by the
teacher.
14. In groups, students create a rhythm for the rule. (When a
verb ends in ie change the ie to y before adding ing).
15. Groups present the rule to the rhythm they created.
16. Groups demonstrate the rule using one of the sentences
written on the board containing a verb ending with ie.

15
(Teacher writes sentences on the board before the groups
demonstrate) See Appendix 1 in CD for some suggestions.

Conjunctions
17. Students are presented with a compound sentence and
identify two sentences within that sentence.
18. Students are questioned to elicit the word which joins the
two sentences. Teacher introduces the word conjunction
and gives a definition. Students read the definition.
19. Students are presented with other compound sentences
and activities 15 and 16 are repeated.

NB. The use of conjunctions in compound sentences should


be reinforced throughout the term. Select authentic examples
from students work where conjunctions could have been used
to correct run on sentences.

Join the Game


20. Students play Red Over game. See Appendix 2

Reflection
21. In the form of oral presentations, students in small groups,
talk about the three methods used to convey information.
Re: flyers, music and games.

Resources:

Stationery: copy paper or Bristol board


Art supplies: coloured pencils, markers, crayons
ICTs: dance Video (YouTube), computer (optional)
Other: flyers, appendix1 (sentences ie), place value mat,
base ten blocks, chalk (for drawing place value mat on
floor), cut outs of numerals, box or basket for cut outs,
sentence strips (simple sentences), cut outs of
conjunctions.
Assessment:
Worksheet Appendix 3 (ie words, in CD)
Worksheet Appendix 4 (conjunctions, in CD)
Evidence of the correct construction of compound
sentences in a continuous piece of writing.
Worksheet Appendix 5 (place value, in CD)

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Appendix 2

Red Over Game

Class is divided into two groups: A and B

Group A is given two simple sentences on sentence strips.

Group B is given cut outs of conjunctions (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so).

Group A reads the sentences then designates two pupils to hold them up. They discuss
and decide which conjunction can be used to join the sentences they were given. They
face group B and sing, Red Over, Red Over, send (name of conjunction) right over.

The student from group B, holding the conjunction asked for run over and places the
conjunction between the two sentences.

The class reads the compound sentence formed. Students and teacher make
corrections if necessary.

The game is played again with new sentences and the teams switch sides.

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UNIT ONE: Exploring Media
Learning Plan: 2 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Deconstructing texts
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Media is the combination of words, graphics or sounds used to
communicate information. Texts can be in the form of wordless HFLE:
books - graphics only, words only, or a combination of both. The Decision Making
skill of deconstructing texts lends itself to the deconstruction of Creative Thinking
media forms which permit knowledge of medias intent as well as
facilitate informed decisions with regards to products that Literacy
influence health and behaviour. Reading
Outcomes: Writing
At the end of this learning experience students will: Oral
express numbers to one million in expanded notation Communication
understand that texts have purposes and are written for Literary
audiences Appreciation
monitor reading for accuracy and sense, demonstrating Media &
that they have the confidence to adjust their reading Information Literacy
generate questions about the text
read grade level texts independently Numeracy
take notes after listening Problem Solving
ask pertinent questions Critical thinking
deconstruct selected media to understand how Communication
information/messages are presented to audiences Representation
Reasoning
name basic forms of media in Spanish
.
Activities: ICT Skills

Deconstructing Analogy: Differentiated


Instruction
1. The number 896 234 (or any number to one million) is
displayed in some form (written or projected). Students are Assessment for
asked to expand this number and restore it (by adding learning
according to place value) to the original form using paper
provided (option: base ten blocks and place value mats can
be used). Students volunteer other numbers to expand and
restore (at teachers discretion).
2. Students discuss in pairs, groups or with the entire class
(to be decided by the teacher) the completed activity. The
discussion is guided by the teacher to elicit ideas related to
taking apart and putting together e.g. dismantle,
assemble, etc.
3. A toy or any object (based on student interest e.g. cell
phone) that could be dismantled is displayed by the

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teacher.
Students are asked if they could take the object apart and
put it back together. If the answer is yes, they are asked to
demonstrate this for the class. If the answer is no it is
done by the teacher (practised before).
4. Students discuss in pairs, groups or with the entire class
(to be decided by the teacher) the activity seen. The
discussion is guided again by the teacher to elicit ideas
related to taking apart and putting together e.g.
dismantle, assemble, etc.
5. The words Deconstruct and Construct are introduced to
students and displayed in some form (written or projected).
It is explained to students that:

Deconstruct is the opposite of Construct.


Construct' means to build and Deconstruct means
to dismantle.
Deconstruction is done when more information is
needed for a better understanding of the contribution
of the different parts (as in the case with the number
and toy or cell phone e.g. battery for power).

6. It is also explained that Deconstruction not only applies to


Mathematics, toys or certain physical objects, but to words,
texts, graphics (pictures, illustrations) and sounds in
various combinations (as they will discover).

Prior planning by teacher:

A variety of grade level appropriate texts based on students


interests, personalities and backgrounds is compiled.

Deconstructing Texts (Modelled by the Teacher):


7. A text from the prepared list is chosen and read (using
guided reading, shared reading or teacher read aloud -
each can be used with different texts over several
sessions) followed by a think aloud using these questions:

Note These questions may be modified by the teacher and must


be prepared on a word document to be projected when mentioned
during the think aloud. Students will be asked to contribute to the
answers which will be written next to the questions.

What is the purpose of this text? (To inform? To


persuade? To create mental images? To tell a story?)

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Who is it intended for? (Adults? Children? Males?
Females?)
(NB That an authors purpose and audience will determine the
kind of language that s/he uses and the form the piece of
writing will take.)
What am I learning?
What do I already know about this?
Does this make sense?
Should I adjust the speed with which I read or Reread?

Students are informed that these questions assist in the


understanding of the text Deconstructing, as well as in the
monitoring of their learning with the text.
8. They suggest other questions and these are entered in the
word document. After the questions have been entered,
students suggest possible answers. These are projected as
well.

Deconstructing Texts - Independent Reading and Sharing:


9. Students choose a text to read from the prepared list. After
reading the text they silently self-question themselves
using the questions in activity 7. They then share their
answers in pairs, groups or with the entire class (to be
decided by the teacher).
10. After sharing, students write other questions that could
assist in the understanding of the text as well as in the
monitoring of their learning with the text. Students share
their questions in pairs, groups or with the entire class (to
be decided by the teacher).
11. Students write the questions that they think would help
them better understand the text chosen to be read and also
ask the presenter what influenced their choice of the
question of interest (to be moderated by the teacher).

Deconstructing Media

12. Students are presented with various forms of media:


signs
posters
billboards
movies
television
podcasts

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They select one form per group (decided by the teacher) to be
Deconstructed using the methods used for Deconstructing texts
(teacher may review if necessary). They then share their ideas
within the group.

13. Groups present their form of media to the class together


with their questions and answers. At the end of the
presentations, students are asked to think about some
words that can be used to describe (define) media. The
discussion is guided by the teacher to elicit media as a
combination of words, graphics or sounds used to
communicate information.

Media in Spanish

14. The teacher shows students various pictures of media


computer, internet, website, television, radio, newspaper.
As he shows them he says the Spanish word (la
computadora, el internet, el sitio web, la televisin, la radio,
los diarios).
15. The English words for identified forms of media are written
on the board with matching numbers (1. computer, 2.
internet, 3. website, 4. television, 5. radio, 6. newspaper).
The numbers 1 6 are printed on cards and placed in a
bag. The students stand around in a circle. They pass the
bag in a clockwise direction while music (preferably
Spanish) is played. When the music stops whoever is
holding the bag picks a number. The student gives the
Spanish word that corresponds to that form of media listed
on the board. If the word is correct, the music resumes and
they continue to pass the bag. If the word is incorrect then
the child steps out of the circle. The others give the correct
word. The bag is passed around until a winner is identified.
16. The English words are placed on the word wall.

Teacher Recap
17. The teacher reviews the process of Deconstructing media.
Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencils.
ICTs: cell phone, computer, digital projector
Literature: grade level texts
Other: pictures of various forms of media (computer,
internet, website, television, radio, newspaper), bag,
Spanish music, cards with numerals 1 to 6, toys, base ten
blocks, place value mats

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Assessment:
Teacher observation
Students are asked to write two pieces each with a
different purpose and audience. For example a letter to an
older family member, explaining the use of a game and a
description of a game for a friend their age. Pay particular
attention to students awareness of purpose and audience
in these pieces.
Pass the bag game
Collaborative activities
Oral presentations
Media in Spanish Game: Hang Man. Students are placed
in groups of six. Teacher writes blank spaces on board.
Each group is asked to guess letters to figure out which
form of media he is referring to. If they miss a letter then
another group has the chance to complete it. When the
word is complete the entire class then has to say it out
loud.

22
UNIT ONE: Exploring Media
Learning Plan: 3 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Media Evolution
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Media has grown rapidly with the advances of technology. First
there was the telegraph, then the radio, the newspapers, HFLE:
magazines, television and now the internet. This growth has Cooperation
transformed our way of life by allowing us to have quick and easy Critical Thinking
access to information.
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Reading
apply a variety of appropriate-level strategies and skills to Writing
construct meaning from text, including before, during and after Oral
reading Communication
list forms of technology for communication and information Literary
discuss strengths and weaknesses of created media texts Appreciation
create mental images to respond to text Media &
make connections among different cultures through literature Information Literacy
make text-to-self, text-to-text and text-to-world connections
between what they already know and the information Numeracy
presented in the text Problem Solving
Critical thinking
read in isolation, and in context, high-frequency words
Communication
appropriate to grade level
Representation
formulate questions that can be addressed by statistical data
Reasoning
classify, organise and represent data using tally charts,
frequency tables and graphs (pictographs, block graphs) using ICT Skills
various scale factors
compare whole numbers up to millions and use the symbols < Differentiated
or > to show the relationship between them Instruction
order a given set of numbers in ascending or descending order
and explain the order by making references to place value Assessment for
round whole numbers to the nearest thousand learning
clap/tap/play characteristic rhythmic patterns of popular
Caribbean musical genres
sing /play characteristic melodic patterns of popular Caribbean
musical genres.
Activities:

NOTE: A story, Techno Mans Plight will be used for the


activities of this lesson (See Appendix 1)

Before, During and After Reading


1. Students are shown the title of a story, Techno Mans Plight.

23
They use this name to brainstorm what the story may be
about. Responses are recorded by the teacher on a graphic
organiser (see Appendix 2).
2. Students are provided with guided questions (projected or
written on the board) which they think about while the story is
being read. E.g. What are some forms of technology that are
commonly used for communication and gaining information?
What are some of the strengths of using media texts? What
are some of the weaknesses of using various forms of media
texts? (See appendix 3).
3. Students listen to the story that is read by the teacher who
focuses on voice projection and intonation and stops at
strategic points to ponder on the guided questions asked
previously.
4. In groups, students discuss three main elements of the story
(character, setting and plot).
5. Students complete a T chart to compare media from the past
to present-day, to show how technology has contributed to its
growth (teacher re-reads the story or students are given a
copy).

Readers Theatre

Prior planning by teacher:

A variety of grade level appropriate stories from different cultures


will be made available for students to select e.g. Anansi, Aesops,
Greek Mythology etc.

6. Students listen to an explanation by the teacher about what is


Readers Theatre and what is required of them for this activity.
(See appendix 4).
7. The class is divided into four groups.
8. Each group selects a story; one must be Techno Mans Plight
and the other three from different cultures.
9. Groups are given time to practice the story using the Readers
Theatre strategy.
10. They then perform the story.
11. Students review each others performances.
12. In groups, students discuss the main elements of the story
(character, setting and plot), focusing on the commonalities.
13. Each group then discuss mental images that were created
while the story was read.
14. They draw an image to show these mental images created.
15. Through discussion they make connections with text to self or
text to text.

24
Convincing the King
16. Students collaborate in groups to design the survey that will be
used by Techno Man to gather the information that he needs.
17. Pretend that you are from Planet Digi and answer the
questions that Techno Man posted.
18. Use the responses of the students in class to create tally
charts and graphs to represent the data that was collected and
analysed.
19. A scenario is presented: Techno Man and his followers from
Planet Beyond moved to Planet Digi. Strangely, both beings
looked alike and it was very difficult for the Captain of Planet
Digi to identify those who were banished. He gave the
command to tag with identification numbers everyone from
Planet Beyond.
20. Students are to think of a 5, 6 or 7 digit number that can be
used as an identification tag. They write it on a label to be
displayed.
21. Each student reads his number.
22. In pairs students will compare numbers using the symbol > or
< to determine which one is smaller or larger using the place
value of the digits.
23. They form a line in ascending or descending order based on
their numbers.
24. Students will use the identification numbers to round whole
numbers to the nearest thousand.

Rhythm and Melody


25. A scenario is again presented: The Captain of Planet Digi
ordered Lady Cloud to plan a welcome party for the people of
Planet Beyond. She had everything covered except the music
for the party. She wanted to choose Caribbean music, can you
help her decide?
26. Select two types of music genres that are popular in the
Caribbean. E.g. (Traditional Calypso and Reggae, Chutney
and Parang) NB: The two music genres selected should have
distinct rhythmic patterns so that the students would be able to
distinguish the two without much difficulty.
27. Students listen attentively for the rhythmic patterns that are
repeated for each of the two music genres.
28. They do body percussions (clap, snap, tap feet, beat table) to
imitate the rhythm of the songs.
29. They identify and sing melodic patterns from the song.
30. Students now describe the mood or emotion that the song
produces (soothing, relaxing, hyper, active).

25
Resources:
Stationery: plain paper, pencils, colour pencils, crayons,
markers
ICTs: computer, printer, CD player,
Literature: copies of the story Techno Mans Plight, guided
questions, selected stories from various cultures, Search
words World of tales.
Others: songs of music genres that are popular in the
Caribbean (Traditional calypso, Reggae, Chutney and Parang)
Assessment:
Graphic organizer
Peer evaluation
Oral presentations
Drawings
Teacher observation
Checklist for survey design
A rhythm is played and students identify the genre
or teacher gives the genre and students play the
rhythm
Reflective log

26
Appendix 1

Techno Mans Plight

Far away, in the deep, dark galaxy, a planet called Beyond was ruled by King
Analog. One day, King Analog became very, very angry with one of his subjects: Techno
Man. Techno Man was receiving messages from another planet called Digi where he was
learning about new and faster ways of obtaining information. He was so fascinated that he
spent a lot of time and energy exploring these modern waves of technology. Soon, he
realised how backward his planet Beyond was and tried to convince King Analog to adapt
to these new technologies.
Regrettably, King Analog was old-fashioned and was afraid of change or even to
explore new ways of doing things. He was comfortable writing letters and delivering them to
his people. Although it took quite a few days to reach its destination, King Analog was
confident that his message would reach. He was so fond of writing on paper that he built
his entire empire on print media. There were words everywhere! The streets were filled, the
walls on buildings were plastered, every single vehicle had text and there were posters,
billboards, signs, flyers in every direction you turned. His mission was to convey information
through print by making it visible and easily accessible.
The Kings subjects worked hard to make sure that the people of planet Beyond had
current information and open communication with the rest of the planets. They had stations
set up to send out telegrams, operate post offices and a print media department. This
departments task was to create and print booklets, brochures and other printed material.
As long as King Analog saw letters and words as he travelled through the land he was the
happiest King ever.
This method of communication worked but it took up a lot of time and very often the
transfer of information was delayed. The place eventually became cluttered and not
everyone appreciated the amount of printed material that was around.
The head of the Information Department, Techno Man, contacted Lady Cloud of
planet Digi through a letter to get information for a special project to which he was
assigned. It was almost one month later when Lady Cloud got the letter but it took less
than one hour for Techno Man to receive a response. Techno Man was amazed at the

27
speed and efficiency of this new wonder called the Internet. He did not have to print and file
the letter, since it was stored on-line. The benefits were more than he imagined, the
enormous amount of information available was so much to take in. He saw a more
organised Planet, less clutter and more attractive ways of providing information.
Lady Cloud showed Techno Man how to send letters by email, how to video chat and
conference call with many people at one time. Techno Man became more and more excited
and was interested in finding out more. He found out about MP3 players, tablets, digital
cameras and other Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment that were
compact, neat and flexible.
Techno Man once again pleaded with his King to at least listen to the many benefits
that could be gained. I dont want to hear! Get away from here! the King roared. With his
head hanging, Techno Man left. In the quiet of his home he began to think. He thought and
he thought. My King is too stubborn! Why cant he see how good this would be for
everyone? Techno Man became angrier with King Analog the more he thought about it. I
Know! I will carry out a survey and have interviews with the people on planet Digi, he
smiled to himself, I can even use You Tube videos and podcasts.
Techno Man was pleased with his idea. He nodded his head and shouted, Yes! This
will surely convince my King. He will be able to see the benefits of modern communication
especially when I present the information that I will gather. Techno Man set out to work.
He created an on-line survey that was posted on a Web Page, where every citizen had
access to it. Lady Cloud helped him with setting up a Blog where people can discuss topics
and share their experiences. Interviews were recorded and posted and viewers had the
opportunity to share their opinions.
Lady Cloud and her team worked hard along with Techno Man to collect the
information that he needed to convince the King. The response was remarkable! Techno
Man had to classify and organise the information before he could present it. He was
prepared to toil for days and nights; he laid out sheets of paper and planned how to attack
this huge task. Once again Lady Cloud came to his rescue and showed him how to use the
computer to analyse the data and create very colourful charts. To his amazement his job
was completed in less than a day.
Very confidently Techno Man again made an appointment to see King Analog. He
felt more prepared this time. Techno Man was almost finished with his presentation when

28
he heard, Stop! I cant believe this! shouted King Analog. I cant believe so many people
on planet Digi are using this INTERNET! This data must be false. King Analog continued
boldly, My people will not be interested in this, they are happy with my way of
communicating and the media that I choose to use.
Techno Man was once again disappointed but begged King Analog to let him finish.
The King did. He allowed him only three more minutes. When started to present data that
was different to the Kings belief the King questioned, Do you expect me to believe that
more than 80% of my people are interested in ICTs other than print media? He answered
the question for himself, Surely this is not true? My people will never betray me!
Techno Man felt like he had lost the battle this time. The King had banished him and all his
followers. Go, you and your followers to Planet Digi! I will continue to use my paper and
print method, it works for me! He exclaimed. Techno Man and his subjects were thrown out
of the Kingdom. They left with a bitter sweet feeling.

29
Appendix 3

GUIDED QUESTIONS TO BE USED AS A DURING READING STRATEGY

1. Can you imagine where planet Beyond is?

2. What do you think King Analog looks like?

3. What are some forms of technology that are commonly used for communication
and gaining information?

4. What are some of the strengths of using media texts?

5. What are some of the weaknesses of using various forms of media texts?

NOTE: Teachers can add to the list as they see necessary.

30
Appendix 4 What is Readers Theatre?

Readers Theatre commonly called RT is a form of theatre or drama. As its title suggests, it
focuses on reading. Its a reading and learning tool that adds fun and excitement to oral
reading activities, and helps stimulate interest in reading and learning. It helps improve reading
skills by providing a purpose for practising reading, and can also improve understanding of
what is being read. There are different styles of Readers Theatre. However, generally, it
involves two or more readers reading aloud. They use their voices, facial expressions and
gestures to interpret a story. Its non-threatening since readers have a script and get to
practise many times before performing. The images are formed, not on stage, but inside the
readers and the listeners heads.

In summary:

o Readers interpret the story orally, rather than act it out.

o Readers dont try to become the characters, like actors do, although they us their voices
and gestures to bring life to the characters.

o Readers dont have to memorize lines. They take their reading texts or scripts on stage
with them, even if they dont use them.

o Readers dont need elaborate costumes. They often dress in black.

o Readers dont need special sets or props. They often just sit on stools.

Readers Theatre in 5 Easy Steps

1. Choose a script. Choose a prepared script, or have kids choose a book from which to
develop a reader's theatre script.

2. Adapt the script. If adapting, kids identify speaking parts (including narrators) and break
down the story into dialogue.

3. Assign parts. Kids might try out different parts to get a feel for them, and then choose their
roles themselves.

4. Highlight parts and rehearse. Kids highlight their dialogue, then practice their lines at home
and in groups during school.

5. Perform. The cast reads the play aloud for an audience, often made up of parents or
younger students.

31
UNIT ONE: Exploring Media
Learning Plan: 4 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Getting the Message in the Media
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
In addition to capturing ones attention, media carries with it
messages that are overt and implied. Guiding students to develop HFLE:
the skills necessary to identify these messages will assist students Assertiveness
in deciding medias purpose and significance. Understanding
Outcomes: Consequences
At the end of this learning experience students will:
calculate the unknown in number sentences involving the Literacy
four operations and explain procedures used Reading
highlight important points relevant to a given topic Writing
analyse details using graphic organizers Oral
use metacognitive strategies to clarify meaning in text e.g., Communication
rereading, visualizing, thinking about the text, before, Literary
during and after reading strategies Appreciation
identify overt and implied messages in selected media texts Media &
explain the purpose of selected media texts (a television Information Literacy
show, advertisement, radio broadcast, poem any other
audio selections etc) Numeracy
Problem Solving
discuss the significance of the media in society.
Critical thinking
Activities:
Communication
Representation
Problem Solving Support:
Reasoning
1. A problem is presented by the teacher in the form of a
think-aloud e.g. I am thinking of a number. When I take 9 ICT Skills
away from the number my answer is 19. What number am I
thinking of? Differentiated
2. The problem is written on the board (can use sentence Instruction
strips or projected determined by the teacher) and
important points (key words or phrases) are highlighted Assessment for
(written aside, underlined, circled etc.) by the teacher e.g. learning
take, away from, answer etc.
3. Using a simple graphic organizer, the highlighted words or
phrases are mapped by the teacher (to simplify information
and stimulate thinking skills) e.g.

32
Take Answer

remove response
subtract equal to

Mathematical Mathematical
symbol Symbol
- =

4. Students discuss (in pairs, groups and eventually with the


entire class to be decided and moderated by the teacher)
the information presented in the graphic organizer and
suggest a way in which this information could be written in
a sentence form - key word. The term number sentence is
elicited by the teacher (may be written and displayed in any
form if necessary).
5. Students assist the teacher in the creation of a number
sentence for this problem. The sequence is elicited by the
teacher

Step 1: Look for key words or phrases in the


problem (from graphic organizer).
Step 2: What number/s do you subtract?
Step 3: Write the number sentence.

? - 9 = 19

6. Students work individually to solve another problem using


the steps demonstrated i.e. highlighting key words, using a
graphic organizer and writing a number sentence. They
share their answers voluntarily with the class.
7. An additional problem is presented but this time students
work in pairs or groups (to be decided by the teacher) to
solve the problem. Students share their answers voluntarily
with the class.

8. After students have shared they discuss (in pairs, groups

33
and eventually with the entire class to be decided and
moderated by the teacher) how they felt working alone and
with others. Key words or phrases are elicited by the
teacher that leads in summary to this:

When ideas are shared, support is provided leading to


decisions that have a greater impact in the solving of
problems.

9. Students are told that there is a way in which they dont


have to depend on others for support in the solving of
problems; and this could be applied to Reading, Writing
and Mathematics

Prior planning by teacher:

A variety of grade level appropriate texts based on students


interests, personalities and backgrounds will be compiled.

Teacher Demonstration:

10. Students choose by voting a book to be read aloud to them


from the prepared list. Before, during and after the read-
aloud session the teacher pauses at certain points and
self-questions using a think-aloud (teacher may modify
questions and choose to answer them or elicit responses
from the students ):

What am I supposed to learn from in this book?


Is there anything I know about the topic?
I wonder what would have happened if the setting was
changed in the story?
Does this character remind me of anyone that I know?
What does this line mean? How could I say it differently?
Do I need to revisit/reread the paragraph to better
understand what this means?

Students are informed that this is known as monitoring in


comprehension)

This activity should be done on a regular basis, so that it


becomes part of students practice even away from class.

34
Mapping of Ideas:

11. These questions are displayed (in some form by the


teacher) and students highlight the key words or phrases
to map using a graphic organizer. They share their ideas
with the class (demonstrated previously).

Applying Strategy:

12. Students choose a text from the list for individual reading
and self-question themselves using the questions in
Activity 10 (questions can be modified by the teacher).
They then map their ideas and share as in Activity 11.

Prior planning by teacher:

The media text selected for this activity is an advertisement. This


is a sample and the teacher may select any other media text or
use the templates available in Microsoft Publisher. In the case of
Newspapers, the teacher must ensure that all students have
identical copies. They are asked to acquire the paper (or the
teacher may make other arrangements) with the same date and
page number. The teacher will decide upon the use of words,
graphics or both as the object of focus for the activity. Students
can work individually, in pairs or in groups as decided and
moderated by the teacher.

Messages in Media:

13. Students view an advertisement (see resources) and


highlight (written aside, underlined, circled etc.) the key
words or phrases that are relevant to the advertisement
e.g. The Learning Centre, Hey Kids etc.
14. Using a simple graphic organizer, the highlighted words or
phrases are mapped by the students. They then share
their work with each other.
15. Words or phrases that convey messages are elicited by
the teacher e.g. learn more, Help your friends. Students
note that these are the obvious (overt may be used by the
teacher) messages in the advertisement.
16. Students refer to their graphic organizers and discuss

35
messages that are not obviously stated e.g. Hey kids -
targeting kids, 8:30am to 3:00 pm - private school. They
will share these messages with each other.
17. After students have shared they discuss why
advertisements use overt and implied messages. It will
be elicited by the teacher that these messages are used by
advertisers to entice the reader/consumer to become
interested in what is being advertised.
18. Other words or phrases that capture attention from various
media are discussed and students are asked how this has
affected their friends and neighbours (teacher will extend
to society) e g. buying a shoe, snack etc.

Resources:
Literature: grade level texts
Other: advertisement sample, graphic organizer, sentence
strips
Stationery: markers, paper
ICTs: computer, digital projector

Assessment:
Teacher observation
Creation of media with different types of messages
(assessed by rubrics)
Collaborative activities
Oral presentations

36
UNIT ONE: Exploring Media
Learning Plan: 5 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 3 days Topic: Application of Media
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Distinct pieces of information that exist in a variety of forms can
be accessed or produced to help inform decisions. Data can be HFLE:
used to support or justify certain choices, trends can be
established and projections can be made for future decisions. Problem Solving
Outcomes: Decision Making
At the end of this learning experience students will:
collect data based on the investigation of a problem or Literacy
question using questionnaires, experiments, data bases Reading
and other sources Writing
chart the weather pattern in various locations Oral
interpret inferences from data gathered Communication
observe weather pattern over a period of time Literary
state in Spanish how they use different forms of media. Appreciation
use the correct form of the verb in writing: Media &
some personal pronouns agree with the Information Literacy
singular verb while some use the plural form
Use knowledge of phonics in conjunction with other word- Numeracy
attack strategies such as knowledge of morphemic word Problem Solving
families, spelling generalizations, and letter combinations Critical thinking
including double letters to decode new words in context. Communication
use spelling rules correctly in writing: produce the following Representation
correctly: Reasoning
double the last letter of words ending in a
short vowel followed by a single consonant ICT Skills
before adding a y e.g. bag baggy
add a y to words ending with two Differentiated
consonants to form describing words e.g. Instruction
dirt-dirty
for words ending in a silent e, drop the e Assessment for
before adding y e.g. ice-icy. learning
deconstruct selected media to understand how
information/messages are presented to audiences

Activities:

How I use Media in Spanish

1. Students are asked to discuss the different types of media


they have been using or reading about thus far.

37
2. Teacher tells the class that today he would like to share
with them some of the different forms of media he uses.
He shows them a picture of 5 forms of media computer,
internet, television, radio, newspapers. They review the
Spanish words for these (la computadora, el internet, la
televisin, la radio, los diarios). The Spanish expressions
stating how these forms of media are articulated loud for
the class I use the computer, I surf the Internet, I watch
tv, I listen to the radio, I read newspapers (Uso la
computadora, Navego el internet, Veo la televisin,
Escucho la radio, Leo los diarios).
3. The Spanish phrases are repeated until students are
comfortable saying them.
4. He then asks random students to mime themselves using
a form of media. The class has to say in Spanish what they
think the person is saying.
5. Students are asked to choose at random a picture of a
form of media from a bag and say that they use this in
Spanish.

Planning a trip Will the Weather Permit?

6. Students are presented with a problem: Your class is


planning a cross country visit throughout Trinidad or
Tobago. Students may have to walk through mud trails to
reach their destinations. The paths may be hilly and windy
and can be dangerous if weather conditions are
unfavourable. Your task would be to investigate and collect
data to decide on the best place and time for this visit.

7. Students are asked to collect weather data for example,


rainfall or temperature, and observe these weather
patterns, from various forms of media (data bases online
e.g. www.wunderground.com , television, radio or
newspaper) over a period of time, for different areas in
Trinidad or Tobago. (Different areas could be assigned to
different groups)

Write Time

8. Students choose to whichever source of data is available to


them and bring their findings.

9. Students can work individually or in groups to collate the


data that was collected on the weather pattern for various
areas. Students may write their findings in paragraph form

38
(one paragraph per area). More advanced classes can also
create an accompanying table.
10. Students decide and justify from the data the best place
and time to go on the trip.
11. Students who need guidance could be given a template for
the paragraph(s). They should be encouraged to use the
appropriate personal pronoun and correct verb form
associated with it.

Poetry Time
12. Students read a poem that is projected or written on the
board:
The morning air was misty,
Making the place dark and foggy,
Was it really foggy or was it hazy?
Couldnt tell because it was so breezy,
Breezy or windy?
Does it really matter?
In just a few hours it will be sunny.
13. They identify words from the poem that are related to the
weather misty, foggy, hazy, breezy, windy, and sunny.
14. These words are written on the board or on word cards and
students say what they observe about the words they all
end in y.
15. The root words are identified and through discussion
students explain the spelling rules
double the last letter of words ending in a
short vowel followed by a single consonant
before adding a y e.g. fog foggy
add a y to words ending with two
consonants to form describing words e.g.
wind windy
for words ending in a silent e, drop the e
before adding y e.g. breeze- breezy
16. Other words are given to the students and they practise the
spelling by applying the rules (see attached list).
17. Students choose two words from each rule (see activity 10)
and write sentences for each.
18. Students are asked to create their own weather poem.
19. Students compare their weather paragraph to their weather
poem. Some suggested questions are:
What was the purpose of the paragraph?
What was the purpose of the poem?
How are they similar?
How are they different?

39
Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, markers, ruler, eraser, white
board
Art Supplies: coloured pencils
ICTs: computer, printer, projector
Others: Search words wunderground
Assessment:
Teacher observation:
of raw data that was collected from the investigation
by listening to students say in Spanish how they use
different forms of media
of written work done by students

40
SAMPLE OF WORDS AND THEIR SPELLING RULES

No. Double the last letter of Add a y to words Words ending in a


words ending in a short ending with two silent e, drop the e
vowel followed by a consonants to form before adding y
single consonant describing words
before adding a y

1. bump bumpy bag - baggy breeze - breezy


2. catch - catchy crab - crabby ease - easy
3. chill chilly crap - crappy flake - flaky
4. crank cranky flab - flabby grease - greasy
5. crust crusty fog - foggy haste - hasty
6. curly curly gum - gummy haze - hazy
7. dirty - dirty snip - snippy laze - lazy
8. dusty dusty snap - snappy noise - noisy
9. fish fishy sun - sunny nose - nosy
10. lump lumpy shine - shiny
11. mess messy
12. nerd nerdy
13. patch patchy
14. rust rusty
15. scant scanty
16. stink stinky
17. wind windy

41
LEARNING UNIT 2: Creativity In Digital Learning

Class: Standard 4 Theme: Media and Information Estimated frame: 12 days


Context: Digital learning is the use of technology in pedagogy designed to enhance
students learning experiences. Being creative in digital learning provides
students with the opportunity to learn at their own pace having support through
formative assessment.
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:
develop a scenario based on articles, advertisements and pictures in their
drama portfolio
solve problems using whole numbers involving the four operations
understand that ICT influences how one thinks and behaves and that one
should exercise caution when using it
maintain healthy lifestyles through physical activities, healthy diet and
personal hygiene
research and recommend agricultural practices that positively impact
food security in ones country
propagate plants using various methods and technologies
demonstrate an understanding of algorithms, mental strategies and
estimation strategies
demonstrate understanding of impartiality
describe methods and analyse results and make decisions
communicate findings and decisions made using vocabulary associated
with statistics
develop and apply procedures to solve problems involving fractions and
the four operations
demonstrate an understanding of behaviours displayed by good citizens
produce models of different media items
know ways of interacting with a range of aural aesthetic stimuli for
enjoyment
know skills of oral expression applicable to level
know how to use pre-listening, during-listening and post-listening listening
strategies
use words which express deeper meaning in speaking, reading and
writing
apply appropriate reading comprehension skills and strategies explicitly
taught to develop as strategic and critical thinkers
use before, during and after reading strategies
know how to apply critical literacy skills
know the rules of punctuation to apply to writing
know how to expand the basic sentence type by adding noun, adjective
and adverbs (single word or phrase) to enrich sentences
know how to construct complex sentences

42
know that a subject must agree with a verb in number
know to apply spelling rules correctly when writing
know how to use the different types of vocabulary across content areas
create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences
know how to write exposition using the process approach with focus on
organizational structure and transition words
reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators
investigate the properties of materials such as conduction of electricity.
Learning 1) Thinking On Your Feet
Plans: 2) Media In Everyday Life (Part1)
3) Media In Everyday Life (Part 2)
4) Media In Everyday Life (Part 3)
5) Agritech
6) Powered Media
Resources: Learning Plan1: recycled paper(to make balls/potatoes), Bristol board markers,
coloured pencils, computer with internet connection (optional) ,clock/watch,
chalk, other forms of media to look for recipe

Learning Plan 2 (Part 1): computer, different types of media (radio, newspaper,
magazines, DVDs etc.)

Learning Plan 2 (Part 2): Bristol board, computer, poster colours

Learning Plan 2 (Part 3): paper for writing

Learning Plan 3: paper, pencil, coloured pencils/crayons, computer, camera,


power point, Poem Food Security, Seeds/cuttings, SWGB, styrotex containers,
potting soil, guide for plant propagation, map of the Caribbean, activity sheet,
word sleuth Search Words: Food security

Learning Plan 4: Lab report, Bristol board for word wall, paper to make comic
books, coloured pencils(optional), markers, story( may be projected or copies
made and distributed to students), Battery, 2 Wires, Bulb, Masking tape, a pair
of scissors, Conductors and non-conductors of electricity, Sturdy material to
construct their circuit on, different types of media, fraction board, fraction pieces
(equivalent factions)
Assessments
Observation
Portfolio
Worded Problems
Word Sleuth
Math Game
Oral presentations
Journal writing

43
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 1 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Thinking On Your Feet
Context Critical thinking is important for everyday living. To CONSIDERATIONS:
encourage children to think on their feet (respond intelligently at a
moments notice) will prepare them for the many challenges that HFLE:
arise in life unexpectedly. Critical Thinking
Decision Making

Outcomes: At the end of the learning experience students will be Literacy


able to: Reading
create and solve problems in addition (sum less than 10 Writing
000) Oral
explore, describe and use a range of mental strategies and Communication
recording for solving problems Literary
determine the approximate solution to a problem Appreciation
explain procedures used in solving problems Media &
use the correct form of the verb in writing Information Literacy
practise washing hands and face after physical activity
use imagination, experiences and listening skills to enjoy Numeracy
and connect to aural, aesthetic materials Problem Solving
apply the correct punctuation marks to writing: colon, Critical thinking
comma Communication
Representation
use spelling rules correctly in writing, when a word ends in
Reasoning
a silent e, drop the e before adding an ing
write instructions applying the process approach to writing
ICT Skills
focus on transition words
articulate emotional and intellectual responses to a variety
Differentiated
of aural stimuli
Instruction
expand the basic sentence type by adding adjectives
practise drinking water and eating healthy foods. Assessment for
learning
Activities:
Quick thinking
1. Students are engaged in a discussion based on their
experience when shopping (school cafeteria,
neighbourhood shops/grocery). Eg.
a) How do you know how many items you can
purchase
with the money you have?
b) What strategy/ies can you use when shopping to
avoid having to replace items when cashing?

44
c) How can you check to verify that your bill was
calculated correctly?
2. The word estimation is introduced and explained to
students.
3. Students are shown a variety of items with prices attached.
They are to estimate the total cost of the items. (This
activity can be repeated using different price tags)
4. Students explain the strategies they used to get an
estimate of the total cost of the items.
5. Students brainstorm other strategies that can be used to
give an estimated total.
6. Students are introduced to the skill of front end
estimation
In front-end estimation, the original price/number is
estimated based on the first digit in the number.
eg: Addition: 456 + 729 is estimated to 400 + 700 or
$17.25 + $6.50 is estimated to $17.00 + $6.00
Students are given other examples.
7. Students are introduced to another skill of estimation:
compensation- 173 + 282 + 368 + 189 + 572 is close to
200 + 300 + 400 + 200 + 500 = 1600; (572 is rounded
down to compensate for all the other numbers being
rounded up).
Students practice estimation using the skills of front end
estimation and compensation.

Potato Race
8. Students use balls (made out of paper) or any object to
represent potatoes. They draw circles a few meters away
from a starter line to represent buckets.
9. Students take potatoes/balls from the starter line and place
them in their circle/bucket a few metres away.
10. Students go back and forth with a different student from
each group repeating the process until one minute is up.
Adding Potatoes Collected
11. Students add the potatoes collected using the key (1potato
represents 225 potatoes).
12. Students give their answer and explain two ways the
13. Answer could have been found.
(Students and teacher create additional problems for
students to work in groups).
Catering Woes
14. Students practice estimation strategies such as front end
and compensation.
15. Students are presented with problems eg. Their school
population of 3687 has to be served their favourite dish of

45
potatoes. The caterer has to supply the same dish to
another school with a population of 1468 students. How
many more. Approximately how many students does he
have to cater for?
The caterer bought potatoes from three different suppliers.
His first bill was $575.00, the second was $620.80 and the
final bill was $818.35. Give an estimate of his total bill.
(Students and teacher create additional problems)

16. Students listen, observe and create sentences based on


the explanation given by the teacher that forms of the verb
to be take the number of the subject. (am, is, are, was,
were) E.g.:
a) The caterer is unaware of the time.
b) The principal was not happy about the late arrival of
the lunch.
c) Mrs. John, the class teacher, is unable to contact the
caterer.
d) All the potatoes were used to make the dish.
e) The students are anxious and hungry.
f) I am exhausted.
Preparation of meal
17. Students engage in a discussion based on the important
hygiene issues that must be considered before the
preparation of the meal.
18. In small groups, students decide how they will prepare
potatoes to assist the caterer. (Students can use media to
research recipe).
19. Students make a list of ingredients needed to prepare a
healthy dish using potatoes. (Use colon and commas
where necessary).
20. Students observe how action words ending with e have to
drop the e before adding ing. Students use the following
words when writing the method.
Eg. place placing, combine combining, mince mincing
shake shaking, determine - determining
Students can peruse different forms of media to find
example of words that drop the e before adding ing.
(The teacher can include other words)
21. Students write the method to be used to prepare potatoes
on Bristol board, using some of the words listed above
together with words such as:
First, initially, following, second, then, next, after, finally,
afterwards. (one paragraph)

46
Potato la
22. Students draw the finished dish on Bristol board and
present to the class. Students give their dish a foreign
name (use internet to research names). Students include
words(adjectives) to describe their dish eg delicious,
creamy, moist, tasty, appetizing, colourful etc.
(The teacher can encourage the students to use other
words in their written and oral presentations making them
aware that adjectives are used to describe nouns)
Resources:
Stationery: recycled paper(to make balls/potatoes), bristol
board
Art supplies: markers, coloured pencils
ICTs: computer with internet connection (optional)
Other: clock/watch, chalk, other forms of media to look for
recipe, items with price tags

Assessment:

Math: Worded problems involving addition to suit level of the


class and using estimation strategies.
Create a scrap book with the following:
-a list of words that drop the e before adding ing.(words can be
collected from different forms of media e.g. magazines,
newspapers, Internet etc.)
-a list of adjectives that describe any food item or dish (option
draw the item(s) described.
-the recipe for the potato dish presented by one of the group.

47
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 2 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Media in Everyday Life(Part 1)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Pupils are bombarded with different forms of media in their
everyday lives. They also use media to convey messages of their HFLE:
own. It is important for student to explore the different types of
media and be able to analyse how diverse strategies are used to Effective
capture the readers or listeners attention. Communication
Outcomes: Choose an item.
At the end of the learning experience students will be able to:
recognize that different media forms use particular Literacy
language styles and techniques in the construction Reading
make judgments on pros and cons of techniques used to Writing
create media Oral
judge the impact of created media re purpose Communication
select appropriate formats based on the needs of the Media &
audience and purpose Information Literacy
understand that ICT influences how one thinks and
behaves and that one should exercise caution when using Numeracy
it Problem Solving
represent data using tally charts and graphs (pictographs,
Critical thinking
block graphs, bar graphs, using various scale factors) or
using simple graphing software to enter and create a graph Communication
interpret the findings displayed in the tables, charts and Representation
graphs Reasoning
use analyzed data to solve problems, draw conclusions
and make decisions ICT Skills
evaluate decisions made on analysis of data by groups of
students via group presentations Differentiated
communicate findings by writing a report using language Instruction
associated with statistics e.g. data and mode
recite and recall the Spanish words for media Assessment for
forms(computer, internet, website, television, cable TV, learning
radio, newspaper).
Activities:

Interpreting Media
1. Students view video clips, magazines, newspapers and
other forms of media (collected by students and teacher).
2. Students engage in a discussion after viewing the different
forms of media to determine what message the advertiser
was bringing across to the audience. Students can be
asked questions such as:

48
a) Who was the target audience? (Target audience to be
explained).
b) What types of techniques were used to bring across the
message e.g. the use of words, sounds, colour, and
character?
c) What are some of the pros and cons of the techniques
used?
d) What was the purpose of the advertisement?
(Word wall can be created using words that came up during the
discussion).

Brainstorming Activity
3. Students will come to a consensus as to which media form
is most frequently used to attract children.
4. Discuss appropriateness of techniques used for the age
level the media targeted.
5. State two ways in which advertisements can influence
choice.
6. In small groups students use a graphic organiser to present
information.

Media Survey
7. In small groups, students compile data on the types of
media preferred by different audiences other than children.
The data is based on their experiences at home with their
relatives (e.g. parents, grandparents, brother, sister etc.)
8. Students create a tally chart with the data collected.
(Teacher provides assistance where needed).
9. Students share data collected with other groups and
represent the collected data on a block graph (sample in
CD) or use simple graphing software to create block graph.
The words data and mode are introduced and explained
by the teacher.
10. Students in groups, present their findings based on the
data collected.
(Students use the word mode to describe the most popular
media type represented in the graph).
11. Students write a report using the words data and mode to
present their findings.
12. Students present report orally using Spanish words to
replace the names of some types of media.
Resources:
ICTs: computer (optional)
Other: Different types of media (radio, newspaper,
magazines, DVDs).

49
Assessment:
Observation: Oral presentations on which form of media is
more appealing and why. (Using 5-6 sentences) e.g. Name
the type of media that captures your attention and state
why.

50
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 3 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 1day Topic: Media in Everyday Life (Part 2)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Pupils are bombarded with different forms of media in their
everyday lives. They also use media to convey messages of their HFLE:
own. It is important for student to explore the different types of
media and be able to analyse how diverse strategies are used to Effective
capture the readers or listeners attention. Communication
Outcomes: Choose an item.
At the end of the learning experience students will be able to:
understand that texts have purposes and are written for Literacy
audiences Reading
in small groups, create and present one scenario from Writing
information collected from articles, advertisements and Oral
pictures Communication
Discuss the message of aural texts by asking and Media &
answering 5Ws+H- questions to make meaning: Main Information Literacy
idea and supporting details, speakers intention/purpose
compare and contrast media produced by individuals in the Numeracy
class. Problem Solving
Activities:
Critical thinking
Create a variety of Media texts for different purposes and Communication
audience. Representation
1. As a class, students and teacher analyse articles, Reasoning
advertisements and pictures.
2. In groups, students create a scenario after viewing or ICT Skills
listening to selections of media e.g. articles,
advertisements and pictures. (Same media used above Differentiated
can be used). Instruction
3. After viewing/listening students use the 5ws + H as a
guide when creating their scenario e.g. Who are the Assessment for
characters? What is happening? When: past, present / learning
what time of day? Why did it happen? Where is it taking
place? How effective was the scenario in bringing across
the intended message.
4. Students present their scenarios to the class.
5. Students brain storm and write a draft to an imaginary
production company stating why their scenario should
receive preference in an upcoming production.
6. Then present orally their request. (Teacher observes and

51
assists students with their draft.

Reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters


and creators
7. Students respond (orally) assuming that they are
responsible for accepting or refusing scenarios after
engaging in the following:
reflect on techniques and tools used to create
scenarios and make judgements on pros and cons of
these
discuss strengths and weaknesses of created
scenarios
judge the impact of the scenario on audience (class)

8. Students brainstorm, write a draft then present orally their


critique. (Teacher observes and assists students with their
draft).
Resources:
Stationery: Bristol board
ICTs: computer (optional)
Art Supplies: poster colours
Assessment:
Observation of students during the creation of their
scenarios e.g. participation, answering/ catering for the
5Ws + H.
Create a portfolio containing:
letter to the production company
response from the production company

52
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 4 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Media In Everyday Life (Part 3)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Pupils are bombarded with different forms of media in their
everyday lives. They also use media to convey messages of their HFLE:
own. It is important for student to explore the different types of
media and be able to analyse how diverse strategies are used to
capture the readers or listeners attention. Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of the learning experience students will be able to: Writing
use analyzed data to solve problems, draw conclusions Oral
and make decisions Communication
use different notations to indicate division e.g. 240 12 Media &
and 12 240
Information Literacy
write a simple advertisement applying the process
approach to writing. Numeracy
Activities:
Problem Solving
Distribution of advertisements created. Critical thinking
1) In small groups, students imitate how information is Communication
distributed and received. E.g. electronic billboards on the Representation
roadside for motorist and their passengers or distribution of Reasoning
newspapers.
2) Solve problems using division skills without remainder and ICT Skills
use different notations to indicate division
a. A small community of 624 persons needs to Differentiated
be informed of an upcoming event. If 8 fliers Instruction
are distributed per day, how many days will
it take to distribute to the entire population? Assessment for
b. The bill for running an ad for one day is learning
$732. Each clip cost $12. How many times
was it played for the day?

