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Folio B

Created by: Sharla Bazen

1(d) The teacher understand how learning occurshow learners construct knowledge,
acquire skills, and develop disciplined thinking processesand knows how to use
instructional strategies that promote student learning.
Curriculum Area: English Language Arts (Reading Strategy Lesson)
Artifact one is a reading strategy lesson plan (Act It To Storytell It) that I created
and implemented in my Kenowa Hills Alpine Elementary second grade
classroom, during my Teacher Assisting semester (Fall17). In my opinion, it is
impossible to educate the mind without involving the body learning is thinking
and movement integrated. Acting out the story to deepen comprehension and
knowledge of the story is the main objective of this lesson. The lesson
incorporates movement (acting) and thinking (storytelling) to begin the learning
process. Learners construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop disciplined
thinking processes simply by doing. Doing the work, doing the story, and most
of all doing the learning.
o I began the lesson by drawing on the scholars prior knowledge and then
engaged them even further with an exciting anticipatory set (click live link
here). I showed the scholars a video clip of another second grade scholar
from a different school/district that acted out his story with lots of facial
expressions, different voices, gestures, and even (appropriate) fluctuations
of volume to tell his story the best way that he could. I had my scholars do
the same with a story that we collectively love and know well in our
second grade class Mr. Putter & Tabby Spill the Beans. They were
thrilled to act out their favorite characters and several of them told me how
much they loved doing it. Acting out the story really made the story come
to life for the scholars because they had to think deeper than just reading
the words. They had to think about the specific events that happened, the
order of those events, and the characters - how their faces or bodies might
look, or how they were feeling in that particular moment. They had to
adjust the way they spoke to make their voices and bodies match the
characters in specific scenes. I was thrilled that they had fun while
learning this instructional reading strategy called, Act It to Storytell It from
my Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo. The accommodation
for this lesson was that if you were too nervous to act it out you could act
it out in your mind but when I came to your spot in the room you would
tell me what was happening in your mind. The extension for this lesson
was to have some volunteers act out their story (after some practice time
of course) in front of their peers to show how well the strategy can really
work if you put your whole body and mind into it. I had several
volunteers and we even had to do it a second day because so many
scholars wanted to volunteer and we ran out of time the first day. The
lesson was a huge success.
o See Artifact 1.1 Act It to Storytell It lesson plan
o See Artifact 1.2 Act It to Storytell It PowerPoint

2(g) The teacher understands and identifies differences in approaches to learning and
performance and knows how to design instruction that uses each learners strengths to
promote growth.
Curriculum Area: English Language Arts (Writing Strategy Lesson)

Artifact two (Writers Show Not Tell) is a writing strategy lesson plan that I
created for my second observation at Kenowa Hills Alpine Elementary, during my
Teacher Assisting semester (Fall17). When I implemented this in our second
grade classroom, I began by first drawing on the scholars prior knowledge and
then engaged them even further by showing them a little video clip of two
Elementary girls performing Show Not Tell (click live link here). Some scholars
can learn and comprehend what it means to show not tell simply by hearing my
verbal instructions. However, not all scholars learn this way, so I wanted to show
them a visual and verbal example of what it sounds like to show not tell in
writing. We then reviewed what kinds of things we could add to our writing to
make it even better (i.e. details, dialogue, sound words, senses, and emotions).
Then I lead the scaffolded lesson that is detailed below.
Scaffolded Lesson:

Process of Writers Show Not Tell lesson plan:


o Review Act It to Show It Mrs. Nicolette giving Maizy a bath (I was Maizy)
o Review the work done over past few days
o Watch Show Not Tell video to clarify even further
o Review a sample that we did together in the past (I Do)
o Do one sentence together to get their minds on the right track (We Do)
o Move on to partner work around the room (Collaborative You Do)
o Share what a few groups came up with and transition to individual work
o Individually work on a piece of their own writing (revise, edit, clarify,
additional information) (You Do)
o I Do, We Do, You Do scaffolded structure that started with Act It to Show It,
now were focusing on Showing It not Telling It. The last step is editing and
revising, adding additional information to Show not Tell, and polishing a piece
of writing that will be published in the classroom and will be used for their
conferences coming up.
o Scaffolded instruction (I Do, We Do, You Do) corresponds with the Gradual
Release Model and takes us through the writers process in Showing Not Telling,
beginning with the teacher providing an example, then we all do it together,
then they have more We Do (or Collaborative You Do) practice with their
partners around the room, and then they go back to their seats to individually
polish a piece of their writing.
o Share a few pieces of writing (if there are volunteers)
o Review I CAN statements
o Mention what we will do tomorrow
o Transition to Reading Neighborhoods

See Artifact 2.1 Writers Show Not Tell lesson plan


See Artifact 2.2 Writers Show Not Tell Observation Results of lesson plan
3(l) The teacher understands how learner diversity can affect communication and knows
how to communicate effectively in differing environments.
About the third week of school this year we had a lovely boy join us from Guatemala and
he spoke little to no English at all. I was still able to communicate with him a little bit in Spanish
and also used simple English in front of him to help build his English vocabulary. I would often
just hold up my pencil (or notebook, or paper) and say el lapis es un pencil en Ingles or
something similar and along those lines depending on what I was holding up. I would also talk to
him just a little bit slower so that he could watch my mouth as I spoke and also so he could catch
each word I was saying. I would always have accommodated work for him to do so that he
always felt included and was never sitting there with nothing to do. I use past tense because the
third week in October our little friend went back to Guatemala to be with his family he was
only here as one of our seasonal scholars. Although he didnt know a lot of English, he did very
well and always watched my hand gestures. Within the time he was with us, I was able to get
him to write his first and last name, his numbers 1-20, and was able to trace and copy the entire
alphabet. Keep in mind he was only with us for five weeks, so the mere fact that he could do all
of that was highly satisfying and highly rewarding.

3(k) The teacher knows how to collaborate with learners to establish and monitor elements
of a safe and productive learning environment including norms, expectations, routines, and
organizational structures.
My Philosophy of Education is a prime example of the above statement and is attached as
my artifact three.
However, I also am a firm believer in the love and logic classroom. I have fallen in love
with what it stands for and the level of love and respect that is given to each individual in
the classroom with this program. I plan to adopt the program and of course tweak it to fit
me once I am in my own classroom. The love and logic classroom is full of choices as a
reward and also sets high, yet very clear expectations for the scholars because they have
been taught (using the same language) since the start of their time at Alpine Elementary.
Whether it be that they started in Pre-K, Kindergarten, first or third grade - they are all
taught the same procedures using the same language. This type of consistency is key and
is the main reason we can expect scholars to abide by these rules/norms and expectations.
When scholars come through the hallways they are holding one finger over their mouth
and one hand signing a peace sign (which is a silent message to others that they are not to
be speaking at the moment). If they want to silently say hello to someone while walking
down the hall they can use one finger and kind of wave it by moving one finger up and
down. Now these rules all have a "backstory" if you will and all rules are there to ensure
student safety and student learning. When scholars are noisy in the hallways it is very
disruptive to other classes that are in session - hence the procedure for the hallways.

Scholars also have a procedure for how they partner talk ("whole body listening"). First they
"park their thinking" to ensure they are not thinking about anything else. Then they paraphrase
what their partner said and then they ask a thoughtful question. Once they have done that they
can even challenge themselves