(Students and teachers can formulate other division problems).

Creating an Advertisement
3) Students are asked to create an advertisement for a class
event, using the following guidelines-
Teacher reviews the writing process
Review of the use of persuasive language may
also be necessary
Brainstorm and use a graphic organiser to
organise the information (Appendix 1)

53
Write a first draft (Drafts can be peer reviewed)
Revise to improve the draft
Edit and proof read
Publish and present your report

(Optional Students can be assisted by the teacher using the


computer to type).
Resources:
Stationery: paper for writing
Assessment:
Division problems created by the teacher.
Presentation and display of the report.

54
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 5 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Agritech
Context: We all need food to survive. Food security is therefore a global CONSIDERATIONS:
concern. Teaching students some self- sufficient ways of securing food
for themselves and their families can go a long way in relieving the heavy HFLE:
demands made on the agricultural sector. Critical Thinking
Outcomes: At the end of the learning experience students will be able to: Decision Making

illustrate three ways of making food security a reality to develop the Literacy
region using selected text Reading
Demonstrate understanding of impartiality: Gather and interpret Writing
data from a range of sources before giving their own opinion on Oral
matters of local, regional and global interest Communication
recommend at least two agricultural practices that will improve food Literary
security in Trinidad and Tobago from observation of information Appreciation
given in a variety of media Media &
propagate plants from seeds and from cuttings using at least two Information Literacy
forms of appropriate technology
Demonstrate an understanding of behaviours displayed by good Numeracy
citizens Problem Solving
create and solve problems in multiplication (two, three or four digit Critical thinking
numbers by two digit numbers) by using appropriate written Communication
algorithm and mental strategies Representation
Reasoning
use spelling words correctly in writing. Produce the following
correctly:
ICT Skills
when the suffix -full is added to the end of a base word, drop one
l. e.g. Helpful
Differentiated
practise washing hand and face after physical activity.
Instruction

Assessment for
Activities:
learning
Poem
1. Students read poem entitled Food Security with the teacher.
(Appendix 1)
2. Students are divided into groups. Each group reads a different
paragraph and gives an explanation to the class.
Research Skills
3. Students give their opinion as to why some countries experience
food shortages.
4. Students peruse selected texts provided by the teacher to collect
information on why specific countries within the
Caribbean experience food shortages. (See Websites)
5. Students use information to make an informed decision as to why

55
some countries experience food shortages.
Finding Solutions

6. In small groups, students pretend to take on the responsibility of


heading the Ministry of Agriculture in Trinidad and Tobago. They
discuss ways of reducing food shortages and present solutions to
the class. Students are asked to write a short speech (no more
than five paragraphs) discussing their plans.To give support to
students, guiding statements for the speech may be given or a
template for the structure of the speech.

Implementing agricultural methods


7. Students listen to the teacher as she/he enlightens them about one
of the methods that can be used to produce food (plant
propagation). A definition is given:
Plant propagation is the continuation of a particular species of
plant.
Plant propagation can be done using stem cuttings and seeds.
8. Students view power point of plant propagation using stem cuttings
and seeds. (See Appendix 2)
9. In small groups, pupils engage in plant propagation using stem
cuttings and seeds. (See Appendix 3)
10. Students take photos or use drawings to illustrate the steps
involved in stem cutting and seed propagation.
11. Students practise proper hygiene by washing hand and face after
the physical activity.

Taking care of the garden


12. When attending to plants, students watch out for L eating
caterpillars. If a word ends in the suffix full the caterpillar will eat
the last L. A suffix is letter or a group of letters added to the end of
a root word.
13. Students observe the use of suffixes in the following sentence.
Playful children have to be careful around pesticides as they can
be harmful.
(Teacher can provide additional examples)
(See appendix 4 for activity in CD)

Providing Relief
14. Students will solve the following word problems:
a) We have 248 grow boxes. We planted 12 seeds/cuttings in
each box. How many plants did we produce?
b) A plot of land was allocated for agricultural use. It was decide
that tomatoes should be planted. 6 beds,1 072 metres long were
prepared. Tomatoes must be planted 1 metre apart. How many
holes must we make to plant the seeds?

56
c) If 3 seeds are placed in every hole, how many seeds would we
need?
(Teacher can provide additional problems)

Closure
15. Students relate their experiences as Ministers of agriculture
after successfully educating the population on plant propagation
which aided in food security. Students use some of the --ful words
listed in appendix 4, together with other new words learnt.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil
Art Supplies: coloured pencils/crayons
ICTs: computer, camera, PowerPoint,
Websites: Search words Famine In The Caribbean
- Plant Propagation
Literature: Poem Food Security
Other: Seeds/cuttings, SWGB, styrotex containers, potting soil,
guide for plant propagation, map of the Caribbean, activity sheet,
word sleuth

Assessment:
Word sleuth. Appendix 5 (in CD)
Portfolio - Sequence the pictures/drawings collected during the
lesson to show the steps involved in plant propagation.
Work in groups to formulate and solve multiplication problems.

57
Appendix 1

Food Security
Sometimes whole populations are underfed
And others are just wasting bread
How can we balance the equation?
And get enough food for every nation

Many factors can cause shortage


Like slash and burn to pay mortgage
Clearing away too much forest and swamp land
And not leaving enough space to plant yam

We waste food and this threatens security


By throwing good food because we have plenty
Please be thankful for what youve got
And try to share with those who have not

Securing food can start with me


I can ensure there are no hungry people in my community
I can teach them plant propagation
And I can take other planting methods into consideration

Food security starts right here


Save the environment, plant and share
We need to work hand in hand
To feed all people of every land

58
Appendix 3
Steps in plant propagation

Seeds
1. Select seed eg. ochro or beans
2. Prepare potting media/promix
3. Use Self Watering Grow Boxes (S.W.G.B) or styrotex containers (soup size)
4. Sow seeds 3 per hole, 2 cm deep and 30 cm apart
5. Observe germination/growth
6. Record

Stem Cuttings
1. Cuttings - leaf/stem
2. Prepare a propagation bin (S.W.G.B)
fill with sharp sand and cover with clear plastic that is UV treated.
Or use a container of water eg jaliter bottle (cut the top)
3. Select planting material
healthy leaves/stems
mature soft stem/hard stem (cassava)
stem should be pencil thick
stems should be 30cm long and planted 3 cm deep
stems planted 10 cm apart
remove leaves or cut into
cut the base to the stem at angle/slant 450 (degrees)
plant immediately after cutting into a watered box or jaliter bottle of water
cover the box to maintain humidity
fill the reservoir every two week or do a finger test
observe for new growth/death

59
UNIT TWO: Creativity In Digital Learning
Learning Plan: 6 of 6
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 3 days Topic: Powered Media
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Technology keeps us connected in many different ways. This
would not be possible if it werent for electricity. Electricity is HFLE:
needed to power and produce most types of media be it print or
digital. Understanding how it is generated has always fascinated Creative Thinking
children of all ages. Decision Making
Outcomes:
At the end of the learning experience students will be able to: Literacy
employ taught strategies to assist in making meaning: Pre- Reading
listening-connecting to previous knowledge, During Writing
listening-note taking, note making, Post listening- oral Oral
responses to aural stimuli Communication
use the media to become and stay an informed citizen Media &
appreciate the use of data in making informed choices Information Literacy
use the different types of vocabulary in context across
content areas-Technical terms, synonyms Numeracy
develop and use the algorithm for solving problems Problem Solving
involving the addition and subtraction of fractions involving Critical thinking
same denominator Communication
develop and use the algorithm for solving problems Representation
involving the addition and subtraction of fraction involving Reasoning
one denominator that is a multiple of the other
solve real-life problems involving fractions and use the ICT Skills
algorithms developed
design experiments to compare the properties of materials Differentiated
based on conduction of electricity Instruction
collaborate in teams to find solutions to problems
develop a more sophisticated vocabulary by extending Assessment for
basic word knowledge across content areas
learning
produce some short media texts for specific purposes and
audiences, using a few simple media forms and
appropriate convention and techniques e.g. to influence
attitudes positively.

Activities:

Story time (Appendix 1)


1) Students listen to story read by the teacher. They engage
in pre, during and post listening skills.

60
Creation of word wall
2) Students and teachers make a list of all words related to
media and electricity used throughout the lesson.

Research and Discussion(In small groups, or whole class)


3) Students and teachers peruse media to gather information
on materials that can be used to conduct electricity. They
pay attention to how to create a simple electrical circuit.
During the research students discuss and record the
meaning of words that appeared on the word wall and
other words that were encountered during their research.
Students use newly found words in their discussion.

Purchasing of materials (same denominator)


4) Students prepare a list of materials to be used using
appropriate punctuation. (Emphasis on colon and comma).
5) Students engage in problem solving activity involving
fractions to supply the list generated during their research.
E.g. 1) Students use fractions with same denominator. Our
project requires 1(8/8) roll of wire. Mr Johns Hardware has
roll of wire left and Mr Harrys hardware has roll of
wire left. Is this sufficient for the project?
E.g. 2) Students pretend they are taking a lunch break
before creating the circuit. A 12 slice pizza is delivered.
There are nine children working on the project. If each
child gets one slice how many slices would remain?
Express what happened to the pizza using fractions.

Purchasing of material(equivalent fractions)


6) Eg.1) Plywood to build a circuit is scarce. One hardware
has 3/6 of a length and another hardware has 6/12 of a
length. Which hardware has more, or do they have the
same amount? Use the fraction chart to determine your
answer.
Use the fraction chart to compare other fractions to
establish greater than, less than and equal to.
Use the algorithm to make equivalent fractions.

Algorithm - Multiply the numerator and the denominator by the


same number.

Eg. 1/3 = /9 1x3=3


3x3=9

Eg. 3/8 = 6/ 3x2=6


8x2=16

61
Algorithm- Divide the numerator and the denominator by the
same number.

Eg. 4/16 = /4 4 4 =1
16 4 =4

Eg. 5/20 = 1/ 5 5 =1
20 5 = 4

Creating Electricity
7) In small groups , students use batteries, wire, bulb, wooden
block /cardboard to create electricity.

Safety with electricity- SAFETY NOTE:


8) Exploring electricity is safe as long as it is done with
low- voltage batteries and under adult supervision.
9) Tell students never to experiment with electricity from
a wall outlet. Doing so can be fatal.

10) Students test materials to determine their conductivity. The


words conductors and insulators are introduced.

Safety purposes.
(Educating the worker- Manipulate different materials to determine
the most appropriate materials to be used for the handling of
electricity.)

11) Students orally present their findings and inform workers of


these safety materials.

Lab as a form of media (Appendix 2)


12) Students with the assistance of the teacher use the lab
report sheet to record the steps used in creating electricity,
their observation and conclusion.

The importance of electricity to digital media.


13) Students observe comic books or comic section of the
newspapers to identify the attributes of a comic. Special
attention is paid to characters, panels and dialogue boxes.
14) Students design and create a comic book. The focus of the
comic is the conservation of electricity as it is need to
power many sources of digital media. They use as many
words from the word wall created. They begin or end with:

62
Media now, media the, Media, Media will never end.

Resources:
Stationery: Lab report (Appendix 2), Bristol board for word
wall, paper to make comic books
Art Supplies: coloured pencils(optional), markers,
Literature: Story( may be projected or copies made and
distributed to students) Appendix 1
Other: Battery, 2 Wires, Bulb, Masking tape, a pair of
scissors, Conductors and non-conductors of electricity,
sturdy material to construct their circuit on, different types
of media, fraction board, fraction pieces (equivalent
factions)
Assessment:
Presentation of comic book created (attention paid to use
of vocabulary from word wall and conjunctions)
Presentation of lab report
Observation of groups working together
Oral questioning based on lesson
Report Writing: Steps involved in creating circuit
Worded problems on fractions created by teacher to suit
class level
Find Your Partner
-At random each student is given one symbol of a fraction
that was used during the lesson.
-Music is played for a few seconds.
-When the music stops, students form a group with other
students who have equivalent fractions eg.
1/2, 4/8 and 3/6
1/4, 2/8 and 3/12
2/3, 6/9 and 8/12
o The teacher observes and assists where necessary.
o The fractions are collected and redistributed at random.
o The game starts again
o Teachers can be creative with the game e.g. having only
two equivalent fractions; also one students may end up not
having any matches etc.

63
Appendix 1

An Electrifying Story with a Shocking Solution

Storm Crackle Crackle Bam wreaked havoc over our land. This terrible storm caused a
tremendous power surge. All the lights went out and everything that operated with
electricity became useless. Days passed but attempts to restore power proved futile.

Computers, television sets, rechargeable batteries and all other electronic devices were
useless since they could no longer be used to gather information or for entertainment.
Some families were without home cooked food and water as their stoves, fridges,
toaster ovens, water pumps and other appliances all needed electricity to operate.
Families depending on solar energy were not much more fortunate as the storm
continued for many days blocking out much needed sunlight.

Communities had to use media that were not dependant on electricity to update its
members about the crisis situation. They utilized megaphones, handwritten posters,
door to door visits and other innovative ways to inform citizens of the places they could
have gone to receive assistance and advice, as well as updates about the storm.

There was an urgent cry for a superhero, someone who would restore electricity and
allow homes to function normally again. Some experts attempted to conjure up
electricity using wind and hydroelectric power but to no avail because the storm raged
on thwarting those efforts. A standard four class, in their simple wisdom, decided to
wear the cape and used electricity from batteries which run cars, toys and flashlights to
restore normalcy within communities. The class however said they would only do it if
and when a commitment was made to conscientiously conserve electricity. Entire
communities promised to turn off lights when no one was in the room and turn off
appliances, games, televisions and radios that were not being used. Standard four
saved the day! What a great feat!

64
Appendix 2

Lab Report

Subject: Science Level: Standard Four Date:

Students Name:

Group Members:

Strand : Matter and Materials

Aim: To investigate the ability of various materials to conduct electricity.

Apparatus:

Method:

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Results:

Name of Material of Prediction Actual


object object
Conductor Insulator Conductor Insulator

Discussion:

The material that was the best conductor of electricity was:

The material that was the worst conductor of electricity was:

The materials which were good insulators were:

Which material would be best to make a pair of gloves when working with electricity?

The reason for my choice is:

Conclusion: It was determined that _________________ was the best conductor of


electricity.

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LEARNING UNIT 3: Being A Responsible and Skilful Digital Learner

Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information

Estimated frame: 6 days


Context: Media and information access in the twenty-first Century has created an
increasing demand to prepare our students to use these resources safely,
legally and responsibly in our schools as well as socially and ultimately
professionally.
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:
understand that ICT influences how one thinks and behaves and that one
should exercise caution when using it
know the following to engage in narrative-descriptive writing:
o the elements of story writing
o language use
o sensory details
o figurative language
o organization
o transitional words and phrases
o paragraphing
o grammar and mechanics
o the stages in the writing process
ascertain that the mass media are the channels for information-sharing in
any society and that what is reported affects ones choices and disposition
use before, during and after reading strategies
critique dance performances
know appropriate listening and speaking behaviours for a variety of contexts
demonstrate an understanding of the properties of solids and plane shapes
solve problems involving solids and plane shapes
demonstrate an understanding of area of regular and irregular plane shapes
demonstrate an understanding of the right to privacy and what it entails
demonstrate deepening understanding of respect for self and others
demonstrate understanding of the ways in which the media can be used with
due consideration for others
demonstrate an understanding of behaviours displayed by good citizens
share agricultural technologies with others to achieve food security
maintain healthy lifestyles through physical activities, healthy diet and
personal hygiene
demonstrate competence in gaining messages as an independent consumer
of media texts
sing nation building songs and songs from other Caribbean islands.
Learning 1. Media and Choices
Plans: 2. Shaping The Way Through Media
3. Showcasing Media

67
Resources: Learning Plan 1: three advertisements from newspapers, magazines or
flyers, audio advertisement, video advertisement, guided questions for print,
audio and video advertisements, white board, markers, paper, pen, CD
player, laptop, projector, speakers, CD / DVD, one story that is covered by
print, audio and video media, DVD player, graphic organiser, bristol board,
glue, narrative-descriptive stories, word cards, ruler, story wall appropriate
grade level stories.

Learning Plan 2: computer, shapes creation programme, multimedia


projector, concrete models of 3D and 2D Media house/car (or any other
appropriate objects), concrete models of 3D shapes: (cube, cuboid, cylinder,
cone, sphere and pyramid), hangers or pieces of wire, Bristol board,
markers, pieces of string, radio, a phone (cell or otherwise), camera, plain
paper, pencils, straws, string, long strips of paper, sheets of
newspaper/magazine pages, rulers, scissors, adhesive tape, journals, pens,
sheets of grid paper, geo board, foil paper, gift paper, kite paper, buttons,
glue, paints, paint brushes, crayons, colour pencils.

Learning Plan 3: Radio, CD, speakers, Laptop, voice clips, worksheet,


pictures, crayons, coloured pencils, paper, pen, pencils, Soca warriors
training video Search words on You Tube Soca Warriors Training
Session @ FIU Clip 1, head phone, microphones, lyrics to the songs
selected.

Assessments:
List at least two ways in which advertisements can influence a persons
choice.
Teacher Observation
Student Observation
Rubrics
Presentations
Worksheets
Collaborative activities

68
UNIT THREE: BEING A RESPONSIBLE AND SKILLFUL DIGITAL LEARNER
Learning Plan: 1 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Media and Choices
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Advertisements, news and stories are everywhere and can be
represented by all the various forms of media. They convey very HFLE:
important messages and provide information to the public. They have
the power to influence peoples choices and decisions. Effective
Outcomes: Communication
At the end of this learning experience students will: Decision Making
identify key words when scanning texts to establish relevance
understand that texts have purposes and are written for Literacy
audiences Reading
state two ways in which advertisements can influence a Writing
persons choice Oral Communication
determine/judge impact of created media re purpose Media & Information
analyse the coverage of one story reported across different Literacy
media
describe in two or three sentences how advances in Numeracy
technology impact on social interactions Problem Solving
Critical thinking
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning middle
Communication
and end plot structure, character development, setting,
Representation
sensory descriptive words and the simile, simple metaphor and
Reasoning
personification devices
write narrative descriptive stories applying the stages in the ICT Skills
writing process:
Differentiated
o pre-writing skills
Instruction
o drafting skills
o revising skills
o editing skills Assessment for
o publishing skills learning
use the media to become and stay an informed citizen.
Activities:

Advertisements (Print, Audio, Visual)


1. Students view at least three print advertisements from
newspaper, magazine, flyer, bill board.
2. Students respond to guided questions by the teacher to
identify key words from the advertisements e.g. sale, half

69
price, buy one get one free. (See appendix 1)
3. Students identify the elements of the advertisement that
appealed to their senses (colour, size, fonts, and graphics).
4. Students give their opinion on the relevance, purpose and
audience for which the advertisement is targeting.
5. They discuss how advertisements influence behaviour and
choices.

NB: Repeat the steps for the other two forms audio and visual
making adjustments where necessary.

Analysing story coverage


6. Students are provided with one story that is reported via
various forms of media (newspaper, radio and television or
internet).
7. Students are instructed to read, listen to and view the story,
then complete a graphic organiser about the effect / impact of
the same story presented in the different forms. (See
appendix 2).
8. Guided questions are used to elicit from students other forms
of media in which information can be obtained (Facebook,
twitter, BBM, WhatsApp).
9. Students work in groups to create picture charts highlighting
at least three modern technological systems that can be used
to communicate (social media icons).
10. Students explain how advances in technology impact on
social interactions using one of the systems from the chart
they created.
11. They write at least three sentences about the impact of
advances in technology on social interactions.

Narrative-descriptive stories
12. A narrative-descriptive story from print media is presented as
a think aloud by the teacher, (for example the teacher reads
the printed text and pauses along the way and thinks out loud
and discusses the characters, setting, vocabulary and literary
devices used in the story.
13. Students use a graphic organiser to identify the characters,
settings, events, problems and solutions from the story that
was read by the teacher. (See appendix 3 for guided
questions).
14. Students extract new words from the story and create word
cards with the meaning of the word at the back of the card.
15. The use and examples of literary devices such as simile,
simple metaphor and personification is explained by the
teacher. Students explore other texts and complete a table

70
identifying at least two similes, metaphors and personification.
16. The beginning, middle and end of the story are explained by
the teacher. Students use other stories to point out the plot
structure.
17. Students read a story that has a moral or a tragic ending and
discuss what happens to the character(s) in the story.
18. They provide an alternative ending to the story indicating what
they would have done about the issue or situation.
19. Students brainstorm ideas based on the story, using a
semantic map (a new or familiar story can be used). They are
reminded to include elements of the story setting, character,
plot, conflict, resolution.
20. Students use the semantic map as a guide to create a first
draft of their stories applying the stages in the writing process.
21. Review of students first drafts is done by peers in the class.
These are shared by peers and suggestions are given to
improve each draft.
22. The second draft of the stories is reviewed by the teacher and
any additional editorial changes are made.
23. Students write their final drafts after no more editorial changes
are required.
24. Students publish and display their narrative descriptive stories
on a story wall.
Resources:
Stationery: white board, markers, paper, pen, bristol board,
glue, ruler
ICTs: CD player, DVD player, laptop, projector, speakers, CD /
DVD
Others: three advertisements from newspapers, magazines or
flyers, audio advertisement, video advertisement, guided
questions, one story that is covered by print, audio and video
media, graphic organiser, pictures, narrative-descriptive story,
word cards, semantic maps, story wall.
Literature: appropriate grade level stories

Assessment:
List at least two ways in which advertisements can influence a
persons choice.
Teacher observation of students completing graphic
organisers, creating charts and presenting.
Teacher observation of the writing process.

71
ASSESSMENT

COMPLETE THE WORKSHEET FEATURES OF A DANCE

Write at least two sentences in the space provided after viewing the dance performances

Number of dancers

Type of space

Costuming

Lighting

Accompaniment

Impact of performance

72
UNIT THREE: BEING A RESPONSIBLE AND SKILLFUL DIGITAL LEARNER
Learning Plan: 2 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Shaping the Way Through Media
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Shapes in their various forms and sizes play an integral part in
media and information development and delivery. For example, in HFLE:
order to use the space on a newspaper or magazine page
effectively and skilfully there must be at least a basic Understanding
understanding of shape properties and area. It is therefore Consequences
important that students develop an appreciation of how the Creative Thinking
properties of shape apply to everyday life.
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Reading
use high-frequency and content-specific words to create and Writing
express meaning Oral
draw faces of solids and describe their properties (e.g. shape Communication
of faces, number of faces, parallel and perpendicular lines, Literary
angles right, non-right and equal, number of sides) Appreciation
construct and draw plane shapes given a description of its Media &
properties and using appropriate resources including computer Information Literacy
software
solve problems involving solids and plane shapes Numeracy
follow and provide relatively complex directions and Problem Solving
instructions Critical thinking
calculate the areas of compound shapes that may be Communication
dissected into rectangles and squares Representation
Reasoning
draw different shapes of a given area on grids
estimate and verify the area of shapes using square meters
ICT Skills
and centimeters, and determine reasonableness of answer
solve problems involving area Differentiated
recognize that each person has a right to privacy Instruction
discuss ways in which consideration can be shown for others
while using the media Assessment for
describe ways in which they can demonstrate consideration for learning
others while using the media.
Activities:

Shape Separation
1. Students are shown both a three-dimensional (3D) and a two-
dimensional (2D) model of a Media house/car (or any other
appropriate objects) via a computer with multimedia projector
where the images can be rotated and each shape extracted.
Alternatively, concrete models could be used.
2. Responses are elicited from students about which model i.e.
73
3D or 2D they prefer and why.
3. Students then extract and identify the 3D and/or 2D shapes
which make up the Media House/Car. The names are
supplied if the students are not familiar with the shapes.
4. Students in groups create word cards with the names of the
shapes. They can display these word cards by creating a
mobile for each group.

A Closer Look
5. As a whole class via computer with multimedia projector,
students now observe and discuss the properties of the 3D
shapes (cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone, sphere and pyramid)
one at a time. Properties include: (shape of faces, number of
faces, parallel and perpendicular lines, angles: right, non-
right and equal, number of sides). Alternatively, students could
be placed in groups where concrete models might be used.
6. Through questioning students make the connection of these
shapes to items used in Media e.g. a radio, a phone (cell or
otherwise), camera can be cuboids or cubes. These examples
of items are passed around for students to examine.
7. Students draw the shapes and number of faces of these solids
in No.5 paying attention to parallel and perpendicular lines,
angles: right, non-right and equal, number of sides.
8. Each group then creates a table showing each solid and its
properties or number of properties. Bristol Board or paper is
provided.

Name That Shape


9. The class may then be taken outside where they are divided
into groups. Each group is given a secret box with pictures
or models of items used in media. One child from each group
describes the properties of a plane shape while the others
draw it or construct it using materials like strips of paper,
straws, string, the geo board with rubber bands etc. They
take turns doing this.
10. In their journal students write at least three properties of two
2D and two 3D shapes that were learnt using appropriate
vocabulary.

Shaping The Area

11. In groups students are given sheets of newspaper/magazine


pages. They then measure and cut out many rectangles and
squares from these sheets or pages. Guidance is given as to
what size lengths and widths to use. Alternatively, pre-cut
shapes of rectangles and squares could be provided to

74
students.
12. They then put together the cut out rectangles and squares
to create compound shapes. Students can also use
geo boards to create compound shapes using rectangles and
squares. Students then calculate the area of these compound
shapes.

Creative Designs

13. Students draw compound shapes on grid paper and calculate


the areas. Conversely, the areas of compound shapes are
given and students draw these shapes on grid paper.
14. Students then design a future mobile phone using 2D and 3D
Shapes, bearing in mind the properties of the various solids
done and their areas.
15. Students role play scenarios demonstrating the use of their
future mobile phone creations. E.g. Making a phone call,
sending a text, taking pictures, etc. Using these scenarios
they discuss what consequences could arise and how respect
can be shown for others while using this medium and other
types.
Resources:
Stationery: Bristol board, plain paper, journals, pencils,
rulers, markers, colour pencils, adhesive tape, glue
Art Supplies: paint, colour pencils, crayons, paint brushes,
string, scissors
ICTs: computer, multimedia projector, shapes creation
computer programme, radio, cell phone, camera
Others: concrete models of 3D and 2D Media house/car (or
any other appropriate objects), concrete models of 3D shapes
(cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone, sphere and pyramid),
hangers/pieces of wire, string, straws, newspapers/magazines,
grid paper, foil/gift/kite paper, buttons
Assessment:
Teacher observation
Rubrics for Mathematics (See appendix 1)
Word Card Mobile Creations (See appendix 2)
Construction and drawing of plane shapes, solid shapes and
faces of solid shapes
Table showing each solid and its properties
Journal writing of properties of 2D and 3D Shapes
Compound shapes drawn on grid paper

75
UNIT THREE: BEING A RESPONSIBLE AND SKILLFUL DIGITAL LEARNER
Learning Plan: 3 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 2 days Topic: Showcasing Media
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
In unit two, through the use of media, students were exposed to Food
Security and they have knowledge of Personal Hygiene. These are HFLE:
two separate issues that impact on the health and wellbeing of citizens Effective Communication
in our country. Using ICT skills and various forms of media, the Cooperation
knowledge and information obtained concerning these issues can be
presented in a responsible and skilful style. Literacy
Reading
Outcomes: Writing
At the end of this learning experience students will: Oral Communication
encourage others to use technologies in agriculture to achieve Media & Information
food security Literacy
explain personal hygiene
Numeracy
sing nation building songs and songs from other Caribbean Problem Solving
islands with correct breathing appropriate expression and >80% Critical thinking
pitch accuracy, both independently and in groups Communication
explain the purpose of selected media texts (a television show, Representation
Reasoning
advertisement, radio broadcast, poem any other audio
selections) ICT Skills
express personal thoughts and feelings about some simple
media works (e.g., state whether they like or dislike a character Differentiated
in a cartoon, song, or movie; draw a picture of the character in a Instruction
song)
recognize that different media forms use particular language Assessment for
styles and techniques in their construction. learning
Activities:

Agricultural technology and Food Security


1. Listen to a broadcast on food security and use prior knowledge
to complete a worksheet, to recap a definition of food security.
2. List at least three ways in which a country can ensure it
achieves food security from listening to the voice clip.
3. Discuss the responses written on their worksheets and decide
on the best responses in groups.
4. Elect a presenter from each group to present the information to
the class.
5. Create using visual media e.g. photo story, power point
presentation, poster or podcast, a presentation about agricultural
technology and food security in groups. The product should
have pictures / graphics, a poem or lyrics to a song (jingle) and a

76
character. It should provide information on agricultural
technologies to achieve food security.
6. Work collaboratively to collect materials and follow the criteria
listed above to create their product through the use of any form
of visual media.
7. Present the product that was created.
8. Justify the use of the selected media.
9. Peer critique the presentation by the other students in the class
explaining their thoughts and feelings about the character, the
song or the poem.

Personal Hygiene
10. View a video of Soca Warriors training for a match.
11. Discuss what personal hygiene should be practiced before,
during and after the session.
12. Prepare a script for an interview that would be broadcast on the
radio about personal hygiene in groups. The interview will be
conducted by two radio announcers and the panel will have at
least three athletes.
13. Simulate the radio interview using props to highlight personal
hygiene practices before, during and after physical activities.
14. Justify the use of the selected media.
15. Peer critique the interview by the other students in the class
explaining their thoughts and feelings about the characters.

Lets sing

Prior planning by the teacher:


Select one song- one local nation building song or one that deals with
personal hygiene or one from another Caribbean island. Ensure
students have a copy of the lyrics and can read it.

16. Sing the song that was selected with correct breathing,
appropriate expression and >80% pitch accuracy, both
independently and in groups.

NOTE: Refer to VAPA Music standalone lesson on the format for


teaching a song.

Final cut
17. Discuss language styles and techniques used in the different
media forms to construct advertisements and convey information
to influence audiences.
Resources:
Stationery: crayons, coloured pencils, paper, pen, pencils
ICTs: radio, CD, speakers, laptop, voice clips Search words

77
You Tube food security, portfolio with pictures / drawings from
Learning Plan 5 (Agri Tech) Unit 2, soca warriors training video
Search words on You Tube Soca Warriors Training Session
@ FIU Clip 1, head phone, microphones
Others: worksheet, pictures, lyrics to the songs selected
Assessment:
Teacher observation of completed work
Presentations

78
LEARNING UNIT 1: Nature of Change

Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change Estimated frame: 8 days

Context: Change is Change is ever occurring in our personal lives and in our
surroundings. It is reflected in our physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual,
interpersonal and intrapersonal development. The rhythms of change can
also be seen in the natural environment as well. It is important that students
be aware of the various changes in order to understand their world.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

Become aware of body changes and how to manage it in a healthy


manner.
Recommend ways to deal with change
Explain personal hygiene.
Identify the benefits resulting from participation in different forms of
physical activities.
Know that specific attire is required for physical education classes.
Know appropriate listening and speaking behaviours for a variety of
contexts.
Select words which express deeper meaning in speaking, reading and
writing
Know that a message should be analyzed before its acceptance
Understand the changes that take place in animals as they mature.
Reflect on adjustment to change
Investigate the growth, development of one class of farm animals
Understand that linear measures and measures of mass/weight can
be quantified using standard units and their sub-parts.
Apply measurement techniques to quantify measures for length and
mass/weight.
Solve problems involving linear measure
Understand that volume can be quantified
Demonstrate an understanding of decimals up to hundredths
Develop an understanding of different types of numbers by exploring
their patterns.
Investigate the growth, development of plants
Understand the changes that take place in plants as they mature.

79
Understand that change is unavoidable
Know skills of oral expression applicable to level
Know how to use pre-listening, during-listening and post-listening
listening strategies.
Describe, in Spanish, major changes taking place in the world using
the structure hay ms (there is more)
State the usefulness of foreign language learning
Recognize the importance of world languages
Identify Hispanic foods that can be found in Trinidad and Tobago
Recognise Creole patterns in their writing and in oral language to code
switch to Standard English patterns
Compose and document short pieces of music
Analyze selected aural musical excerpts to identify the form.
Identify the benefits resulting from participation in different forms of
physical activities.
Recognise the role of games and sport in getting to know and
understand others of like and different cultures

Learning 1. Changes in the Individual


Plans: 2. Changes in Animals
3. Changes in Plants
4. Cultural Changes
5. Changes in Our Melting pot
Resources: Learning Plan 1 - Height Limit scenario, stationery materials, bristol board,
Measuring tape, clear tape, Art/craft materials, Multimedia unit with internet
access, PowerPoint Presentation, reading material

Learning Plan 2 - boxes; computer; projector; video- Growth and change in


Animals; cage with litter etc. for rearing of animal, CAC Booklet;
advertisements, blank letter-sized paper, descriptive language sheet, sheet
with blanks, synonym sheet

Learning Plan 3 poem, soaked legumes, hand lens, plastic cups, tissue
paper or cotton, drawing paper, ruler, digital cameras or webcams,
computers, projector, Prediction/Record sheets, Guidelines on investigating
changes in life cycle of seed-bearing plants

Learning Plan 4 Flashcards, PowerPoint presentation, Reading material,


Multimedia - internet; microphone, CD with songs, Melodic instruments,
Stationery supplies, Props for final production, Additional Reference Material
- Cote ci Cote la The Trinidad and Tobago Dictionary by John Mendes
(2003)

Learning Plan 5 - Stationery: notebook, pencils, chart paper, markers, cue

80
cards; computer with internet, pictures; graphic organizers

Assessments: Assessment activities built within the PowerPoint presentation, Fill the blanks,
Sentence completion
Students completed work, Oral Discussion, Presentations
Oral questioning, Checklist, Prediction/Record sheet
Group collaboration, Performance assessment
Participation checklist, Oral Presentation, Observation of Charts, Observation
of written clues, Jeopardy Game

81
UNIT ONE: NATURE OF CHANGE
Learning Plan: 1 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Changes in the Individual
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

This learning activity focuses on the physical changes that occur within HFLE:
the individual as he/she grows. It is necessary for students to
understand that as they grow and develop, they undergo many Managing Feelings
emotional adjustments about how they think about themselves, their
sense of belonging both at home and at school, in addition to their roles Self-Management
and responsibilities which change as they mature. It is important for Literacy
teachers to be sensitive to the nature of the content regarding puberty
as they discuss changes in the body with students. One of the Reading
measurement activities is done at the beginning of term 2 and repeated
Writing
at the end of the school year.
Oral
Outcomes:
Communication
At the end of this learning activity students will be able to:
Literary
list physical changes that take place in the body as it matures Appreciation
explain ways of taking good care of the body during puberty for
each of the following: hygiene, diet, exercise Media &
explain ways in which the body uses water and the importance of Information Literacy
food for physical activities
understand reasons for wearing appropriate attire for physical Numeracy
activities
Problem Solving
differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate attire for
physical activities Critical thinking
recognise the role of games and sport in getting to know others of
like and different cultures Communication
understand that change is unavoidable
demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between standard Representation
units and their sub-parts to solve practical problems involving linear
measure. Reasoning
demonstrate appropriate techniques when measuring
solve problems involving linear measure
Solve problems involving volume. ICT Skills
utilize appropriate listening and speaking behaviours for a variety of
contexts
Differentiated
develop a more sophisticated vocabulary by extending basic word

82
knowledge across content areas Instruction
ask pertinent questions pertaining to the a given message
highlight important points relevant to a given topic Assessment for
learning
Activities:

Exploring physical changes in the individual


1. Students bring in pictures of themselves from the different stages of
growth throughout the years. (Students who do not have photos
may draw pictures representing themselves at different life stages)
Pictures are placed in a timeline sequence on a My Life wall to
depict stages of growth and development. They participate in a
discussion based on changes that happened to them from the time
they entered first year to their present class. Students list these
changes on word cards and place on board. Some examples
include: height; weight; facial hair; voice changes.

2. Students are introduced to the term puberty. They work in groups


to research the meaning of the word, using dictionaries, or other
teacher approved sources. They use the examples from the word
cards as well, to create definitions of the term puberty and present
their definitions to the class.

Importance of food and water for physical activities


3. The idea is shared that eating healthy is important for people of all
ages.
4. Students look at photos of people involved in physical activities.
They relate what happens to their bodies when they exercise or
participate in any physical activity(accepted answers include sweat
or perspiration, increased heart rate, increased thirst, feelings of
exhaustion/relief/satisfaction/joy that are experienced at the end of
physical activities).
5. They discuss the reasons why food and water are important for
different physical activities.
6. Students research the types of food that provide us with energy for
physical activities and give examples.
7. Students choose a sporting area and research the nutrition involved
in an athletes diet during training. They compare research to
determine whether athletes who participate in different sports, eat
the same type of food.
8. Students view the PPT on water intake. They respond to questions
by the teacher based on terms such as dehydration, hydration and
perspiration. They conduct a survey of students in the classroom to
find out how many bottles of water are drunk by students per
day/week. They calculate the volume of bottled water drunk by

83
students per day.

Physical activities- appearance and clothing


9. They discuss the clothing worn by persons (shown in the pictures
provided), who are participating in physical activities. They identify
the clothing that is appropriate for physical activities and give
reasons for their choices. Some suggestions include: clothing that
allows you to move easily/ allows freedom of movement; should be
loose (but not baggy), comfortable and soft.
10. Students provide examples of clothing that is inappropriate for
physical activities. They give examples that are opposite to
appropriate clothing. They build a list on a T-Chart as shown below.

CLOTHING FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES


APPROPRIATE CLOTHING INAPPROPRIATE CLOTHING
Loose, comfortable, soft Tight-fitting, low cut, cropped or
clothes: halter tops, jeans, dress shirts,
t-shirts, track pants, jogging dresses, long skirts
pants, track shorts flip flops (slippers), dress shoes,
Comfortable shoes that cushion high heels
and support your feet: sneakers

Hygiene Practices
11. Students look at photos of people who participated in physical
activities and make observations about their appearance. They
relate what happens to their bodies when they exercise or
participate in any physical activity. Students discuss hygiene
practices that they follow such as using a rag, soap, deodorant,
washing hands and face and taking baths. They list other hygiene
practices that are done as they go through puberty, such as
grooming habits regarding hair growth and body odour. They
discuss the consequences of not following hygiene practices
especially after any physical activity.

Measurement Activity
12. On the My Life wall, a chart based on measurement of body parts is
displayed for students to complete. Students are informed that at
the end of the school year, they will be measured again. Students
use measuring tape to measure lengths of various body parts (using
standard units and sub units), such as their hand spans, waist
measurements, head spans. (Students will determine whether all
body parts continue to grow as they get older.)

13. Students read the following scenario:

84
At a play park, there are two popular rides for students to enjoy.
However, in order to gain access to the rides, there is a height
requirement for both rides. Each student must determine for which
ride he/she is eligible.

Students use rulers/measuring tape to perform measurement of


their heights in order to know which ride they can access.
They tally the number of students in the class who are able to
access each ride. They create a T-Chart to record their heights,
approximating the decimal value and make observations based on
their measurements. They convert measures found in metres into
centimetres.

Survey
14. Students view the PPT on water intake. They respond to questions
by the teacher based on terms such as dehydration, hydration and
perspiration. They conduct a survey of students in the classroom to
find out how many bottles of water are drunk by students per
day/week. They calculate the volume of bottled water drunk by
students per day. They add to find the total capacity in millilitres, of
all of the bottles drunk in one day, They convert the total millilitres
into litres by using the formula: 1000ml = 1 Litre.
They tabulate the volume of bottled water (in litres), drunk by
students in five days/a school week.

Material on Puberty
15. Students read material provided by the teacher based on puberty.
Some of these include the physical changes as well as emotional
changes. They discuss how they feel about their bodies, the need
for privacy, the need to be accepted by their peers, and their roles
in their homes based on new responsibilities as they get older. They
compare the similarities and differences of their roles and
responsibilities in their families and how they feel about having new
responsibilities as they get older.
Model Mobile Activity
16. Students create a mobile using a string and hanger. They use
art/craft materials to create 3D models based on their interests,
hobbies or needs, from when they were babies to their present
year. For example, students could create models of baby bottles,
book bags, books, computers, IPads, cell phones, sport items, the
solar system These models are made with boxes, paper, Bristol
board and other items. Students use string on which to tie their
models, to create their model mobiles.
Resources:

Height Limit scenario

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Stationery materials including Bristol board, Measuring tape,
clear tape
Art/craft materials
Multimedia with internet access
PowerPoint presentation Water Intake
Reading material - Puberty
Search words - emotional changes during puberty

Assessment:
1. Assessment activities within the PowerPoint presentation
2. For each of the following: hygiene, diet, exercise, explain two
ways of taking good care of the body during puberty
3. List five physical changes that take place in the body as it
matures.

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PUBERTY

Puberty occurs in both boys and girls. It usually occurs between the

ages of 8-14 in girls and ages 9-15 in boys. It is a time when their bodies

begin to change as their bodies grow and develop. As they grow, two sets of

physical changes occur.

The primary physical changes happen to the reproductive organs of the

body by special hormones in both boys and girls. For boys, the hormone is

called testosterone, and for girls, the hormone is called oestrogen. These

hormones work on different parts of the body in a girl and in a boy and are

responsible for growth and development of their reproductive organs. Girls

may also experience their monthly cycle or period, which is a natural way of

their bodies preparing for reproduction later on. This type of change takes

a girl some getting used to, as her body shape has to adjust for the future

growth and development of a baby.

The secondary physical changes are the visible changes that happen to

the body. Some of these changes include: facial changes in which their bones

become more defined; hair growth under arms, in their private parts (pubic

areas) and on their faces. Most often, there is a growth spurt in both boys

and girls, where there is an increase in their height, arms, legs, and even

feet! Additionally, some girls gain more fat on their hips and in their

breasts, which makes

87
them look curvier. In boys, their shoulders grow wider, their bodies become

more muscular and their voices change.

Some problems could happen in boys and girls as well as they go

through puberty. The most common problem is the appearance of acne or

pimples. Another concern is the increase in perspiration or sweat that

causes unpleasant body odours, especially under their arms. This can be

controlled or monitored with proper hygiene practices, including taking a

shower more than once a day and using deodorants.

With all of the changes that is occurring to their bodies, both boys and

girls begin to feel differently too. Not all of them grow and develop at the

same rate. Some feel quite happy and proud of their developing bodies.

Others feel anxious and unsure about how to come to terms with their

changing bodies. They might feel embarrassed, overly sensitive, shy, upset,

and angry or offended by remarks made to them about their bodies. There

is also a change in how they relate to their friends. Almost every boy and

girl wants to be liked and accepted by their friends, but sometimes this does

not always happen.

88
HEIGHT LIMIT SCENARIO

At a play park, there are two popular rides for students to


enjoy. However, in order to gain access to the rides, there is a
height requirement for both rides. Each student must
determine for which ride he/she is eligible.

89
UNIT ONE: NATURE OF CHANGE
Learning Plan: 2 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 Days Topic: Changes in Animals
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Changes occur in animals as they grow and mature. These changes
are observable as the animals mature. HFLE:
Outcomes: Self-Management
At the end of this learning experience students will: Managing Feelings
represent the dimensions of animals using metric units
explain that as some animals mature, their parts grow in height, Literacy
mass and girth Reading
Writing
differentiate between adults and their young
Oral
describe ways in which to cope with change
Communication
demonstrate the meaning of figurative language in narratives
Literary
consider the influence of perspective, motivation and medium of
Appreciation
a message on its meaning (advertisement)
Media &
demonstrate an understanding of standard units and their sub- Information Literacy
parts to solve practical problems involving linear measure and
mass/weight
Numeracy
estimate and compare the height, mass and girth of the baby
Problem Solving
animal with that of the adult
Critical thinking
demonstrate appropriate techniques when measuring length
Communication
and mass/weight
Representation
Reasoning

Activities ICT Skills


Observing growth in animals
1. Short (time lapse) videos are presented by the teacher Differentiated
depicting growth and development in an animal. Photos may Instruction
also be used.
2. Students engage in a discussion about the presented videos Assessment for
(or photos) and share their opinions and /or points-of-view learning
based on what they observed about the changes that
occurred in the growth and development of the animals and
plants.
3. Students estimate and compare the height, mass and girth of
the young with that of the adult (worksheet should include an
estimation and exact measurement).
4. Students engage in a discussion on the stages in growth of
domestic animals (e.g. dogs, cats, fishes, parrots, etc) based
on their recorded data and observations.
5. Groups make presentations (e.g. small book, PowerPoint,
drawings and/or written reports), based on their recorded

90
data of the growth and development of the selected animal.

Solving Problems
6. Using the data collected, from activity 2 on length, height and
weight of the animals, students will solve simple problems on
standard units. (See worksheet).

Bunny for Sale


7. The poster Rabbit Rescue is introduced by the teacher who
instructs students to silently observe the pictures, the
phrases and the words.
8. Students are then asked to read the words, phrases and
state what the pictures depict. They are then given a sheet of
letter sized paper and are instructed to write one phrase or
word and what meaning that phrase or word conveys to
them. The same instruction is repeated for the pictures if they
chose to write about the pictures. Students are allotted 3
minutes to complete this task.
9. Students are then asked to share what messages the
pictures, the words and the phrases conveyed to them.
10. Their responses are recorded on the chalk/whiteboard.
11. Students then engage in a class discussion about the
message being conveyed by the poster, examining the font-
type, size and the number of words used. They respond to
questions posed by the teacher:
a) What parts of speech do these words belong to?
b) Is the writing or words simple and easy to understand?
c) Is the message clear and to the point?
d) Did the writer of the advertisement use figurative language?
e) Why would the writer use such language?
12. The process is repeated using another advertisement from
newspaper or other electronic media.

Using Figurative Language

NB. This activity could be repeated at different points in the term,


highlighting different figures of speech.
13. Students are asked to consider the following group of
sentences:
Group 1:
My dog Rufus was very light when he was a puppy. Now he is
very heavy.

Group 2:
When my dog, Rufus was a puppy, he was as light as a bag
full of clouds. Now, when he jumps on me he feels like a

91
truck load of bricks.
14. Students are asked which sentences are more interesting
and why.
15. The difference between literal and figurative language is
established. (Literal language gives the facts as they are as
in the first group of sentences. Figurative language often
asks the reader to use their imagination and make
comparisons. It is more dramatic and is used in stories and
poems to make them more interesting to read.)
16. A poem about an animal is read to students. Copies may be
distributed. It can be printed on poster size paper, or
projected on the wall so that students can read along. The
poem should be narrative in nature and contain at least
similes and metaphors. Some suggested poems: The
Walrus and the Carpenter by Lewis Carroll, So Small by
Joan Poulson, Walking With My Iguana by Brian Moses)
17. Students discuss the characters, setting and plot of the story
in the poem (a simple graphic organiser may be used.)
18. Students identify the figures of speech in the stories, try to
explain what they mean and share whether or not they find it
interesting and why. (The class may be divided into groups,
each group responsible for spotting a specific figure of
speech, explaining it and commenting on whether or not it is
interesting).
19. Students are asked to write a paragraph or a poem using at
least one figure of speech.

Resources:
Stationery: Rabbit Rescue advertisement, advertisement/s of teachers
choice from another source, blank letter-sized paper, class set of a
poem about an animal using figurative language.

ICT - computer; projector; Search Words- time lapse video of animals


and plants growing; watch baby bunnies grow up; life cycle chicken,
poetry websites e.g. www.poets.org, www.poetryarchive.org or search
words poems about animals

Assessment:

Students completed work


Peer assessment using rubrics
Oral Discussion
Presentations
Graphic organisers-Finding Synonyms

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Name :
PROBLEM SOLVING WORKSHEET
1. Which is a better unit of measure for the weight/mass of an adult
rabbit?
o Kilogram
o Gram

2. Which is the better unit of measure for the length of a


chicks beak?
o Millimetres
o Centimetres

3. Which is longer, 10 cm. or 10 mm?


o 10 cm.
o 10 mm.
o They are the same

4. Convert from mm to cm and mm


78mm = ____ cm. ____ mm.

5. The length of a cage is 1.5 metres. Will 4 cages be longer


than 5 metres?
o Yes
o No

6. What will be the length of the 4 cages?

Answer: _________________________

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7. In 1 hop a rabbit can jump 2 metres.

How many metres will the rabbit jump in 8 hops?

Answer: _____________________________
metres

8. Two baby birds can use 250 ml of water in 1 day.


How much water will the baby birds use in 5 days? Write your answer in
litres and millilitres.

Answer: _________ litres __________ millilitres

9. A farmer feeds his pigs 50kg 25g of vegetables in 1 week. What is the
total weight of vegetables eaten in 6 weeks? Write your answer in kg
and g.

Answer: ________kg. ________g.

10. Which is heavier a kitten or a pony?

Answer: ______________________

94
UNIT ONE: The Nature of Change
Learning Plan: 3 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: The World of Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Changes in Plants
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

We live in an ever-changing world as is evident in both the living HFLE:


Decision Making
and non-living components of our environment. Plants, like other Critical Thinking
forms of living things, also change as they grow and develop.
Knowledge about the different stages in the life of a plant and an Literacy
understanding of the changes that take place are essential, if we Reading
Writing
are to better understand our changing world. Oral Communication
The activity involving the investigation of the growing of the seed Literary Appreciation
will span a period of 42 days and measurement and recordings Media & Information
Literacy
will be made during this time frame. (See Consideration note
below) Numeracy
Problem Solving
Critical thinking
Outcomes: Communication
Representation
Reasoning
At the end of this learning experience students will:
know how to employ taught strategies to assist in making ICT Skills
meaning for pre-listening, during-listening and post-
Differentiated
listening Instruction
describe ways in which to cope with change
investigate the growth and development of plants Assessment for
sequence the steps in growing plants from the germination learning
of a seed
explain that as plants mature, their parts grow in size:
height.
demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between
standard units and their sub-parts to solve practical
problems involving linear measure
demonstrate appropriate techniques when measuring
develop a more sophisticated vocabulary by extending
basic work knowledge across content areas.

Activities:
Listening to a Poem Life of a Plant
1. Pre-listening- The students are asked by the teacher What
does a plant grow from? Students record their answer and
list the parts of a plant and where these parts are located.

95
Students exchange their written answers with a
student.(e.g. leaves are found on branches, roots are
underground)
2. Listening - They are told that they will listen to a poem on
the life of a plant, entitled Life of a Plant by Risa Jordan.
The poem is read by the teacher. They are instructed that
when they hear of part of the plant (e.g. roots, stems,
branches) if it was written in their peers note, they must
draw a circle around the words or phrases. The students
listen to the poem as it is read by the teacher.
3. Post-listening - The notes are returned to the students.
Each student checks to find out if what was written on the
note was stated in the poem. Students share with the class
their answers.

Investigation of structure of a seed


4. Using soaked peas or beans and hand lens, students recall
and identify the three main parts of a seed (seed coat,
baby plant, cotyledon/s). Students draw the cross sections
of the seed complete with appropriate labels and titles.

Investigation of the Process of Germination and Seedling


Growth
5. Prediction - Students are provided with seeds from plants
with relatively short lifecycles (such as bodi, string bean
e.g. contender bean).In their small groups, students predict
how the baby plant will grow out of the seed (germinate)
and continue to develop into a mature plant capable of
reproduction. They also make predictions on the growth of
a seedling that is not given the same care e.g. less water,
deliberately not cared for.
6. Students will represent each stage by drawing and include
brief but accurate captions / statements (descriptions) of
the changes predicted (height measured and recorded in
cm and m for the entire time period) in the Prediction
Sheet.
7. A teacher made rubric will be used to assess the
measurement technique used by the students.
8. Each group plans and investigates to either confirm or
disprove their predictions on seedling that is cared for and
the seedling that is neglected. Observations are made at
key stages in the life of the plant (Days 3, 5, 7, 11, 19, 27,
35 and 42).
9. Students select their own materials and orally give a brief
overview of their methods including data to be collected
(e.g. height of seedlings and method of recording and

96
communication. Students use the Guideline Sheet.
10. Entries are made in the Record Sheet on the given days
noting physical changes recorded in drawing, numeric
notation and in point form.
11. If available, digital images can be captured at each stage,
down-loaded and file-saved. These can then be used to
create slideshow presentations illustrating changes during
the stages of the lifecycle of a plant and can be used to
further help in orally communicating the changes.
12. Small group presentations are made at each stage,
presenting the data on plants growing and maturing
collected in a sequential order with an emphasis on the
changes that took place in various stages from germination
to day 42.

Coping with Change

13. The teacher shows pictures of two plants, one is thriving


and is healthy while the other not healthy. They are asked
to make inference based on the pictures to explain the
reasons why both plants are in their current states.
14. The teacher asks what could have been done to prevent
the wilted plant from being in that state. Teacher draws
similarities between taking of themselves and taking care
of plants. Teacher explains that as individuals we need to
change and be more responsible as how we behave can
result in negative consequences.

My life as a plant
15. Students are asked to pretend that they a plant for 2 days.
They will write about their lives in their journal, talking
about what they experienced in the two days. Scenario - in
the first day, the plant is cared for by the caretaker while in
the second day no one waters it. (e.g. Today, I felt so alive.
My leaves are so green. Oh I love the way the water feels
on my feet (roots))

Consideration
Because of the hands on nature of the activity Investigation of
the process of germination and seedling growth this Learning
Plan must be stopped and resumed over a period of 6 weeks to
ensure that maximum opportunity for learning has occurred. The
subsequent Learning Units and Learning Plans are executed and
interrupted to complete this activity in the specified times (Days 3,
5, 7, 11, 19, 27, 35 and 42)

97
Resources:

Poem by the teacher


several different types of soaked legumes, bodi,string bean,
hand lens,
colourless plastic cups, tissue paper or cotton
drawing paper, ruler,
ICTs - digital cameras or webcams, computers with pre-
loaded MS Office suite (Word and PowerPoint), projector,
Prediction/Record sheets, Guidelines to outline group
strategy for investigating changes in life cycle of seed-bearing
plants,

Assessment:
Oral questioning
Drawing Checklist (appended)
Prediction/Record sheet (appended, to be enlarged on
(11 X 17 paper or created on chart paper or Bristol board))
Oral Presentation rubric (appended)
Use of measurement rubric to assess students performance
task

98
Standard 4 Term: II Learning Unit: The Nature of Change Learning Plan 1: Changes in
Plants
Prediction Sheet

Group number: __________ Type of Seed/Plant: _______________

Group Leader: ______________ _____

Group Members: ________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Predictions on the Plant that is Cared for:

Made on . (date of planting )

Day 3 Day 5 Day 7 Day 11 Day 35 Day 42


(flowering) (Fruiting)
Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing

Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes


anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated:
1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1.

2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2.

3. 3. 3. 3 3. 3.

4. 4.

99
Predictions on the Plant that is not Cared for:

Made on . (date of planting )

Day 3 Day 5 Day 7 Day 11 Day 35 Day 42


(flowering) (Fruiting)
Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing

Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes


anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated: anticipated:
1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1.

2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2.

3. 3. 3. 3 3. 3.

4. 4.

100
Record Sheet for the Plant that is Cared for

Day 3. Day 5. Day 7. Day 11. Day 35. Day 42


Date: Date: Date: Date: (Flowering) (Fruiting)
Date: Date:
Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing

Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes


observed: observed: observed: observed: observed: observed:
1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1.

2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2.

3. 3. 3. 3. 3. 3.

4. 4.

101
Record Sheet for the Plant that is not Cared for

Day 3. Day 5. Day 7. Day 11. Day 35. Day 42


Date: Date: Date: Date: (Flowering) (Fruiting)
Date: Date:
Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing Drawing

Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes Changes


observed: observed: observed: observed: observed: observed:
1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1.

2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2.

3. 3. 3. 3. 3. 3.

4. 4.

102
Standard 4 Term: II
Learning Unit: The Nature of Change Learning Plan 1: Changes in Plants

Guidelines Sheet

Group number: _________

Group Leader: ______________________________

Group Members: __________________________________________________

Guidelines for Outlining Groups Strategy for investigating changes that take place during the
life cycle of 2 plants

1. Type of Seed/Plant: ______________________

2. Materials needed:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

3. What we plan to do:

I. ____________________________________________________________

II. ____________________________________________________________

III. ____________________________________________________________

IV. ____________________________________________________________

V. ____________________________________________________________

VI. ____________________________________________________________

4. We would be observing __________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

5. We would record this by ___________________________________________

103
UNIT ONE: Nature of Change
Learning Plan: 4 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Changes in our Culture
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Our society is evolving every day, whether it is in our industry, HFLE:


creative arts, population growth or religion. As such, students must be Effective
able to cope with change. They should also be made aware that they Communication
can express how they feel about such changes in a creative way. Managing Stress
Prior to this lesson, students would have to conduct research based
on a music and math integrated activity (using the search words Literacy
provided in the resource section of this plan), which would assist Reading
them in their use of shapes to create rhythmic compositions. Writing
Oral
Outcomes: Communication
Literary
describe, in Spanish, major changes taking place in the world Appreciation
using the structure hay ms (there is more) Media & Information
state the usefulness of foreign language learning: society Literacy
changing, our cultural heritage, second language learning
recognize the importance of world languages Numeracy
reflect on adjustment to change Problem Solving
recognise the role of games and sport in getting to know Critical thinking
others of like and different cultures Communication
describe ways in which to cope with change Representation
identify the form (structure) of 8-10 musical excerpts as being Reasoning
call and response, verse and chorus or solo/chorus - look at a
calypso piece, folklore song ICT Skills
classify 8-10 selected pieces according to form (call and
response, verse and chorus, solo/chorus) Differentiated
Instruction
compose and perform short pieces of music on melodic
instruments using proper technique and tone
Assessment for
document composition using varied media
learning
extend or predict subsequent elements in patterns.
relate decimals and fractions
use code switching to change Creole patterns to Standard
English patterns
read in isolation, and in context, high-frequency words
appropriate to grade level
speak and perform for school audiences with appropriate
pronunciation and enunciation
speak with attention to standard English pronunciation
articulate emotional and intellectual responses to a variety of

104
aural stimuli
employ taught strategies to assist in making meaning
use appropriate verbal and non-verbal language features to
communicate effectively
use high-frequency and content-specific words to create and
express meaning.

Activities:

Exploring the Creole and Standard English languages:


a) Interviews
1. Students are put into groups and student interviews are
conducted and recorded by the class teacher.
2. The interviews are replayed and students practise listening
skills to determine what was said in the interviews.
3. Students discuss the Creole language (where present) in the
interviews and suggest its equivalence in Standard English.
They give reasons why they use more of the Creole language
in their speech. (one reason accepted is that they are
accustomed with everyone around them speaking like that).

b) Interpreting word strips


4. Sentence strips that contain phrases of the Creole language
are given to groups of students. They work in their groups to
interpret the meaning of the Creole language. Students
present their interpretations to the class, as well as the
Standard English translation.

c) Examining cues, gestures, audience and purpose


5. Students discuss situations when both the Creole and
Standard English are appropriate for use: e.g. at a function,
when giving a speech, telling a joke, talking with friends and
family, and acting in a play.
6. Students listen to a monologue read by the teacher that
involved the use of the Trinidad/Tobago Creole.
7. Students discuss the audience for such a performance; the
cues, tone and gestures the presenter used during his
delivery, the purpose of using the Creole language to get the
message across to the audience, and debate whether the
effect would have been the same with the use of Standard
English. They give examples of some of the gestures that are
used in our everyday speech.

d) PowerPoint presentation of our varied languages


8. A PPT is shown on languages in our culture (see CD), to
provide examples for students to see. Students discuss other

105
languages in our culture: Creole, English, Spanish, Patois,
Hindi, Arabic, and Mandarin (Asian influences). They state the
usefulness of foreign language learning (for example, assets
for jobs, able to speak a second language, understand and
converse with other members in our society).
9. They write on word strips, a word from any language that they
know. These are placed on the word wall in class and read by
students. The languages of these words are then identified
e.g. agua Spanish.

B) Exploring changes in our society


10. Students discuss changes in our society. Some examples
include: new roads, more education, housing, information
technology, population increase, traffic.
11. Students listen to the proper pronunciation of the examples of
changes given above, in Spanish. They then orally describe
the changes in Spanish using Hay mas, and demonstrate
the types of changes using hand gestures. They form the
expressions: Hay ms informacin; Hay ms trfico; Hay ms
tecnologa; Hay ms populacin; Hay ms educacin; Hay
ms casas.

C) Coping with change


12. Students discuss changes that they have to cope with at
school. For example: additional stress of preparation for
assessment components, study time, expectations of parents
or family members on their performance at school, less time to
relax and have fun. Students give some examples of how they
cope with their stress.

b) Story time
13. Students listen to a story entitled Coping With Change.
Students discuss how easily the children in the story bonded
over a game of sports such as football. They give their
opinions about the following questions posed by the teacher:
- What caused the children to let Wan Li play with them?
- Why didnt it matter to them that they couldnt understand
each other properly?
- Can sports help people of different cultures to get along?
- Do you see in the world of sports how people of different
backgrounds and cultures, coming from different countries,
work together as one team?
14. They respond to guided questions from the teacher such as:
What were some ways that the child dealt with his stress? Was
there anything about that child that you can relate to in your
own life? Who should you turn to when you are feeling

106
stressed? Did talking to such a person ease your stress or give
you a better attitude in dealing with your problems? Students
discuss how they could positively cope with changes in their
lives.
c) Relaxation Techniques
15. They participate in some relaxation techniques that would
allow them to relax their minds when becoming stressed.

D) Exploring rhythmic patterns and lyrical content


a) Identifying structure of a song
16. Students are grouped and each group is given a cultural song
to identify the structure. For example: (verse, chorus, verse) or
(chorus, verse, chorus).

b) Identifying the beat and rhythmic pattern of a song


17. They listen to the song to determine the beat and rhythmic
pattern. They collaborate in their groups to clap the beat and
the rhythm of the piece.

c) Composing rhythmic patterns through math activity


18. Students collect cut-out shapes. They represent the rhythmic
pattern using shapes, fractional shapes, strips, or pattern
blocks. They manipulate the shapes to create their own
rhythmic pattern. They present the pattern to the class.
19. Students use decimal flash cards to replace the fractional cut
out shapes with decimals, and they repeat the patterns
created.

E) Lyrical and Melodic Composition based on Cultural


Changes
20. Students listen to the lyrical content of one song (such as a
Calypso on Education), and determine the message of the
song. They participate in a class discussion on the relevance
of the use of lyrics in the song.
21. Students are told that they will be creating a lyrical composition
based on any change in our culture that was discussed.
Students work together to write an 8-10 line composition.
22. Students create a rhythmic pattern for the lyrics that will be
played on a melodic instrument (depending on what is
available at their school). Students demonstrate the beat and
the rhythmic pattern of the piece.
23. They represent the rhythmic pattern with letters to show the
pitch so that they can play the rhythm on a melodic instrument.
F) Presentation
24. Students work together to create a short 1-2 minute production
to present their lyrical and melodic compositions. Students use

107
props to aid in their presentations. Each presentation will be
videotaped by the teacher, or with the help of students. The
presenter speaks using Standard English to introduce the
members of each group and after their presentations, students
respond to questions based on their songs, using Standard
English.

Resources:

Flashcards with phrases from Creole Language


PPT on Languages in our Culture
Reading material based on coping with change
Multimedia including internet; microphone
CD with songs (reflecting our multicultural diversity)
Melodic instruments (such as: steel pan, recorder, flute,
xylophone)
Stationery supplies
Props for final production

Additional Reference Material (if needed)


Cote ci Cote la The Trinidad and Tobago Dictionary by John
Mendes (2003)

Search Words:
Yoga for children
Local literature monologues creole language
music activities and arts integration

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on the following: group collaboration in all


activities where applicable
Performance assessment: students will present their final production
in their groups in front of the class

108
COPING WITH CHANGE

Wan Li looked at his new school with a feeling of trepidation. His heart raced,
his stomach churned and his palms grew sweaty. He truly felt alone. He knew the
other students were looking and pointing at him as he walked to his seat in his new
classroom. He felt all eyes on him. He remembered the words of his mother before
he left, Dont worry; you are a wonderful person; be yourself and everything will be
all right.
Class, this is Wan Li.
Good mornin, Wan Li!
G-g-good morning.
Some of the children looked confused at his accent. He saw a couple boys
snickering. His heart sunk. This was going to be difficult.
Treat him well. He is a new student coming all the way from Japan.
Ooooh Japan? exclaimed a few children.
Wan Li saw that there were students of different races, ethnicity and
colouring. They looked at him with curiosity as they began their work.
At recess children gathered around him and began speaking. He could not
understand their accent. They talked so fast! One wanted to know about how far
from Trinidad was Japan. Another asked if he knew karate. But the two boys who
were snickering were just mean, he thought, as they continued to make fun of his
accent, his pale colour and the shape of his eyes. The bell saved him from further
humiliation.
At lunch time, Wan Li stood rooted outside the classroom looking at everyone
play. Fear gripped him again as he thought about joining the boys in a game. He
thought about his friends that he left in Japan. How he missed them! He couldnt help
but feel a bit angry at his parents for moving. Having to give up everything he knew,
his home, his friendswhy didnt they think about him? Didnt his opinion matter?
Did they expect him to be happy with being in a strange land with stranger people?
He continued like this for the next two days. Every day he would enter the
school compound and go straight to his classroom, take out a book to read and just
respond to the other children with nods. He was afraid to talk much because of the
boys in the class.
He did not want to complain to his mother, but he just could not take it
anymore by the end of the third day. He waited for his mother to ask him about his

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day, and then he told her everything. He begged her to go back to Japan. He even
began to cry, unashamed of his tears, as he felt he could not cope.
His mother listened to him until he finally stopped. Gently wiping his tears, she
hugged him tightly. They remained like that for a long time.
Dont worry, Wan Li, she said, brushing her hands through his hair,
adjusting to a new place takes time. I felt the same when I had to move. But I love
you son and you can always come to me whenever you have a problem. Your
teacher will help you too. She is nice.
Wan Li calmed down. He realized he could have turned to other people for
help. He felt better talking out the problem to her, and with her advice, decided to
approach the next day with a stronger mind and better attitude.
It was lunch time and for once, he was actually standing in the school yard
watching the boys play football. He had no idea of how to ask them to include him in
the game. Just then, the ball rolled to his feet. What do I do? He saw the other boys
standing there watching and waiting. Hesitating for a moment, Wan Li rolled the ball
onto his shoe, performed a few dribbles in the air, and then kicked the ball back to
the boys.
All the boys exclaimed at the same time and rushed to Wan Li.
Show me how you did that! You wanna play? Hes on my team! No,
mine! They were all screaming with excitement.
Wan Li felt happy, but just then, he heard the two boys again, making fun of
his accent. He stopped, but instead of walking away, he began to approach the boys.
Hey stop making fun of him.
Yeah, he didnt do you anything.
If you want to play with us you have to show Wan Li some respect. It is not
easy for him to leave his old school for a new one.
Wan Li turned as he could not believe his ears. The other boys were behind
him. They were actually standing up for him! He stood with his new found friends as
they all looked at the two boys, waiting on their response.
Sorry for making fun of your accent. We will not do it again, said the boys.
I accept your apology. It is difficult for me to understand you too, but I will try
if you will, replied Wan Li.
They spent the rest of their lunch time happily playing together. Wan Li felt
comforted that the new change in his life would not be as difficult as he first thought.

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WORD CARDS WITH THE CREOLE LANGUAGE PHRASES

Buh A-A!

Wha yuh say?

Limin later?

Ah geh boof up

Dat is presshah

Ent?

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Fuh real?

Yuh makin joke!

Me eh no

Yuh unnerstan?

Look at dat zog up head!

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UNIT ONE: Nature of Change
Learning Plan: 5 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Changes in our Melting Pot
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
The cuisine in Trinidad and Tobago is a melting pot of a unique blend
of dishes indicative of the cosmopolitan nature of the country. Citizens HFLE:
therefore have a wide variety from which to choose; however, they are
sometimes unaware of the origin of some of the foods to which they Effective
have grown accustomed. In order for students to fully appreciate the Communication
cultural diversity that exists in their country, they must be made aware Choose an item.
of all cultural influences that have contributed to local cuisine. In this
learning activity, students will learn about local hispanic dishes. Literacy
Reading
Outcomes: Writing
At the end of this learning experience students will: Oral
identify Hispanic foods that can be found in Trinidad and Communication
Tobago Literary
demonstrate an appreciation of the cultural diversity within Appreciation
Trinidad and Tobago. Media &
Information Literacy
Activities:
Lets explore our local cuisine Numeracy
1. Students source pictures of local dishes and bring these to Problem Solving
class. Teacher distributes additional ones which include Critical thinking
traditional and contemporary Hispanic dishes found in Trinidad Communication
and Tobago (pastelle, paimee, paella, arepas, empanadas, Representation
burritos, tacos, jalapeos, guacamole, salsa, corn bread, corn
Reasoning
pie, tacos, tortillas, quesadillas, churros)
2. Students get into groups of 4-5 and chat about the names and
origin of the dishes seen in the pictures they collected and ICT Skills
additional ones distributed by the teacher.
3. Each group is given chart paper and markers and instructed to Differentiated
construct a table as shown below. They stick the pictures, write Instruction
the name of the food if known, and guess its origin. Teacher
supplies the names of dishes which are unknown to students. Assessment for
4. Students engage in online research to find out if their guesses learning
are correct or incorrect or teacher discusses and supplies
answers. If their guesses are incorrect, they insert the correct
answers. Groups present their charts.

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Picture Name of Origin Real origin
food my guess

pizza America Italy

Our local Hispanic dishes


5. Students observe the charts made and list the names of
Hispanic dishes. Teacher engages students in discussion of
those that have been around for a long time and those that
recently started appearing in restaurants or grocery stores.
6. Teacher puts up another chart that displays a comparison
graphic (as shown below) and guides different students to stick
pictures/word cards in the correct box.

HISPANIC
FOODS
FOUND IN
Traditional TRINIDAD Contemporary
AND TOBAGO

Lets Play Jeopardy!


7. Teacher models the writing of Jeopardy type clues and
responses in question format.

E.g. Clue: This traditional Hispanic dish closely resembles


pelau.
Answer: What is paella?

8. Students formulate as many clues as they can related to local


Hispanic as well as other local dishes. Clues may be extended
to include other categories related to Hispanic and other cultures
in Trinidad and Tobago e.g. clothing, music, and dance. Teacher
collects all clues and ensures that the statements are clear and
easily understandable. Students then rewrite their clues neatly
on cue cards and return them to the teacher.
9. Students are grouped into teams. Each team will have one

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voice. The rules of the game are introduced and discussed.
Teacher can have students model the activity before so that
students feel comfortable with the steps.
10. Teacher assumes the role of host and presents clues one at a
time. The team which acquires the most points wins.

Resources:
Stationery: notebook, pencils, chart paper, markers, cue cards
ICT: computer with internet, pictures
Other: graphic organizers

Assessment:
Participation checklist
Oral Presentation
Observation of Charts
Observation of written clues
Jeopardy Game

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LEARNING UNIT 2: INVESTIGATING CHANGE

Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Topic: Understanding


Change
Unit: Investigating Change Estimated frame: 8 days

Context: In this unit, students will learn about investigating changes that occur within
their family and about themselves. This includes giving them the ability to
make well informed decisions, being impartial and understanding the
consequences and impact of their decisions. Included in the unit, is the
investigation of structures, where modification to loads, levers and centre of
gravity are made in order to improve a structures stability.
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

demonstrate an understanding of behaviours displayed by good


citizens
demonstrate an understanding of the right to privacy and what it
entails
make responsible choices
understand and accept changes that occur within a family over time
apply appropriate reading comprehension skills and strategies
explicitly taught to develop as strategic and critical thinkers
describe, in Spanish, major changes taking place in the family
know appropriate speaking behaviour for a variety of contexts
use interpretive movement to highlight and comment on social issues
modify simple structures to improve their stability
demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between standard
units and their sub-parts to solve practical problems involving linear
measure
demonstrate appropriate techniques when measuring
solve problems involving linear measure
demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between standard
units and their sub-parts to solve problems involving mass/weight
construct mobiles using models created
demonstrate a basic understanding of informed decisions
give simple justifications for responsible choices
act fairly and display sensitivity to others who need support
demonstrate a basic understanding of advocacy and social justice
know how to use figurative language in context
know how to use the different types of vocabulary across content
areas
select words to express deeper meaning in reading and writing
identify the benefits resulting from participation in different forms of
physical activities
solve problems involving mass/weight.

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Learning 1. Family Life
Plans: 2. Structures and Stability
3. Making Choices

Resources: Learning Plan 1: ICTs -computer, printer, internet access, PPT on Family
Life, stationery material - writing materials, graphic organizer, newspaper
articles; art/craft supplies for props, song lyrics, students pictures of their
families

Learning Plan 2: ICTs: computer, printer, videos, website; stationery


supplies, art supplies; pictures, newspaper, books, mini book instruction
sheet, cut out triangles, pin, washers and string, pictures of structures -chairs,
tables,

Learning Plan 3: ICTs: multimedia including video and audio equipment,


internet access, videos from the internet; stationery: paper, dictionaries,
colouring pencils, markers, poster materials, tape, glue; reading passages,
activity sheet with scenarios

Assessments: Formative assessment


Worksheets
Performance based assessment

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UNIT TWO: Investigating Change
Learning Plan: 1 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Family Life
Context: CONSIDERATION
S:
Family life can be hectic, following schedules and cycles that
become a routine part of life. It is important for students to know that HFLE:
in families they share similarities and differences. They must also be Effective
aware of the right to guard their privacy, in their families and Communication
especially when using cell phones, or social media sites. In this Understanding
Learning Plan students will be introduced to various methods they Consequences
can use when taking precautions to protect themselves and when
being advocates for more responsible behaviour in their daily Literacy
routine. Reading
Writing
Outcomes: Oral
Communication
At the end of this learning activity students will: Literary
Appreciation
begin to understand that as they grow their responsibilities as Media &
citizens will increase Information
recognise that each person has a right to privacy Literacy
develop criteria for determining the appropriateness of music
identify the changes in a family over time Numeracy
apply knowledge of inference and deduction to identify cause Problem
and effect relationships in a news article Solving
describe, in Spanish, major changes taking place in the Critical thinking
family Communication
use Standard English for formal speech contexts Representation
identify main idea and supporting details from text Reasoning
express preferences and support their views by reference to
ICT Skills
a news article
create a 1-2 minute narrative dance piece depicting one
Differentiated
social issue featured in the local newspapers.
Instruction
Activities:
Assessment
for learning
Family responsibility
1. Students view the PowerPoint presentation - Responsibilities
in My Family (See CD). They examine responsible behaviour
in relation to family practices as depicted in the presentation.
2. Students think of ways they can show or demonstrate
responsibility.
3. They reflect on their responsibilities in their own families

118
based on those identified in the presentation, implications of
not being a responsible family member and strategies some
parents try to encourage the members to be responsible at
home.
4. They complete a schedule listing their responsibilities in their
homes. Schedules are shared with their peers.
5. They discuss the responsibilities of their brothers or sisters or
their parents. They give examples of the changing roles and
responsibilities that are held by others.
6. Students respond to questions regarding their own
responsibilities and how they have changed over the years.
For example, what types of responsibilities they have now
that they did not have as a five year old.
7. They suggest some of the additional responsibilities that
would be given to them as they grow older. Students see that
as they grow their responsibilities change.

Causes and consequences re responsibility of citizens


8. They give examples of how they contribute to the school
community e.g. keeping their environment clean.
9. Students examine how responsible they are as citizens, in
their community and in the country.
10. They examine places where people give of themselves as in
volunteer work. They look at the services provided by these
organizations and describe what it means to be a volunteer.

Respecting ones privacy


11. Students discuss what changes they have made when it
comes to respecting each others privacy in their home.
12. They respond to questions posed by the teacher, such as:
What do you understand by the term privacy?
Do you think it is important to have some privacy for
yourself?
Giving others privacy in your home, is that important?
Why?
Why does it annoy you when your family members do not
give you your privacy?
How can you ensure that you do not intrude on others
privacy?
13. Students are asked to discuss the decisions that they have to
make or should make when chatting with persons online, or
with anyone whom they are now getting to know.
14. They identify the limit of shared information. Factors taken
into consideration include:
o How well do they know the person with whom they are
conversing online?

119
o How much confidence or trust do they have in the
person? How sure are they that the person would not
share their personal information?
They give reasons for making choices to share information
online. They discuss the consequences of sharing
information online.

15. Students work in their groups and use the internet to search
for articles based on how to guard their privacy whilst online
(see Search Words below).
16. They decide amongst their peers on the type of information
that should be shared online, or with persons whom they are
now getting to know. They choose one article based on their
research to identify the main idea based on the text provided.
Students identify the main points in the text that relate to
guarding their private information whilst online. They share
their points amongst groups and a general list of reminders is
built for students to follow should they visit sites online.

Childrens Music
17. Students list the names of popular songs that they listen to.
They present the lyrics of their favourite songs.
18. Working in groups of fours, they are asked to examine the
songs to determine which lyrics their parents would approve
of and which lyrics they would disapprove of. Students give
reasons why the particular songs which have been identified
would not be approved. Students are asked to give further
reasons why parents would disapprove of other songs.
Students also determine what type of lyrics of songs that they
think would not be appropriate for children their age to listen
to. They explain their reasons for their answers.

19. Students discuss the type of music videos that they see.
They are asked the following guided questions.
- Would your parents approve of the videos that you like to
watch? What would make your parents ban you from
watching a video?
- What about other content online? Do you think you should
access online sites that are created for adult viewing?
What are some sites that are suitable for your age level?

20. Sites are listed by the teacher, as suggested by students, as


well as the list provided in the Resource section, for students
to record and access when they are at home.

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Exploring changes in families
21. Students collect pictures of their family showing the present,
and the past (at least five years ago). They discuss changes
that occurred within their families. Students respond to
questions such as:
a) What changes occurred in your family during this period?
b) What are some positive changes that can occur in
families?
c) What are some negative changes that can occur in
families?
d) What are the causes of such changes?

Newspaper article

22. Students are asked to research newspapers/news articles to


find out about families that experienced hardships or
windfalls of some kind. They look at the causes and
consequences of the familys experience and list such. In
their groups, students collate their results of the questions
above onto a graphic organizer.
23. They present their results, using Standard English in their
speech as they explain the changes that occur in families.
They highlight each point and present their reasons why such
effects are positive or negative on family life. They examine
the causes and consequences of the experiences that all of
the families had to go through.
24. They use Spanish words to describe the changes in families
using the phrase Hay ms where applicable. For example,
Hay ms nios (positive change addition to a family).

Dance movement (Letting it sink in)


25. Students discuss how they would feel about some changes in
their families. Slips of paper with positive or negative issues
(crime, flooding, marriage) are given to students. Students
read their slips and collaborate in groups to convey the
emotions felt based on the changes that families experienced
through miming. They use art/craft supplies to create any
props for their presentation.

Resources:

PPT on Family Life


Stationery material: writing materials, graphic organizer,
newspaper articles
Art/craft supplies for props
ICTs: computer, printer, internet access

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Song lyrics
Student pictures of their family

Search Words:

Online safety rules


Protecting kids privacy online rules
Family stressors positive changes negative changes
Causes for distress in families

Safe sites for children:


www.pbskids.org
www.kids.nationalgeographic.com
www.timeforkids.com
www.coolmath4kids.com
www.funbrain.com
www.howstuffworks.com

Assessment:
Teacher observation
Performance Assessment: students perform their dance piece in
their groups in front of the class.

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UNIT TWO: INVESTIGATING CHANGE
Learning Plan: 2 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Structures and Stability
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Investigating the way structures are built is the main focus of this HFLE:
plan. Students will discover what is meant by the term centre of Problem Solving
gravity and apply this concept as they build their own structures Cooperation
and test for stability. Through group work, students will become
aware of the importance of cooperation and collaboration. They Literacy
will continue to develop mathematics skills as opportunities are Reading
encountered for the development and practice of skills in Writing
measurement. Oral
Communication
Outcomes: Literary
Appreciation
At the end of this learning activity students will: Media &
create a stable simple structure Information Literacy
modify simple structures to improve their stability
evaluate the sturdiness of a the structure Numeracy
solve problems involving solids Problem Solving
measure and record heights of objects using the millimetre, Critical thinking
centimeter and meter Communication
convert linear measure from one form to the other Representation
measure the mass/weight of objects in kilograms and Reasoning
grams using a scale
convert measurements of kilograms to grams and vice ICT Skills
versa
use high frequency words to create sentences Differentiated
understand that balance can be used in creating 3- Instruction
dimensional work
work in a collaborative manner with each other. Assessment for
learning

Activities:

Exploring terms based on the centre of gravity

1. Students are given a semantic map with the term centre of


gravity. They research the meaning of the terms centre of
gravity, stability and stance, using a search engine on the
Internet or with a dictionary. They work in small groups to
build their semantic maps, sharing definitions, words or
phrases.

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2. Students present their semantic maps to the class and view
those created by their peers. They participate in a discussion
about the new terms and phrases with their teacher.
3. They write a short paragraph based on centre of gravity,
using the information displayed on the semantic maps (They
are not to use any other reading material). They are informed
that they will review their paragraphs at the end of all of the
learning activities.
4. Students are told that they are going to investigate how to find
the centre of gravity in a shape.
Identifying the Centre of Gravity
5. Students use triangular shape cut-outs and a modified plumb
line to identify the centre of gravity. (see INSTRUCTIONAL
SHEET 1).
6. Students participate in a class discussion to review learning
points from the activity.

Balancing Act
7. Students test their ability to balance. Students follow teachers
instructions to perform a few balancing activities e.g.
- Stand on one foot and have arms at their sides.
- Raise arms above their head, standing on one foot.
- Stretch upraised leg outwards and put one arm on hip.
- Tiptoe with both feet on ground and feet close together.
Widen their stance and try tiptoeing again.
- Bend forward at the waist, head down, and extending one
leg behind.
8. Students discuss the effect of the change in body movement
and the ability to balance. What makes it easier to balance and
what makes it more challenging to balance?

Tower Building
9. Students are given a problem to investigate: What would be
the best 3D solids to use to build a high tower?
10. Students work in groups to build a tower as high as possible
using 3D solids, without using an adhesive to stick them
together. Think of the properties of 3D solids and ways to
position the 3D solids so that they do not topple over.
11. Students measure the height of the tallest tower that was built
that did not topple over.

Constructing balanced structures


12. Students are given a task of building any structure (e.g. a
table, bridge, tank stand) that can support a weight at the top.
Supplies are distributed to students, who work in groups to
draft and then build their structures, following the

124
INSTRUCTIONAL SHEET 2).
13. They work in a collaborative manner, listening to ideas given
by peers and sharing the work to be done.

Testing the stability of your peers structure.


14. Through teacher guided questions, students investigate what
happens to their structures when modifications are made to
them. Some questions include:
Wheres the centre of gravity on the structure?
Would you be able to balance the structure if it was held at
another point far from the centre of gravity?
Would the stability of the structure be maintained if the
base of support is narrower/wider?
Would the stability of the structure be maintained if the
structure is taller./shorter?
What happens when you tilt your structure?

Making modifications
15. Students check the stability of their structures and make
modifications. For example - they make the legs of the table
longer or shorter or widen the base of the bridge or tank stand
and retest to check the variations in stability of the structures.

Testing of the structures


16. Books are used as a standard unit of measure to test the
sturdiness of the built structure. Students estimate the number
of books as well as the mass that could be supported by their
structures. e.g. 10 dictionaries 1 kg 200 grams
17. Students test the design of their peers by placing one book at
a time on the structure, to confirm their estimations. The
sturdiness would be the last mass on the structure prior to the
collapse of the structure.
18. They use a scale to measure the mass of the books in grams,
.that caused the structure to collapse
19. The students convert the mass into kilograms.

Group mini books/learning logs


20. Students use art supplies to make and decorate their mini
books. They record what they have learnt about stability,
stance and centre of gravity in their mini books. This includes
writing definitions, using the terms to create sentences, giving
explanations and illustrations. They also create a vocabulary
word list of new terms that they were introduced to in the
learning activities.
21. Students share their mini books with each other and
participate in discussing what they have learnt from the

125
activities.

Resources:

Stationery supplies: pencil, scissors, newspapers, books,


semantic map sheets
Art Supplies: play dough, cut out triangles of various sizes and
types, crayons, coloured pencils to decorate mini books
Other: pin, string, box, different objects to use as loads, 3D
solids(boxes, blocks, tubes)
ICTs: multimedia, internet access, computer

Search Words:
Centre of gravity
stability of an object
stance and stability
height and centre of gravity

Assessment:

Students will present their mini books to their peers and explain
their ideas and illustrations based on: stability, stance and centre
of gravity.

126
UNIT TWO: Investigating Change
Learning Plan: 3 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 3 days Topic: Making Choices
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Choices are what inform our actions. We are faced with choices HFLE:
every day, and whatever we choose translate into positive or
negative behaviour. Students investigate the decision making Understanding
process as the focal point of this learning activity. Consequences
Decision Making

Outcomes: Literacy
Reading
At the end of this learning experience students will: Writing
examine the consequence of choices they make, or have Oral
made Communication
identify processes that can be used to make well informed Literary
and impartial decisions Appreciation
identify the benefits resulting from participation in different Media &
forms of physical activities Information Literacy
describe ways in which persons can advocate for others
defend the rights of peers who have been treated unfairly Numeracy
initiate and participate in activities geared to help persons Problem Solving
who are challenged by social issues Critical thinking
influence others to be courageous in helping others Communication
identify key words when scanning texts to establish Representation
relevance Reasoning
identify main idea and supporting ideas in text
express preferences and support their views by reference ICT Skills
to texts
Differentiated
apply knowledge of inference and deduction to identify
cause and effect relationships in texts Instruction
analyse details using graphic organizers
Assessment for
produce own figurative language based on context and
learning
content
use homophones in context across content areas
determine the meaning of words used in descriptive and
factual language
Solve problems involving mass/weight.

127
Activities:

Making choices and recognising their consequences


1. Students read the given scenarios (Activity 1- Scenarios).
2. Students are introduced to a model based on Decision Making
called SODAS (Situation, Option, Disadvantages, Advantages,
Solution).
3. They use this model to analyse the given scenarios, identifying
the situation in each scenario, think of their options; identify
the disadvantages or advantages of their final response to
each situation and give a reason for the solutions at which
they arrived.
4. They complete the table stating the choices that they would
make and the consequences of their choice being followed.
5. Students discuss the types of decisions that they have to
make every day. They give examples of how they make
decisions. For example, do they talk to their parents, their
brother/sister, or best friend, seek advice from their teacher, or
someone whom they respect? Do they think about the
issue/problem for a long time or short time?

Journal entry on poor choices made in the past


6. Students record in a journal a situation where they made poor
choices and the consequences of such. They explain how they
are aware now that it was the poor choice that they made, and
in looking back, identify what the correct choice would have
been.
7. Similarly, they write on a responsible choice that they have
made and describe how they benefitted from such a choice.

Health And Fitness Choices


8. Students participate in simple warm up exercises such as
stretching exercises, jumping jacks or running on spot. They
respond to questions based on how they feel when they
participate in physical activities with their friends (e.g. have fun
playing together, feel relaxed, and enjoy teamwork).
9. Students discuss life situations where decision making could
affect their health, for example, in choosing to exercise or to
eat the right foods.
10. They identify the benefits of taking part in different physical
activities such as skipping, cycling, walking, swimming or
walking (e.g. feel fit and healthy, working out helps to tone the
body and build muscles, energizes you especially for mental
work, helps to reduce stress, improves heart, lung and muscle
fitness).
11. They give their opinions based on the consequences of not

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being physically active.
12. Students journal choices that they plan to follow based on their
health and physical fitness. These choices will be monitored
by the teacher and peers each week.

Advocacy choices
13. Students are introduced to the term advocacy. They research
the meaning of the term. They think of what it means to be an
advocate -to stand up for an issue.
14. They use the internet to identify advocacy groups
(internationally or locally), that stand up for the rights of
people, the environment, and animals.
15. They view a video based on ordinary people who chose to
take action based on issues that they felt strongly about (See
Search Words).
16. They discuss the ways in which those advocates promoted
their issues and the resulting change that occurred because of
the stand that they took.

Being an advocate
17. Students discuss with the teacher, the pros/cons of standing
up for others. They make a list of issues for which they could
take a stand. Issues include could range from the serious -
school violence, littering, homeless children, physically
challenged individuals and lack of facilities, to ones that they
wish could happen, such as No Homework!
18. Students are put into groups. Each group chooses one issue
from the list.
19. They think of pros and cons regarding the issue. They think of
ways that they could use to promote their issue.
20. Students collaborate on creating a song, banner, poem, skit,
jingle, poster, writing letters to a newspaper based on their
chosen issues, or use media to create and record their
message.
21. Students use art and stationery supplies to create promotional
material based on their issues.

Reading passages
22. Students are given two passages - Empty Nets, based on an
environmental issue and No More Bullying! based on a social
issue.
23. They look at the title of each passage and brainstorm ideas of
what each passage is about. They read to confirm if their
predictions were correct.
24. They read the first passage and derive meaning based on how
the words are written in context. They verify if their meanings

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were correct by checking dictionaries or asking the teacher.
25. Students extract the homophones for given words from the
second passage. They work in teams to write as many words
with the same sound as the given words and use them in
sentences.
26. Students give their point of view based on the issues identified
in the passages and respond to questions based on the
issues, both orally and in written form, giving complete
sentences and using Standard English.
27. Students discuss the possible impact on Brian if he was not
supported by the Principal, the teacher or his friends.
Discussion is held on the impact of lack of support for those
who really do need our support.
28. Students use their knowledge of advocacy to think of ways to
draw attention to the public about the issues highlighted in the
passages.
29. Students, with the guidance of the teacher, explore the
figurative language (similes) used in the second passage.
Students look at the similes and think of other comparisons
that can be substituted. They work in pairs to create their own
similes. They give examples of their similes in oral sentences.

Solve Problems
30. Students are given a worksheet with a few word problems
based on the passage Empty Nets, to solve problems
involving different units of mass/weight.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, dictionaries, colouring pencils, markers,
poster materials, tape, glue
ICTs: multimedia including video and audio equipment,
internet access
Other: Reading passages, Activity sheet with Scenarios,
journal

Search words:
Video: Nickelback If Everyone Cared
You Tube CNN Heroes
Assessment:
Discuss, in one paragraph, one (1) process that can be used for
making decisions
Presentation of Advocacy product
Students write a learning log based on what they have learnt
about being an advocate

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LEARNING UNIT 3: Fostering Positive Change
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Unit: Estimated frame: 2 1/2,
2 1/2, 3, 3

Context: No man is an island, and certainly our young children are not living in an
isolated bubble. In their lives, they are exposed to various influences that have
an impact on their physical, emotional, social and environmental well-being.
This unit encourages a positive transformation in all areas of their lives in order
to have an improve quality of life.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:


Give simple justification for responsible choices
Make responsible choices
Justify their choice of healthy foods
Exhibit sensitivity to individuals who suffer from food related illnesses or
challenges
Recall skills involved in reflective writing.
Know how to write a reflective piece.
Know how to use strategies that assist in simultaneous listening and
analyzing activities.
Know that a message should be analyzed before its acceptance
Demonstrate an understanding of estimation strategies
Identify positive changes in a family over time
Become aware of what is needed to establish a successful family
Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which effective
communication helps to maintain trust within relationships
Act with integrity and discretion
Apply appropriate reading comprehension skills and strategies as
strategic and critical thinkers
Know the elements of story writing to engage in narrative-descriptive
writing:
Use critical and strategic reading strategies to read competently
Assess uses of renewable and non-renewable energy
Differentiate between the Greenhouse Effect and the Enhanced
Greenhouse Effect
Communicate, employ and persuade others about good environmental
practices
Give simple justification for responsible choices
Describe, in Spanish, major changes taking place in the world using the
structure Hay ms
Accurately read and record time to the minute and solve practical
problems involving time
Develop an understanding of time schedules

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Know how to apply critical literacy skills in Compare and Contrast and in
Close reading
Know how to write exposition using the process approach
Act fairly and display sensitivity to others who need support
Demonstrate deepening understanding of respect for self and others
Distinguish among the four seasons and the activities associated with
each
Identify and map the major climatic divisions of the world using an atlas
and a globe
Use physical activity as an opportunity for positive social and group
interaction
State the usefulness of foreign language learning
Recognize the importance of world languages
Create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences
Apply appropriate reading comprehension skills and strategies as
strategic and critical thinkers.

Learning 1. Impact on the Individual


Plans: 2. Impact on the Family
3. Items in the Environment
4. Impact on Society

Resources: Learning Plan 1: Collection of pictures of foods and running, Worksheets,


Notes; ICT computers, internet, PowerPoint presentation, Recipe book

Learning Plan 2: Stationery, Art Supplies - paint, brushes, ICTs: computer,


PowerPoint A Successful Family, picture, Literature: Stories Are Secrets
Gossip?; Students researched articles

Learning Plan 3: 2 identical glass jars, 2 pieces of dark cloth; 2


thermometers; paper; pencil; worksheets, analog clock; digital clock;
reference material article, notes, experiment sheet, record sheet, tally
sheet; observation book, internet, encyclopaedia, graphic organizers main
idea, compare and contrast

Learning Plan 4: Paper, pencil, coloured pencils; worksheets, World map


template

Assessments:
Worksheet, Journal entry, discussion, Critique, Oral Presentation
Guided Questioning, Oral Discussion, Narrative-Descriptive Writing product
Presentation, Poster and 3-D models creation, worksheets, students
interaction and participation during classroom activities
Completion of world map, worksheets

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UNIT THREE: Fostering Positive Change -
Learning Plan: 1 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Impact on the Individual
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

In our daily experiences we encounter various situations and HFLE


events which require choices on our part. Young children need a Understanding
safe environment where they can develop the necessary skills to Consequences
make positive choices and safely avoid or be removed from Decision Making
making wrong choices.
Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of this learning experience students will: Writing
select healthy foods from pictures and lists Oral
develop criteria for determining the appropriateness of Communication
websites and print, etc. Literary
explain that healthy foods are impacted by ingredients Appreciation
used and method of preparation Media &
defend their food choices Information Literacy
ask pertinent questions.
take notes after listening Numeracy
highlight important points relevant to a given topic Problem Solving
demonstrate appropriate responses and behaviours to Critical thinking
individuals who do not choose healthy food options Communication
use the estimation strategy of compensation to check and Representation
justify answers in problem solving contexts and to Reasoning
determine the reasonableness of answers
Express their thoughts and feelings in a reflective piece. ICT Skills

Differentiated
Activities: Instruction

What is my choice? Assessment for


1. Students are shown a collection of pictures of food learning
prepared by the teacher. Pictures are mixed from the
categories of healthy foods and unhealthy foods.
2. Students supplement the collection with their pictures of
favourite foods.
3. Students separate the healthy foods from the unhealthy
foods and compile a list of healthy foods.
4. Each student adds 5 additional healthy foods to his /her
personal list.

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What shall I use?
5. Pictures of popular dishes (culturally appropriate and
relevant to the students experiences) are presented to the
students by the teacher.
6. The students brainstorm to decide on the ingredients used
in the preparation of the dish.
7. The ingredients are revealed by the teacher who
confirms or corrects the answers given.
8. Students use the Student Assessment of Health Ratings
of Popular Dishes to rate the dish to determine how healthy
the dish is with this combination of ingredients. A rating of
Very Healthy, Healthy and Unhealthy is used.
9. Students are informed by the teacher that the internet
would be used to research several upcoming activities.
10. An agreement must be made to access websites that
are related to health and fitness,
advocate the prevention of illnesses,
are affiliated with health clinics and /or educational
institutions.
11. Agreements are made by the students that music or music
videos will not be accessed as they are not relevant they
will stay on task.
12. Students research using the internet or popular recipe
books to determine healthy substitutes for ingredients
identified. A suggested list is given, which can be modified
as needed to be culturally relevant to the needs of the
students.
13. If there are students in the class with any health concerns
relating to diet, e.g. allergies, they can use this opportunity
to look for healthy substitutes.
14. Students now review the Student Assessment to determine
if the dish can receive an improved rating.

How shall I prepare it?


15. Students are asked to prepare a list of 6 popular dishes in
pairs where the main ingredient of each pair of the dishes
would be the same, (in each case the dish was prepared
according to a different method such as baked, fried; bar-
b-qued; , grilled, curried, stewed) e.g. baked chicken, bar
b qued chicken, grilled lamb, curried lamb
16. The class is divided into groups. Each group selects two
pairs of dishes, with each pair having the same main
ingredient.
17. Each group researches using the internet to determine
which method is healthier. Search terms include grilled vs,
fried healthier cooking methods baked vs curried

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18. The table Assessment Of Dishes According ToThe Method
Of Preparation is completed.

Group presentation:
19. Oral presentations are made by the group, where the
research is shared.
20. Conclusions formed by the group are presented and
defended by the members.
21. Their peers listen to the presentations and make notes on
the method of preparation and the health benefits /
drawbacks.
22. They ask questions if needed.

How do I respond?
23. Running the Race picture is presented to students by the
teacher. The picture depicts an overweight person running
a race and is lagging behind.
24. Students formulate reasons why the think the runner is way
behind her peers and predict the outcome of the race.
25. They brainstorm to determine possible reasons why the
person lost the race. They determine if the runner is
healthy or unhealthy.
26. The students examine if any change is recommended to
the runner in order to be healthy (the targeted answer is
the need to eat healthily).
27. Students and teachers discuss appropriate and
inappropriate ways to respond when attempting to bring
about change in someone who is not healthy or eating
healthily. Ways addressed include quarrelling and
arguing, bullying and teasing, laughing, appealing and
explaining, and accepting of someones choice . Students
decide appropriate behaviours.
28. Students share personal experiences where they may
have witnessed these behaviours and the impact on
individuals who received such behaviour.

That time when


29. Students are shown the model for stages in reflective
writing.
30. Students use their journal to record in 5-6 sentences what
happened, specifically focusing on an inappropriate way of
responding to someone who is not eating healthily.
31. They journal their thoughts and feelings about the event.
32. They then make judgments about the experience, whether
they were good or bad.
33. Students analyse the event, trying to make sense of the

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situation.
34. They conclude writing about what else they could have
done about the event.
35. Finally, students write about if this situation ever arose
again, how they would respond or what they would do.
36. Completed reflective pieces are published in the classroom
and share for peers to read.

My calorie intake
37. A List of calories of some foods with the calories are
researched by the teacher through the internet using the
search words calories in foods. A supplemental list has
been provided.
38. The list of food items and the resources are shared with
the students.
39. Students are told by the teacher that they will use an
estimation strategy called Compensation that will help
them to solve addition problems easily and mentally.
40. Students view the Compensation PowerPoint presentation.
41. Students are given several combinations of foods to
calculate the number of calories, using compensation to
add within the caloric requirements for ages of students to
be healthy.

Resources:

Collection of pictures of foods (teacher and student made)


Worksheets student assessment of healthy ratings of
popular dishes, assessment of dishes according to the method
of preparationNotes - Model of stages of reflective writing, List
of calories of some foods
ICT computers, internet, PowerPoint presentation on
compensation
Recipe books
Picture stimuli running a race

Assessment:

Worksheet
Journal
discussion
Critique,
Oral Presentation

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Student Assessment of Health Ratings
of Popular Dishes
Dish Very Healthy Healthy Unhealthy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Substitution Of Unhealthy Ingredients


DISH INGREDIENT SUBSTITUTE ORIGINAL NEW
UNDER RECOMMENDED RATING RATING
REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

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SUGGESTED LIST OF INGREDIENTS TO RESEARCH
White bread
Bread crumbs
Butter / margarine/ oil -cooking
Cutter/ oil margarine sticking
Eggs
Flour
Mayonnaise
Milk
White rice
Sour cream
Syrup
Fruit flavoured yogurt

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UNIT THREE: FOSTERING POSITIVE CHANGE
Learning Plan: 2 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: A World of Change: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 days Topic: Impact on the Family
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
This learning plan reflects an exploration of the positive
transformation that occurs in families. It seeks to develop HFLE:
students understanding of how effective communication can help Effective Communication
build and strengthen relationships by encouraging trust, Decision Making
respecting confidences and displaying loyalty to their peers.
Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: Oral Communication
discuss in two or three paragraphs the POSITIVE changes Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
in a family over time Literacy
explain three or four factors that contribute to a successful
family life Numeracy
describe four (4) elements of effective communication Problem Solving
Critical thinking
apply principles of effective communication to build and Communication
maintain trust within relationships with peers and those in Representation
authority Reasoning
know when it is acceptable to disclose secrets and to
ICT Skills
whom secrets should be disclosed
assess the advantages and disadvantages of displaying Differentiated
loyalty to ones peers Instruction
read grade level texts independently
read in isolation, and in context, high-frequency words Assessment for
appropriate to grade level learning
apply reading comprehension skills and strategies
independently
respond to and ask literal and inferential questions based
on a given stimulus
write narrative descriptive stories applying the stages in the
writing process
identify key words when scanning texts to establish
relevance
identify main idea and supporting details from text
use the estimation strategy of front-end rounding to check
and justify answers in problem solving contexts and to
determine the reasonableness of answers.

Activities:
What makes a family successful?
1. Students view a PowerPoint entitled, A Successful Family.

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They engage in a discussion about what it means to be a
successful family. Students brainstorm and share ideas based
on what are their perceptions of a successful family, displaying
appropriate listening and speaking behaviours. Students
responses are recorded on the board. Students use the
dictionary or thesaurus to define new terms based on the
PowerPoint A Successful Family.

2. Students discuss the basic needs of a family and a compiled


list is written on the board: food, shelter, clothing, emotional
needs, financial needs health needs. They identify factors that
contribute to positive changes within families, which include:
marriage, a new job, graduation, improvements in a family
members health, a new sibling, or a new promotion or pay
increase. Students identify shared positive experiences with
their families, such as birthdays, or spending time in
recreational activities. They relate what fun activities they can
do together and list some examples of physical activities they
enjoy. Shared fun activities with families include: hikes, riding
bikes, walking in the park, playing games or sports, going to
the beach, fishing or gardening. They identify the positive
emotions that they feel as they experience spending time with
their families.

Working together
3. Students read a short story Kanu and his family where they
identify the characters relationship with his father. They
identify the main idea in the each paragraph and the
supporting details.
They work in pairs to create their own list of literal or inferential
questions based on the story. For example:
- What was Kanus relationship to Ono?
- How many members were in Kanus family?
- Was Kanu skilled at picking oranges? What words tell you
this?
- How did Kanu feel on that Saturday morning? Give
supporting details.

4. Students read the story and identify the problem to solve


based on the given context. They work individually to use the
estimation strategy of front-end rounding to check and justify
answers based on the number of oranges harvested by Kanu
and his father in one week. For example:
Morning 457 oranges; Estimation 500 oranges
Afternoon 513 oranges; Estimation 500 oranges
Total for day one 1000 oranges

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Communication Lost in Translation
5. Students participate in a Communication exercise.
Students are questioned by the teacher: How did the first
person send the message to the second? Who was the
original sender of the message? What did you do to receive
the message from your friend? Did you understand what you
heard? Why do you think the message was not the same as in
the beginning?
6. Students use the internet to research the elements of effective
communication. They use these key terms in their search:
Sender, Receiver, Message, the Channel, and Feedback.
Students participate in a discussion with the teacher based on
each element. They identify the different channels through
which messages could be sent, such as through text, email,
etc.
7. Students practice in pairs to send messages to each other,
being the sender and receiver of their messages, and identify
the channel through which the message was given.
8. Students identify rules to follow when communicating with
each other. Students are grouped and four elements of
communication are distributed as flashcards for each group.
They reflect on the previously grouped activities and discuss
some important tips to follow when communicating with each
other. They list these tips based on each element. For
example:

- Sender: speak clearly, pronounce words clearly, do not


talk too quickly, and give a good explanation.
- Receiver: listen attentively, think about what is being said,
ask the person to repeat if the message is not understood
- Message: use appropriate terms and simple language,
language must be clear
- Channel: some ways a message could be sent are via:
word of mouth, telephone, internet, email, blog, text

9. Students are presented with a story entitled Are Secrets


Gossip? They identify the conversations that took place
between pairs of children (e.g. Richard/Shazaad;
Shazaad/Elizabeth...). They identify the sender, receiver, the
message shared and how it was transmitted. The original
message is compared with the feedback at the end of the
entire conversation. Students analyse the ways in which
messages could become distorted because of the perceived
understanding of the receiver. They identify ways they should
communicate with their peers, their family members and with
adults.

141
10. They read the text and respond to inferential and literal
questions posed by the teacher:
- What was the result of not keeping the secret in the
beginning?
- How do you think Richard felt when he realized that his
friend Shazaad did not keep his secret?
- Richard was walking by and overheard what LiLi had to
say. How do you think he will react to Shazaad when he
sees him?
- Was anyone harmed as a result of secrets not being
kept?
-
What Gives?
11. Students focus on their personal experience of keeping
secrets and respond to questions by the teacher:
- Would you trust a person who could not keep your
secrets?
- When is it okay to tell a secret? When is it not okay?
- Do you keep your word when you make a promise to
keep a secret?

12. Students listen attentively to the responses of their peers and


wait their turn to express their own ideas and examples. They
are shown a table on the board with the headings:
Keeping Secrets
When is it acceptable to keep When is it not acceptable to
a secret about your friend or keep a secret about your
family member? friend or family member?

E.g. When the persons E.g. When the person could


feelings could be hurt, or most likely be in potential
become embarrassed danger or harm

Students work in groups to think of other examples or situations


based on the given questions. Each group reads their example
and place it on the board. Students state if they agree or disagree
with the examples and given situations.
The term Loyalty is defined through the use of a dictionary or
thesaurus by the groups. Students discuss the positive aspect of
maintaining trust between friends or family. They identify the
advantages of being loyal to their friends (considered to be
trustworthy, reliable, deep bonds of friendship formed) and the
disadvantages of being loyal (e.g. when a friend is not telling the
truth and you decide to stay quiet about it).

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High Frequency words
13. Students read and extract words used to describe the dog in
the story. They identify the words as synonyms; words with the
same meaning but different spelling. Students use the
synonyms to create their own sentences.

Paired Writing
14. Students look at a picture based on a happy family moment.
They provide descriptions of the scene being viewed. Students
work in groups to create a narrative descriptive piece of
writing on the topic: Family Moments to Remember

Students brainstorm ideas using a graphic organizer with the


headings Setting, Character, Plot, Conflict, Resolution.
Students use the semantic map as a guide to create a first draft of
their stories applying the stages in the writing process.
Review of students first drafts is done by peers in the class.
These are shared by peers and suggestions are given to improve
each draft. The second draft of the stories is reviewed by the
teacher and any additional editorial changes are made. Students
write their final drafts after no more editorial changes are required.
Students publish and display their narrative descriptive stories on
a story wall.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, marker
Art Supplies: paint, brushes
ICTs: computer, PowerPoint A Successful Family, picture
Literature: Stories Are Secrets Gossip?; Students
researched articles based on effective communications.

Search link
http://www.ehow.com/about_5232701_elements-effective-communication_.html
http://ezinearticles.com/?Elements-of-Effective-Communication&id=4510750

Assessment:
Guided Questioning
Oral Discussion
Narrative-Descriptive Writing product

143
Communication exercise

1. Students form two lines.

2. The first student in each line listens to a message whispered to him/her by the teacher

3. The student then conveys the message heard by whispering it to the next person in line.

4. Each student in line listens to the message and then conveys what was told to him/her to the

next person in line.

5. This continues until the last person stands and says the final message that was heard.

6. The original message is written on the board and students compare it to the final message

received.

7. Students suggest reasons why the message became distorted from its original context.

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Kanu and his Family
Kanu awoke early Saturday morning. He had a broad smile on his face as he quickly jumped out of
bed. Today was the day! Rubbing his hands in glee, Kanu looked out his bedroom window. What a
beautiful day! he exclaimed. Fields and fields of oranges completed dressing in record time and
rushed off for breakfast. Kanu met his mother, Alala, as she prepared breakfast for her only child
Kanu and her dear husband Ono.

Eat well my son, for today you will be going with me to harvest the oranges from our orchard, said
Ono. Kanu felt a thrill of excitement as he gobbled up his food. They made their way to the orchard,
where Ono had several of his field workers already picking oranges. Kanu followed his father as he
learned how to pick the oranges. He had a lot of problems at first, but soon he was able to perform
the job skilfully. By the end of lunchtime, they picked 457 oranges. In the afternoon they picked a
further 513 oranges.

Kanu enjoyed spending time with his father and learning about the work involved on the farm. As he
worked throughout the day, he observed the ways of his father as he interacted with his field workers.
He now understood how much effort his father made to make his life comfortable and for this he was
extremely proud and grateful to be a part of his loving family.

145
Are Secrets Gossip?
Narrator Mr. Ghouralal had finally completed teaching his
Social Studies class about Basic Needs of the family. The class sat in
silence for a moment, thinking about what they had learned.
Donna couldnt keep this secret to herself anymore. These were her best
friends.
Below is an account of the story and what prompted Donnas actions.

Richard Hey Shazaad can you keep a secret? Today Im getting a Dalmatian puppy.
I am so excited. But remember its a secret.

Narrator Do you think it will be kept a secret?

Shazaad Thats good news. So when can I play with him?

Richard As soon as I get him Ill let you know and you can come to my house. But
remember its a secret.

Shazaad Oh I cant wait. And yes I will keep your secret.

Narrator But as we all know good friends also have good friends as well.

Shazaad Hey Elizabeth, want to hear a secret? But you have to keep it between us.
Richard is getting a Dalmatian?

Elizabeth Whats a Dalmatian?

Shazaad Its a dog. Have you ever seen those movies with the fire-fighters?

Elizabeth Yeah

Shazaad Well you see the black and white spotty dog the fire-fighters have, thats a
Dalmatian.

Elizabeth Ohhh!

Shazaad Remember its a secret so dont tell anyone. Get it?

Elizabeth Got it
Narrator Later that afternoon in a phone between Quami and Elizabeth, the
following takes place.

Elizabeth And Quami before I forget to tell you, Shazaad told me that Richard is
getting a new dog.

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Quami What kind?

Elizabeth Yuh know nah, that dog that has all the splotches on its skin. I cant
remember the name right now

Quami So hes getting a blotchy dog

Narrator The secret gets passed on with more colourful synonyms for spotted being
used to describe the dog. Finally it reaches Donnas ears as she passes
down the hallway. She overhears a conversation between Li Li and Sati.

Li Li Sati, did you hear that Shazaad said that Richard is a dirty dog?

Sati But girl, arent Shazaad and Richard best friends?

Li Li Yes! But something may have happened between the two of them.

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UNIT THREE: Fostering Positive Change
Learning Plan: 3 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Term 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 3 days Topic: Items in the Environment
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Many of the items used in our daily lives we take for granted by using HFLE:
them and then discarding them. Some of these items can impact on our Critical Thinking
lives to various degrees. Children can be made aware of these items, Cooperation
their uses and the need to protect the environment.
Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
Writing
At the end of this learning experience students will: Oral
explain how the earth becomes warm as a result of the Communication
Greenhouse Effect Literary
draw and label diagrams to illustrate the Greenhouse Effect Appreciation
describe in Spanish major changes taking place in the world Media &
using the structure Hay ms Information Literacy
communicate good environmental practices
persuade others (in writing or orally) to adopt good new Numeracy
practices Problem Solving
describe time as minutes to or minutes after or past the hour Critical thinking
and tell time to the minute Communication
match times shown on standard digital clocks, 24 hour digital Representation
clocks and analog clocks to the minute, and record time Reasoning
calculate the duration of events using starting and finishing times
(elapsed time) ICT Skills
estimate the duration of an event in minutes and up to one hour,
verify by measuring, and determine the reasonableness of Differentiated
estimates Instruction
compare a similar theme presented in two different literary texts
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts expressing point Assessment for
of view learning
understand that non-renewable energy stores are finite
explain the difference between renewable and non-renewable
energy
analyse details using graphic organizers.

Activities:
How hot is it?

1. The Activity Too Hot is conducted in an area with lots of sun

148
such as outside.(see CD)
2. Students use the Temperature Record Sheet (see CD) to record
the time the experiment starts (0 minutes) and the temperature
shown by each thermometer. At five minute intervals, the
temperatures in both jars are recorded. This is continued until a
total of 30 minutes has elapsed.
3. At the end of the observation period students answer questions:
In which jar did the temperature rise faster?
How much faster (time) did it rise?
Why do you think this happened?

Say it in Spanish
4. Students use the term hay ms (there is more) to say
which bottle has more heat while pointing to the jar with the
higher temperatures.
5. The Greenhouse Effect is introduced and students explain what
they know, or think they know. Students listen attentively as the
note on The Greenhouse Effect (see CD) is read to them.
6. A short video clip is sourced by the teacher using the search
words in resources.
7. The students view the video to further understand the
Greenhouse Effect.
8. The note on the Enhanced Greenhouse Effect is read by the
teacher.
9. In groups of 4 or 5 students discuss the greenhouse effect and
the enhanced greenhouse effect. They write points on each
and present to the class.
10. Students use the internet or encyclopaedia to research
information on drawings depicting the Greenhouse Effect.
11. They draw and label a diagram of the greenhouse effect.

Good habits that benefit us


12. Students research good environmental practices in agriculture
for the growing of plants and rearing of animals such as:
a) proper management practices which reduce the need for
chemicals for pest and disease control with more focus on
biological control
b) good sanitation practices keeping a clean environment to
reduce the chance for an animal to contract a disease;
c) waste management practices (converting animal waste into
manure, plant waste into compost);
d) conservation of land space.
13. Students share their research, notes and pictures and discuss
good environmental practices.
14. Students identify three ways these practices can help reduce the
greenhouse effect and the benefits to the environment.

149
15. Students are separated into two groups (this can be increased
based on the class size). Each group will create a poster to
show two good environmental practices to reduce the
greenhouse effect.

What time is it?


16. Students examine and discuss both analog and digital clocks
e.g. how hands or numbers move, direction of these movements
(up/down, clockwise/anticlockwise), features of each clock, etc.
17. Students identify the part of the face of an analog clock that
shows past the hour and to the hour.
18. Students use the analog clock and count the minutes. They use
the minute and the hour hands to represent minutes past the
hour and minutes to the hour e.g. 12 minutes past 9; 12 minutes
to 9.
19. Students use the digital clock and represent the times shown in
an analog clock and vice versa.
20. Students calculate the time as shown on a 24 hour clock and its
equivalence on a 12 hour clock.
21. Teacher presents scenario and students estimate time e.g. how
long did it take to - eat lunch?; - enter the classroom after
assembly?
22. Students discuss problems, based on elapsed time, with
classmates and complete their worksheets Activity Time and
Elapsed Time (See CD) .

What is it about?
23. Two pieces of literature are given to the students which address
the same topic e.g. Trinidad Guardian article entitled Bullies
manipulate, try control others and the attached article Is it
bullying? (See CD)
24. Students read the literature that is presented to them.
25. A graphic organiser is located by the teacher using the search
words Graphic organiser and main idea.
26. Students use the graphic organizer to identify points, main idea
and the theme. (Individual work)
27. Students explain the contents of each text and answer questions
on who, what, why, when, where and how.
28. Students compare each piece of literature and the answers to
the questions.

How did you feel?


29. Students view a picture on Bullying.
30. The class is divided into two groups. Based on the image in the
picture, both groups will write a 2-paragraph journal entry. One
group writes from the point of view of the victim, while the

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second group writes from the perspective of the onlooker. Both
groups write in First Person and emphasis is placed on the
thoughts and emotions of the character whose point of view is
taken.

Energy detective
31. Students use the internet or the encyclopaedia to research the
meaning of the term energy. Meanings are presented and
discussed. One working definition is decided on.
32. Students research and identify the different sources of energy.
List of energy sources is presented by the students with a brief
explanation of each.
33. The terms renewable and non-renewable energy sources are
researched by the teacher, using printed literature or video clips
from YouTube as reference material. These are shared and
used as needed.
34. Students work in groups of about 5 (depending on class size).
They use the graphic organizer Compare and Contrast to help
differentiate between renewable and non-renewable energy
sources.
35. In their groups students formulate a definition for renewable and
non-renewable energy. They present these definitions to the
class.
36. The students read the Sources of Energy article. They group
the resources into renewable and non-renewable, on the
worksheet provided. Students also give reasons for why a
resource is renewable or non-renewable.
37. On their own students complete a Worksheet to identify
renewable and non-renewable resources.

How many?
38. Students identify the good environmental practices they
followed during the rearing of the animal or the growing of the
ochro plants (sanitation would be the only one left out as they
are not allowed to use chemicals).They use dictionaries to
define the meaning of the word yield.
39. Students are divided evenly into groups one group per plant.
Students estimate and measure the time it will take to pick the
mature ochroes off their plant. This activity continues daily or
every other day depending on the readiness of the ochroes to be
picked.
40. Students count the number of ochroes picked per plant and
record in the Ochroes Record Sheet
41. Students tally the yield of the ochroes per plant and calculate the
entire yield for all of the plants in one week and complete the
Ochroes Tally Sheet.

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OR
39. Calculating the yield of an animal: students calculate the yield of
the animal by weighing it. They record this data in their record
books. (This is the book they used to record observations made
during the growth of plants or the rearing of the animal).
40. Students compare the weight of the animal at the beginning of
the rearing period and the present weight.

Resources:
2 identical glass jars, one with a lid; 2 pieces of dark cloth; 2
thermometers;
paper; pencil;
Worksheets Time, Elapsed Time, Renewable or Non-
renewable Sources of Energy, Renewable or Non-renewable,
Analog clock; digital clock;
Reference material - Trinidad Guardian article on bullying,
Picture stimuli Bullying at School
Notes What is the Greenhouse Effect? The Enhanced
Greenhouse Effect, Sources of Energy, Is it Bullying?
Experiment Sheet Too Hot
Record Sheet Temperature, Ochroes Tally Sheet;
observation book
Internet access,
Encyclopaedia
Graphic organizers Main Idea, Compare and Contrast

Search words: the greenhouse effect video for kids; the greenhouse
effect easy to understand

Assessment:
Points presented on what is the greenhouse effect.
Posters and 3-D models
Information/Answers given in worksheets
Students interaction and participation during classroom activities

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UNIT THREE: Impact of Change
Learning Plan: 4 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: The World of Change: Understanding Change
Topic: Impact on Society
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
An individuals activities impact on the society. The advancement
of the Social Media has allowed persons from various countries to HFLE:
Problem Solving
interact with each other even though physically they are miles Effective Communication
apart. Culture and values are transmitted through Social Media
and this has made both positive and negative impacts on the Literacy
society. Reading
Writing
Oral Communication
Outcomes: Literary Appreciation
act fairly and display sensitivity to others who need support Media & Information
Literacy
demonstrate deepening understanding of respect for self
and others Numeracy
observe and record weather patterns using symbols Problem Solving
Critical thinking
explain the difference between weather and climate Communication
outline steps to prepare for extreme weather conditions Representation
name two or three activities associated with any two of the Reasoning
four seasons
ICT Skills
insert on a map of the earth: the hemispheres, the seven
continents, the oceans Differentiated
locate and name the major lines of latitude on a map of the Instruction
world
name the main lines of longitude Assessment for
recognize the role of games and sport in getting to know learning
and understand others of like and different cultures
exhibit responsible behavior through fair play and respect
for others
share in team work
state the usefulness of foreign language learning
recognize the importance of world languages
use information products and technology ethically
employ media etiquette when using technology and
producing media texts
select appropriate formats based on the needs of the
audience and purpose
produce some short media texts for specific purposes and
audiences, using a few simple media forms and
appropriate conventions and techniques: to influence
attitudes positively e.g. towards pollution or smoking health
effects
use metacognitive strategies to clarify meaning in texts e.g.

153
rereading, visualising, thinking about the text, before,
during and after reading strategies
express preferences and support their views by reference
to texts
make text to self, text to text and text to world connections
between what they already know and the information
presented in the text
generate questions about the texts
evaluate texts by making explicit and inferential reference
to texts
use estimation strategies such as compatible numbers to
check solutions to addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division problems, including those involving money and
determine reasonableness of answers
Activities:

I am me!
1. Introduction: Students are paired and each pair receives a
small safety mirror. They are instructed to each take a turn
and observe their own reflection in the mirror followed by
their friends reflection. They then engage in a teacher
facilitated discussion about their observations.
Discuss the uniqueness of the individual.
2. Each student is given a copy of the questionnaire labelled
Worksheet 1.(Adapt as necessary by adding or reducing
the number of questions).
3. Students will be asked to interview their classmates until
they have a response for all or almost all the questions
from the questionnaire.
Explain that students should write only one name per
question.
The same name should not appear more than once on the
same sheet (excepting there are two students with the same
first name, then their full name is to be used)
4. Students will engage in a teacher facilitated discussion
about their recorded results.
How many students discovered something new about a
classmate?
What were some of the things discovered?
Did their classmates share common interests, traits or
abilities as themselves?
How many students discovered that they shared similar
interests, traits or abilities?
How does it feel to discover that you share something in
common with another classmate?
Was it easier to find name for some questions than for

154
others?
Why do you think this might be so?
5. Students will reflect on what makes each of them unique.
We are all born with some characteristics/traits, we
develop certain interests as we grow, and we each
possess specific abilities.
6. Students will engage in a teacher facilitated discussion on
which factors that may have influenced and developed
some of these traits and characteristics. (E.g. culture,
family values, media trends, fads, fashion to name a few).

SOCIAL! MEDIA! OR SOCIAL MEDIA?


7 A poster or an ad from the paper is presented and students
discuss the message presented from the ad.
Students respond to focus questions posed by the
teacher:
How do media influence us as persons?
What kinds of messages do television advertisements
send
to viewers?
What kinds of messages do magazine ads send to
readers?
8 Students view a PowerPoint presentation- What is Social
Media. They listen and discuss questions posed on slides
#3 and #4.
9 Students engage in a teacher facilitated discussion.
Always be respectful of others when using social media
e.g. Twitter and Facebook.
Reiterate and validate the need for respect.
10.The class is divided into an even number of groups with 4-5
students in each group. Each group is given a sheet of
chart paper/Bristol Board and Art supplies; they are
instructed to create a poster on Rules for using the internet
OR Netiquette Rules.
11.A class Blog is set up by the teacher using Social Media
such as MySpace. Each group is given a current issue
such as Pollution, Recycling or Smoking Health Effects.
They will research and post their research on the blog,
answer and respond to questions posed by their peers and
maintain and demonstrate good netiquette.
12. Students will be assessed through rubrics on the accuracy
of information presented, responses to questions and
good blogging practices.
13. Students will write a daily journal for two (2) weeks on their
blogging experiences.

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WEATHER OR CLIMATE
14. Students research the meaning of the words climate and
weather. As a whole class they discuss the difference
between weather and climate.
15. Students describe the climate they experience where they
live or go to school. They make predictions about the
climate for the next month, during the dry or wet season.
16. Using different weather symbols students will record the
weather in their area for a week. At the end of the week
they describe the weather and identify the dominant
weather pattern for the particular period.
17. Scenario presented by teacher: a hurricane will hit the
island in 24 hours.
18. Individual work: students will write about the steps and
precautions they are going to take to prepare for the
hurricane, during the hurricane and after the hurricane.
19. Group work: in groups of four or five (depending on class
size) students create posters to show the steps that should
be taken to prepare for a hurricane.

WHERE DO I LIVE
20.Using pictures students name and identify the four seasons
in temperate countries.
(spring, summer, autumn/fall and winter). Students then
name three activities and specific sporting events that
take place during each season.
21. Students identify the seasons in Trinidad and Tobago.
Sporting events of other countries that take place in
Trinidad and Tobago are named e.g. football, track and
field, volleyball, etc.
22.Class engages in a discussion on how sports and games
Can help people from different countries get to know each
other (reference can be made to cricketers like Brian Lara
and Sachin Tendulkar who are good friends; going to other
countries to take part in sporting events like the 2012
Olympics in London).
23.Discussion on what helps a team win an event (team work,
responsible behaviour, fair play and respect).
24.(Students use atlases here) Countries that experience
these seasons are named and located on a map of the
world. Using the world map in an atlas the 7 continents are
named and located. Students insert the continents on a
blank template of a world map. The oceans are also
inserted on the same map.
25.Students show in the atlas where temperate countries are
located. The hemispheres are then located and inserted on

156
the template.
26.Students then name and locate the main lines of latitude
and longitude. These are then inserted on the template.
27.On blank template students insert the seven continents,
oceans, hemispheres, and major lines of latitude and
longitude.

MATH IS FUN
28.Students current knowledge is assessed and working
groups
decided. In these groups students work together and use
estimation strategies (using compatible numbers) to check
solutions to problems in addition, subtraction, multiplication
and division.
29.Students work individually to complete a worksheet. (see
attached worksheet for examples)

Resources:
Paper, pencil, coloured pencils
Mathematics worksheet, science worksheet, worksheet 1
World map template
Assessment:
Completion of world map
Estimation strategies used to complete Math worksheet
Correct use of weather symbols

157
MATHEMATICS Estimation
These examples can be used to create a worksheet for use in class.

Round off each number then perform the function to estimate the answer.

1) 1 608 820 =
2) 2 719 915 =
3) 332 + 729 =
4) 2 816 + 1 209 =

Use estimation strategies to solve these.

5) You want to buy five magazines that cost $5.95 each. Estimate what you would pay for
the five magazines.

6) The cost of making one costume is $4 000. If 25 people ordered costumes how much
money would be needed to make these costumes?

7) 1100 beads have to be packed in bags of 40 before being sent to a mas camp. How
many bags will be sent to the mas camp?

8) 1 200 chicks have to be packed in crates with one dozen each to be sent to a pet shop
in time for Easter. Estimate how many crates will be sent to the pet shop?

9) Miss Davis bought Easter eggs for her class. She spent $16.25 on chocolate eggs,
$11.75 on pink eggs and $12.25 on blue eggs. Estimate the total cost of Miss Davis
purchase.

10) The head piece for a costume has 998 silver beads and 923 black beads. In your
estimation how many beads do you think one head piece has?

11) There are 5 653 Easter chocolates. 4 317 are wrapped in silver paper and the rest in
coloured paper. How many do you estimate are wrapped in coloured paper? What is the
actual answer?

12) 800 hot cross were ordered for a school to be given to students and staff. 765 hot cross
were given away. Estimate how many buns remained.

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LEARNING UNIT1: Promoting Patriotism

Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change Estimated frame: 3 weeks

Context: Patriotism is love for ones country. Our students, at a very early age are
exposed to the unique cultural heritage that defines us as a people.
Therefore, it is imperative that students understand their role in their countrys
development and be empowered to make decisions to bring about change. In
the thrust towards promoting patriotism, students also need to become civic
minded and demonstrate civic efficacy. Civic efficacy is the readiness and
willingness to assume citizenship responsibilities. This unit focuses on
providing students with learning experiences that will help them recognize
and understand aspects of culture and their role in becoming an ideal citizen
of Trinidad and Tobago.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:


display a sense of patriotism for country
use and understand the use of agro-processing methods to extend the
shelf life of agro products in Trinidad and Tobago
develop and apply procedures to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of decimals
develop estimation skills
solve multi-step problems involving whole numbers, fractions and
decimals using algorithms, mental strategies and other problem solving
strategies
design survey(s) to solve problem(s) that involves the use of statistical
data
gather, classify, organize and display data using tables, tally charts and
graphs ( bar graphs) and interpret results
describe methods and analyse results and make decisions
communicate findings and decisions made using vocabulary associated
with statistics
justify their choice of healthy foods
state in Spanish what they have for breakfast
compare local breakfast to a typical breakfast in a named Hispanic
country
exhibit sensitivity to individuals who suffer from food related illnesses or
challenges
develop an understanding of the political history of Trinidad and Tobago
and how it contributed to the political system today
develop a sense of national pride by recognizing the significance of the
national awards
recognize the constitution as the law of the land that protects the freedom
and independence of citizens

159
outline ways in which Hispanic culture is being infused in contemporary
Trinidad and Tobago
express, in Spanish, likes and dislikes of selected aspects of Hispanic
culture
be open- minded to the culture of others
express in Spanish, likes and dislikes of selected aspects of the Hispanic
culture
demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which effective
communication helps to maintain trust within relationships
demonstrate deepening understanding of respect for self and others
demonstrate an understanding of impartiality
practise proper performance behaviour
play two-part pieces by rote on melodic instruments
know how to use pre-listening, during-listening and post-listening listening
strategies
know how to use strategies that assist in simultaneous listening and
analyzing activities
know how to apply critical literacy skills such as point-of-view,5w+h
questioning for meaning of text, compare and contrast, close reading
know how to use figurative language in context
apply appropriate phonic skills and strategies to reading
create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences
use words which express deeper meaning in speaking, reading and
writing
know how to use the different types of vocabulary across content areas
know that a message should be analysed before its acceptance
know appropriate listening and speaking behaviours for a variety of
contexts
know that literary texts are written by different people from varying
countries with diverse cultures

know that a subject must agree with a verb in writing


demonstrate competence in gaining messages as an independent
consumer of media texts.
Learning 6. Patronizing Our Local Produce
Plans: 7. Respecting Food Choices
8. Celebrating our Achievement
9. A Nation is Born
10. Developing Civic Efficacy
Resources: Learning Plan 1: Stationery, Pictures (see attached PowerPoint - From
the farm to the table), ICT computer, projector, software
Learning Plan 2: Computer, Printer, Photocopying Machine, Multimedia
Projector, Compact Disk, CD player, Pictures, Stationery, Stationery:
flashcard-size pieces of Bristol board, markers, pencils, computers with
internet, printer, cameras, pictures, graphic organiser

160
Learning Plan 3: Pictures of National Awardees and National Awards,
Sample medal or trophy, Computer to conduct research, The four categories
of our National Awards, List of recipients of National Awards (2012 is given
as an example), Template for tally chart and frequency table, Computer/
laptop, Multimedia projector, video recorder, videos, CD player, Power Point
Presentation, Mystery Box with various items, blindfold
Learning Plan 4: Computer, Pictures, Internet, CD Player, CD National
Songs with accompaniment, Dates in Our History, Paper, Pencil, Copies of
National Songs, Checklists, Box, Dice
Learning Plan 5: Paper, Pencil, Markers, Drawing book, Scrapbook,
Computer, Photocopier, Video recording, Pictures, Graphic organizer, Bench,
Chair or desk, Podium, Story of the Political Evolution in Trinidad and Tobago
(teacher sourced), Word cards, Prefect Badge(teacher made),Red food
colouring / Stamp pad, Small container, Ballot box

Assessments: Oral Questioning


Rubrics
Checklist
Performance Task
Charades
Oral Presentations
Worksheets

161
UNIT ONE Promoting Patriotism
Learning Plan: 1 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 3 days Topic: Patronizing Our Local Produce
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Students need to understand the importance of being
patriotic by supporting our local agro-industries. They will learn
about the advantages of agro-processing and the creation of HFLE
cottage industries. These help to reduce unemployment and Decision Making
alleviate poverty. Problem Solving

This learning plan seeks to explore the agro processing


industry, in which students are given opportunity to research Literacy
agro processing methods, cost of production and marketing Reading
strategies. Writing
Literary
Outcomes: Appreciation
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral
report the use of at least three, agro-processing Communication
methods as they are used to extend shelf life of agro Media &
products Information
solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of Literacy
decimals, including money
use estimation skills to check solutions to problems and Numeracy
determine reasonableness of answers Problem Solving
explain that healthy foods are impacted by Critical thinking
o ingredients used and Communication
o method of preparation
Representation
select healthy foods from pictures and lists
Reasoning
defend their food choices
read level grade texts independently
ICT Skills
compose own poems and stories
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts
Differentiated
expressing point-of-view
Instruction
explain the purpose of selected media texts (a television
show, advertisement, radio broadcast, poem any other
audio selections) Assessment for
use information products and technology ethically. learning

Activities:
Value methods of processing produce
1. Students are placed into groups and are shown pictures
of various fresh produce and processed products.
2. Students are asked to discuss what is shown and
identify ways of extending the shelf life of the produce.

162
3. Students research agro processing methods and foods
that are processed by those methods pickling, drying,
salting, freezing, frying, smoking, canning, bottling.
4. Students compare the shelf life of fresh produce with
that of processed products.
5. Students create and present a report based on the
research, outlining the steps used to process the
products.
6. Students research the cost of fresh produce and agro
processed products by visiting the market, vegetable
stalls etc.
7. Given scenarios, students estimate the cost of
production in a cottage industry, (few families coming
together to produce large quantity of different items
such as Kuchela) using rounded numbers up to 1000.
8. They compare the difference in cost between fresh
produce and processed products to determine the most
cost effective method.
9. Students calculate the total cost of additives for food
production and the change to be received in dollars and
cents if given a budget of 1000 dollars.

Choosing healthy methods


10. Students are shown pictures of various types of foods
and are asked to identify healthy agro - processed foods
and defend their choices (see attached).
11. They form groups and discuss the task then present to
the whole group.
12. In groups, students are then asked to name the
additives used in healthy agro processed foods to
extend shelf life.
13. They then suggest healthy methods of preparing foods.

Buy Local
14. In groups, students produce an advertisement in the
form of a jingle, poem, story or song to promote the
theme of Buy Local.
15. Students present their jingle, poem, story or song to
class.

Resources:
Stationery paper, pencil, markers, Bristol board
Pictures (see attached power point which can be
printed)
ICT computer, projector, software
PowerPoint - From the farm to the table

163
Assessment:

Rubric for assessing portfolio outlining the steps of at


least three agro processing methods.
Checklist for advertisement
Oral questions
Worksheet - calculate bills giving change using two
decimal places (not included)

164
UNIT ONE : Promoting Patriotism
Learning Plan: 2 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Theme A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 3 days Topic: Respecting Food Choices
Context: In todays world, information on healthy foods abounds, so CONSIDERATIONS:
much so that people are overwhelmed by the varying facts that are
presented. Despite the evidence presented about the ill-effects of HFLE:
Understanding
overconsumption of certain types of food, food-related health issues Consequences
continue to escalate. Moreover, there are numerous misconceptions Decision Making
about fast foods. Children need to appreciate that while fast food
consumption is a part of modern living, they have to get the knowledge Literacy
Reading
necessary to make food choices that would bring them health benefits.
Writing
Additionally, it is imperative that they respect each others food choices. Oral Communication
Media & Information
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience, students will:
Numeracy
Problem Solving
collect data on food choices using interviews Critical thinking
list fast food options available in Trinidad and Tobago Communication
use the Spanish structure me gusta/no me gusta to express likes Representation
Reasoning
and dislikes for particular foods
communicate findings and decisions by writing a report using ICT Skills
language associated with statistics e.g. data and mode
justify the choice of foods according to the health aspects Differentiated
defend food choices Instruction
demonstrate appropriate responses and behaviour to individuals
who do not choose healthy food options Assessment for
use vocabulary words in context learning
state in Spanish what they have for breakfast
compare local breakfast to a typical breakfast in a named Hispanic
country
influence others to make healthy food choices by designing and
creating information flyers
determine the strengths and weaknesses of their flyers
detail ways in which persons can respect themselves and others.

Activities:

What We Eat
1. Working in small groups, students generate a list of the fast foods
available in Trinidad and Tobago.
2. Students share their understanding of fast food. They list different

165
types of foods that they consider to be fast foods.
3. Students work together to generate their own definition of fast
foods.
4. Students then conduct online research to get a definition of fast
food. Alternatively, they read a definition provided by the teacher.
5. Students compare their own definition with that accessed online or
by teacher.
6. Based on the formal definition, students add/delete food items that
they listed earlier on.
7. Students share personal experiences with fast foods.

Vote on your feet (Respecting My Choice And Others)


8. Students listen as teacher calls out the list of foods identified in the
previous activities. If they love the food identified, they move to
one end of the class labelled I Love. If they do not like the food,
they move to the opposite end of the classroom, labelled I Dont
Like. Students may stand anywhere along the line, showing the
extent to which they love the food, for example, if they stand half
way along the line, the neither like nor dislike the food. This activity
is repeated with a variety of foods.
9. After each vote students orally express their opinions on the
different food choices, i.e. they defend their opinions on their
choice of foods. Students engage in class discussion on
observations and ways to show respect for each others food
choices (by being considerate). For Example, most people like fast
food X, 1/3 of the class dislikes Fast Food Y.
10. The teacher reminds the students of the Spanish phrases Me
gusta (I Like) and No me gusta (I Dont Like). Teacher continues
calling foods. Students express how they feel about the food out
loud in Spanish. After they state their preference in Spanish, the
students move to the spot area on the continuum.
N.B. (For this activity, teacher would only use singular foods for
example, fried chicken, pizza, roti, doubles, etc. Me gusta is used
only for singular food items)

Obesity and Trinidad and Tobago.


11. Students in groups read a newspaper report on the obesity
situation in Trinidad and Tobago.
12. Students use a highlighter/pencil to underline the key terms in the
article. Students complete the vocabulary organizer with the
terms/words highlighted (see Word Detective organizer in CD).
13. Using a (different colour) highlighter/pencil, students underline
three important facts about obesity in Trinidad and Tobago.
14. Students explain the health ministers response to the current
situation.
15. Students express their opinions on the content of the text

166
16. Students suggest reasons for the obesity situation that exists in
Trinidad and Tobago. They may conduct research of causes of
obesity in people. If using the internet as a resource, students may
type in the prompt What causes people to be overweight?
17. Students list possible causes of obesity. Reasons may include
over-consumption of (fast) food, poor eating habits, medical issues
with individuals, physical inactivity etc.
18. Students research/suggest the effects of being overweight or
obese.

Fast Food School!


19. Students work together to create a simple interview to find out the
types of fast foods consumed by classmates/schoolmates and the
frequency that they eat these fast foods. They may use the W and
H questions to help in the creation of the questionnaires.
Examples of questions that may be used Which is your favourite
fast food? How often do you eat fast foods? When did you last eat
fast foods? What was the last fast food you ate?
20. Students decide on the sample population for their interview. For
example, they may decide to interview all the members of their
class, or twenty random members of the upper school. Each group
may decide on a different sample population.
21. Students conduct their interviews.
22. Using the interviews, students work in their groups to tally the
responses on tally chart.
23. Students work together to analyse the tally charts. They generate
a written report of their findings and make oral presentation.

Breakfast in Trinidad and Tobago


24. Students chat with their peers about foods they usually have for
breakfast. They create flashcards by writing the names of these
foods. All flashcards are stuck on the word wall. Teacher engages
students in oral reading of the word list.
25. Teacher creates and presents flashcards of the Spanish words for
the most common foods and has students repeat the words
several times. Teacher calls upon individual students to match
English flashcards to Spanish flashcards. Pictures can also be
used in the matching activity.
bread pan, cereal cereales, fruit fruta, coffee caf, tea
t, milk leche, chocolate chocolate, juice jugo

26. Teacher introduces the question Qu tomas para el desayuno?


and translates it. Pointing to himself/herself, teacher answers
Tomo pan - I have bread. Teacher models the use of this
structure using the names of the food items listed above.
27. Students practise answering to the question Qu tomas para el

167
desayuno?
28. Students collect/take pictures of breakfast items and create a
picture menu using both the English and Spanish words.

I wonder what our neighbours have for breakfast


29. Students make predictions on what people in Spanish-speaking
countries have for breakfast. These are written on an organiser as
shown below.

Breakfast in Spanish- Breakfast in Spanish-


speaking country speaking country
My predictions My findings

30. If computers with internet are available, students research what


people in a neighbouring Spanish-speaking country (e.g.
Venezuela) have for breakfast and write down their findings.
Available pictures can be printed. Information collected is
discussed. (If the technology is unavailable, teacher provides
sources of information.)

Venezuelan breakfast options


o Fried eggs on toast sprinkled with cacao, black beans, sliced
avocado and tomato.
o A small pastry or toast served with coffee or fresh juice
o Ham crescent roll made up of corn flour, eggs, ham and butter,
Venezuelan chocolate, coffee
o Arepas with butter, cheese or ham

Lets compare
31. Students engage in short discussion with peers to generate
comparative statements about breakfast in their own country and
those of a Spanish-speaking country. Statements are shared with
the class.
32. Students make a journal entry based on what they have learned
about breakfast in their country and that of the Spanish-speaking
country.

A healthier Trinidad and Tobago


33. Students, in their groups, suggest healthier food choices for

168
persons who regularly consume fast food. Students may use the
internet to gather information on making healthy fast food choices.
They share their findings. For example, limiting portion sizes,
choosing salads/vegetables instead of fries, drinking water instead
of soft drinks, limit heavy salad dressings.
34. Students, using their knowledge/findings about healthy foods and
fast foods, design and create a flyer advising others about making
healthy food choices when buying fast foods.
35. Students present their flyers. The class comments on the
strengths of the flyers. They then make suggestions on how the
flyers may be improved.
36. Students may use comments to edit their flyers.
37. Students display flyers in designated areas around the school.

Resources:
Interview questions
newspaper article
charts
paper
Art supplies

Assessment:
Oral Questioning
Observation Checklist
Oral Presentations
Product Presentations

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UNIT ONE Promoting Patriotism
Learning Activity: 3 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 3 days Topic: Celebrating Our Achievements
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Trinidad and Tobago is a diverse country whose culture has been
influenced in many ways. The Hispanic cultural influences have become HFLE:
more recognizable in our country today; because of that, different types Self-Motivation
of people live here, many of whom have had a significant and positive
impact, contributing to the development of our twin-island Republic. Literacy
All citizens are eligible to be considered for a National Award based on Reading
their distinguished, outstanding, long, meritorious, loyal and devoted Writing
service. It is with this in mind that students should become familiar with Literary
various ways of acknowledging and celebrating ones achievements. Appreciation
Oral
Outcomes: Communication
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Media &
determine a suitable scale for data and record the scale in a key Information
represent data using tally charts, frequency tables and bar graphs Literacy
utilize the features of graphs to ensure that they are completed
appropriately Numeracy
name and label the horizontal axis Problem Solving
name the four National Awards of Trinidad and Tobago Critical thinking
explain the significance of two National Awards Communication
identify aspects of Hispanic culture that are being infused into the Representation
contemporary culture of Trinidad and Tobago
Reasoning
express, in Spanish, likes and dislikes of selected aspects of
Hispanic culture
ICT Skills
describe elements of effective communication
use high- frequency and content- specific words to create and
express meaning Differentiated
read grade level texts independently Instruction
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts expressing point-
of- view Assessment for
make connections among different cultures through literature learning
compose own poems and stories
use the correct form of the verb in writing
express personal thoughts and feelings about some simple media
works.

Activities:
The Significance of National Awards
1. A student is presented with a medal or small trophy for his/ her

170
outstanding contribution in class.
2. Students discuss why individuals are given awards. They note
that when someone makes a positive contribution they are given
an award, which is also done at the National Level.
3. Students listen to school broadcast on National Heroes then view
pictures of citizens who have been the recipients of our National
Awards.
4. Students engage in discussion, led by the teacher, with key focus
on:
the names of some individuals who have received
National Awards
why persons might have received a National Award.

Naming the National Awards


5. Students, in groups of four or five, conduct research to determine
the names of our four (4) National Awards.
6. Students describe the differences among the various awards and
brainstorm the possible reasons for presenting these awards to
individuals.
7. Teacher explains that each award has its own significance and
invites students to read the four categories of our National
awards.
8. Students make entries in their journals based on what is read.

Representing Recipients on a Bar Graph


9. Students are presented with a list of recipients of our National
Awards for a given year (2012 is given as an example).
10. Students represent the data presented using a tally chart and
frequency table.
11. Students analyze the data to determine a suitable scale for
representation on a bar graph. The scale is recorded in a key.
12. Students utilize the features of the graph to ensure that it is
completed appropriately.
13. Students name and label the horizontal axis.

Who Would You Choose For an Award


14. Students are invited each to identify one member in their
community who they consider to be suitable for receiving a
National Award.
15. Students work in groups developing a questionnaire to conduct an
interview with that person. They document as necessary.
16. Students use information gathered to write a report, poem or short
story justifying the purpose for their selections.
17. Students work in groups to edit their writing.

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Me gusta ..?

18. The teacher creates a Mystery Box with a variety of objects that
are of interest to students of Sd 4. A student is selected to be blind
folded. Then s/he is asked to pull an object from the Mystery Box.
The student tries to guess what it is and say whether or not s/he
likes it. When the blind fold is removed the student confirms like or
dislike of object. Then whole class discussion on why students
may like/dislike particular things: (for colour, taste, how it feels
etc.). The phrases Me gusta (I like) and No me gusta (I dont
like) are introduced in the discussion. Teacher displays an object
and asks who likes this or who dont like this? Students would
stand quickly and say Me gusta or No me gusta.
(N.B. Since gusta (I like) and No me gusta can only be used for
singular items the teacher must only show singular items.
19. Students are introduced to short bits of the following aspects of
Hispanic culture: Hispanic food, Hispanic clothes, Latin music,
Spanish language, football and Latin dance using the power point
presentation provided. The Spanish for each is introduced to them
from the audio CD. (la comida latina, la ropa latina, la msica
latina, la lengua espaola, el ftbol and el baile latino). As each
slide is shown, students are given the opportunity to express their
likes and dislikes of the items in Spanish. For example when the
slide of Hispanic food is shown, a student may say, Me gusta la
comida latina or No me gusta la comida latina.
20. Students then select a picture or (phrase in English) of the
Hispanic culture from the Mystery Box and act it out. The other
students guess the action, then form a sentence saying Me
gusta.. or 'No me gusta.. E.g. Me gusta la msica latina.
Students can use a video recorder/camera/camera phone to
record this activity to showcase.

Resources:
Literature: The four categories of our National Awards, List of
recipients of National Awards (2012 is given as an example)
ICTs: Computer/ laptop, multimedia projector, video recorder,
videos, CD player, Power Point Presentation
Others: Pictures of National Awardees and National Awards,
Sample medal or trophy, Template for tally chart and frequency
table, Mystery Box with various items, blindfold

Assessment:
Rubric and checklist
Performance assessment
Charades
Journals

172
UNIT ONE Promoting Patriotism
Learning Activity: 4 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 2 days Topic: A Nation is Born
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Trinidad and Tobago is a unique nation that was born from many
historical experiences. Most of the evolution of our nationhood came
from European countries which are displayed in the diversity of our HFLE
people. As a multicultural society, our diverse culture is unlike any other Effective Communication
island in the Caribbean. Cooperation

Outcomes: Literacy
Reading
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Writing
create a timeline of the major political events in the evolution of Literary
Trinidad and Tobago from crown colony to republicanism Appreciation
state traits of a patriotic citizen Oral
name things that changed when Trinidad and Tobago became an Communication
independent nation Media &
state benefits of becoming a republic nation Information
employ taught strategies to assist in making meaning Literacy
highlight important points relevant to a given topic
read grade level texts independently Numeracy
exhibit appropriate behaviour before, during and after Problem Solving
performances Critical thinking
perform simple two-part pieces by rote on melodic instruments Communication
using proper technique and with 80% rhythmic and pitch accuracy Representation
formulate problem situations that can be addressed via statistical Reasoning
data
collect data using questionnaires ICT Skills
create a table to organize collected data
determine a suitable scale for data and record the scale in a key Differentiated
represent data using tally charts, frequency tables and graphs Instruction
utilize the features of graphs to ensure that they are completed
appropriately. Assessment for
learning
Activities:

A trip down Memory Lane


1. Students listen to School Broadcast.
2. Students view two pictures, one of the queen of England and the
other, the first president of Trinidad and Tobago.
3. In groups of four or five, students brainstorm the ideas surrounding

173
the events which took place between Crown Colony and
Republicanism. Each group records their ideas on a semantic
map.

Research
4. Students conduct research on the events that occurred in Trinidad
and Tobago from Crown Colony to Republicanism.
5. Each group of students create a timeline using ICTs, drawings etc.
highlighting major events that took place in Trinidad and Tobago
from Crown Colony to Republicanism. Assistance in using ICTs is
provided by teacher where necessary.
6. Timelines are presented to class. Students compare each others
timeline and make adjustments where necessary.
7. In groups, students will conduct research on Independence and
Republicanism and what it means to be patriotic.
Each group presents their idea of the meaning of being an
Independent and Republic Nation, as well as, the changes that
took place.
8. Students engage in discussion on the benefits of being an
Independent and Republic Nation.
9. Students write in their journal a report on what they understood
from the research.

Songs of Our Nation


10. Students learn to sing a song:
Listen to song on CD or teacher singing the song.
Discuss the meaning of the lyrics.
Listen to the song again.
Speak the lyrics to the correct rhythm.
Accurately sing short phrases after speaking the lyrics to the
rhythm.
11. Students sing one of the National Songs and play part of the
chorus on a melodic instrument (choose instrument from those at
school).
12. Students display a level of readiness, giving of their best and
securing instruments that were used at the end of each session.
13. They perform for their schoolmates.

The Game
14. Students work in groups to compile questions based on
Independence, Republic and Patriotism.
15. Questions are reviewed by teacher and placed in a box.
16. Groups will compete against each other in a Q&A Game.
17. Results are recorded on the board by teacher.
18. Students manually organise or use ICTs to analyse results and
create a tally chart and frequency table.

174
19. Each group devises a key and represents their data on a
horizontal bar graph.
20. Students present their bar graph to the class.

Resources:
ICTs: Computer, Pictures, Internet, CD Player, CD National
Songs with accompaniment
Literature: Dates in Our History
Stationery: Paper, Pencil
Other: Copies of National Songs, Checklists, Box, Dice
Assessment:

Oral questioning
Rubrics (journal, report, singing, bar graph)

175
UNIT ONE Promoting Patriotism
Learning Plan: 5 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
Duration: 4 days Topic: Developing Civic Efficacy
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
HFLE:
Trinidad and Tobago has a democratic system of government which is Decision Making
guided by its constitution. Students need to become familiar with this Cooperation
system of government and understand their rights and responsibilities in
Literacy
exercising their franchise.
Reading
This plan will provide students with learning experiences focused on
Writing
them become civic minded with a readiness and willingness to assume
Literary
citizenship responsibilities
Appreciation
Oral
Outcomes: Communication
Media &
At the end of this learning experience, students will:
Information
outline the process of voting on election day
Literacy
explain the necessity for exercising ones franchise
create and/ or label a diagrammatic model of the structure of Numeracy
Trinidad and Tobago
Problem Solving
state functions of the Tobago House of Assembly
Critical thinking
describe the functions of the local government
Communication
state in a short paragraph why there is a constitution in Trinidad
and Tobago Representation
identify process that can be used to make a well informed and Reasoning
impartial decisions
formulate problem situations that can be addressed via statistical ICT Skills
data
collect data using questionnaires Differentiated
determine a suitable scale in a key Instruction
represent data using tally charts and bar graphs
utilizing the features of a graphs to ensure that they are completed Assessment for
appropriately learning
present alternative points of view
discuss varying points of view
consider the influence of perspective, motivation and medium of a
message on its meaning
make judgments of what is heard by assessing the messages
strengths and weaknesses
form and articulate opinions about what is heard and how it is said
to approve or disapprove
read grade level text independently.

Activities:

Considering the best representative


1. A prefect badge is displayed by the teacher.
176
2. Students engage in discussion on the roles and responsibilities of
a prefect.
3. Questioning by the teacher to elicit whether or not they should
select someone as class prefect only because he/ she is a friend.

Questionnaire & Feedback


4. Class discussion to determine a way to find out each student
opinion or points of view on the qualities of a prefect.
5. In groups of five, students brainstorm, discuss and design simple
six to eight items questionnaire to determine the qualities of a
good `prefect and which student(s) best demonstrate such
attributes. Creativity in layout is allowed as students are free to
use the computer OR design by hand.
6. Students print questionnaires or they are photocopied by the
teacher and distributed for exchange among groups.
7. Students complete questionnaire and return to respective groups.
8. In groups, students analyze and record responses on tally chart.

Nomination
9. Each group evaluates questionnaire and nominates one candidate
for class prefect.
10. Once nomination has ceased, the candidates are invited to the
front of the class and recognized by all class members.
11. A candidate is assigned to each group by teacher.

The Great Debate


12. In groups, students will collaborate and compose a simple
campaign message to address why other classmates should vote
for their particular nominee. Message can be hand written or
typed.
13. They are encouraged by the teacher to share their points of view
and work collaboratively in the compilation of the campaign
message.
14. Candidates are assisted by other group members on presentation
strategies ( posture and conviction, eye contact )
15. Each candidate presents his/her message on podium/ designated
area set up at the front of class
16. They put forth their arguments highlighting why he/ she should be
selected as class prefect.
17. Question and answer session: Students question candidates for
any clarification based on the message presented and share their
alternative points of view.

Who Am I?
18. A photography area is set up in an area in the classroom by the
teacher.
19. Students take and print photos, draw OR bring picture from home
to be attached to students ID cards. They complete the required
information on card.

The Secret Ballot


20. A ballot box is placed in an area of the classroom and the secret

177
ballot system is explained to students by teacher.
21. Students receive their ballot paper from teacher with the names of
the candidates.
22. Students present their ID card to polling clerk (teacher) and
proceed to vote by secretly placing an X next to their choice
candidate, dip finger in ink/ food colouring, then place ballot in box.
23. Class observe while all ballots are revealed. Two students are
assigned the task of ballot counting and recording on tally chart
under the guidance of the teacher.

Making it count
24. Using information on tally chart students identify the candidate
with the most number of votes. The new elected class prefect is
presented with badge by the teacher.
25. Students construct a horizontal bar graph using graph paper OR
Microsoft Excel to represent the information on the tally chart in
another way. They make judgments and select the most
appropriate key to represent information.
26. Oral questioning to gather information from the graph constructed
is done by the teacher.

Our Government; Our People


27. Questioning and discussion to elicit students response to the
following: Is there an important time in your life when u will vote
again? When? Do you know of anyone who voted before? Why
did they vote? When did they vote? At what age can you
(students) vote? How often are national elections held?
28. Students identify by naming familiar faces in pictures presented by
teacher based on the current composition of members of the
government. Non- examples are also given eg. teacher, principal,
cafeteria worker, cleaner.
29. In groups, students sort pictures and create graphic organizer to
show classification based on place of employment. Graphic
organizers are presented to class and displayed on board.
30. Students engage in discussion based on commonalities identified
on graphic organizer. Attention is given to the headings.
31. Class discussion on the role of persons identified under heading
Government (Who is he/ she? What he/she does? Where do
they work?)
32. Students state or research the name of the parliamentary
representative for their community using primary of secondary
sources e.g. Primary sources: question teacher(s), principal, talk
to someone, Secondary sources: magazines, newspapers, radio,
internet etc.

National Elections
33. Students view video on the process of voting on Election Day OR
listen to school broadcast.
34. They compare and contrast national elections and class prefect
elections. Students also discuss the importance of exercising
ones franchise.

178
35. Students name the electoral body that is responsible for national
elections. Optional: visit the Elections and Boundaries
Commission website. Check registration status of parents/
guardians.

Tell Me A Story
36. The story of the political evolution of Trinidad and Tobago is read
to students by the teacher OR students listen to broadcast on Our
Government
37. Students engage in discussion and further examine the need for a
constitution.

Our Government; Structure and Function


38. A blank diagram is drawn on board by the teacher.
39. In groups of four or five students conduct research by visiting the
school library or reading previously supplied books from the
teacher. Each groups is given a word card with a word or phrase
to research( see attached)
40. Information is recorded by groups and shared with class on flip
chart paper/ news print / Bristol board.
41. Students use word cards to complete the diagram to show the
structure of the government in Trinidad and Tobago
42. Students will collect sort and analyze information in a scrapbook
on the functions of the Central and Local Government and the
Tobago House of Assembly.
43. Students present scrapbook to class.
44. Scrapbooks are added to class library for reading pleasure.

Resources:
Stationery: paper ,pencil, markers, drawing book, scrapbook
ICTs: computer, photocopier, video recording, school broadcast,
pictures - members of government and school, blank Graphic
organizer
Furniture: bench, chair or desk for giving speech
Literature: story of the political evolution in Trinidad and Tobago -
(teacher sourced) search words political evolution in Trinidad and
Tobago, word cards
Website: Elections and Boundaries Commission:www.ebctt.com/
Other: Podium, Prefect badge ( teacher made),red food colouring /
stamp pad ,small container, ballot box

Assessment:
Oral Questioning
Rubric for scrapbook
Worksheets
Checklist for the election process and graph construction

179
LEARNING UNIT 2: Becoming More Responsible

Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change Estimated frame: 9 days

Being responsible means taking charge of ones own action. A


Context: responsible person understands, deals with their responsibility and
most importantly learns from his/her mistakes. Our students face
many challenges daily and are forced to make decisions which can
significantly impact on their lives. More so, the choices that are made
are a reflection of the level of responsibility accepted. In a world of
change, it is imperative that our students be exposed to learning
experience which will help them to become more responsible
individuals.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

value the usefulness of agro-processing and its contribution to


food security
create and solve one-step and multi-step problems involving
whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, decimal, percents
including money using algorithms, mental strategies and other
problem solving strategies
design survey(s) to solve problem(s) that involves the use of
statistical
gather, classify, organize and display data using tables, tally
charts and graphs ( bar graphs) and interpret results
describe methods and analyse results and make decisions
communicate findings and decisions made using vocabulary
associated with statistics
demonstrate an understanding of mode
modify simple structures to improve their stability
know their rights as consumers and the institution available to
protect their rights as consumers
demonstrate an understanding of impartiality
demonstrate an understanding of behaviours displayed by
good citizens
create narrative drawings, cartoon or comic strips
know how to use strategies that assist in simultaneous listening
and analyzing activities
know that a message should be analyzed before its acceptance
use words which express deeper meaning in speaking, reading
and writing
know how to use figurative language in context
know how to write exposition using the process approach with
focus on organizational structure, introductory paragraph,
transitions words, content ,language use, grammar and
mechanics

180
create a variety of media texts for different purposes and
audiences(e.g. a poem, announcement, or flyer produced
electronically by combining word-processed text with pictures
and/or photographs; a newspaper article that includes a
photograph and headline)
demonstrate competence in gaining messages as an
independent consumer of media texts
know the following to engage in narrative-descriptive writing:
the elements of story writing, language use, sensory details,
figurative language, organization, transitional words and
phrases, paragraphing, grammar and mechanics, the stages
in the writing process
apply a variety of appropriate-level strategies and skills to
construct meaning from text, including before, during and after
reading.

Learning 11. When Disaster Strikes


Plans: 12. Making The Right Choices
13. My Money, My Responsibility!

Resources: Learning Plan 1: Pictures depicting natural disasters, Graph


showing examples of agro- processed foods , Materials and tools to
create structure (cardboard, string, glue, scissors, tape, paper,
sticks), Web resource: http://www.odpm.gov.tt/

Learning Plan 2: Stationery, multimedia, computer, brochures from


the Consumer Affairs Division, Pictures of businesses, Manila folder,
Scenario sheet / cards, pictures of goods and services, graphic
organizer, Web resources - http://www.legalaffairs.gov.tt/ &
http://pbskids.org/dontbuyit/

Learning Plan 3: Newspaper story, Spread Sheets, Bristol Board,


Computer, Art supplies- pencils, crayons, markers
Assessments:
Oral Questioning
Rubrics
Checklist
Performance Task
Oral Presentations
Worksheets

181
UNIT TWO: Becoming Responsible
Learning Plan: 1 of 3
Class: Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Standard 4
Duration:3 Topic: When Disaster Strikes
days
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
A natural disaster is a major adverse event resulting from
natural processes of the Earth; examples include floods, HFLE:
volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, and other Understanding
geologic processes. A natural disaster can cause loss of Consequences
life, damage to food crops, property damage, and typically
leaves some economic problems in its wake. Students
Literacy
should take into account some of the necessary measures Reading
to be taken when disaster strikes. Writing
Oral Communication
Outcomes: Media & Information
Literacy
suggest examples of agro- processed foods to collect
in times of a disaster Numeracy
select and use appropriate estimation strategies to Problem Solving
check for reasonableness of answers and use Critical thinking
calculators to check answers/solutions Communication
Representation
investigate and apply mental mathematics strategies Reasoning
and skills to solve problems, such as, the use of related
facts, compatible numbers within 1000, multiplication ICT Skills
and related division facts up to 12 times table and
squares and square roots Differentiated
interpret findings displayed in tables, charts and graphs Instruction
use analyzed data to solve problems, draw conclusions
and make decisions Assessment for
create a stable simple structure with consideration of : learning
choice of basic material, shape, width of base, overall
height, placement of load and center of gravity
analyze simple structures and improve their stability by
attempting to lower the center of gravity
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning,
middle and end plot structure with a key focus on
character development, personification, simile and the
simple metaphor.
use interpretive movements to highlight and comment
on social issues

Activities:
Stocking up on Food
1. Students are shown pictures of various natural disasters
and their physical impact.

182
2. Students share experiences and ideas based on what is
viewed.
3. Students browse the website for the Office of Disaster
Preparedness and Management (ODPM) to develop
deeper awareness of disasters and their impact.
4. Students, in their groups, brainstorm some of the
possible negative effects of natural disasters.
5. Students document their ideas and present orally to the
class.
6. A discussion is led by the teacher with a key focus on:
- the impact a natural disaster has on the
supply of food
- why it is necessary to stock up on food
during a natural disaster.
7. Students suggest examples of foods that can be
collected in times of a disaster.
8. Students make journal entries with examples of agro-
processed foods

Checking for Solutions


9. Students listen to a scenario presented by the teacher
in which the supply of food in a community has been
affected by a natural disaster.
10. Students are asked to apply appropriate estimation
strategies to determine the cost of damage to crops and
livestock.
11. Students are then given a problem and asked to
calculate the actual damage to the supply of food that
took place.
12. The strategies for estimation and calculation are verified
by the teacher after class discussion.
13. Students, in their groups, are presented with examples
of agro- processed foods that are used in times of
disaster.
14. Students interpret the findings displayed in the graph to
determine answers to questions posed by the teacher.
15. Students use the analysed data to solve problems, draw
conclusions and make decisions.
16. Groups present their findings to the class.

Damage Control
17. Students are asked to design a simple stable structure
that would be able to withstand the elements of a
natural disaster.
18. Students, in their groups, create their structure using a
variety of materials.
19. An investigation is conducted to determine the stability
of the various structures when exposed to a natural
disaster. This can be simulated with the use of a fan or
flowing water.
20. Students analyse their structures and improve their
stability by attempting to lower the centre of gravity.

183
21. Students document their findings in their journals.

The Big Storm


22. Students work together to develop a story based on
The Big Storm with key focus on character
development. (A lesson on character development can
be inserted here)

23. Students apply their knowledge of personification, the


simile and simple metaphor in creating their stories.
24. Students celebrate their achievement by reading their
stories to the class and displaying it on a story board.

Movement
Students work together to interpret movements from the story
and create a one to two minute narrative dance piece
depicting one social issue highlighted in the story.

Resources:
Art Supplies : Materials and tools to create structure
(cardboard, string, glue, scissors, tape, paper, sticks)
ICTs: Web resource: http://www.odpm.gov.tt/
Others: Pictures depicting natural disasters, Graph
showing examples of agro- processed foods

Assessment:
Documentation
Journal entries
Presentations
Rubrics for narrative- descriptive writing
Oral questioning

184
UNIT TWO:Becoming More Responsible
Learning Plan: 2 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 3 days Topic: Making The Right Choice
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
Consumer rights are protected by the laws of HFLE:
Decision Making
Trinidad and Tobago. In todays society our students Self-Management
are constantly exposed to a variety of goods and
services. As consumers, they select, purchase and Literacy
utilize these goods and services to satisfy personal Reading
needs. The choices students make are influenced by Writing
Oral Communication
their wants, needs, interest, beliefs, culture, Media & Information Literacy
environment, price, purchasing decisions of others
and media effectiveness. Furthermore, it is the Numeracy
responsibility of the Consumer Affairs division to Problem Solving
protect consumers by providing them with advice and Critical thinking
information on poor quality goods and services. Communication
Representation
This learning plan seeks to guide students in making Reasoning
right choices and empower them to exercise their
rights as they seek redress. ICT Skills

Outcomes: Differentiated Instruction


At the end of this learning experience, students will:
Assessment for learning
name the institution responsible for the
protection of the rights of the consumer
state considerations to be made when
purchasing an item
identify process that can be used to make well
informed and impartial decisions
recognize that all citizens have a right to
justice
outline options that are available to citizens for
seeking redress when their rights have been
infringed
create a narrative drawings, cartoon or comic
strip of 4-5 panels using appropriate lettering
and illustrations to show the actions that can
be taken for redress
interpret the findings displayed in the tables,
charts and graphs
use analyzed data to solve problems, draw
conclusions and make decisions
communicate findings and decisions by writing
a report using language associated with
statistics
Solve one-step and multi-step problems
involving whole numbers, fractions and

185
decimals (including money transactions, bills,
best buy, profit and loss, involving dollars and
cents together using the four operations.
Solve routine and non-routine problems using
a variety of strategies such as: use a model,
act it out, draw a picture, look for a pattern,
guess and check, work backwards, logical
reasoning, make a table or chart, make an
organized list and try a simpler form of the
problem.
write simple reports applying the process
approach to writing
consider the influence of perspective,
motivation and medium of a message on its
meaning
make judgments of what is heard by
assessing the messages strengths and
weaknesses
form and articulate opinions about what is
heard and how it is said to approve or
disapprove
explain the purpose of selected media text
highlight important points relevant to a given
topic
Identify and assess the effects of words and
phrases in messages which are used for
persuasion, facts and opinions.
work cooperatively in groups
make responsible decisions as consumers

Activities:

My Purchase, My Choice
1. Students take a field trip to the mall to observe
the quality and types of goods and services
available to them OR view web sourced video
(search words # lets go shopping) presented
by teacher.
2. Students participate in discussion on the
factors that influence their choice of purchase
e.g. needs, wants, comparison and calculation
of the difference in prices, best buy, available
spending money, sale, brands etc.) List is
compiled on board and justification of
responses discussed by class.
3. Guided questioning by the teacher to elicit the
name given to persons who purchases goods
and services.

186
4. Students listen to school broadcast on
consumer education and engage in class
discussion on information received.

Tricks In Disguise
5. Students view pictures of different ads and
engage in discussion on the reason
businesses create advertisements.
6. Students explore the concept of profit and loss
and solve simple profit and lost problems
given by teacher.
7. Class discussion on different advertising tricks
used to persuade consumers to purchase
items.
8. In groups, students analyse and discuss
advertisements in different forms of media
(print, video and audio). Each group is given
one media form to analyse. They note the
purpose of the advertisement, analyse
strengths and weaknesses in the message,
discuss and make judgement on its
effectiveness.
9. Students select words or phrases used in the
advertisements that are used for persuasion,
facts and opinions.
10. Students record the words identified on colour
paper
(persuasion red, facts blue, opinion
yellow) and display on graphic organizer on
board.

Fair and Reasonable Actions


11. Students are presented with comic strip by the
teacher or view a web sourced video on
consumer exploitation. ( see attached)
12. Students share experiences and engage in
discussion on incidents where consumers are
treated unfairly e.g. variations in price, poor
quality or expired goods, denied refund or
replace of items purchased.
13. In groups of four or five, students research
ways or brainstorm and record ideas to
identify possible actions that can be taken by
the consumer in comic strip or video for
redress. Groups share ideas with the class
and engage in discussion led by the teacher.
14. Students create their own comic strip of 4-5
panels to show the actions that can be taken
for redress.

187
Being Informed and Protected
15. Students write on a KWL Card the things that
they know about being a consumer and thing
they want to know.
16. Students read brochures provided by the
teacher from the consumer affairs division OR
visit the Consumer Affairs Division on the
Ministry of Legal Affairs website and share
three things they learnt with group members
after completing KWL Card.
17. In groups, students research the rights and
responsibilities of a consumer.
18. Oral questioning done by teacher to elicit
students understanding of their rights and
responsibilities, as a citizen and a consumer,
when purchasing any type of goods or
services.

Putting Pen to Paper


19. Students review the writing process (see
attached). They use the writing process to
publish a report (hand or type written) to the
consumer affairs division seeking redress for
unsatisfactory goods or services. Students are
free to use a named good(s) or service(s) of
their choice.
20. A variety of craft materials and stationeries are
distributed to students in groups of four by the
teacher.
21. In groups, students create a consumer guide
Big Book using narrative comic strip. Big Book
must show ways of obtaining redress and
consumer tips.

Making Big Decisions


22. Students view graph showing four different
business organizations daily sales and
customer returns.
23. Students make observations, analyse graph
and engage in class discussion.
24. Class is divided into groups by the teacher.
Each group receives a file on a business
showing its product(s), sales and number of
customers to analyze.
25. In groups, students will create a business
portfolio. The portfolio must consist of simple
report on findings based on information
received e.g. calculation of profit or loss based
on sales, patterns observed, graph etc.
26. Groups produce an advertisement for their

188
business using choice of effective advertising
medium. Emphasis is placed on the use of
persuasive language and information to be
transmitted.
27. Groups present their business portfolio to
class.

Resources:
Stationery paper, pencil, bristol board, manila
folders,
ICTs multimedia projector, computer,
Literature - Brochures from the Consumer Affairs
Division, scenario sheet / cards, graphic organizer
Pictures businesses, goods and services,
advertisements
( teacher sources current Ads )
Web sources - http://www.legalaffairs.gov.tt/
http://pbskids.org/dontbuyit/

Assessment:

Oral question and answer session


Rubric for assessing report and Big Book
Checklist for report , the creation of business
portfolio and advertisement

189
Before making a purchase, conduct research on products and
services.

Always collect and safeguard your receipts.

Carefully examine products and read labels before purchasing.

Obtain and understand a written warranty at purchase and keep


it safe.

File complaint to the manager of the place of purchase upon


encountering a problem with an item purchased

190
The Right The Right
to a The Right to
Healthy to Safety Informatio
Environm n
ent

The 8 basic The Right


Right to
Consum Consumer to Basic
er Needs
Educatio
Rights
n

The
The Right Right
The Right to to
to
Representat Choose
Redress
ion

191
Whey!!!ah now
buy this shoe in
d mall for $1200.

What should Lowjack do?

192
193
Cherry bloom

Cherry Bloom Company has been in business for


the last five years and conveniently located in
your favourite mall. We are producers of different
types of cherry flavoured ice cream. At Cherry
Bloom, we serve to satisfy your taste buds with the best cherry
vanilla, cherry coconut, cherry chocolate, cherry strawberry, cherry
pistachio, cherry pineapple, cherry peanut, cherry sour-sop, and
cherry five finger ice- creams in the country.

Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

Cherry Bloom
Month Sales
January 50
February 65
March 80
April 95
May 105
June 195

194
Swanky Styles

Swanky Styles is a hip new local clothing


store located in your favourite mall. We offer the swankiest clothing
and accessories for the hip Standard four boys and girls. At Swanky
Styles, we have styles for all occasions.

Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

Swanky Styles
Month Sales
January 115
February 210
March 90
April 65
May 45
June 30

195
NEW LOOK BEAUTY SALOON

At the New Look Beauty Salon, we believe in beauty with a conscience.


Our salon offers the highest quality hair services for boys and girls in a top
class environment. We are committed to providing the hottest and latest
hair care and styles. Come and transform into a new look.

Located in your favourite mall

Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

New Look
Month Customers
January 85
February 85
March 85
April 85
May 85
June 85

196
Best Brand

Recognized by many girls who are


conscious and trend-savvy shoppers,
Best Brand has quickly become the
source for the most current fashions at
the greatest value.

Best Brand has fun and creative clothing designs and the
accessories to make you look your best. We have everything
for all fashion forward Standard four girls. Check us out in
your favourite mall for top brands and best quality items.
Always be in style with the best brand from Best Brand
Stores.

Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

Best Brand
Month Sales
January 130
February 75
March 75
April 65
May 35
June 20

197
CONNECT D CELL

Connect with your friends wherever and whenever you want.


CONNECT D CELL caters for all your mobile needs. We supply the
best services and top brand phones for calls, texts, bbm, twitter,
Whats App, Instagram, Skype, Tango, Viber

Located in your favourite mall

Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

CONNECT D CELL

Month Sales

January 55

February 60

March 75

April 95

May 130

June 145

198
Looking for a hot sporty car, then look no further. Sporty Cars
Company is the number one car dealer in Trinidad and Tobago.
We have all the top make and models of sports cars. Conveniently
located in Scarborough and Port of Spain
Phone: 555- 0123
Opening Hours: Monday Friday 8:00 am - 5: 00 pm
SPORTY CARS COMPANY

Month Sales

January 35

February 125

March 50

April 55

May 150

June 90

199
UNIT TWO:
Learning Plan: 3 of 3
Class: Standard 4 Theme: Becoming More Responsible
Duration: 2 days Topic: My Money, My Responsibility
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Budgeting is effective money management. Learning how to
manage money at an early age will help children to become more HFLE:
financially literate. This learning plan seeks to empower children Problem Solving
to carefully plan their spending and as a result become thrifty. Decision Making

Outcomes: Literacy
Reading
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Writing
give reasons why one should have a personal budget Oral Communication
identify factors which should be of priority when making a Media & Information
budget Literacy
apply familiar vocabulary to gain understanding of texts
Numeracy
answer questions orally on a given text Problem Solving
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts expressing Critical thinking
point-of-view Communication
support personal views with reference to a text Representation
Reasoning
demonstrate their understanding of personification through
the creation of cartoon characters ICT Skills
represent budget information on a bar graph
label the axes of a bar graph Differentiated
interpret data represented on bar graph Instruction
make decisions based on data collected.
Assessment for
learning
Activities:
Santa Claus comes to town
1. Students read and analyse newspaper article entitled
$100 Gift for Students.
2. Students respond to literal and inferential questions based
on the article.
3. Students give their personal opinions on the actions of the
individuals mentioned in the article.
4. Students suggest things they would do if they were to
receive $100 at this moment.

Planning My Spending
5. Students discuss their daily expenses. They list all the
things that they usually buy during any given day. Teacher
notes the common items on the board.
6. In groups, students are given $100 specimens to create a
weekly budget.
7. In groups, students discuss their own spending habits.
They may use the list from the board.
8. Students create a personal spending plan (budget).
Spending plans may be typed or hand-written.

200
9. Students present their plans to the rest of the class,
justifying and comparing spending habits.

My Personal Budget
10. Students suggest reasons for the importance of making a
plan for spending money (budgeting).
11. Students discuss the important categories to consider
when making their personal budgets.
12. Students debate the importance of including a Savings
category in their personal budgets. Students look at their
budgets and brainstorm ways in which savings can be
comfortably increased.
13. Students review their group budgets to see whether
adjustments can be made, based on the discussions from
previous activity. Students report on their budgets,
justifying any changes made.
14. Students use the data from their spread sheets to create a
Bar graph. They accurately label the axes.

Our National Budget at a Glance


15. Students discuss other persons/groups that need to work
with a budget. These may include their parents, teachers,
school, and governments. Students discuss things that
these people/groups would need to include in their
budgets.
16. In groups, students conduct research on National Budget
using the search words, Trinidad and Tobago National
Budget, OR literature provided by the teacher. Each group
is given a different term/phrase to research (income,
expenditure, who creates it and when).
17. Students engage in discussion based on information
obtained.

My Budget Character.
18. Students look at their revised budgets and they orally
express their opinions on their plans.
19. Students are asked to think about what their budget would
say to them if it could talk. Students share their budget
thoughts/questions with the rest of the class.
20. Students are asked to create a character to represent their
talking budget. Individually, students draw/ create their
character.
21. Students are reminded that a budget is a thing, but they
have used their creative minds to give him a look and a
voice. Students are told that the term personify or
personification is used when giving things or inanimate
objects human qualities, for example the ability to speak.
22. Students brainstorm to come up with other verbs that
would give their budget human characteristics. Students
are encouraged to be as creative as they can/want.

201
23. Students present their budget characters.

Resources:

Newspaper story
Spread Sheets
Bristol Board
Computer
Art supplies- pencils, crayons, markers,

Assessment:

Question/Answer
Product Presentation
Observation

202
LEARNING UNIT 3: Preserving Our Environment

Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change Estimated frame: 5 days


Context: Our environment consists of everything around us. It significantly
impacts on the quality of life we enjoy. Environmental preservation
refers to the sustainability and use as well as management of our
natural and man-made resources.
This learning unit seeks to address issues affecting our environment
and provide students with the necessary knowledge of their roles and
responsibilities in the preserving of our environment for future use.
At the end of this learning experience students will:
Outcomes:
evaluate the suitability of agro-processing methods
enjoy agro-processing and work in a safe manner
know how to use the different types of vocabulary across
content areas
know how to write exposition using the process approach with
focus on organizational structure, introductory paragraph,
transition words, content , language use, grammar and
mechanics
reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and
creators
solve problems involving direct proportion
demonstrate an understanding of algorithms, mental strategies
and estimation strategies
gather, classify, organize and display data using tables, tally
charts and graphs (pictographs, block graphs and bar graphs)
and interpret results
communicate findings and decisions made using vocabulary
associated with statistics
demonstrate an understanding of mode
describe methods and analyse results and make decisions
communicate findings and decisions made using vocabulary
associated with statistics
differentiate between the greenhouse effect and the enhanced
greenhouse effect
distinguish among the four seasons and the activities
associated with each
identify and map the major climatic divisions of the world using
an atlas and a globe
create a sculpted piece based on a theme
mirror body movements of partners, paying close attention to
detail.

Learning 1. A Season for Change


Plans: 2. Food for Life

203
Resources: Learning Plan 1: small thermometers, jars/transparent containers,
modelling clay, clock/watch (with second hand), incandescent light
bulb (100 watts), globe/map, pencil, worksheets, notebooks, ,
medicine dropper, teaspoon, tablespoon, small container/bottom of
chubby bottle, straws, dilute acetic acid (vinegar), baking powder,
computer, internet

Learning Plan 2: computer, office software (Microsoft Excel or


Open Office), ingredients for agro processed product, bottles,
assorted containers (size), Bristol board, markers

Assessments:

Oral Questioning
Rubrics
Checklist
Performance Task
Oral Presentations
Worksheets

204
UNIT THREE: Preserving Our Environment
Learning Plan: 1 of 2
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 3 days Topic: A Season for Change
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
The Greenhouse effect is a growing phenomenon affecting
Earths atmosphere in both hemispheres. The enhanced
Greenhouse Effect is a result of increased human activity that HFLE
produces Greenhouse Gases. Students at this level need to Assertiveness
be aware of the consequences of human activities on the Cooperation
Enhanced Greenhouse Effect. As such, they will become
aware of their responsibilities in environmental conservation. Literacy
Reading
Outcomes: Writing
explain how the earth becomes warm as a result of the Literary
Greenhouse Effect
Appreciation
explain how mans actions have created the enhanced
Oral
Greenhouse Effect
Communication
name activities associated with the four seasons
Media &
locate on a globe or map the hemispheres, seven
Information
continents and oceans
Literacy
locate and name the major lines of latitude on a map
of the world
Numeracy
name the main lines of longitude
Problem Solving
write simple reports, instructions and directions
applying the process approach to writing Critical thinking
represent data using a horizontal bar graph Communication
utilize the feature of graphs to ensure that they are Representation
completed appropriate Reasoning
compare the effectiveness of different representations
of the same data to determine suitability of forms and ICT Skills
for different audiences
compare the effectiveness of different methods of Differentiated
collecting data Instruction
determine the mode for a given set of data and explain
its importance in data analysis. Assessment for
learning
Activities:

Warming the Earths Atmosphere


1. Students conduct search on Google for The
Greenhouse Effect and they view video clip.
2. Class discussion on how the Earth gets warm is
facilitated by teacher.
3. Students are placed in groups by teacher. Each group
is given a set of materials, a worksheet and
instructions to conduct an investigation on how the
earth becomes warm (see instructions attached).

205
4. Each group draws and labels diagram to illustrate
what was done.
5. Groups add their results on the class data table
displayed by teacher. Columns include: group name,
starting temperature, ending temperature, and
average temperature (see attached sample).

Note: Starting temperatures should be the same as the room


temperature (as all groups worked in the same room).

6. Each group displays the results on a horizontal bar


graph (time vs. temperature).
7. Class discussion is facilitated by the teacher on:
The effectiveness and suitability of both forms
of representations (class data table and bar
graph).
Reasons for variations in temperature on both
thermometers.
The mode and its importance.

Enhanced Greenhouse Effect


8. A review of previous activity The Greenhouse Effect
is facilitated by teacher.
9. Students use the internet or literature provided by
teacher to gather information on Greenhouse Gases.
10. Class discussion on things we do that produce
Greenhouse Gases is facilitated by teacher.
11. Each group is given a set of materials, a work sheet
and instructions to conduct an investigation on the
Enhanced Greenhouse Effect (see instructions
attached).
12. Each group draws and labels diagram to illustrate
what was done.
13. Students display the results on a horizontal bar graph
(time vs. temperature). They compare current results
with the results from the previous activity.
14. In groups, students discuss and list human activities
that increase the production of Greenhouse Gas
carbon dioxide.
15. Class discussion on their findings is facilitated by
teacher. They also discuss what they can do to
decrease the production of carbon dioxide.

The World Systems

16. Each group of students is given a globe or map of the


world. Students locate Trinidad and Tobago on the
globe or map. A review of the seasons experienced in
Trinidad and Tobago is facilitated by teacher.

206
17. Students are asked by teacher to locate the line that
equally divides the Earth horizontally and state its
name. Students also identify other major lines of
latitude.
18. Each group brainstorms the purpose of the equator as
it divides the earth into hemispheres.
19. Students use the internet or literature provided by
teacher to conduct a research project on the four
seasons. They include the name, activities associated
with each season and location in terms of latitude.
20. Students use Google maps or a globe to locate the
seven continents and the major oceans. Assistance is
provided by teacher where needed. They discuss
within their groups whether these continents
experience four seasons.
21. Each student records the lines of latitude that pass
through or close to these continents.
22. In groups, students create a display on each of the
four seasons.

Time Zones
23. Groups locate the line that equally divides the Earth
vertically and state its name.
24. Groups discuss the function of the Greenwich/Prime
Meridian.
25. Students create a model to simulate day and night.
26. Students write a report on what was learnt from the
activity.

Resources:
Other: laboratory thermometers, jar or transparent container,
Clock or watch (with second hand), Incandescent light
bulb (100 watts), Globe/map, Modelling Clay, Strings,
Medicine Dropper, Teaspoon, Tablespoon, Small
container/bottom of chubby bottle, Straw, Dilute Acetic
Acid (Vinegar), Baking Powder
Stationery: Pencil, Worksheets, Notebook/Exercise book,
ICTs: Computer, Internet

Assessment:
Rubric (report)
Checklist (investigations)
Oral questioning (discussions)
Peer evaluation

207
Materials:

jar or transparent container


2 laboratory thermometers
light: incandescent (100 watt bulb)
clock or watch
worksheets
stand for light if needed (e.g., ring stand)
string

Activity:

1. Each group is provided with the equipment to set up their investigation.

2. Place thermometer 30cm apart under the lamp for 3 minutes so the
thermometers will be giving accurate readings.

3. Record the temperature readings on both thermometers as well as the time the
reading is taken.

4. Place the jar or container over one of the thermometers. Do not let the jars
shadow fall on the uncovered thermometer.

Note: If the thermometers are too large to remain horizontal inside the jars, they
can be placed diagonally.

Safety: remind the students that the lamps will become very hot, and they should
not touch the glass bulb, socket or cover. Also, remind them to keep hair, paper,
and other objects away from the glass bulb.

5. Ensure that you have the correct positioning before turning on the lamp.

6. Students turn on the lamp and take a temperature reading every minute for ten
minutes. These readings are recorded on their worksheets.

Note: Students are reminded to turn off the lamp when they have finished the
investigation and all the data has been recorded.

7. Students calculate the average temperature and record this on their worksheet.

208
Greenhouse Effect
Worksheet
Date: _______________________________________________________________

Hypothesis:
________________________________________________________________

Group Members:
1. ___________________________________________
2. ___________________________________________
3. ___________________________________________
4. ___________________________________________
5. ___________________________________________

Start Time Observation Thermometer Thermometer


Number A B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Average temperature: A__________________ B_________________

Findings:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
________________________________

209
Class Data Table

Group Name Starting Temperature Ending Temperature Average temperature

210
Materials:
2-litre clear plastic soft drink bottle, worksheets
label removed small container/bottom of chubby
laboratory thermometers bottle
small lump of modelling clay teaspoon
light: incandescent (100 watt bulb) tablespoon
stand for light if needed (e.g., ring medicine dropper
stand) straw
masking tape dilute acetic acid (vinegar)
string baking powder
clock or watch ruler

Activity:
1. Each group is provided with the equipment to set up their investigation.

2. Measure 15 g or 1 tablespoon of baking powder and put it into small


container/bottom of chubby bottle. Carefully place it into two litre soft drink bottle
to avoid spillage.

Note: Remind them the importance of carefully taping the bottle together in order
to get a good seal.

3. Tie string onto thermometer, insert it into bottle and seal other end of string onto
top of bottle using modelling clay.

Safety: Remind the students that the lamps will become very hot, and they
should not touch the glass bulb, socket or cover. Also, remind them to keep hair,
paper, and other objects away from the glass bulb.

4. Set up the bottle and the lamp 30cm apart. Ensure that you have the correct
positioning before turning on the lamp.

5. Position straw over baking powder. Use medicine dropper to measure 5 ml of


vinegar and drop it down the straw. Remove straw and seal the opening of the
bottle.

6. Students record the temperature inside the bottle before turning on the lamp.
They turn on the lamp and take a temperature reading every minute until the
temperature remains unchanged for at least five minutes. These readings are
recorded on their worksheets.

Note: Students are reminded to turn off the lamp when they have finished the
investigation and all the data has been recorded.

7. Students calculate the time it took to reach a stable temperature and record this
on their worksheet.

211
Greenhouse Effect
Worksheet
Date: _______________________________________________________________

Hypothesis:
________________________________________________________________

Group Members:
1. ___________________________________________
2. ___________________________________________
3. ___________________________________________
4. ___________________________________________
5. ___________________________________________

Start Time Observation Temperature


Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Average temperature: ______________________________

Findings:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
________________________________

212
Checklist for Investigations

Date:_____________________________________________________________

Title:______________________________________________________________

Start Accurate Diagram Findings


Student Names time spacing Clear, Accurac Clearl Organise
inserte of large y of y d
d apparatu drawings labels state
s d

213
UNIT THREE: Preserving Our Environment
Learning Plan: 2 of 2
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change Making Choices
Duration: 2 days Topic: Food for Life
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
Fresh produce has a limited shelf life before they begin to rot. To
extend the shelf life of fresh produce, they can be processed HFLE
using a variety of methods. All of these methods have already Effective Communication
been documented and are available to the student by means of Cooperation

research.
This learning plan explores methods of food processing using Literacy
direct proportion as a means of adjusting existing recipes. Reading
Writing
Literary
Outcomes: Appreciation
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral
Communication
validate the usefulness of an agro-processing method to Media &
extend the shelf life of a product Information
enjoy agro-processing activities while working in a safe Literacy
manner
mirror body movements of partners, paying close attention to Numeracy
detail Problem Solving
create a sculpted piece based on a theme Critical thinking
describe methods and analyse results and make decisions Communication
gather, classify, organize and display data using tables, tally charts
and graphs (pictographs block graphs and bar graphs) and interpret Representation
results Reasoning
solve problems involving direct proportion
ICT Skills

Activities: Differentiated
Instruction
Making a Processed Product
From the research project done previously (see Unit 1), choose Assessment for
one method of agro processing, and make an agro processed learning
product:
1. Students select an agro processing method and research
how it is done
2. They create a list of steps for that particular method
3. Students sequence the steps that will be used in the agro
processing activity
4. They use direct proportion rules to increase or decrease
ingredients in a known recipe.
5. They create an excel document that would use direct
proportion to create recipes for agro processing OR
manually calculate values using direct proportion (see
214
techtorial)
6. They then collect materials for the agro processing activity
such as the ingredients and containers to be used
7. Students use the appropriate method with a chosen
agricultural produce (mango, pommecythere, cashew,
chenette, five finger, cherry) to create a processed product.

Recording
8. They record the changes that occurred with the agricultural
produce during the activity (colour, texture, taste).
9. Students compare the shelf life of fresh produce with an
agro processed product
10. They compare the taste of fresh produce with agro
processed product
11. Students evaluate if the method was suitable for the
produce
12. They explain the usefulness of the method.
13. Students create a form of media highlighting the method of
agro processing such as a poster, chart or advertisement.
14. Students collect information on their likes and dislikes for
agro processed foods and record the information in a
tabular format.
15. They create a tally chart using information in the table.
16. Students create a bar graph using the information.

Action! Buddy Fun


17. Students are paired off; facing each other, they mirror body
movements of their partner. They depict likes and dislikes
as in facial expressions and gestures.
18. They mimic foods used in the graph using body sculpting

Resources:
ICT - Computer, office software (Microsoft Excel or Open
Office),
Realias - ingredients for agro processed product, bottles,
assorted containers (size),
Stationery - bristol board, markers

Assessment:
Create an agro processed product using an appropriate
method
Analyse a graph based on likes and dislikes of agro
processed products
Use direct proportion to solve problems while manipulating
recipes
Celebrate achievement using body movements

215
Techtorial
How to use Microsoft Excel: Creating a . recipe
Click on START

Go to MICROSOFT OFFICE EXCEL and click on it

Type the name of the agro processing method and the product at the top of the page (cell A1)

Highlight A1 to E1, then

List the ingredients in the A column starting at A3

List the quantities of the ingredients in the B column starting at B3

In column C type the unit of measurement such as g. kg. ml. etc

In cell D2 type My Recipe

In cell D4 type =$D$3/$B$3*B4

(Remember to start with an equal sign (=) this tells the computer that you are writing a formula.
=$D$3/$B$3*B4 tells the computer to always look at cell D3 and divide it by cell B3 and to
multiply the answer by what is in cell B4)

Copy cell D4 and paste it in all the cells from D5 to the end of the recipe

When you change the amount in the D3 cell all the other cells will change in direct proportion

216
Checklist for Agro processing

Name of Activities
Student Research Create Scale Prepare Collect Prepare Combine
method list of recipe garden ingredients ingredients ingredients
steps produce

217
Observation Records

Name of Student Class


..

Name of Product

..

Ingredient Taste Colour Texture Shelf Life

Before
Processing

After Processing

Sample Table of likes

Agro processed product Number of students who like the product


Mango Chow 7
Plum Chow 4
Pommecythere Chow 5
Cucumber Chow 9

Sample Tally Chart

Agro processed product Number of students who like the product


Mango Chow

Plum Chow

Pommecythere Chow

Cucumber Chow

218
Core Skills:
Agricultural Science

219
LEARNING UNIT: Rearing one class of animals

Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change: Understanding Change


Unit: Animals Estimated frame: 1 Term

Context: Animals are an important component of Agricultural Science, providing us with


food and other valuable products. In this unit, students will understand the
needs of a rabbit or chicken through their research, explore suitable housing,
and observe all the developmental changes and the feeding requirements of the
animal. They will learn about the types of ailments that can affect a rabbit or
chicken, and the treatments that can be used to improve the animals health.
They will also identify how the animals are disposed of and the importance of
performing preventative maintenance in clean-up activities and proper storage
of equipment.
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:
identify the basic needs of one class of animals
prepare a home for one class of animals rabbit OR chicken
construct housing for one class of animals
modify equipment for selected animal
identify the correct type of feed for the selected animal
introduce the animal to the home
observe and record changes in the growth of the animal
research ailments and treatment of rabbit OR chicken
present research using any form of media
identify the records kept on rabbits OR chicken
keep records on the rabbit OR chicken
state the purpose of rearing the particular class of animals
dispose of the animal in an appropriate manner
demonstrate the proper procedure for cleaning up and storage of
equipment used in the rearing and disposal of an animal (chicken OR
rabbit).

Learning 1. Needs of the animal


Plans: 2. Preparation of an animals home
3. Caring for the animal
4. Ailments and treatment of the animal
5. Record keeping
6. Disposal of the animal
7. Disassembly and storage of equipment

Resources: Learning Plan 1: Stationery: paper, pencils, markers


ICTs: search words agrodok rearing animals

220
Learning Plan 2:
Other:
rabbit: 1.2 cm x 1.2 cm ( x ) mesh wire, clips, automatic feeder, automatic
waterer, grass rack, drop board OR
chicken: 1.2 cm x 1.2 cm ( x ) mesh wire, clips litter, newspaper (to line
the bottom of the cage for litter), light fixture (60W bulb, cord, socket), automatic
feeder, automatic waterer,

Learning Plan 3: Stationery: journals/learning logs


ICT: computer, search word agrodok
Other: mild soap/ disinfectant
rabbit: wilted grass, pellets OR chicken: chick starter

Learning Plan 4: ICT: computer, search word agrodok


Stationery: pencils, paper, markers, bristol board
Other: pictures

Learning Plan 5: ICT: computer (e.g. Microsoft Excel)


Stationery: index cards
Other: balance/scale

Learning Plan 6: Stationery: record cards

Learning Plan 7: Stationery markers, bristol board, coloured pencils/crayons


ICT digital camera (optional)
Other soap, detergent, oil, rag, PPE gloves, goggles, pictures

Assessments:
Teacher observation of students mini books.
Performance assessment preparation of a home for one class of animals
Performance assessment:
- clean the home and equipment for one class of animals
- introduce the animal to the home
Create a presentation showing ailments of rabbits OR chickens and possible
treatment.
Prepare a record card for a rabbit OR chicken.
Students identify two reasons for rearing one class of animals.
Teacher observation and feedback to students as they create a poster/chart
showing the clean-up and storage of equipment.
Performance assessment demonstrate the clean-up and storage of
equipment used.

221
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
ONEUNIT: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 1 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 1 hour Topic: Needs of Animals
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Animals are an important component of Agricultural Science,
providing us with an easily available source of protein. In this HFLE:
learning plan, students will understand the needs of animals Effective
through their research. Communication
Cooperation
Outcomes:
At the end of this learning experience pupils will: Literacy
identify the basic needs of one class of animals. Reading
Writing
Activities: Oral
1. In groups, students view pictures of one class of animals Communication
reared on a farm. Literary
2. They discuss and complete in groups, a list of the needs Appreciation
of animals. Media &
3. In groups, students research the steps in rearing one Information Literacy
class of animals, with a focus on the needs, using the
search words agrodok rearing animals. Numeracy
4. Each student creates a mini book with: Problem Solving
illustrations of one class of animals Critical thinking
illustrations of the animals needs Communication
a few sentences relevant to the needs of animals Representation
Reasoning
Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencils, markers ICT Skills
ICTs: search words agrodok rearing animals
Differentiated
Assessment: Instruction
Teacher observation of students mini books.
Assessment for
learning

222
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
ONEUNIT: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 2 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Preparation of an animals home
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Animals need a place to live where they would be safe from
predators. They must also be away from the elements of heat HFLE:
and rain. This learning plan seeks to explore suitable housing Cooperation
used to rear chickens or rabbits. Effective
Communication
Outcomes:
At the end of this learning experience pupils will: Literacy
prepare a home for one class of animals rabbit OR Reading
chicken Writing
construct housing for one class of animals Oral
modify equipment for selected animal. Communication
Literary
Activities: Appreciation
5. Students choose a class of animals to rear rabbit OR Media &
chicken. Information Literacy
6. They consult their mini books to identify the housing
requirements for the selected animal. Numeracy
7. They assemble the home to be used for housing the Problem Solving
animal (build the base, attach the side walls with clips, Critical thinking
and attach the top of the cage with a hinged door. This is Communication
to facilitate easy access to the animal and equipment).
Representation
8. Students select appropriate equipment to be used for the
selected animal and modify the equipment as necessary. Reasoning
9. Students prepare the home for the selected animal:
For chicken: ICT Skills
a) Layout the litter:
- Spread a few sheets of newspaper on the base of Differentiated
the cage. Instruction
- Place litter on the newspaper to a depth of 5cm.
- Cover the litter with a sheet of newspaper. Assessment for
b) Install the lighting fixture and connect bulb. Suspend learning
bulb inside the cage.
OR
For rabbit:
a) Install grass rack (manger).
b) Place the drop board on the floor of the cage.

10. Students install the automatic waterer.


11. They install the automatic feeder.

223
Resources:
rabbit: 1.2 cm x 1.2 cm ( x ) mesh wire, clips, automatic
feeder, automatic waterer, grass rack, drop board.
OR
chicken: 1.2 cm x 1.2 cm ( x ) mesh wire, clips litter,
newspaper (to line the bottom of the cage for litter), light fixture
(60W bulb, cord, socket), automatic feeder, automatic waterer,

Assessment:
Performance assessment preparation of a home for one
class of animals

224
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT TWO: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 3 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 1 hour Topic: Caring for the animal
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
All animals require shelter as one of their basic needs. Students
understanding is facilitated by taking care of the animal as it HFLE:
grows and develops. They will also understand all the
developmental changes as well as the feeding requirements of Cooperation
the animal. Understanding
Consequences
Outcomes:
At the end of this learning experience students will: Literacy
identify the correct type of feed for the selected animal Reading
introduce the animal to the home Writing
observe and record changes in the growth of the animal. Oral
Communication
Literary
Activities:
Rabbits and Chickens Appreciation
1. Clean feeders with mild soap/disinfectant, dry the feeder Media &
and fill with clean fresh feed. Information Literacy
2. Clean waterer with mild disinfectant and fill with clean fresh
water. Numeracy
Problem Solving
Rabbit Critical thinking
3. Fill the grass rack with wilted grass and the feeder with Communication
pellets. Representation
4. Introduce the animal to its home. Reasoning
5. Monitor and record weekly changes observed in the growth
of the animal in a learning log/journal. ICT Skills

OR Differentiated
Chicken Instruction
6. Fill the feeder with recommended feed (chick starter for the
first 4 weeks and broiler finisher from the 5th week. Refer to Assessment for
agrodok for gradual change of feed). learning
7. Introduce the animal to its home.
8. Monitor and record weekly changes observed in the growth
of the animal in a learning log/journal.

Resources:
Stationery: journals/learning logs
ICT: computer, search word agrodok

225
Other: mild soap/ disinfectant
rabbit: wilted grass, pellets
OR
chicken: chick starter
Assessment:
Performance assessment:
- clean the home and equipment for one class of animals
introduce the animal to the home

226
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT TWO: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 4 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 1 hour Topic: Ailments and treatment of animals
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Most ailments occur as a result of poor management practices.
It is important to know the types of ailments that can affect HFLE:
animals, and the treatments that can be used to improve the
animals health. Cooperation
Choose an item.
Outcomes:
At the end of this learning experience students will: Literacy
research ailments and treatment of rabbit OR chicken Reading
present research using any form of media. Writing
Oral
Activities: Communication
1. Students view pictures of rabbits OR chickens suffering Literary
from ailments. Appreciation
2. They research the ailments, observable symptoms and Media &
treatments. Information Literacy
3. In groups, students create a presentation of their research
using any form of media. Numeracy
Problem Solving
Resources: Critical thinking
ICT: computer, search word agrodok Communication
Stationery: pencils, paper, markers, bristol board Representation
Other: pictures Reasoning

Assessment: ICT Skills


Create a presentation showing ailments of rabbits OR chickens
and possible treatment. Differentiated
Instruction

Assessment for
learning

227
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT TWO: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 5 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 1 hour Topic: Record Keeping
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Record keeping is an important aspect of rearing animals.
Students need to develop proper record keeping skills and habits HFLE:
to ensure good management practices. These include budgeting, Critical Thinking
early detection of diseases, projections and general action Decision Making
research.
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Reading
identify the records kept on rabbits OR chicken Writing
keep records on the rabbit OR chicken. Oral
Communication
Activities: Literary
1. Students prepare record cards for the animal. Appreciation
2. They record the type of feed used at the various stages of Media &
development. Information Literacy
3. They record any ailment of the animal and possible
treatment for the animal. Numeracy
4. Students record the yield/weight of the animal at various Problem Solving
stages of growth. Critical thinking
Communication
Resources: Representation
ICT: computer (e.g. Microsoft Excel) Reasoning
Stationery: index cards
Other: balance/scale ICT Skills

Assessment: Differentiated
Prepare a record card for a rabbit OR chicken. Instruction

Assessment for
learning

228
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT TWO: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 6 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 1 hour Topic: Disposal of the animal
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Agriculture teaches the rearing of animals for food and other
valuable products. Depending on the purpose, the animals are HFLE:
disposed of in several ways, through live sale or slaughter for
home use or for market. Cooperation
Outcomes: Decision Making
At the end of this learning experience students will:
state the purpose of rearing the particular class of animals Literacy
dispose of the animal in an appropriate manner. Reading
Writing
Activities: Oral
1. Students discuss in groups, the reason/reasons for rearing Communication
a particular class of animals. Literary
2. They identify and agree on a method of disposal (prize, Appreciation
sale, slaughter, donation to a charitable institution). Media &
3. They dispose of the animal using the selected method. Information Literacy
4. They record the method of disposal in the record card
created in the previous lesson. Numeracy
Problem Solving
Resources: Critical thinking
Stationery: record cards Communication
Representation
Assessment: Reasoning
Students identify two reasons for rearing one class of animals.
ICT Skills

Differentiated
Instruction

Assessment for
learning

229
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT TWO: Rearing one class of animals
Learning Plan: 7 of 7
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: Understanding Change
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Disassembly and storage of equipment
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
An important aspect of all activities is the clean-up and storage of
equipment. In this way equipment will be kept in good working HFLE:
condition and be free from pest and disease. This learning plan
seeks to emphasise the importance of performing preventative Cooperation
maintenance in clean-up activities and proper storage of Understanding
equipment to extend their lifespan. Consequences

Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience pupils will: Reading
demonstrate the proper procedure for cleaning up and Writing
storage of equipment used in the rearing and disposal of Oral
an animal (chicken OR rabbit). Communication
Literary
Activities: Appreciation
Caring for equipment Media &
1. Students are shown pictures of equipment used in the Information Literacy
rearing of a selected animal. They are asked to describe
the condition of the equipment seen (dusty, rusted, mouldy, Numeracy
chipped, broken, and twisted). Problem Solving
2. Students discuss possible reasons for the state of Critical thinking
deterioration of the equipment. Communication
3. Students discuss in groups what could be done to prevent
Representation
the equipment from getting into this state of disrepair.
4. Students outline good management practices to be Reasoning
followed before storage of equipment.
ICT Skills
Clean-up activity
5. Students are given the task to clean and sanitize the Differentiated
equipment used in rearing the animal feeder, waterer, Instruction
animal cage, using mild soap/detergent.
6. They are asked to disassemble, clean and sanitize the Assessment for
cage. learning
7. Students dry the equipment and repair as necessary.
8. They then oil the metal equipment to prevent rust.
9. Students then store the equipment in a dry secure room,
until the equipment is needed again.
10. Students create a chart showing the steps in disassembly
and storage of the equipment
o digital pictures could be used during the actual

230
clean up and storage process, these could be
mounted and labelled;
o alternatively, students could draw pictures
showing the steps involved.

Resources:
Stationery markers, bristol board, coloured
pencils/crayons
ICT digital camera (optional)
Other soap, detergent, oil, rag, PPE gloves, goggles,
pictures

Assessment:
Teacher observation and feedback to students as they
create a poster/chart showing the clean-up and storage of
equipment.
Performance assessment demonstrate the clean-up and
storage of equipment used.

231
Core Skills:
English Language Arts
This section provides samples of learning plans that have been provided to
teach key core skills in English Language Arts. The CD that accompanies
the printed toolkit provides lntra-disciplinary Learning Units which outline
the learning plans in suggested sequence.

232
UNIT ONE: Clauses, Compound and Complex Sentences
Learning Plan: 1 of 9
Class: Standard 4 Term 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 45 mins Topic: Whats A Clause?
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
A main clause sometimes referred to as an independent clause
contains a subject and a verb and expresses a complete thought as HFLE:
that of a sentence. Having knowledge of the main clause and using it in Effective
writing improves students skills in writing. Communication
Cooperation
Outcomes:
apply the correct punctuation marks to writing: colon (W) Literacy
select appropriate formats based on the needs of the audience Reading
and purpose (MIL). Writing
X Oral
Communication
Activities: Literary
Appreciation
Prior planning by teacher a paragraph with simple and
Media &
compound sentences
1. Paragraph is read and discussed Information Literacy
2. Sentences are categorised according to simple and compound
sentences Numeracy
3. One simple sentence is analysed by the class guided by the Problem Solving
teacher (simple subject and simple predicate) ask students to try Critical thinking
grouping words or dividing the simple sentence so that both Communication
groups of words makes sense) Representation
4. A compound sentence is then analysed (a compound sentence Reasoning
is divided into two dependent clauses and a conjunction) the
term independent clause is introduced ICT Skills
5. Simple sentences and complex sentences from the paragraph
are distributed Differentiated
6. Students engage in deconstructing sentences
Instruction
7. Students use different media formats in their presentation e.g.
group presenters can use chart paper and class presenters can
Assessment for
use the digital projector
8. They discuss their findings and present it to the class using learning
different media formats (grouping to be done by the teacher).
9. Students examine findings (guided by the teacher) to discover
that a simple sentence cannot be divided and still hold its
meaning.
10. Students view examples of main clauses and compare them to
sentences in terms of the simple subject and simple predicate.
11. Students discuss and present their findings (using different
media formats) to discover that a main clause is also a sentence

233
and is also referred to as an independent clause since it can
have meaning on its own.
12. Students discuss and present sentences at the group and class
level using various media formats.

Resources:

Stationery: chart paper, flash cards, coloured pencils, markers,


tape
ICTs: computer, digital projector
Literature: literary texts

Assessment:

Teacher observation of oral and media presentations


Checklist for participation

234
UNIT ONE: Clauses, Compound and Complex Sentences
Learning Plan: 2 of 9
Class: Standard 4 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 45 minutes Topic: Coordinating Conjunctions
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Coordinating conjunctions join two main/independent clauses of similar
grammatical structures. This is important for students to know in order HFLE:
for them to express themselves creatively and to extend their writing Decision Making
capabilities. Please refer to the intra-disciplinary unit, Clauses, Cooperation
Compound and Complex Sentences in the CD for guiding outcomes to
create other learning plans. Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of the learning plan students will: Writing
make connections among different cultures through literature Oral
(Lit. App.) Communication
identify conjunctions: for, and, yet, so (W) Literary
follow and provide relatively complex directions and instructions. Appreciation
(OC)
Media &
Information Literacy
Activities:
Numeracy
Prior planning by teacher -
A variety of grade level appropriate stories from different cultures will Problem Solving
Critical thinking
be made available for students to select e.g. Anansi, Aesops Fables,
Communication
Greek Mythology etc.
Representation
1. Students read stories (individually, in pairs or groups) chosen Reasoning
from the list. They discuss and present similarities in these
stories character, setting and plot. ICT Skills
2. Students read and pronounce the displayed words - coordinating
conjunctions. Differentiated
3. Students view a list of coordinating conjunctions (written on a Instruction
flash card for each student or projected).
4. They discuss the purpose of coordinating conjunctions in Assessment for
sentences teacher elicits to join two main/independent learning
clauses that have the same grammatical structure.
5. They identify conjunctions in stories read and create a list.
6. Students use identified conjunctions to write and follow
directions for a task such as using the dictionary to find the
meaning of a word (teacher can use another task). This may be
done in pairs or groups alternating for writing and following
directions. A checklist is used to record the conjunctions used
(sample - appendix 1).
Resources:
Stationery: writing paper, flash cards, coloured pencils, markers

235
ICTs: computer, digital projector
Literature: literary texts search words - world of tales
Assessment:
Teacher observation
Oral presentations
Checklist for identification of coordinating conjunctions

236
UNIT ONE: Clauses, Compound and Complex Sentences
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 4 Term 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 45 minutes Topic: Colon-izing the Sentence!
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Punctuation aids reading comprehension and writing. It is therefore
important to know how to properly place them and also what to do or HFLE:
expect to follow when they are met in reading. The colon is Effective
introduced in this learning plan. It is designed to help the students Communication
understanding that one must read on for more information when the Cooperation
colon is met, and that a list usually follows.
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience pupils will: Reading
read grade level texts independently (R) Writing
speak with attention to Standard English pronunciation (OC) Oral Communication
apply the correct punctuation marks to writing - colon (W) Literary
Appreciation
Activities:
Media & Information
Literacy
Prior planning by teacher -
A variety of grade level appropriate texts based on students
Numeracy
interests, personalities and backgrounds will be compiled. For the
purpose of this learning plan, these texts should not be lengthy or Problem Solving
selected pages may be used from lengthy texts. The teacher must Critical thinking
ensure as much as possible the inclusion of the colon in texts being Communication
used to punctuate the end of a sentence when a list of items follow. Representation
Reasoning
1. Students scan a few pieces of literature then agree and select
a book to be read to them. ICT Skills
2. Students listen to a read aloud of the text with emphasis on
Standard English enunciation and pronunciation. The teacher Differentiated
stresses where the colon is to draw students attention to the Instruction
punctuation mark.
3. Students read selected texts with a peer to practise Standard
Assessment for
English pronunciation. They may read in pairs, groups or with
learning
the entire class as the teacher determines.
4. Students examine texts for the punctuation marks used and
identify each by name. The word name and symbol for the
colon is displayed on the board, along with the others. The
names are read by all.
5. Students are invited to make a list of favourite games they
play. As the games are called, the teacher writes a sentence
on the board listing several games.
6. Students are asked to check their texts to see if there are any
lists and the punctuation marks used with the list/s. Students

237
reply by naming the different punctuation marks seen.
7. Students re-examine the texts read to locate the colon and to
say what they think is the function of the specific punctuation
mark. They discuss the impact of this new information to their
understanding of the texts.
8. In small groups, students create a list of a few of their favourite
things. For example toys, foods, friends, places, and shows.
They write a sentence using their list of favourite things using
the example given as a guide to the format. Each group shares
their sentence with the entire class in a dramatization. One
student begins by narrating the sentence stem then the rest of
the group continues by saying who they are acting out, until
the last student speaks.

For example
Student 1- My favourite fruits are:
Student 2- the apple
Student 3- the pommerac
Student 4- the plum
Student 5- and the sapodilla.

Resources:
Stationery: writing paper, cards, coloured pencils, markers.
Worksheet.
Literature: grade level texts.

Assessment:
Teacher observation
Presentations
Worksheet

238
The following are examples of sentences to punctuate using the colon. However,
teachers need to create sentences based on students experiences and monitor the
application of the skills in students writing. This type of assessment serves as an initial
record of understanding the skill. However, the proof of skills acquisition is when
students apply what they know to their writing.

Worksheet The Colon

Name: _______________________ Class: ____________________

Punctuate the sentences by correctly placing the colon in each.

Example My favourite toys are: a truck, a bicycle, a top and an airplane.

1. I have three hobbies collecting marbles, fishing and playing video

games.

2. For the first day of school you will need the following items a

pencil, a ruler and an eraser.

3. Three places I like to visit are the Zoo, the Botanical Gardens and

Maracas Beach.

4. Write one sentence listing the rules for playing your favourite game. Use

correct punctuation marks.

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

239
UNIT ONE:
Learning Plan: 1 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 40 minutes Topic: Medium or Larger?
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
The mass media is so prevalent in todays society that we often take
them for granted and ignore their prevalence and influence in our lives. HFLE:
Effective Communication
Television, radio, the Internet, newspapers, and books are some of the Critical Thinking
tools of mass communication that we are constantly surrounded by in
our daily living. Teaching of media literacy builds an awareness of the Literacy
prevalence of media in our lives. Reading
Writing
Oral Communication
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
Explain the purpose of selected media texts (a television show, Literacy

advertisement, radio broadcast, poem any other audio Numeracy


selections etc.) Problem Solving
Express personal thoughts and feelings about simple media Critical thinking
works Communication
Representation
Discuss varying points of view
Reasoning
Respond to and ask literal and inferential questions based on a
given stimulus. ICT Skills

Differentiated
Activities: Instruction
1. Whole class introductory discussion about communication is
engaged in by the teacher. Assessment for
2. Students will generate a list of different ways we communicate learning
and their answers will be recorded on the whiteboard.
3. Students view PPT on media literacy and respond and discuss
appropriately the questions on slides #2, #3 and #4.
4. Students will play a game identifying which media they listed on
whiteboard are mass media and which are not. (Add to the list
as students generate more ideas)
5. Students will view short movie on the history of media.
6. They will discuss the role of mass media in their lives by asking:
Which types of mass media are most dominant in your life?
What are some advantages of mass media?
What are some disadvantages of mass media?

7. Explain that when their grandparents were growing up much of


the mass media they have today did not exist. From the movie
discuss which type of mass media they believe were most
prevalent when their grandparents were growing up.
8. Students will interview their grandparents and a follow-up on the

240
interview will be done in class.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, whiteboard marker
ICTs: computer, projector, PPT on Media Literacy (Attached)

Assessment:
Interview from grandparents
Collaborative discussions
Observation

241
UNIT ONE:
Learning Plan: 2 of 5
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 40 minutes Topic: Target: Me
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
The mass media is prevalent in todays society that we often take them
for granted and ignore their predominance and influence in our lives. HFLE:
Effective Communication
Television, radio, the Internet, newspapers, and books/magazines are Critical Thinking
some of the tools of mass communication that we are constantly
surrounded by in our daily living. Teaching of media literacy builds an Literacy
awareness of the prevalence of media in our lives. Reading
Writing
Oral Communication
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
Deconstruct selected media to understand how Literacy
information/messages are presented to audiences.
Numeracy
Explain the purpose of selected media texts (a television show, Problem Solving
advertisement, radio broadcast, poem any other audio selections Critical thinking
etc.) Communication
Recognize that different media forms use particular language styles Representation
and techniques in their construction Reasoning

ICT Skills
Activities: Differentiated
1. Magazines, newspapers or other periodicals are distributed and Instruction
students are asked to peruse books and take a note about the
number of advertisements found within each publication. Assessment for
2. A record is taken and students discuss why advertisers and learning
companies advertise in this way. Students will then discuss and
share their points-of-view.
3. Students are paired and one magazine/newspaper is given to
each pair of students.
4. Students will look through the magazine and find an
advertisement that they like. (They are told to look for an
advertisement that has a comparison to another product or use
an authority such as doctor, Dental Association etc.)
5. Allow about five to seven minutes for the students to select an
advertisement. Once an advertisement is selected, hand out the
Advertisement Dissection and Analysis worksheet.
6. Students will answer as many questions as possible about the
advertisement, based on the advertisement that they selected.
7. As soon as pairs of students have completed their analysis,
have them compare their advertisement with another group and
discuss what they discovered. (Continue to group pairs of
students in this manner as they complete the activity)

242
8. Once all pairs of students have shared their findings, regroup
students for a whole class discussion
9. Students will discuss what they found when analysing the
advertisements.
Note any obvious themes, patterns or
phrases/persuasive language presented through the
advertisements.
10. Student will engage in a teacher facilitated discussion through
questioning.
Why do companies use authorities such as doctors,
Dental Associations in their advertisements?
Why do companies compare the qualities of similar
products (cars, toothpaste, pain-relievers) with one
another?

Advertisers believe that an endorsement by an authority


figure will influence consumer tastes and preferences for
the product thereby increasing consumer demand for the
product.

Advertisers believe that consumers who believe and think


the quality of one product is higher than another will
substitute the higher quality product for another similar
product, thus creating a demand for that product.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, whiteboard marker, newspapers,
magazines, catalogues
ICTs: computer, projector, videos, pictures

Assessment:
Collaborative discussions
Observation
Worksheets and graphic organizers

243
UNIT ONE: Stepping Up
Learning Plan: 3 of 10
Class: Standard 4 Term: 3 Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
Duration: 40mins. 80mins. Topic: May I Question Please?
(double period)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Reading Comprehension becomes critical as students advance
through primary school and beyond. As such, proficiency in HFLE:
reading comprehension depends on utilizing effective Decision Making
comprehension instruction such as question-generating. This Choose an item.
learning experience seeks to help students become more critical
thinkers, using an intra-disciplinary English Language approach. Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
employ taught strategies to assist in making meaning: Media & Information
Literacy
post-listening: self-question to determine if expectations
were met, oral responses to the aural stimuli (OC) Numeracy
generate questions about the text (R) Problem Solving
compare a similar theme presented in two different literary Critical thinking
texts (Lit. App.) Communication
Representation
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning, Reasoning
middle and end plot structure, character development,
setting, sensory descriptive words and the simile, simple ICT Skills
metaphor and personification devices. (W)
Differentiated
Activities: Instruction
Activity One Generating Questions
Assessment for
1. Students engage in a Readers Theatre of the story, learning
Techno Mans Plight.

2. Next, the teacher uses hot-seating to allow students to feel


comfortable in generating questions. One student
volunteers to be in the hot-seat, while the teacher and/or
other students question the volunteer e.g. King Analog
why were you afraid of change? Why did you banish
Techno Man and his men to Planet Digi? How did you
feel when you did that? How would you have felt if
roles were reversed/or if you were the one banished
from your planet? How else do you think you could
have resolved that situation?

3. Teacher explains to students the importance of questioning


the text inclusive of audio and electronic media.

244
Questioning the text, helps us to guide our reading;
understand the message better; look at situations from
different angles and find relevant information. Teacher
questions for other possible reasons. Generating questions
can be done before reading, during reading and post
reading, as Mr. Frank Porter does prior to every reading
lesson. Teacher explains that there are different levels of
questioning, along with signal words. (See Resource List).
(Informally assessed).

4. Teacher and students practise generating questions for the


text, using the suggested signal words reading one slide at
a time. They respond orally using Standard English
structures.

Activity Two Whats The Big Picture?

5. Teacher asks students for the theme in this story. Students


are reminded that the theme is the big picture, not what the
story is about. It is the underlying meaning or truths about
human nature. Theme explores characters emotions and
values. They can either be explicit or implicit. Some themes
in, Techno Mans Plight, can be, afraid of change,
differences are unacceptable or intolerable, perseverance,
taking chances etc.

6. Teacher and students explore other stories/genres with


similar themes that are explicitly mentioned. They discuss
why those were chosen as themes. Teacher probes for
supporting details and encourages the use graphic
organizers to assist with making connections to other texts
with similar themes.

Activity Three My Thoughts on Paper

7. In groups, students create a story using one theme


discussed. They clearly show, beginning, middle and end,
with setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Resources:
signal words for different types of questions, story Techno Mans
Plight (PPT see attached)

245
Assessment: Re: LP Three: May I Question Please?

Activity One (3) Generating Questions

Each student generates four questions for text one for each type
of question.

Activity Three (7) My Thoughts on Paper

Students develop one explicit theme with beginning, middle and


end plot structure, setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Checklist for Writing


Name ___________ Date __________ Attempt No. ___________

TRAIT YES NO COMMENT


Evidence of the development of explicit theme
Clear beginning, middle and end
Use of descriptive words in correct context
Use of at least two similes, correctly used
Evidence of personification
Code-switching between Standard English
structures and The Creole
Participated constructively in group work

RESOURCE LIST

1. Signal Words for Generating Questions

TYPES OF SIGNAL WORDS WHEN USED STUDENTS


QUESTIONS EXAMPLE
Memory (short who, what, where, naming, identifying,
word, phrase) when defining
Convergent why, how, in what explaining, comparing
Thinking ways and contrasting
(requires longer
answers)
Divergent imagine, suppose, if predicting, inferring,
Thinking then, predict reconstructing,
hypothesizing
Evaluative defend, judge, justify, valuing, judging,
Thinking what do you think? defending, justifying

246
UNIT ONE: Stepping Up
Learning Plan: 6 of 10
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
Duration: 40mins. 80mins. Topic: My Thoughts Matter
(double period)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Literature is the means through which students can make judgements
and evaluate their thinking. Moreover, literature encourages students HFLE:
to willingly share feelings and express opinions. When students are Understanding
consistently engaged in these activities they begin to think at Consequences
inferential levels, therefore, improving comprehension skills. This Choose an item.
learning experience combines literature with comprehension to
develop critical thinkers. Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
apply a variety of appropriate-level strategies and skills to Literacy
construct meaning from text, including before, during and after
reading (R) Numeracy
Problem Solving
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts expressing Critical thinking
point-of-view (Lit. App.) Communication
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning middle Representation
Reasoning
and end plot structure, character development, setting,
sensory descriptive words and the simile, simple metaphor ICT Skills
and personification devices. (W)
Differentiated
Activities: Instruction
Activity One My Thoughts
Assessment for
6. Students reread the story, Techno Mans Plight, learning
independently, using individual copies.

7. Teacher asks students to choose which character they are in


the story and why. They are then placed at different parts of
the room.

8. Each group now engages in a literature circle activity. This


entails each member choosing a discussion director (lead);
passage master (chooses sections of the story to discuss);
word wizard (vocabulary issues); connector (makes text-to-self
and text-to-text connections); summarizer, illustrator and
investigator (researches author, other books by this author etc.
- none for this story) (Tompkins, 2010 pp.339).

9. Teacher models the activities of the literature circle. Teacher

247
engages discussion about the genre of this text, main
characters and plot; together, they explore text factors of
narrative stories; recall big ideas and themes; identify
figurative language (if any) and explain them. Students also
use this opportunity to examine social issues in the story e.g.
the effect of King Analogs use of paper on the environment.
Students essentially express thoughts, feelings, ideas and
opinions based on the story.

5a. Next, members of each group express their points-of-view.


Teacher reminds students to be respectful to all peers and to
follow rules of attentive listening. They also have the option to
code-switch or use any language variety that is comfortable for
them during the small group interaction, but when presenting
use formal Standard English structures. King Analogs group,
takes centre stage, retelling the story from his angle I have
decided no internet, no technology because people will
lose their jobs. There will be little communication among
humans as people are stuck behind these machines,
electricity bills will soar. There will be health issues e.g.
no form of exercising at least with paper, people have to
post, they meet and they socialize. Im afraid that
technology will take that away.

b. Next, Techno Mans group rebuts. Techno Man responds,


While your concerns are valid and noted, my point is
technology can help us get so much done, in less time.
Now, we will have time to socialize, visit friends and
relatives and exercise. Also, friendships can be made with
people from across the planet and beyond. My dear King
Analog, your way is destroying our environment. The
enormous amount of paper being used is destroying our
trees, and animal life. Please reconsider, we can balance
this off. Please give the technology a chance. Let us try it
for three months and well see the impact on the planet.
Lady Cloud is invited to support Techno Man.

c. The process is repeated with the minor characters either


presenting separately or supporting the main character.

d. Each group then gives one different point-of-view that


impacted on them. They also engage in self-reflection to
determine the strengths and weaknesses of their
participation within their groups (see Assessment).

Activity Two - Thinking About Texts Skimming

248
6. Teacher then asks students to share their method of locating
information form the story. Teacher probes, Did you have to
read the entire story to locate answers? Let us now examine
this story further. Pretend you did not know this story, who are
the characters in this story? What clues on the first slide will
indicate? Yes, the bold print.
Similarly, when we want to find information quickly from
text, we skim or glance quickly but meaningfully to get the gist
of the passage. We look at our table of contents, captions,
titles, headings and subheadings, first and last paragraphs,
proper nouns, and qualifying adjectives (worst, best),
typographic signals, illustrations and the text beneath them
etc., to help in pre reading and during reading activities.
Furthermore, skimming helps readers to get the main idea or
general overview of the text. Therefore, enhancing the ability
to construct meaning from text in a jiffy.
Teacher models by moving the index finger very quickly
from left to right throughout the entire text, in order to find the
approximate area of the text where the answer can be found.

7. Students engage in skimming exercises to locate responses


for specific teacher-made questions e.g. Describe the Kings
attitude towards technology. How did Techno Man feel at the
beginning of the story as compared to the end of the story?
teacher generates other questions, assisting students in
developing proficiency in using the technique.

Follow-up Activities Narrative Writing (See Assessment for


Checklist)

8. Use scanning as a technique to help students construct


meaning from text using clue words. Students are required to
run eyes quickly over the page, looking for key words and
clues to find a specific bit of information.

9. Students complete their story from LP (3) - May I Question


Please? In groups, students complete their story using one
theme discussed. They clearly show, beginning, middle and
end plot, with setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Resources:
individual copies of, Techno Mans Plight, (see attached), literature
circle self-evaluation forms, stationery, reference books

249
Reference Books
Mc Laughlin, M., & Allen, M.B., (2002). Guided comprehension: a
teaching model for grades 3 8. International Reading
Association

Tompkins, G.E., (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: a balanced


approach. (5th ed.). Allyn & Bacon

Website
Leggat, C., (2010). Skimming and scanning:reading comprehension
skills retrieved 13/11/20 from
http://www.slideshare.net/sakinasabbas/reading-skills-lesson-plan

Assessment: Re: LP Six - My Thoughts Matter Activity One (5 d)


Literature Circle Self-Evaluation (adapted from Mc Laughlin & Allen
(2002).

Name; ___________ Date: ___________ Text: ______________

1. How do you think you participated in this discussion? Circle


one
enough not enough sometimes not at all

2. Would you like to use the literature circle again? Yes No

3. If No, what else would you like to use?


___________________

__________________________________________________

4. What did you learn in the literature circle?


______________________________________________
______________________________________________

5. What is your opinion about your groups discussion?


excellent fair boring
everybody got an opportunity to express ideas
everyone was treated with respect

6. Did the literature circle help you to understand the story better?
Yes No

10. How can the literature circle be improved?


__________________________________________________

250
__________________________________________________

Follow up Narrative Writing


Checklist for Writing
Name ___________ Date __________ Attempt No. ___________

TRAIT YES NO COMMENT


Evidence of the development of explicit theme
Clear beginning, middle and end plot
Evidence of a point-of-view taken with at least
three supporting details
Use of descriptive words in correct context
Use of at least two similes, correctly used
Evidence of personification
Code-switching between Standard English
structures and The Creole
Participated constructively in group work

251
UNIT ONE: Stepping Up
Learning Plan: 3 of 10
Class: Standard 4 Term: 3 Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
Duration: 40mins. Topic: May I Question Please?
80mins. (double period)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Reading Comprehension becomes critical as students advance
through primary school and beyond. As such, proficiency in HFLE:
reading comprehension depends on utilizing effective Decision Making
comprehension instruction such as question-generating. This Choose an item.
learning experience seeks to help students become more critical
thinkers, using an intra-disciplinary English Language approach. Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
employ taught strategies to assist in making meaning: Media & Information
Literacy
post-listening: self-question to determine if expectations
were met, oral responses to the aural stimuli (OC) Numeracy
generate questions about the text (R) Problem Solving
compare a similar theme presented in two different literary Critical thinking
texts (Lit. App.) Communication
Representation
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning, Reasoning
middle and end plot structure, character development,
setting, sensory descriptive words and the simile, simple ICT Skills
metaphor and personification devices. (W)
Differentiated
Activities: Instruction
Activity One Generating Questions
Assessment for
8. Students engage in a Readers Theatre of the story, learning
Techno Mans Plight.

9. Next, the teacher uses hot-seating to allow students to feel


comfortable in generating questions. One student
volunteers to be in the hot-seat, while the teacher and/or
other students question the volunteer e.g. King Analog
why were you afraid of change? Why did you banish
Techno Man and his men to Planet Digi? How did you
feel when you did that? How would you have felt if
roles were reversed/or if you were the one banished
from your planet? How else do you think you could
have resolved that situation?

10. Teacher explains to students the importance of questioning


the text inclusive of audio and electronic media.

252
Questioning the text, helps us to guide our reading;
understand the message better; look at situations from
different angles and find relevant information. Teacher
questions for other possible reasons. Generating questions
can be done before reading, during reading and post
reading, as Mr. Frank Porter does prior to every reading
lesson. Teacher explains that there are different levels of
questioning, along with signal words. (See Resource List).
(Informally assessed).

11. Teacher and students practise generating questions for the


text, using the suggested signal words reading one slide at
a time. They respond orally using Standard English
structures.

Activity Two Whats The Big Picture?

12. Teacher asks students for the theme in this story. Students
are reminded that the theme is the big picture, not what the
story is about. It is the underlying meaning or truths about
human nature. Theme explores characters emotions and
values. They can either be explicit or implicit. Some themes
in, Techno Mans Plight, can be, afraid of change,
differences are unacceptable or intolerable, perseverance,
taking chances etc.

13. Teacher and students explore other stories/genres with


similar themes that are explicitly mentioned. They discuss
why those were chosen as themes. Teacher probes for
supporting details and encourages the use graphic
organizers to assist with making connections to other texts
with similar themes.

Activity Three My Thoughts on Paper

14. In groups, students create a story using one theme


discussed. They clearly show, beginning, middle and end,
with setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Resources:
signal words for different types of questions, story Techno Mans
Plight (PPT see attached)

253
Assessment: Re: LP Three: May I Question Please?

Activity One (3) Generating Questions

Each student generates four questions for text one for each type
of question.

Activity Three (7) My Thoughts on Paper

Students develop one explicit theme with beginning, middle and


end plot structure, setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Checklist for Writing


Name ___________ Date __________ Attempt No. ___________

TRAIT YES NO COMMENT


Evidence of the development of explicit theme
Clear beginning, middle and end
Use of descriptive words in correct context
Use of at least two similes, correctly used
Evidence of personification
Code-switching between Standard English
structures and The Creole
Participated constructively in group work

RESOURCE LIST

2. Signal Words for Generating Questions

TYPES OF SIGNAL WORDS WHEN USED STUDENTS


QUESTIONS EXAMPLE
Memory (short who, what, where, naming, identifying,
word, phrase) when defining
Convergent why, how, in what explaining, comparing
Thinking ways and contrasting
(requires longer
answers)
Divergent imagine, suppose, if predicting, inferring,
Thinking then, predict reconstructing,
hypothesizing
Evaluative defend, judge, justify, valuing, judging,
Thinking what do you think? defending, justifying

254
UNIT ONE: Stepping Up
Learning Plan: 6 of 10
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: A World of Change: Making Choices
Duration: 40mins. 80mins. Topic: My Thoughts Matter
(double period)
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Literature is the means through which students can make judgements
and evaluate their thinking. Moreover, literature encourages students HFLE:
to willingly share feelings and express opinions. When students are Understanding
consistently engaged in these activities they begin to think at Consequences
inferential levels, therefore, improving comprehension skills. This Choose an item.
learning experience combines literature with comprehension to
develop critical thinkers. Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience, students will: Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
apply a variety of appropriate-level strategies and skills to Literacy
construct meaning from text, including before, during and after
reading (R) Numeracy
Problem Solving
share thoughts and feelings about literary texts expressing Critical thinking
point-of-view (Lit. App.) Communication
write narrative-descriptive stories showing beginning middle Representation
Reasoning
and end plot structure, character development, setting,
sensory descriptive words and the simile, simple metaphor ICT Skills
and personification devices. (W)
Differentiated
Activities: Instruction
Activity One My Thoughts
Assessment for
10. Students reread the story, Techno Mans Plight, learning
independently, using individual copies.

11. Teacher asks students to choose which character they are in


the story and why. They are then placed at different parts of
the room.

12. Each group now engages in a literature circle activity. This


entails each member choosing a discussion director (lead);
passage master (chooses sections of the story to discuss);
word wizard (vocabulary issues); connector (makes text-to-self
and text-to-text connections); summarizer, illustrator and
investigator (researches author, other books by this author etc.
- none for this story) (Tompkins, 2010 pp.339).

13. Teacher models the activities of the literature circle. Teacher

255
engages discussion about the genre of this text, main
characters and plot; together, they explore text factors of
narrative stories; recall big ideas and themes; identify
figurative language (if any) and explain them. Students also
use this opportunity to examine social issues in the story e.g.
the effect of King Analogs use of paper on the environment.
Students essentially express thoughts, feelings, ideas and
opinions based on the story.

5a. Next, members of each group express their points-of-view.


Teacher reminds students to be respectful to all peers and to
follow rules of attentive listening. They also have the option to
code-switch or use any language variety that is comfortable for
them during the small group interaction, but when presenting
use formal Standard English structures. King Analogs group,
takes centre stage, retelling the story from his angle I have
decided no internet, no technology because people will
lose their jobs. There will be little communication among
humans as people are stuck behind these machines,
electricity bills will soar. There will be health issues e.g.
no form of exercising at least with paper, people have to
post, they meet and they socialize. Im afraid that
technology will take that away.

b. Next, Techno Mans group rebuts. Techno Man responds,


While your concerns are valid and noted, my point is
technology can help us get so much done, in less time.
Now, we will have time to socialize, visit friends and
relatives and exercise. Also, friendships can be made with
people from across the planet and beyond. My dear King
Analog, your way is destroying our environment. The
enormous amount of paper being used is destroying our
trees, and animal life. Please reconsider, we can balance
this off. Please give the technology a chance. Let us try it
for three months and well see the impact on the planet.
Lady Cloud is invited to support Techno Man.

c. The process is repeated with the minor characters either


presenting separately or supporting the main character.

d. Each group then gives one different point-of-view that


impacted on them. They also engage in self-reflection to
determine the strengths and weaknesses of their
participation within their groups (see Assessment).

Activity Two - Thinking About Texts Skimming

256
11. Teacher then asks students to share their method of locating
information form the story. Teacher probes, Did you have to
read the entire story to locate answers? Let us now examine
this story further. Pretend you did not know this story,who are
the characters in this story?, what clues on the first slide will
indicate? Yes, the bold print.
Similarly, when we want to find information quickly from
text, we skim or glance quickly but meaningfully to get the gist
of the passage. We look at our table of contents, captions,
titles, headings and subheadings, first and last paragraphs,
proper nouns, and qualifying adjectives (worst, best),
typographic signals, illustrations and the text beneath them
etc., to help in pre reading and during reading activities.
Furthermore, skimming helps readers to get the main idea or
general overview of the text. Therefore, enhancing the ability
to construct meaning from text in a jiffy.
Teacher models by moving the index finger very quickly
from left to right throughout the entire text, in order to find the
approximate area of the text where the answer can be found.

12. Students engage in skimming exercises to locate responses


for specific teacher-made questions e.g. Describe the Kings
attitude towards technology. How did Techno Man feel at the
beginning of the story as compared to the end of the story?
teacher generates other questions, assisting students in
developing proficiency in using the technique.

Follow-up Activities Narrative Writing (See Assessment for


Checklist)

13. Use scanning as a technique to help students construct


meaning from text using clue words. Students are required to
run eyes quickly over the page, looking for key words and
clues to find a specific bit of information.

14. Students complete their story from LP (3) - May I Question


Please? In groups, students complete their story using one
theme discussed. They clearly show, beginning, middle and
end plot, with setting, sensory descriptive words, incorporating
simile, and personification devices.

Resources:
individual copies of, Techno Mans Plight, (see attached), literature
circle self-evaluation forms, stationery, reference books

257
Reference Books
Mc Laughlin, M., & Allen, M.B., (2002). Guided comprehension: a
teaching model for grades 3 8. International Reading
Association

Tompkins, G.E., (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: a balanced


approach. (5th ed.). Allyn & Bacon

Website
Leggat, C., (2010). Skimming and scanning:reading comprehension
skills retrieved 13/11/20 from
http://www.slideshare.net/sakinasabbas/reading-skills-lesson-plan

Assessment: Re: LP Six - My Thoughts Matter Activity One (5 d)


Literature Circle Self-Evaluation (adapted from Mc Laughlin & Allen
(2002).

Name; ___________ Date: ___________ Text: ______________

6. How do you think you participated in this discussion? Circle


one
enough not enough sometimes not at all

7. Would you like to use the literature circle again? Yes No

8. If No, what else would you like to use?


___________________

__________________________________________________

9. What did you learn in the literature circle?


______________________________________________
______________________________________________

10. What is your opinion about your groups discussion?


excellent fair boring
everybody got an opportunity to express ideas
everyone was treated with respect

6. Did the literature circle help you to understand the story better?
Yes No

15. How can the literature circle be improved?


__________________________________________________

258
__________________________________________________

Follow up Narrative Writing


Checklist for Writing
Name ___________ Date __________ Attempt No. ___________

TRAIT YES NO COMMENT


Evidence of the development of explicit theme
Clear beginning, middle and end plot
Evidence of a point-of-view taken with at least
three supporting details
Use of descriptive words in correct context
Use of at least two similes, correctly used
Evidence of personification
Code-switching between Standard English
structures and The Creole
Participated constructively in group work

259
UNIT ONE:
Learning Plan: 1 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change
Duration: 2/3 lessons Topic: Writing Instructions
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
Writing instructions on how to help students understand the HFLE:
importance of writing clear, concise instructions for a range of
interesting tasks. Instructions are written in small increments, Effective
manageable tasks that are clear and easy to follow to completion. Communication
Students must know what is done first, second, third etc. Engaging Cooperation
students in the writing process will assist them to produce effective
writing pieces. During this process a great emphasis is placed on the Literacy
oral aspect of the prewriting to give each student an opportunity to Reading
express themselves orally before engaging in the writing aspect. Writing
Oral
Outcomes: Communication
At the end of this learning experience students will: Literary
read a variety of informational texts with sufficient accuracy to Appreciation
support comprehension Media &
respond to and ask literal and inferential questions based on a Information
given stimulus Literacy
use Standard English for formal speech contexts
develop a more sophisticated vocabulary by extending basic Numeracy
word knowledge across content areas Problem Solving
organize ideas using web maps graphic organizers Critical thinking
Communication
Representation
Activities: Reasoning
Preparation for this activity: favourite games that children play are
displayed. (Monopoly, snakes and ladders, bingo etc.) ICT Skills
1. Students engage in conversations responding to literal and Differentiated
inferential questions to relate the step by step procedure to play Instruction
some of the games.
2. They are placed in groups and each group will discuss the step Assessment for
by step procedure for a particular game they were given. learning
3. One group member will make an oral presentation from their
discussion on how to play the game. (presentations are formal
and students are to respond in Standard English)
4. The games are numbered and students pick a number from a
box. This can be difficult to do if student were in different
groups, and there were so many games presented. Can it be
possible they class work on one game?
5. They are called randomly to give the step by step instructions to

260
play the game.

(A great emphasis is placed on the oral aspect before students


begin to write. Important content words and phrases are written
on the word wall throughout this prewriting stage for later use by
students to aid their writing: first, second, third, next)

Resources: Resources
Stationery: pencils
Others: web maps, games, word wall

Assessment:
On-going assessment

261
UNIT ONE:
Learning Plan: 2 of 4
Class: Standard 4 Theme: A World of Change
Duration: 35 minutes Topic: Writing Instructions
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
Drafting is the stage when students begin to formulate their writing HFLE:
piece on paper having been engaged sufficiently in the prewriting
stage. Effective
Communication
Cooperation
Outcomes:
Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Reading
organize their writing using a graphic organizer to write simple Writing
instructions Oral
apply drafting skills appropriate for writing instructions Communication
(sequencing, numbering, use words and phrases which convey Literary
precise meaning, use clear precise and suitable language) Appreciation
expand the basic sentence type by adding nouns, adjectives or Media &
adverbs (word or phrase) Information
use words from the word wall to write effectively. Literacy

Numeracy
Activities: Problem Solving
Students participated in the prewriting stage to complete a web map Critical thinking
which the teacher modelled.
Communication
1. Students listen attentively and make their contributions while the
teacher models the writing instruction using a graphic organizer Representation
2. They observe the structure or the graphic organizer and make Reasoning
their contributions for completion.
3. Students choose a game of their choice to write instructions to ICT Skills
complete a ( They use the word wall for effective and
appropriate vocabulary for this context) Differentiated
4. They complete a graphic organizer activity which the teacher Instruction
scaffolds when necessary.
(An individual activity which the teacher scaffolds where Assessment for
necessary) learning
Resources: Resources
Stationery: pencils
Others: web maps, games, word wall
Assessment:
On-going assessment
Core Skills:
Science
Core Skills: Science
Learning Plan
Class: Standard 4 Term: 1 Theme: The World of Change: Media and Information
Duration: 90 minutes Topic: Keep me dry
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
During an investigation the measuring cylinder containing the water
topples over, thereby spilling its contents. This water poses a threat to HFLE:
the wooden furniture in the classroom. The students need use the Cooperation
least amount of material to dry the area quickly. As such, students Decision Making
need to be aware of the absorbing property of various materials; thus
they will be able to select the most appropriate material to perform the Literacy
Reading
required task. Writing
Oral Communication
Outcomes: Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
investigate the properties of materials such as absorbency Literacy
formulate and test hypotheses on the most suitable material to
be used Numeracy
interpret data and draw appropriate conclusions from Problem Solving
Critical thinking
observations made Communication
propose innovative recommendations for improvement to Representation
apparatus/equipment. Reasoning

ICT Skills
Activities:
Differentiated
Background Instruction
1. A beaker/cup containing water is spilled onto the table by
teacher. Assessment for
2. Students observe the spilled water as it begins to flow towards learning
the end of the table.

Purpose of Investigation
3. Class discussion on what can happen to the table if the water
remains there is facilitated by teacher.
4. They also discuss what they have available in the classroom
that can be used to absorb the spilled water.

Proposition of Hypothesis
5. Students discuss what can be done by utilizing paper samples
(Suggestion: different brands of same materials or different
types of materials).
6. In groups, students formulate a hypothesis on which material will
the least amount of water remains on the surface.

Selection of Method
7. Materials are distributed to each group by teacher.

264
8. Students list the manipulated and responding and controlled
variables.
9. Students cut pieces of different types of paper (all the same
size). Using a measuring cylinder, they measure the same
amount of water and pour it into a cup or beaker. This
information is recorded (see attached format for investigation
report).
10. Students fold each piece of paper like an accordion (each
should have the same number of folds). They then tie a piece of
string about the middle of the folded paper and gently, lower
each piece of paper into water. After a count of 10 seconds, the
wad of paper is raised and a further count of 2 seconds before it
is totally removed. The amount of water that remains in the
beaker after removing the wad of material is measured. This
information is recorded.

Collection of Data
11. They draw and label diagrams of the investigation.
Note: Diagrams must be large (half of a page).
12. Students record measurements for each quantity observed in
the table e.g. the volume of water, the type of material used.

Analysis of Data
13. Students compare changes in the initial and final volume of
water.

Discussion
14. Students write a report justifying their statements on the degree
of absorbency of each type of paper used.

Conclusion
15. Students make a general statement to validate which paper
should be used.

Resources:
Stationery: pencil, eraser.
Other: beaker/cup, water, different types of paper, scissors,
stopwatch/clock with second hand, measuring cylinders/cups.

Assessment:

Oral questioning
Rubric (for investigation report)

265
Science Investigation Report (format)

Class:

Date:

Group members:

Title/Question: Absorbency of materials

Hypothesis:

Variables: Manipulated:

Responding:

Controlled:

Apparatus:

Diagram:

Method:

Results:

Material A B C D
st nd st nd st nd st
1 try 2 try 1 try 2 try 1 try 2 try 1 try 2nd try
Initial Volume of
water/ml
Final volume of
water/ml

Analysis:

Discussion:

Conclusion:

266
Core Skills:
Social Studies

267
Core Skills: Social Studies
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 4
Duration: 40 minutes Topic: Celebrating our Early Pioneers (Social Studies)

Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Trinidad and Tobago became an independent nation in 1962.
Previous to this, from the time of some of the early settlers, there HFLE:
were significant individuals who, through their works and struggles, Cooperation
contributed to the development of our islands. Effective
Outcomes: Communication
At the end of this learning experience students will:
develop an understanding of some early historical influences in Literacy
Trinidad and Tobago before Independence Reading
identify contributions made by key individuals Writing
use a timeline to show the sequence of these events leading Oral
up to Independence. Communication
Activities: Literary
Appreciation
1. The class is divided into six or eight groups. Each group is Media &
given information on one of the pioneers to read (see attached Information Literacy
below).
2. Students, in their groups, read the information and note Numeracy
significant contributions of the pioneer and the year of the Problem Solving
contribution/achievement. Critical thinking
3. Each group presents their information, beginning with the Communication
earliest year. Significant contributions are identified and Representation
students say what makes it important.
Reasoning
4. The information is noted by the teacher on the board using a
timeline.
ICT Skills
5. Students copy the timeline and write the significant
contribution(s) pertaining to that year.
Differentiated
6. Each group can make a poster for their pioneer to create a
Instruction
pioneer corner in the classroom.
Assessment for
Resources:
learning
Paper, pencil, bristol board, information sheet

Assessment:
Groups presentations
Students individual timeline
Students explanations on the importance of contributions.

268
OUR EARLY PIONEERS

PHILIPPE-ROSE ROUME DE ST. LAURENT


(1743 1805)
He came to Trinidad from Grenada and fell in love
with the beauty of the place. He invited the French
people of Grenada to come to Trinidad after
presenting a proposal to the Spanish to provide
encouragement to them. King Charles III of Spain
accepted his proposal and a permit (cedula) was
declared in 1783 for the settlement and
development of Trinidad. It was because of him
that Trinidad was put on the road to development
and much of the French customs and culture of our
people all point to that historic moment when
Roume first set eyes on Trinidad.

ARTHUR ANDREW CIPRIANI (1875 1945)


was born in Port-of-Spain. He became a leader to
ex-soldiers and labourers, also becoming well
known throughout Trinidad and Tobago as the
champion of the ordinary workers and friend of
the bare-foot man. In November 1919, during a
labour dispute on the Port-of-Spain wharves,
Cipriani called on the workers to strike. This
resulted in the first important industrial strike in
Trinidad. In 1925 he became Mayor of Port-of-
Spain, which helped him to a seat on the
Legislative Council in Trinidads first general
elections. On the Legislative Council he
championed many issues such as, old age
pension, womens rights, minimum wage,
compulsory education, an end to plantation child
labour and the end of the Crown Colony system.

269
EMMANUEL MZUMBO LAZARE was born in Trinidad
in 1864. Later he took on the African name Mzumbo
to show his pride in his African ancestry. He was not
content simply to make money for himself; he wanted
to help his country and especially other African-
Trinidadians. He became involved in local politics and
played a leading role in the campaign against Crown
Colony Government which led to the Water Riots in
Port-of-Spain in 1903. He fought for the recognition of
Emancipation Day as a public holiday. It was through
the ground work he and others laid that voting rights
came about later.

LORD HARRIS (GEORGE F. R. HARRIS) (1810


1872)
Harris was the British Governor of Trinidad from
1846 1854 whose national contributions were
very important to our development.

In 1849 he introduced the ward system where


Trinidad was divided into wards each headed by a
warden, replacing the Spanish system of quarters.
In 1851 he introduced free primary education in
the ward schools as well as starting the Trinidad
Public Library and an island postal service.

WILLIAM ROBINSON (1836 1912)


He was the last British Governor of
Trinidad from 1885-1888 and the first
Governor of the merged colony of
Trinidad and Tobago from 1889 1891.
He led the proceedings for the union of
Trinidad and Tobago in 1889.

270
EDWARD BEETHAM (1905 1975)

He was the last of the British colonial


governors from 1955-1960. He was in
charge during the period when the transfer
took place of Trinidad and Tobago
changing to a full internal cabinet self-
government.

SOLOMON HOCHOY (1905 1983)


In 1960 he became our last governor before
Independence and then our first Governor
General when we gained Independence in
1962. He had the position of Governor General
until 1972.

DR. ERIC WILLIAMS (1911 1981)


He formed the Peoples National
Movement (PNM) in 1956, the political
party of which he became the leader
until the time of his death in 1981. In
September 1956 the PNM won the
national elections and he became the
chief minister of the country from 1956
to 1959, our first premier from 1959 to
1962 and our first prime minister from
1962 to 1981. During his term as Prime
Minister, Williams led Trinidad and
Tobago into the Federation of the West
Indies, to independence within the
Commonwealth in 1962 and to Republic
status in 1976. He died on March 29,
1981 while he was still the Prime
Minister.

271
Core Skills: Social Studies
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Duration:40 minutes
Topic: Communicable Diseases
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Communicable diseases are common in primary schools and
occur frequently among the schools populations. Children need HFLE:
to be made aware of what these communicable diseases are and Effective
how they should treat with them. Communication
Outcomes: Problem Solving
Name two or three types of communicable diseases
List three or four precautionary measures to avoid the Literacy
spread Reading
Explain how they impact on relationships. Writing
Oral
Activities: Communication
1. Students view pictures of persons with communicable Literary
diseases. They discuss what they think the communicable Appreciation
disease is (e.g. common cold; conjunctivitis or red eye; Media &
chicken pox; ringworm) and how it might be spread. Information Literacy

2. Through discussions students devise a definition for Numeracy


communicable disease. A working definition is presented, Problem Solving
on a chart, by the teacher. The terms infectious and Critical thinking
contagious are also introduced. Communication
Representation
3. Students orally name some communicable and non-
Reasoning
communicable diseases. On a worksheet they identify the
diseases that are communicable and those that are not.
ICT Skills
4. Students discuss what they think might be some
Differentiated
precautionary measures to take to avoid the further spread
Instruction
of a particular disease.
Assessment for
5. It is explained by the teacher how the disease can affect
learning
their interactions with other people (school mates and
family members).

6. Some precautionary measures are identified for named


communicable diseases, such as isolation from other
people and immunisation.

Teachers can include other communicable diseases that


are applicable to their environment.

272
Resources:
Pictures, pencil, worksheets
Assessment:
Students list three precautionary measures to avoid the
spread of communicable diseases.
Students complete worksheets. (see attached)

273
For each disease students tick ( ) to indicate if it is a communicable or non-
communicable disease.

Disease Communicable Non-communicable


Common cold

Headache

Ringworm

Dengue

A bleeding cut

Conjunctivitis

Chicken pox

Tummy ache

H1N1 (Swine flu)

274
Name of disease How it is spread Precautionary
measures
Common cold

Conjunctivitis

Chicken pox

Ringworm

275
Core Skills:
Visual and Performing
Arts

276
Core Skills : Music
Class: Standard 4 Duration: 3 hours
Topic: Structure
Context: Students will deliver better performances and CONSIDERATIONS:
compositions if they understand the form/structure of the
particular genre they are working with. It helps them to see HFLE:
beyond the catchy or familiar phrases or lines and opens their Creative Thinking
minds to a realization that their world is made up of many crucial Effective Communication
or important parts that are uniquely combined to form a whole.
Literacy
Reading
Writing
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will : Oral Communication
identify the form (structure) of musical excerpts as being Literary Appreciation
call and response, verse and chorus or solo/chorus. Media & Information
Literacy

Activities: Numeracy
1) Students discuss the structure of houses as having Problem Solving
different parts called rooms. They also talk about homes Critical thinking
being built in many different ways yet all have rooms that Communication
vary in size and positioning within the house. The structure Representation
Reasoning
or form of a piece of music is the overall plan of the piece
or how the different parts were put together. Each part of a ICT Skills
melody is called a section.
Differentiated
Call and response Instruction
2) Students listen to a number of excerpts from songs that
contain this type of structure. Familiar songs should be Assessment for
used first. Some examples of call and response song are; learning
Hill an Gully, Day O, Coconut Woman, Wata Come ah Me
Eye, John Boulay. As students listen they become aware
as the teacher broadly defines call and response as a solo
voice singing a phrase which is quickly answered by more
than one voice singing together, or voices responding
immediately to a musical phrase/line. (see CD for lyrics)

Verse and chorus


3) Students listen for differences between the verse and
chorus.
The verse usually has the same melody throughout but
with different lyrics for each verse. The chorus usually has
a different melody from the verse and the lyrics remain the
same throughout. The chorus is like a refrain in a song.
Some examples of verse and chorus are; Our Nations
Dawning, O Islands in the Sun (see toolkit CD for lyrics).

277
Solo/chorus
4) This structure/form has one melody which is repeated. All
of the sections have the same rhythm and melody
although the lyrics may be different.
Some examples of solo/chorus are; Jane and Louisa,
Johnny Grotto, Mary Had a Little Lamb, God Bless Our
Nation, (see toolkit CD for lyrics).

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencils
ICTs: computer, CD player/cassette recorder to play
songs/rhymes
Others: teachers voice and or melodic instruments to play
excerpts (optional), appendix 1 call and response,
appendix 2 verse and chorus and appendix 3 solo/chorus

Assessment:
Teacher Observation: The teacher listens to responses
throughout the lesson. The teacher selects and plays pieces for
students to indicate orally the type of structure used and to give
reasons for their responses.

278
Core Skills : Visual Arts
Class: Std. 4 Duration: As necessary
Topic: Making a Mobile
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Mobiles are a fun and unique way to hang all kinds of art in the HFLE:
home or in the classroom. Traditionally, they were only hung over
cribs where babies sleep, but nowadays they can be used to Cooperation
create the perfect decor by providing entertainment and soothing
visuals, while also stimulating imagination. Mobiles can be made
with all kinds of crafty mediums or constructional materials Literacy
including found and discarded materials. The art of making a Reading
mobile will allow our students to explore ideas or concepts and Writing
then express it by making something to keep, entertain others
Oral
with or simply look at for visual pleasure.
Communication
Media &
Outcomes:
Information Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will:
Numeracy
Define mobile
Problem Solving
Use various constructional materials
Critical thinking
Make a mobile considering the principles of design
(balance, repetition, pattern, rhythm, contrast) Communication
Activities: Representation
Reasoning
Gather your materials
ICT Skills
1. To design mobiles, you need objects to hang, a base or
bases to hang them from, and string or wire to hang them Differentiated
with. Choose objects to use in your mobile. Mobiles can be Instruction
created with pieces of glass, beads, shells, metal, recycled
material, toys or cardboard cut into specific designs. Select Assessment for
one or more bases. A piece of wood, clothes hanger, learning
cardboard roll, branch from a tree or metal rod makes
excellent bases. Decide if you want to utilize string or wire
to hang the items with. Thinly gauged wire provides a
stable base, while string may be easier for children to work
with. Most children like crafts, and making mobiles will be
an excellent project for them.

Start from the bottom and select 2 objects to hang

2. To design mobiles, you need to balance the elements, and


beginning at the bottom will make this process easier. Cut
two pieces of string or wire to length with scissors or wire

279
cutters. Punch a hole in each element and attach it by
inserting the string or wire into the hole. Secure it with a
knot.

Connect the hanging elements to the base

3. When making mobiles, you can create layers by using


more than one base. Wrap the end of the string or wire to
the base, or punch a hole in the base with a needle and
thread the string though it. Balance the objects by adjusting
the length of the string or wire. To design mobiles properly,
you can establish the balance by holding the base in one
hand while fine-tuning the string with the other. Secure
the elements by tying a knot in the string or wrapping the
wire with needle nose pliers. Trim the string or wire after
attaching the element.

Continue adding elements

4. Add two elements at a time, attaching, balancing and


securing them carefully. You can create patterns with your
elements so that there will be a visual rhythm in your
mobile. Be creative with your design.

Complete the mobile

5. Complete the mobile by tying a string or wire from the top


of the highest base. Attach the mobile from a ceiling
hanger.

Resources:

Pieces of glass, beads, shells, metal, recycled material,


toys
Cardboard cut into specific designs
Bases made from wood, clothes hangers, cardboard rolls,
a branch from a tree or metal rods

Assessment:

Presentation of mobiles

280
Core Skills : Visual Arts
Class: Std. 4 Duration: As necessary
Topic: Making a Narrative Drawing
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:

Narrative art is art that tells a story, either as a part of an on-going HFLE:
story or as a sequence of events. Some of the earliest evidence of
human art suggests that people told stories with pictures. These Cooperation
pictures can be organized along register lines or in panels, like
that of a comic strip, to help define the direction of the narrative.
Most students find themselves doodling when they are bored in Literacy
class. Comics, therefore, offer a lot of positive benefits in art and Reading
can get students who are reluctant to read or who have trouble Writing
with reading more motivated to read.
Oral
Communication
Outcomes: Media &
Information Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will:
Define Narrative Drawings Numeracy
Sketch characters using light sketch lines Problem Solving
Create a narrative drawing with four (4) or more panels
Critical thinking
Communication
Activities: Representation
Reasoning
Sketch Your Characters
1. When doing this, think both about their appearance and ICT Skills
their personality. If you have a plot in mind already, that
will drive the creation of your characters. Develop the Differentiated
character's appearance by drawing them in as many ways Instruction
as you can.
Assessment for
Write Out Your Ideas for the Narrative learning
2. They will start out as rough ideas, but eventually you will
want a fully developed plot. You can develop this plot in
many ways: you can draw out rough pages, you can write
it as a narrative story, you can write a page full of ideas, a
page full of sketches, or you can write it as a script. The
plot shouldn't be quite as long. Use the characters and
settings to figure out the plot.
Do a Rough Sketch of Your Ideas on Scrap Paper
3. The usual way this is done is with thumbnails or panels.
Figure out the final page size, and draw small boxes in
proportion to the final page. E.g. If your finished page will
be 8.5" x 11" then draw boxes that are 1.5" x 2". You will
use these boxes to plan out the entire narrative. Consider
the panels your "map" to the finished product.

Choose Your Paper


4. If you plan on painting, or erasing a lot, you may want to
consider using Bristol board or some other thick medium.

Start by Pencilling the Entire Page


5. Draw lightly and erase with a good eraser. Be as sketchy
or precise as you want. You should pencil in the text for
each panel as well.

Begin the Inking Phase


6. Use a good black pen or marker. Have different tips for
different line widths. An alternative method is brush and
ink, which is more challenging, but enables a different
style. Good use of inking can make your drawings seem
dimensional and bold. Ink in the letters as well.

Erase Any Stray Pencil Lines


7. Inking can be touched up with white paint (even white-out
or liquid paper). Be aware that if you plan on colouring
directly onto the original artwork, white touch ups might
affect the colour adversely. You may want to colour a
photocopy of the inked art.

Colour Your Artwork


8. Any medium can be used for colour reproduction.
Watercolour paint, acrylic paint, art markers, coloured
pencils, etc. Increasingly artists are turning to the
computer for colouring their work. Get a good reference for
painting, colour theory, and any computer
software/hardware you plan on using. And PRACTICE!

Resources:
Bristol Board or any other desired paper type
Writing and sketching paper
Drawing pencils and erasers
Black pen or marker
Watercolour paint, acrylic paint, art markers, coloured
pencils

Assessment:
Presentation of narrative drawings
Core Skills:
Values, Character and
Citizenship Education
CORE SKILLS: Values, Character and Citizenship Education
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 4 Value: Fairness
Duration: 45 minutes Topic: Advocates for Change Making a Difference
Context: Encouraging students to become advocates is a lifelong CONSIDERATIONS:
skill that would help to initiate the much needed change for those
who are challenged and give a voice to the voiceless. HFLE:
Outcomes: At the end of the learning experience students will be
able to:
identify situations in which they can display courage to
ensure fair treatment of others Literacy
influence others to be courageous in helping others Reading
initiate and participate in activities geared to help persons Writing
who are challenged by social issues Oral
exhibit concern for persons who have been treated unfairly Communication
and display willingness to advocate for the rights of such Literary
persons Appreciation
act fairly and display sensitivity to others who need support Media &
Activities: Information Literacy
Brainstorm Activity
1) Students use the KWL chart to brainstorm the term advocacy Numeracy
(See Appendix 1) Words and phrases such as passionate for a Problem Solving
cause, stand up for, etc. Critical thinking
2) Students are shown different pictures depicting people who Communication
are challenged in some way and discuss the challenges they may Representation
face. Students are also encouraged to share their own
Reasoning
experiences with persons who are challenged and experiences in
they themselves were challenged in some way. (See Appendix 2)
(Pictures can be projected or stuck on the classroom wall for ICT Skills
students to view)
Whole Class Discussion Differentiated
3) Students, after viewing the pictures are questioned to elicit Instruction
how fairly they think these people are treated by others.
(Students put themselves in the shoes of those persons who are Assessment for
challenged on a daily basis). learning
Eg. What accommodations are made for people with challenges
in public spaces such as government buildings, public transport
system etc.) Also in schools, children with learning disabilities.
Becoming an Advocate
4) Students are shown a video eg. Girl Silenced World In 5
Minutes.
5) Students engage in a discussion initiated by the teacher which
focuses on the video and how they can become an advocate.
Students also note that they are not too young to become an
advocate.

284
6) In small groups, students are given one of the pictures to
indicate how they can advocate for someone with a given
challenge. Eg. For a student in a wheel chair- other students can
include them in class activities and games that they can
participate. A student who cannot speak- other students can
learn and encourage other to learn sign language to be able to
communicate with them. etc.
7) Students present their work and are encouraged to express
how they feel about defending those who are challenged.
8) Students are questioned to elicit other things that they are
interested in and would like to be an advocate for eg. cruelty to
animals, the destruction of the environment, the neglect of the
homeless etc.
(Teacher makes a numbered list on the board and students who
share the same interest get into groups. Teacher manages the
size of the group)
Influencing Others to Come On Board
9) Students engage in a discussion initiated by the teacher on
ways they can influence others to be get on board in helping
others to advocate for the causes mentioned above.
Eg. through letter writing to relevant authorities, posters, flyers,
public debates, letter to the editor etc.
10) Students use one of the ways mentioned above to help
others to recognise the plight of those who are challenged or
other issues relating to the environment or animals and to
influence persons to provide assistance in whatever way they can.
(Challenges include: socio economic background of some
students, health issues, underperforming learning disabilities,
students who are not liked or very popular also the causes
mentioned above relating to the environment or animals etc.)
11) Students present their work to the class and a discussion on
what was done is conducted.
12) Students can invite other classes to view what they have
done and encourage them to become an advocate for a worthy
cause.
13) Students plan and decide how they can work together to put
their plan into action to help alleviate some of the problems
mentioned above.
Proud to be an Advocate
14) Students create advocate buttons with the words
Champion for Advocate for Support those with
challenges and show that you care etc. (Students can use
the pattern of an award ribbon) (See Appendix 3)

285
Resources:
Other: KWL chart (Appendix 1), Pictures (Appendix 2),
Advocate button (Appendix 3), bristol board and ribbon
(advocate button)

Assessment:
Completion of the KWL chart (What I learnt)

286
Appendix 1

(The page can be edited accordingly)

287
CORE SKILLS: Values, Character and Citizenship Education
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 4 Term: 2 Value: Respect (for self and others)
Duration: 35-40 minutes Topic: Healthy Engagement
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Among the many skills children must acquire and master during
HFLE:
pubescence is the ability to maintain respect for themselves and Creative Thinking
others. This allows them to forge and maintain healthy relationships Problem Solving
which is crucial for their overall development.
Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
Writing
Oral
At the end of this learning experience students will: Communication
Literary
describe three ways in which they can demonstrate respect for Appreciation
self and others Media &
Information Literacy
cite three benefits of respect for self and others
cite three consequences of failing to respect oneself and Numeracy
others Problem Solving
assess situations to determine appropriate responses Critical thinking
justify the need for respect for self and others Communication
Representation
Activities: Reasoning

ICT Skills
What is it?
Introduction Differentiated
1. Students view the 2nd slide of the presentation or interact with Instruction
similar stimulus material
Assessment for
2. Students discuss the content of the slides. The teacher will learning
need to talk through the content of the slide to ensure proper
concept formation.
Main teaching points to be derived are:
developing respect for self and others has to start with the
ways in which we think of ourselves and others.
respecting others requires us to treat others as well as we
would like to be treated
in order to respect ourselves and others, we must accept
that we each deserve to be treated with dignity. Each
person must embrace his or her uniqueness and
individuality even while he or she acknowledges that every

288
other person is a unique individual who deserves to be
treated well.

3. Students are asked to suggest ways in which they can show


respect for themselves and others. Student responses are
noted. Voice activated software can be used to facilitate easy
translation of students words into text.

4. Slides 3 and 4 are then presented. (Alternatively, in the


absence of media to show the PPT, the teacher can
summarise the points made earlier by students and can make
appropriate additions to their ideas.) Students compare and
contrast the responses they gave with the ones presented on
the slide. Teacher summarises the main points with student
assistance.

5. Students infer consequences of not behaving respectfully and


of not treating others with respect. Teacher lists 5
consequences in a location that is visible to all students.

6. Students are invited to stand. On the floor a square area is


marked off using tape. That area is subdivided into quarters as
shown below

The teacher explains that each quarter (quadrant) represents a


choice. He or she labels each area as follows as students
observe: Agree, Strongly Agree, Disagree, Strongly Disagree
The teacher informs students that when he/she reads one of
the statements they must show how much they agree or
disagree with it by moving without speaking into the
appropriate box. The teacher does a demonstration.

7. Slide 5 is presented and students are asked to read what is on


the slide quietly to themselves while the teacher reads aloud.
The teacher will elaborate on the points as necessary.
Students should be allowed to defend/support their choices.
Teacher should model how disagreement is voiced
respectfully.

289
8. Slide 6 is used to facilitate summarising of the LPs key points
and clarification of misunderstanding.

9. Students are given the opportunity to record their thoughts.


They are encouraged to write reflectively in their journals as
they ponder the key learning gleaned during the session.

10. Students are placed in groups. Each group is given one of


three possible scenarios to discuss and on which to report.
Qn.: What response would be most respectful in the given
scenario? Students are encouraged to speak of the dilemmas
that arose as they attempted to come up with an answer. See
Appendix A
Resources:
PPT presentation, Journals
Multimedia projector
Masking Tape
Labels: Strongly Agree, Agree, Disagree, Strongly Disagree
(Alternative: Charts, Posters with content from slides)
Assessment:

1. Discussion
2. PPT presentation
3. Learning Logs

290
Janet is about to enter the classroom when Jonathon rushes past her. All Janets
books fall to the ground. What respectful response could Janet give to Jonathons
actions? What could Jonathon now do to be respectful of Janet?

(Even when offended there is need to remain respectful and to temper ones
emotions. Johnathon could apologise and/or pick up her books)

Claudette is visiting the home of a relative, when one of her cousins friends offers
her an alcoholic beverage. Claudettes mother has told her several times about the
dangers of drinking alcohol. What respectful response can Claudette give to the
invitation issued by her cousins friend?

(Help children to understand that being firm and assertive is not being
disrespectful; however, being abusive and demeaning is.)

Yu Lin, who doesnt speak English very well, has recently transferred to the school.
Many students including Davids friends make fun of her. She asks David while he
is with his friends for directions to the school library. One of Davids friends says
that they will only tell her if she does a Chinese dance? What respectful response
could David give to his friends in this situation?

(What is respectful doesnt depend on what the majority of people think.)

291
Standard
5

292
Core Skills:
Agricultural Science

293
LEARNING UNIT Issues Affecting Agriculture

Class: Standard 5 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship


Estimated frame: 1 Term

Context: Agriculture is significant to people and economies throughout the world. It


focuses on producing food and other basic necessities. Agriculture has
evolved over time resulting in increased production, technology and new
industries. The efficient usage of land, labour, capital and management
determines the success of agricultural projects and ventures. Additionally,
weather conditions and market situations affect productivity. This unit
explores some of the issues that affect agriculture and some of the
challenges faced by farmers both internationally and locally. It attempts to
provide possible solutions to these concerns through research and
portfolio development.
Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:
interact with various forms of literature and other media
recognise the value of organisations and the role they play to aid
in agricultural development
outline some of the pertinent issues affecting international and
local agriculture
conduct research to acquire vital information concerning the issues
relate the issues to the challenges faced by people involved in
agriculture
compare the issues affecting agriculture internationally and locally
point out the issues affecting local agriculture
generate possible solutions to the issues identified
explore the most feasible solution
assess the practicality of the suggested solution
build a portfolio
communicate their findings using a variety of media
work collaboratively and cooperatively with others to achieve team
goals.
Learning 1. Sensitization of World Food Day
Plans: 2. Identifying the issues
3. Exploring possible solutions
4. Testing, evaluating and presenting

Resources: Learning Plan 1: paper, pencil, markers, paint, brushes, computer,


printer, video recorder, videos, pictures Stories, Books, Articles, globe,
crayons, coloured pencils, internet, printer, guided questions on World
Food Day to create the fact sheet.

Learning Plan 2: paper, pencil, marker, pen, computer, printer, videos,

294
pictures, books, journals, newspaper paper.

Learning Plan 3: paper, pencil, computer, printer, graphic organiser.

Learning Plan 4: paper, pencil, bristol board, computer, printer, video


recorder, pictures, props, models, displays.
Assessments:
Teacher observation
Portfolio development
Exhibition of findings

295
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT ONE: Issues affecting Agriculture
Learning Plan: 1 of 4
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Encouraging global citizenship
Duration: 2 weeks Topic: Sensitization of World Food Day
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
marks World Food Day each year on 16 October, the day on HFLE:
which the Organization was founded in 1945. Each year a theme
is selected that focuses on World Food Day observances and Cooperation
helps increase understanding of problems and solutions in the
drive to end hunger through agriculture. By using the theme
students can become aware of the issues affecting agriculture Literacy
and appreciate the need to solve the problems on a global Reading
perspective. Writing
Outcomes: Oral
At the end of this learning experience students will: Communication
conduct research to obtain information about World Food Literary
Day Appreciation
highlight the major issue to be addressed by the FAO Media &
illustrate one problem faced in agriculture Information Literacy
generate pieces to create a portfolio.
Numeracy
Activities:
1. Students conduct research using guided questions to Problem Solving
create a fact sheet / FAQ about World Food Day in groups. Critical thinking
2. They design a mini banner that depicts the World Food Communication
Day theme for that particular year. Representation
3. Students draw a scene to portray the theme. Reasoning
4. They compile a portfolio with products from activities
above. ICT Skills
Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, marker Differentiated
Art Supplies: crayons, coloured pencils, paint, brushes Instruction
ICTs: computer, internet, printer, videos
Literature: pictures stories, books, articles Assessment for
Others: guided questions on World Food Day to create the learning
fact sheet.
Assessment:
Teacher observation
Portfolio development

296
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT ONE: Issues affecting Agriculture
Learning Plan: 2 of 4
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Encouraging global citizenship
Duration: 2 weeks Topic: Identifying the issues
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Farmers throughout the world experience challenges in the
production of plants and animals for food. The issues are HFLE:
generally similar and may include high cost of production, adverse Understanding
weather conditions, availability of land and pest and diseases. Consequences
The issues may exist in our local context and attempts can be Critical Thinking
made to solve the problems so that farmers can increase and
improve production. Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of this learning experience students will: Writing
define a problem that affects agriculture globally Oral
investigate the needs and opportunities of the farming Communication
community Literary
acquire vital information concerning the issues Appreciation
express how the issues become a challenge to the people Media &
involved in agriculture Information Literacy
highlight the issues affecting agriculture internationally and
Numeracy
locally
Problem Solving
uphold the position taken by the Food and Agricultural
Organisation to alleviate the challenges affecting Critical thinking
agriculture. Communication
Activities: Representation
1. Students identify the problems affecting agricultural Reasoning
production through research using the theme for World
Food Day as a guide. ICT Skills
2. They complete a T chart showing needs (challenges) and
opportunities (solutions) based on the World Food Day Differentiated
theme. Instruction
3. They write a short statement that outlines one of the
problems to be solved from the T chart. Assessment for
4. Students explain explicitly in prose, poetry or song the learning
impact of the selected issue affecting agriculture in groups.
5. They associate the international issues with our local
situation by providing evidence through pictures,
interviews, newspaper articles.
6. They participate in a discussion to endorse the position
taken by the Food and Agricultural Organisation to alleviate
the challenges affecting agriculture.
Resources:

297
Stationery: paper, pencil, marker, pen
ICTs: computer, printer, videos, pictures
Literature: books, journals, newspaper
Assessment:
Portfolio development

298
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT ONE: Issues affecting Agriculture
Learning Plan: 3 of 4
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Encouraging global citizenship
Duration: 2 weeks Topic: Exploring possible solutions
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
There have always been challenges in the practice of agriculture
throughout the world. These constraints have allowed man to HFLE:
explore possible solutions to assist in the improvement and Problem Solving
development of agriculture. In pursuing this unit, students will be Critical Thinking
given an opportunity to make their own inputs and contribute
positively to the existing universal agricultural problems. Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of this learning experience students will: Writing
propose possible solutions for the selected problem Oral
affecting agriculture from the T chart Communication
recognize possible alternative solutions to the problem Literary
detect new information and knowledge related to the Appreciation
problem Media &
clarify what the proposed solution is intended to achieve Information Literacy
list some of the limitations to the proposed solution.
Activities: Numeracy
1. In groups students brainstorm and record on a graphic Problem Solving
organiser three possible solutions to the selected issue Critical thinking
from the T chart. Communication
2. Students research and record relevant information Representation
gathered about solutions proposed. Reasoning
3. They state how the solutions could help to solve the
problem affecting agriculture.
ICT Skills
4. They choose the most practical and feasible solution based
on the findings of the research.
Differentiated
5. They explain the selected solution using drawings or
Instruction
representations.
6. Students state two restrictions that may hamper the
Assessment for
proposed solution.
learning
Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil
ICTs: computer, printer
Others: graphic organiser
Assessment:
Teacher observation
Portfolio development

299
CORE SKILLS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
UNIT ONE: Issues affecting Agriculture
Learning Plan: 4 of 4
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Encouraging global citizenship
Duration: 2 weeks Topic: Evaluating and presenting agricultural
solutions
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
It is important to expose students to presentation and
communication skills because it allows them to share knowledge. HFLE:
Additionally, it helps students to expand their knowledge about Effective
agriculture, build research skills and improve self-confidence and Communication
self-esteem. Decision Making
Outcomes:
At the end of this learning experience students will: Literacy
explore the chosen solutions for the identified agricultural Reading
issues Writing
present findings using various forms of media Oral
generate improvements to the recommended solutions. Communication
Literary
Activities:
1. Students identify the steps involved in the chosen solution. Appreciation
2. They plan and execute the entire process geared to solving Media &
the problem. Information Literacy
3. They record the process involved in the chosen solution as
each stage is executed. Numeracy
4. They exhibit their findings using a variety of media in Problem Solving
groups. Critical thinking
5. They recommend at least one way in which the solution Communication
can be improved. Representation
Resources: Reasoning
Stationery: paper, pencil, bristol board
ICTs: computer, printer, video recorder, pictures ICT Skills
Others: props, models, displays
Assessment: Differentiated
Teacher observation Instruction
Portfolio development
Exhibition of findings Assessment for
learning

300
GUIDE FOR PORTFOLIO

1. Cover page - Students name, class, school, title of the project


2. Table of contents
3. Fact sheet
4. Banner depicting the theme
5. Illustration of the theme
6. Highlight a problem experienced in Agriculture globally
7. T chart showing needs (challenges) and opportunities (solutions) based on the
World Food Day theme.
8. A short statement that outlines one of the problems to be solved from the T chart.
9. Prose, poetry or song the impact of the selected issue affecting agriculture.
10. Pictures, interviews, newspaper articles to provide evidence that associate the
international issues with our local situation.
11. Graphic organiser of three possible solutions to the selected issue from the T
chart.
12. Information gathered about solutions proposed.
13. Statement of how the solutions could help to solve the problem affecting
agriculture.
14. State the most practical and feasible solution based on the findings of the
research.
15. Explanation of the selected solution using drawings or representations.
16. Two restrictions that may hamper the proposed solution.
17. Steps involved in the chosen solution.
18. Record of the process involved in the chosen solution as each stage is executed.
19. Presentation of findings using a variety of media in groups.
20. Recommendation of at least one way in which the solution can be improved.
21. Conclusion

301
Core Skills:
Science

302
Core Skills: Science
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class:Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Taking Flight
Duration: 8 hours Topic: An Ideal house
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
In this fast pace world, man has become heavily dependent
on fossil fuels. This form of fuel is both non-renewable (finite) HFLE:
Cooperation
and expensive.
Most (if not all) of the energy used in homes has been
converted from fossil fuels to electrical, light and heat. Literacy
Additionally, there are many design flaws which lead to the Reading
Writing
inefficient use of energy coupled with humans being reliant on Oral Communication
energy from fossil fuels. Literary Appreciation
There are many improvements that can be made to our Media & Information
homes that will make them more efficient and reliant on Literacy
alternative forms of energy.
Numeracy
Problem Solving
Critical thinking
Outcomes Communication
Representation
Reasoning
At the end of this learning experience pupils will be able to:
design model homes that are energy efficient ICT Skills
design or modify simple machines that can make our
Differentiated
lives easier, using the steps in the IDEATE model Instruction
I - Identify the problem Assessment for
D - Define the problem learning

E - Explore possible solutions


A - Access the various solutions
T - Try-out and Test the solution
E - Evaluate the solution

Activities:
I - Identify the problem
2. Pupils discuss the non renewable nature of fossil fuels
and begin to postulate how design of present homes does
not make efficient use of energy.
3. Pupils discuss ways in which people waste energy.
4. Additionally, pupils discuss the inefficiency of design of
homes regarding:
I. Lighting (poor use of natural lighting and

303
reflective surfaces),
II. air-conditioning (poor use of natural
ventilation) ,
III. poor insulation- ceiling, walls, windows
IV. Landscaping (wasted opportunity for shade)

D - Define the problem


5. In groups pupils define the problem with the guidance of
the teacher.

E - Explore possible solutions


6. Pupils form themselves into new groups based on interest
and focus (with regard to the problem) and explore ways
in which homes can be modified /built in order to
overcome the problem.

A - Access the various solutions


7. Pupils research new technology that can avert the
problem. ( this helps pupils conceptualize their designs)
8. Pupils gather materials according to the solutions that
were postulated.

T - Try-out and Test the solution


9. Pupils build model homes and incorporate design
modifications that were discussed.

E - Evaluate the solution


10. Pupils assess their creation based on
I. Fulfilment of purpose
II. Feasibility
III. Durability etc.

Resources:

Based on the proposition of pupils.

304
Assessment:
Ongoing throughout lesson
Pupils participation (assessed using participation rubric)
Pupils scientific Knowledge (assessed using Rubric with
Descriptors)

305
Core Skills: Science
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Strand: Form and Function
Duration:2 hours Topic: Experimenting with Inclined Planes
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Students are introduced to the concept of simple tools and how
they can make difficult or impossible tasks easier. They begin by HFLE:
investigating the properties of inclined planes and how their use Effective Communication
can reduce the force necessary to move objects or simply make Cooperation
work easier.
Literacy
Reading
Outcomes: Writing
justify the use of an inclined plane through conducting Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
investigations
Media & Information
draw and label force diagrams: Literacy
o arrow begins at application of force;
o arrow head shows force direction; Numeracy
Problem Solving
o length of arrow is proportional to size of force
Critical thinking
explain using force diagrams, that a device such as an Communication
inclined plane can reduce the effort needed to overcome Representation
the load. Reasoning

Activities: ICT Skills


Setting the Stage with Work Differentiated
1. Using a small box stack a few books inside. (Do not make Instruction
this box too heavy as safety in lifting properly must be
taken into consideration.) Ask two students individually to Assessment for
lift the box from the floor to the desk and describe the effort learning
put in. Was it heavy? Did it take much effort or energy? Ask
them to lift together with a third student assisting. Now ask
the questions Was it easier to lift? Did the weight of the
box change? Who used energy when lifting? Everyone who
used energy helped to get the work done. What force was
working against you while lifting the box? (Gravity)
2. Students are asked for suggestions as to how else can we
transfer the box from the floor to table. Are there any
simple machines which can make this work easier?
3. Students discuss the following scenarios:
4. Moving a wheel chair up some stairs to a higher platform.
How can this be made easier?
5. Getting a car onto a flatbed tow truck. How is this done?
6. Getting a piano onto a stage. Would lifting be easier? Or
sliding up a ramp?
7. Moving heavy equipment down some stairs.
8. Teacher guides discussion into identifying the inclined
plane as a simple machine. (See notes below for
information)
9. Teacher guides students into drawing an labelling force

306
diagrams:
arrow begins at application of force;
arrow head shows force direction;
length of arrow is proportional to size of force

Setting Up the Experiments


Inclined Planes and Loads (Part One)
10. Students are given one rubber band and a bag with a load
and left to free play, experimenting with how the rubber
band stretches with a load. Short discussion can follow.
11. In groups, will carry out a simple experiment using the
Scientific Method to investigate the effect of an inclined
plane on a load. Which will be easier lifting a bag straight
up or moving it up an inclined plane?
12. Each group will need
a. a ruler,
b. two rubber bands which are cut
c. a plastic bag which can be tied containing some
marbles, sand or pebbles
d. scotch tape
13. Students are asked to tie one end of the cut rubber band to
the neck of the plastic bag containing a load. They are then
asked to hold the load attached with the rubber band
against a ruler holding the strain of the load at 9cm
(starting point). The other end of the rubber band must be
secured to the ruler. Students are asked to release the load
and see how much the rubber band stretches measuring
the distance from the 9cm. The other end of the rubber
band should be securely fastened so that it does not shift.
(See diagram below)
14. Student stack books about 2-3, and use another book to
create a ramp. A piece of board/broad ruler can also be
used. The device with the ruler, rubber band and load will
be used to measure the distance the rubber band stretches
using an inclined plane. The load is set at 9cm (paper clip
marker) and is then pulled up the inclined plane. The
distance of the stretch on the rubber band is recorded.
Inclined Planes and Eggs (Part Two) Reducing Force
15. Each group will need one hard-boiled egg in the shell.
16. Students make inferences as to what would happen if the
egg was to be dropped from knee (measure in cm) height
to the floor.
17. Students are then asked to use an inclined plane to get the
egg from knee height to the ground. It must be pointed out
that the steeper the inclined plane the greater the force the
egg hits the ground.
Write up:
18. In writing up students main focus should be on the areas of
planning, conducting and communicating.

307
19. Students complete write up for each part of the experiment.
See attached. They draw and label force diagrams for each
part of the experiment using arrows to show force direction:
a. arrow begins at application of force;
b. arrow head shows force direction;
c. length of arrow is proportional to size of force

Resources:
Intro: books, small empty box
Part One: rubber band, ruler, small plastic bag, marbles,
pebbles or beans,
Part Two: toy car, strip of wood or wide ruler, books,
measuring tape, stop watch
Part Three: two hard boiled eggs, a piece of board or
2pvc cut in half.

Assessment:
Rubric for Investigation
Rubric for Force Diagrams
Group and Observation Checklists

308
Subject: Science Level: Standard Five Date:

Strand: Form and Function

Group Members: ________________________________________________


________________________________________________
________________________________________________

________________________________________________
________________________________________________

Aim: 1. To investigate the impact of an inclined plane on a load


2. To investigate the impact of on inclined plane on reducing force.

Apparatus: What did you use in your experiment?

Method: Steps taken to conduct the experiment.


A flow chart can be created which show the activities done step by step.
How was the experiment set up? How is the measurement taken? How was the size
of the load used? How was the test administered?
Part One: Moving a Load

Part Two: Egg Drop


Force Diagrams

Before After

Part One:

Part Two:

e.g.

Results: What actually happened?


Before the used of the inclined With the use of an inclined plane
plane
Part One
How far did the neck of the bag How far did it stretch down using an
stretch down the ruler? inclined plane?

Part Two

309
What would happen to the egg if What happened to the egg when let down
dropped from knee height? an inclined plane from knee height?

Discussion: (Suggestions)
Why is it important to know how an inclined plane functions? Who can use that
information?
Part One: Can an inclined plane reduce the effort taken to carry a load from one
level to another?
Part Two: Does the height of an incline plane have any effect on the speed at
which an object car can move down the slope? Does friction have an impact on this?
Part Three: Trade off? Does it trade off - the distance that something would have to
travel when using an inclined plane as opposed to straight down? Does it have an
impact on force?

Conclusion:

It was determined that _______________________________________.

310
Force Diagrams

Group: ______

Members:
___________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

4-5 2-3 1 0
Good Average Not clear No evidence
Before After Before After Before After Before After
Part One:
Load
Representation of
inclined plane
arrow begins at
application of
force;
arrow head shows
force direction;
length of arrow is
proportional to size
of force
Part Two: Egg
Drop
Representation of
inclined plane
arrow begins at
application of
force;
arrow head shows
force direction;
length of arrow is
proportional to size
of force

TOTAL

311
Notes for Inclined Planes

The inclined plane is often the simplest of all the simple machines because it does
not move when you use it; it just sits still. The purpose of an inclined plane is to
move something from a lower height to a higher height. An inclined plane can be
something as simple as a driveway or a staircase. Have you ever used one of these?
An inclined plane works by helping you lift things up to a higher level. Have you ever
tried to carry something heavy up a ladder? It's pretty hard! How about carrying that
object up a staircase instead? Is that easier? It sure is! Carrying a heavy object up a
staircase is easier than a ladder, and carrying it up a smooth ramp is even easier.
Why is that so? (Answer: You do not have to lift as much with your legs.)
There is always a trade-off, though, to moving something in a way that takes less
effort. In an inclined plane the trade-off is distance. If you compare the length of a
ladder to that of a ramp going up to the second floor of a building, you find that the
length of the ladder is much shorter. The distance up the ramp is longer but it takes
less effort to walk up.
Have you experienced this mechanical advantage? People from ancient cultures
figured this out a long time ago when they built the pyramids using long ramps to
help them move the heavy stones to the top! Mechanical engineers today use
inclined planes in many engineering designs for moving things up such as parking
garages, tow trucks, conveyer belts and escalators.

The purpose of an inclined plane as a simple machine is to move something from a


lower height to a higher height with less effort. An object simply placed on a tilted
surface often slides down the surface because of the force in the downhill direction.
The rate at which the object slides down is dependent upon how tilted the surface is;
the greater the tilt of the surface, the faster the rate at which the object will slide
down it. Friction is a force that offers resistance to movement when one object is in
contact with another.

To understand an object's motion on an inclined plane, it is important to analyze the


forces acting upon it. The force of gravity (also known as weight) acts in a downward
direction. When the angle of inclination is greater, and the slope is steeper there is
more weight component to overcome. With a shallower slope the weight component
is easier to overcome and requires less effort.

An inclined plane produces a mechanical advantage to decrease the amount of force


needed to move an object to a certain height; it also increases the distance the
object must move. The object moving up an inclined plane needs to move the entire
length of the slope of the plane to move the distance of the height. For example, if
you have a ramp with a slope length 20 meters that rises 5 meters high, then your
trade-off is moving the 20 meters distance versus lifting straight up 5 meters.

312
Core Skills: Science
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 5 Term: 1 Theme: Pulling It All Together
Duration: 5 sessions @1 hour Topic: Exploring Energy Efficient Devices through
IDEATE
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Electrical energy is costly and energy wastage is a problem
which most households face. Students will engage this problem HFLE:
using the IDEATE Model which takes students through the steps: Cooperation
1. Identify the problem 2. Define further (clarify the results they Problem Solving
want to achieve) 3. Explore possible solutions 4. Assess solutions
and choose one. 5. Test and try out 6. Evaluate the results. This Literacy
Reading
model allows students after evaluation to re-assess the problem Writing
and continue in a loop fashion if the solution/s were ineffective. Oral Communication
Literary Appreciation
Outcomes: Media & Information
Literacy
Develop an operational definition of the term efficiency as
applicable to use of energy. Numeracy
Justify the use of energy efficient devices and practices to Problem Solving
conserve electrical energy Critical thinking
Communication
Construct contextually relevant operational definitions of Representation
the term energy efficient. Reasoning
Propose alternative methods of
o washing and drying clothes; ICT Skills
o using artificial lighting;
o using electrical water pumps; Differentiated
o using air-conditioning. Instruction

Assessment for
Activities: learning
Where does it come from?
1. Students brainstorm what they know about electricity. They
discuss in groups and make a general statement about
electricity and where it comes from.
2. In groups, students make a list of appliances and points of
electrical energy usage in their school. e.g. fans, copiers,
fridges, lights, etc. along with estimated times used per
day.
3. They consider which devices are efficient in reducing
energy wastage (consider energy star rating, or advances
in technology eg fluorescent bulbs and LEDs) and ways
they can manage the use of devices to reduce wastage of
energy.
4. They develop an operational definition of the term energy
efficiency in terms of making choices of appropriate
devices and practices that would reduce energy wastage.
5. Students are presented the following problem in which they
use the IDEATE Model to solve.
The Problem
There is a problem in the schools community. They

313
have been experiencing electrical dips in the power
due the fact that many households are using electrical
devices which energy eaters. In addition to this, the
principal has heard parents complaining about high
electricity bills. The principal has asked students to
come up with a solution for this problem. He will share
students ideas at the monthly PTA Meeting.
6. In groups, students work out the problem using the
IDEATE Model.
7. Step One: Identify the problem
In groups students brainstorm the major issue. What is
behind the power dips? What kinds of devices consume
lots of power? (Heating, cooling) Which ones do people
use the most in their homes?
8. Step Two: Define further
Students can complete the energy foot print hand out (see
attached below) and complete a table containing a
personal and household inventory of the type of devices
used in their homes such as:
Device Time of day when Total time used
(List devices) Use (hrs)
television o Morning Morning _____
o Afternoon Afternoon _____
o Night Night _____
Total _____
fan o Morning Morning _____
o Afternoon Afternoon _____
o Night Night _____
Total _____
o
o

The use of a table as the above will help students get a


clearer picture of how excessively some devices are used.
Students should also be guided to:
a) explore the term energy conservation
b) identify devices which can consume less energy
energy efficient devices (Compact Florescent Lights,
Energy Star Products, web search of Energy Star
Products will give additional information)
c) construct an operational definition for the term
energy efficient.
9. Step Three: Explore possible solutions
In groups, students come up with possible solutions and
alternative for reducing energy wastage. This should
include alternatives to:
o washing and drying clothes;
o using artificial lighting;
o using electrical water pumps;
o using air-conditioning.

314
Students brainstorm as many possible solutions and record
all possible solutions. Students also discuss methods of
sharing this information (students can make posters,
energy saving brochures along with fact sheets, comic
strips, PPT Presentations, drama presentations, songs
including calypso and jingles.
10. Step Four: Assess the solutions and choose one
Students come to consensus as to the solutions they will
choose as a group to build out. Students will brainstorm
ideas for the method they choose, including sketches and
the development of a final product. The final product could
contain information to answer important questions such as
the following:
Where does our electrical energy come from?
What are high energy eating devices?
How are these devices used?
What is energy conservation?

11. Step Five: Test and Try out the choice


Students test the final product within their own households
to get feedback. Students will use a questionnaire to test
the impact of their method of disseminating the information
gathered. Students construct and share the information
with the other members of the class.

12. Step Six: Evaluate the solution


Students construct a questionnaire which family members
as well as group members can fill out to determine how
effective.

Resources: (Suggested Categories)


Stationery: paper, Bristol board, flip chart paper, newsprint
Art Supplies: paint, brushes, markers, crayons
ICTs: computer, printer, video recorder, videos, pictures
Literature: Articles, newspaper clippings, electricity bills
Website for information: Energy Supersavers Saving the
Planet - students can click on the arrow to move to the
menu that says Meet the Energy Stars
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=kids.kids_index

Assessment:
Rubric for Art Piece and Presentation
Group Checklist for completing stages in IDEATE

315
The Design and Problem Solving Process
Use of the IDEATE Model
Designing is the translation of ideas into something tangible. The term design may
be used to relate to the design process or it may refer to the product of the design
process. In technology, designers are people who set out to solve practical problems
that arise from real situations. When an individual is engaged in designing, he or she
takes what he or she thinks it is a good idea and turns it into something that will
solve the problem often referred to as the Design Loop.

The IDEATE Design Loop was developed so that ideas can be translated into an end
result, i.e. products or systems

The IDEATE Design Loop


Start
here

Evaluate the solution

E
Test and try out solution
T chosen
Identify the problem (stated
I
in the context)

Define further (clearer A Assess solutions and


D
definition of the problem) choose one

E
Explore possible solutions

(1) edom of creativity.

316
Name of Student:
_______________________________________________

My Energy Footprint

317
Core Skills: Science
Learning Plan: 1 of 1
Class: Standard 5 Term: Theme:
Duration: 2hrs Topic: Keep Me
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
Each year, we throw away tons of paper, glass bottles,
plastic bottles and containers, aluminium cans, grass HFLE:
cuttings, and other types of solid wastes. It is estimated that Effective Communication
on average an individual produces 2kg of trash per day. At Cooperation
this rate we will eventually have less space for landfills.
Literacy
Reading
Outcomes: Writing
Oral Communication
discuss strategies used in environmental conservation Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
that demonstrates responsible use of resources: Literacy
Reduce
Reuse Numeracy
Recycle. Problem Solving
Critical thinking
Communication
Representation
Activities: Reasoning

Identifying the Problem ICT Skills


1. Students view pictures OR slide show depicting piles
of garbage at the roadside or on a vacant plot of land. Differentiated
2. Class discussion initiated by teacher to elicit the issue Instruction
excessive piles of garbage.
Assessment for
learning
Defining the Problem
3. Students share their experience with garbage pile-up
in their locality or on their way to school.
4. In groups of four or five, students discuss some
possible causes and effects of garbage pile-up. Within
each group, a scribe is selected; this student records
the ideas of the group which is read to the class by the
groups spokesperson.

Explore Possible Solutions


5. A litter inventory sheet (attached) is given to each
group of students by teacher.
6. Students make a list of the types of litter they usually
see at the roadside or on a vacant plot of land.
7. Each group conduct a brainstorming activity to gather
two or three possible solutions to excessive pile-up of
garbage.
8. These solutions are recorded and shared with the
class.

Assess Solutions

318
9. Students select suggestions they think will help
resolve the issue.

Test and Try Out


10. Using the internet OR literature provided by teacher,
students examine ways in which the production of
garbage can be reduced.
11. Reuse Activity: Students cover empty boxes with gift
paper to create gift boxes / create ornaments (animals,
flowers, baskets) using egg crates and or plastic
bottles (see attached).
12. Materials to construct recycling comic strip are
distributed by teacher.
13. Students construct comic strip indicating the steps
involved in recycling an item of their choice.
14. In groups, students select biodegradable items that
can be used to create a compost heap.

Evaluation
15. Class discussion on the best way to decrease garbage
pileup.
16. Using Microsoft word or a sheet of paper (letter size),
students create a brochure that promotes the 3Rs
(reduce, reuse, recycle) as a means of reducing the
production of garbage.

Resources:

Stationery: pencil, paper, notebook/lab book


ICTs: Microsoft word, power point presentation, internet,
computer
Other: boxes, gift paper, glue, scissors, markers, litter
inventory sheet, recycling comic strip, pictures, plastic
bottles, cardboard egg crates,

Assessment:

Oral questions
Rubric (brochure, comic strip and artistic work)

319
Core Skills:
Spanish

320
Spanish
LEARNING UNIT: Hispanic Connections

Class: Standard Five Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship Unit: 1 of 1


Estimated frame: 5 days

Context: Becoming a global citizen requires worldwide exposure to people of


other cultures and languages. At the primary level, students have
taken their first steps in achieving this requirement; however; in order
for them to fully appreciate all that they have learned, they must be
given opportunities to apply their learning in real life contexts. This unit
attempts to accomplish that goal.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

demonstrate a growing sense of patriotism to their nation, and


respect for other nations
engage in conversations using simple Spanish structures
be aware and appreciative of Hispanic culture
use their knowledge of Spanish to engage in safe, responsible and
respectful communication with others, both within and outside of
their country.

Learning
Plans: 1. Describe Yourself!
2. Dress Up!
3. Traditional Hispanic Clothing
4. E-pals Wanted!
5. Name that Flag
6. Lets Link Up!
7. Our Spanish Day

Resources: Learning Plan 1: Stationery: paper, pencil, marker, picture of a


scene, individual pictures, labels of descriptive words, photograph of
self, Bristol board, scissors, glue, pencil, ruler, crayons/coloured
pencils, pastels, paint with brushes, glitter, stickers, braid, stamps,
sequins and similar decorative items

Learning Plan 2: newspapers, chart paper, Items of clothing,


stationery

Learning Plan 3: Bristol board/drawing paper, paint, brushes, colour


pencils, computers, projector, slideshow/pictures, online articles on
the topic, dictionaries, flashcards of Spanish word names

Learning Plan 4: PowerPoint Presentation/ Printouts of Slides,


computer, projector, stationery paper, pencils, markers, glue

321
Learning Plan 5: pencils, colour pencils, markers, Bristol board,
scissors, glue, any other materials to decorate bookmarks, computer,
National Flag replicas, copies of a world map, puzzles of flags of
Trinidad and Tobago, Spain, Venezuela, Cuba, Puerto Rico and
Dominican Republic created by teacher, atlases

Learning Plan 6: phone, computer, internet, Skype, pictures,


classroom items, list of names, addresses and phone numbers of
students in partner schools

Learning Plan 7: paper, Bristol board, pencil, marker, large sheets of


paper, paint, brushes, phone, computer, internet, pictures, packages
with Spanish labels, Music CDs, resource persons

Assessments:
Checklists
Oral Presentations
Musical Flags Game
Oral presentation checklists:- description of self, Show and Tell
Rubrics: Picture Card, Participation, Research, Art work, Project
Teacher Observation
Worksheet exercises

322
UNIT ONE: Hispanic Connections
Learning Plan: 1 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Describe Yourself!
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
As students are on the verge of taking flight, they will need to HFLE:
build self-confidence and have high self-esteem. When they
look at themselves in a mirror, they must be comfortable with Empathy
Creative Thinking
what they see looking back at them. Being able to describe
oneself will assist in developing self-esteem; sharing this Literacy
description with others will facilitate acceptance by others. It is Reading
very important to promote this positive sense of self at this Writing
Oral Communication
stage. Literary Appreciation
Media & Information
Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Numeracy
make descriptive statements about their height and size Problem Solving
in Spanish. Critical thinking
Communication
Representation
Reasoning
Activities
ICT Skills

Scene it- Said it! Differentiated


1. Students are shown a picture/scene with people of Instruction
varying heights and sizes. They are asked to describe in
Assessment for
English, each person by height and size. learning
2. Students are shown individual pictures of both male and
female persons - tall, short, medium-sized, fat and slim.
As each picture is shown, the corresponding Spanish
descriptor is said:
o tall male alto
o tall female alta
o short male bajo
o short female baja
o medium sized male mediano
o medium sized female - mediana
o fat male gordo
o fat female gorda
o slim male delgado
o slim female delgada

(In cases where schools are co-ed, students from the


class can be used to represent the different heights and
sizes. Teachers must be sensitive to students feelings
about body sizes. It is preferable, therefore, to use
pictures.)

323
The students repeat these Spanish descriptive words a
few times for practice. The same is done for each of the
pictures.

Lets Pretend
3. Students are presented with scenarios which would allow
them to practise the vocabulary presented(See Appendix
for scenarios). When the scenario is described by the
teacher, the following question is asked in Spanish:
Cmo eres?
A male student will reply: Soy & appropriate Spanish
Adjective for a male person. A female student will reply:
Soy & appropriate Spanish Adjective for a female
person.
Students are given the opportunity to practise both male
and female forms of the adjectives.
4. Students choose one of the persons in the picture/scene
from Activity 1. They pretend to be that person so that
they can describe themselves in Spanish. Firstly, they
identify themselves by any name Soy , then they
describe themselves in Spanish Soy . For example, a
student who chooses a slim girl from the picture will say,
Soy Alicia. Soy delgada. One who opts for a tall boy will
say, Soy Ricardo. Soy alto.

Picture it
5. Students make a picture card using the following
instructions:
a) Cut a piece of Bristol board 20cm by 14cm.
b) Find half of 20cm and mark on top and bottom.
c) Fold in two at the marks to make a card.
d) Open the card and stick a picture of yourself
inside.
e) Write your name on the outside of the card.
f) Decorate your picture card using any medium.

6. Students present their picture card. They introduce


themselves in Spanish to the class, then describe
themselves in Spanish.

7. All cards can be mixed in a box. Each child draws a card


from the box. They pretend that they are that person, so
they introduce then describe themselves in Spanish.

Resources:
Picture of a scene; individual pictures; labels of descriptive
words in English
Photograph of self

324
Stationery: Bristol board, scissors, glue, pencil, ruler
Art supplies: crayons/coloured pencils/pastels/paint with
brushes
Dcor: glitter, stickers, braid, stamps, sequins and other
stick-ons

Assessment:
Self-Description
Picture card (see rubric below).

325
UNIT ONE: Hispanic Connections
Learning Plan: 2 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Dress Up!
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
As part of this global village, it is exciting when our students
are able to communicate with the other villagers about HFLE:
themselves. Children have a natural tendency to converse
about their belongings such as clothing; they like to exchange Effective
information about what they wear to school or for going out. Communication
Exposing students to relevant vocabulary will facilitate such Choose an item.
communication and interaction with their peers.
Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
Writing
At the end of this learning experience students will: Oral
State in Spanish selected items of clothing that they Communication
wear. Literary
Appreciation
Activities: Media &
Note: Prior to this activity the students would be given the Information Literacy
opportunity to choose one item from the list of clothing
(uniform, pants, shirt, shoe, skirt, dress, t-shirt.). The item Numeracy
would be cut out from newspapers, magazines and printed Problem Solving
outlines for the learning activity.
Critical thinking
Dress Up! Communication
Representation
1. Students stand in a circle. Random students are Reasoning
questioned by the teacher. What do you wear?
Students respond by displaying and naming the article ICT Skills
of clothing they have cut out.
E.g. I wear a uniform/ pants/ a shirt/ shoes/ a skirt/ a Differentiated
dress/ a t-shirt. Instruction
2. As each student gives an answer to the question, the
teacher shows a similar item from his/her clothes Assessment for
basket/bag. The Spanish translation for that item of Learning
clothing will be given by the teacher or from an audio
recording.

Teacher: What do you wear? Qu llevas?


Student: I wear a uniform.
Teacher: Uniforme. (Teacher displays the
item.)
Teacher: I wear a uniform. Llevo uniforme.
Class: Llevo uniforme.

326
This is repeated for the other items of clothing
pantalones, camisa, zapatos, falda, vestido, camiseta .
Students call the Spanish name for items of clothing
as each is shown by the teacher.

Dress Right

3. Students are shown pictures of children wearing the


different items of clothing. They are asked to pretend
that they are the child in the picture. The teacher asks,
Qu llevas? Students respond appropriately. For
example, Llevo pantalones/ uniforme etc.

Clothes Show and Tell


4. Students stand or sit in a circle with their cut-out
pictures of clothing. As an item of clothing is shown by
the teacher, students with that item would display the
picture while calling the name in Spanish. After all the
items are named, students would pass their cut-outs to
the left/right so that each would now have a different
item of clothing to show and tell.

Clothes in Order
5. Students will be given worksheets with pictures of
clothing. The names will be called in Spanish.
6. Students imagine that they are putting away their
clothes in the order in which they are called by the
teacher. Students will number the pictures in the order
in which they were called. (If computers are available,
this activity can be done using Microsoft Word).

Picture Bingo
7. Students cover the pictures as the names are called
by the teacher.

Resources:
Newspapers, chart paper etc.
Items of clothing
Stationery

Assessment:
Show and Tell

327
UNIT ONE: Hispanic Connection
Learning Plan: 3 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 3 hours Topic: Traditional Hispanic Clothing
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
One way of recognising the people of a particular culture is
by their traditional wear. Hispanic wear is quite distinctive in HFLE:
appearance and has become very popular through television,
movies and the world of fashion. Making students aware of Effective
items of clothing that are Hispanic in origin will allow them to Communication
develop a greater sense of appreciation for Hispanic culture.
Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
At the end of this learning experience students will: Writing
recognize selected typical Hispanic wear Oral
state the Spanish words for selected Hispanic wear Communication
be aware and appreciative of Hispanic culture. Literary
Appreciation
Activities: Media &
Traditional versus Contemporary Information Literacy
Students are presented with two words: traditional and
contemporary. Teacher elicits meanings of these words. Numeracy
They use the words in context. Problem Solving
Students are put in three groups they choose one of either Critical thinking
food, music or dance. Each group identifies types of Communication
traditional and contemporary food, music or dance. Each
Representation
group is given the opportunity to present their findings to the
class. Reasoning
In the same groups students brainstorm and list the names of
any traditional clothing worn by people in their country. Each ICT Skills
group shares its responses with the class.
Students infer the reason that there are quite a few types of Differentiated
traditional wear in Trinidad and Tobago (i.e. many different Instruction
cultures due to historical events).
Assessment for
What am I? learning
Students are presented with:
Pictures of traditional Hispanic wear
Name cards of wear (el bolero, el sombrero, el traje de
flamenco, el poncho, la mantilla)
Brief descriptions of wear
In teams, students play the game Qu traje tpico es? (What
traditional wear is it?) They match each picture with its name
and description. Suggested time limit for this activity is one
minute.
Students verify with teacher the number of correct matches. If
all matches are not correct, teams are given further chances
to adjust their answers. (Teacher determines the maximum
number of chances to be given)

328
Students share their responses with the rest of the class.
Students use this opportunity to correct any mismatches.

Artsy Clothing
Students use internet resources to locate and print pictures of
the different types of Hispanic wear. Alternatively, students
draw the clothing items. (samples available in CD).
Using the pictures/drawings, students work together to create
collages of each clothing item. They decorate the
backgrounds of their collages using paints/colour pencils.
They then insert a caption to describe their collage or
drawing. Their products are displayed.

Worksheet exercise Identifying Hispanic wear


Worksheet : Crossword Puzzle Students are presented with
a crossword puzzle based on the items of traditional Hispanic
wear taught. The first student to solve it gets a prize.

Resources:
Stationery: paper, pencil, marker
Art Supplies: Bristol board/drawing paper, paint, brushes,
colour pencils
ICTs: computers, printer
Others: dictionaries, flashcards of Spanish word names,
pictures,

Assessment:
Teacher Observation
Participation rubric
Worksheet exercises
Art rubric

329
Bolero
Mantilla
Poncho
Sombrero
Traje de
Flamenco

330
A very short jacket worn open in the
front.

An outer garment designed to keep


the body warm or, if made from a
watertight material, to keep dry
during rain.

A large straw or felt hat with a broad


brim and tall crown.

A lace or silk veil or shawl worn over


the head and shoulders.

The costume worn by female


flamenco dancers during their
performances.

331
Worksheet

Crossword Puzzle - Traditional Hispanic Wear

Across
2. traditional hat worn by Spanish men
4. Spanish veil usually made of black lace
5. blanket-like cloak with a hole in the centre for the head

Down
1. long frilled dress worn by flamenco dancers
3. short jacket with long sleeves

332
UNIT ONE: Hispanic Connection
Learning Plan: 4 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 4 hours Topic: E-pals Wanted!
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
At the Standard 5 level students are encouraged to begin seeing
themselves as global citizens. The ability to identify themselves HFLE:
and others by nationality is an important step toward achieving
this. Effective
Communication
Choose an item.
Outcomes:
Literacy
At the end of this learning experience students will: Reading
state their nationality in Spanish Writing
state the nationality of others in Spanish Oral
Communication
Activities: Literary
Who am I? Appreciation
1. Students view Slides 1 to 3 (Venezuela, America and Media &
Trinidad) of the PowerPoint presentation E-pals Wanted.
Information Literacy
Students read the cards and make statements, in English,
about the names, countries of residence and the
Numeracy
nationalities of the young people presented.
Problem Solving
2. Slides 1 to 3 are presented again to the students. They
listen to dialogues (recorded in Spanish) of the persons Critical thinking
giving personal information to an interviewer. Communication
3. Students repeat the questions used in the dialogues. Representation
(Cmo te llamas?, Dnde vives?, Cul es tu Reasoning
nacionalidad?) They then repeat the Spanish expressions
used to answer these questions. (Me llamo _____, Vivo en ICT Skills
_____, Soy +nationality).
4. Students note the Spanish vocabulary for the different Differentiated
nationalities. They repeat the nationality phrases. Through Instruction
elicitation, students note that in Spanish when masculine
form of the nationality ends in o, the feminine form ends Assessment for
in a. Learning
5. Students, in pairs, practise the dialogues, then role play
them to the class.

More People to Meet


6. Students view slides 4 to 6 which show three additional e-
pal information cards (from Spain, England and Tobago.)
They again make statements in English about the persons
presented. They ask the Spanish questions used to find
out the name, country of residence and nationality from
these persons.

333
7. Students listen to dialogues to verify their questions. They
then listen again for the responses.
8. Students state the masculine and feminine nationalities
presented. (espaol/ espaola, ingles/inglesa,
tobaguense/tobaguense.)
9. Students note that espaol and ingls are masculine
nationalities but do not end in o and that tobaguense is
the same nationality word for both masculine and
feminine.
10. Students role play the dialogues for these nationalities.

My New E-Pal is
11. Students view slide 7 which shows cards of two persons
who have decided to be e-pals with each other. They role
play the dialogues that the two persons have.
12. Students listen to recording of each person giving
information about their new e-pal. Students note the
expressions for giving anothers persons name (Es
Paloma) and his/her nationality (Es espaola).
13. In pairs, students practise presenting the different e-pals.
They may then role play this to the class.

Can I be your new e-pal?


14. Students assume different personalities from countries
used in the activity. They work in pairs to play the roles of
e-pals meeting each other for the first time and having
conversations. These conversations are presented to the
rest of the class.
15. Students then tell the class about their new e-pals, giving
their name and nationalities.

Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation/ Printouts of Slides, computer,
projector,
Stationery paper, pencils, markers, glue

Assessment:
Checklist
Oral Presentations

334
Vocabulary/Pronunciation Guide

English Spanish Pronunciation


American americano/a Ah-may-ree-cah-noh/nah
English ingls/inglesa een-glay-s / een-glay-sah
I am Soy Soy
I live in Vivo en Vee-voh ay-n
Spanish espaol/a Ay-s-pah-n-yol/ Ay-s-pah-n-yol-ah
Tobagonian tobaguense Toh-bah-gay-n-say
Trinidadian trinitario/a Tree-nee-tah-ree-oh/ah
Venezuelan venezolano/a Vay-nay-so-lah-noh/
Vay-nay-so-lah-noh nah
What is your nationality? Cul es tu nacionalidad? Kwal ay-s tou nah-si-oh-nah-lee-dad
Whats your name? Cmo te llamas? Coh-mo tay yamas
Where do you live? Dnde vives? Doh-n-day vee-vays

Dialogues to be recorded.

Part One
1. - Cmo te llamas? 2. - Cmo te llamas?
- Me llamo Elena Rodrguez. - Me llamo Enrique Martin.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Venezuela. - Vivo en Venezuela.
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy venezolana. - Soy venezolano.

3. - Cmo te llamas? 4. - Cmo te llamas?


- Me llamo Jill Jones. - Me llamo Caleb Carter.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Amrica. - Vivo en Amrica.
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy americana. - Soy americano.

5. - Cmo te llamas? 6. - Cmo te llamas?


- Me llamo Anna Smith. - Me llamo Matthew Chin.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Trinidad. - Vivo en Trinidad.

335
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy trinitaria. - Soy trinitario.

Part Two
7. - Cmo te llamas? 8. - Cmo te llamas?
- Me llamo Jos Fernando. - Me llamo Paloma Castro.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Madrid. - Vivo en Barcelona.
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy espaol. - Soy espaola.

9. - Cmo te llamas? 10. - Cmo te llamas?


- Me llamo Jackson James. - Me llamo Catherine OConnor.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Liverpool. - Vivo en Manchester.
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy ingls. - Soy inglesa.

11. - Cmo te llamas? 12. - Cmo te llamas?


- Me llamo Alana Adams. - Me llamo Derrick Jonas.
- Dnde vives? - Dnde vives?
- Vivo en Tobago. - Vivo en Tobago.
- Cul es tu nacionalidad? - Cul es tu nacionalidad?
- Soy tobaguense. - Soy tobaguense.

Part Three
13. Es Jackson James 14. Es Alana Adams.
Es ingls 15. Es Tobaguense

336
UNIT ONE: Hispanic Connection
Learning Plan: 5 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 2 hours Topic: Name That Flag
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
A national flag is a unique way of identifying a country, and serves
as a symbol representing a countrys history and ideals. It is HFLE:
therefore important that students are able to recognise their Cooperation
national flag as well as the flag of other countries. Decision Making

Outcomes: Literacy
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Reading
identify the flag of their country, Spain and selected Spanish- Writing
speaking countries in the Caribbean Oral
display behaviour that is consistent with patriotism and respect Communication
for other countries. Literary
Appreciation
Activities: Media &
Piecing It Together Information Literacy
1. Students are placed into groups. Each group selects one of
the15-piece puzzles. Students are given one minute to put the Numeracy
puzzles together. When completed each group indicates what Problem Solving
their finished puzzle is about i.e. a National Flag of a country. Critical Thinking
Further, students try to identify the country to which the flag Communication
belongs (Trinidad and Tobago, Spain, Venezuela, Cuba, Representation
Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic). (See attachment
Reasoning
below for examples of the flags/countries. ) Students may be
directed to their atlases to identify the countries to which these
flags belong. Teacher provides the answers where necessary. ICT Skills
Students make word cards of the names of these countries (in
English) to label these completed puzzles. Puzzles and word Differentiated
cards are displayed. Instruction

Location! Location! Assessment for


2. Students locate the countries to which these flags belong on a Learning
world map. (If available, one can use the world map on Google
Maps via the internet).
3. Using the previous groupings students can recall the
significance of the colours used on the Trinidad and Tobago
National Flag.
4. Students recall how they can show respect for a national flag.
5. Students share occasions when they displayed/ proudly waved
the national flag. They also recall occasions when they have
seen many national flags flown.

My Artwork
6. Students select one of the flags to create a Flag Bookmark.
(See attachment below for a sample.)

337
Musical Flags
7. Students are arranged in a circle (sitting or standing). In this
formation each student receives a replica of one of the
national flags. Music or a musical beat is played for the
students to pass the flags along. When the music stops a
student is selected to respectfully raise the flag that s/he holds
and say the name of the country to which it belongs.

Resources:
Stationery: pencils, colour pencils, markers
Art Supplies: bristol board, scissors, glue, any other materials
to decorate bookmarks
ICTs: computers
Others: National Flag replicas, copies of a world map, puzzles
of flags of Trinidad and Tobago, Spain, Venezuela, Cuba,
Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic created by teacher,
atlases

Assessment:
Musical Flags Game
Teacher Observation

338
National Flags of Selected Countries

Trinidad and Tobago Spain

Venezuela Cuba

Dominican Republic Puerto Rico


Sample of a Flag Bookmark

339
UNIT ONE:Hispanic Connection
Learning Plan: 6 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 4 hours Topic: Lets Link Up!
Context: CONSIDERATIONS:
By Standard Five, students must be given opportunities to apply
their learning in a real life context. One way of accomplishing this HFLE:
is for students to engage in oral communication with other
learners of Spanish and students of their own age from a Effective
Spanish-speaking country. Communication
Choose an item.

Outcomes: Literacy
Reading
At the end of this learning experience, students will: Writing
communicate with others of their country who are learners of Oral
Spanish via telephone and video chat Communication
open lines of oral communication with students from Spanish- Literary
speaking countries.
Appreciation
display respect, safety and responsibility as they interact with
others using various media. Media &
display enthusiasm about forming links with others. Information Literacy

Activities: Numeracy
Problem Solving
Ask and Tell Critical thinking
1. Students listen to the dialogue between two persons Communication
meeting for the first time (See sound clip Dialogue Representation
Making Connections). Reasoning
2. Students state the Spanish questions asked to find out :
How are you? ICT Skills
What is your name?
Where do you live? Differentiated
How old are you? Instruction
What is your nationality?
They also state the responses given in Spanish to each Assessment for
question. Learning
3. Students work in pairs and practice the questions and
answers that they have heard. (Students may give
themselves Spanish names.)

Making New Friends


4. Teacher engages students in discussion on respectful, safe
and responsible practices when communicating with others
using various media. Students create a checklist of
appropriate behaviours to which they will refer as they
interact with others. The points of the checklist are
displayed on a chart in the classroom.

340
5. Guided by the teacher, the class partners with a similar-
level class from another school in Trinidad and Tobago or a
Spanish-speaking country. Students:
- meet and chat/share what they have learned about
Hispanic culture in English
- make phone calls in Spanish*
- skype in Spanish/about Spanish culture .*

*Pending the availability of ICT resources

Resources:
ICTs: phone, computer, internet, Skype, pictures
Others: classroom items, list of names, addresses and
phone numbers of students in partner schools

Assessment:
Project rubric

Dialogue

Pedro: Qu tal?

Marisol: Bien. Qu tal?

Pedro: Bien Cmo te llamas?

Marisol: Me llamo Marisol. Cmo te llamas?

Pedro: Soy Pedro. Dnde vives?

Marisol: Vivo en Caracas.

Pedro: Vivo en San Fernando.

Marisol: Cuntos aos tienes?

Pedro: Tengo once aos


Marisol: Tengo doce aos.

Marisol: Cul es tu nacionalidad?

Pedro: Soy trinitario.

Marisol: Soy venezolana.

Pedro: Bien. Adis, amiga.

Marisol: Adis, amigo.

341
UNIT ONE:Hispanic Connection
Learning Plan: 7 of 7
Class: Standard 5 Term: 3 Theme: Encouraging Global Citizenship
Duration: 7 hours Topic: Our Spanish Day
CONSIDERATIONS:
Context:
At this stage, students would have been exposed to many HFLE:
aspects of Hispanic culture. One way to encourage full
appreciation of all that they have learned in this regard, is to have Effective
them prepare, mount and host a display which adequately Communication
represents known aspects of Hispanic culture. Choose an item.

Literacy
Outcomes: Reading
use their knowledge of Spanish to communicate with others Writing
who are learners/speakers of Spanish Oral
describe three (3) ways to prepare for events and activities Communication
use various materials to create simple items for a planned Literary
presentation Appreciation
execute at least 6-8 steps specific to dances from local Media &
festivals/celebrations (Castilian) with appropriate
Information Literacy
music/accompaniment.
sing simple Spanish song in groups. Numeracy
Problem Solving
Critical thinking
Activities:
Communication
Lets Have a Spanish Day Representation
1. In groups, students are given responsibilities to prepare for Reasoning
the Spanish Day:
o create and display a welcome sign in Spanish ICT Skills
o collect and display flags, clothing and music
representative of selected Spanish-speaking Differentiated
countries Instruction
o create typical Spanish wear, using available
material Assessment for
o collect and display packaging of Spanish food items Learning
o create invitation cards in English and send to
persons who can speak Spanish (native
speakers/secondary school students or
teachers/other learners of Spanish)
o rehearse simple Spanish song learnt previously
o rehearse Castillian dance steps learnt previously.

Its our Spanish Day!


2. On the Spanish Day, students dress in typical Spanish
wear sombreros, ponchos, boleros etc.

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3. Students explain their displays to other invited classes.
4. Students perform rehearsed song and dance.
5. Spanish-Speaking persons (native speakers/secondary
school students or teachers/other learners of Spanish) are
invited to meet with the class. Students converse with
these persons, using the Spanish they have practiced in
previous session.

A Time to Reflect
6. Teacher engages students in reflecting upon their
preparations and execution of their Spanish Day in terms of
what went well and what they could have done to improve
the activities. Students can share their feelings/comments
with peers.
7. In their journals, students write about their Spanish Day
incorporating three (3) ways to prepare for such events and
activities in the future.

Resources: (Suggested Categories)


Stationery: paper, Bristol board, pencil, marker etc
Art Supplies: large sheets of paper, paint, brushes
Other: packages with Spanish labels, Music CDs,
resource persons

Assessment:
Project rubric

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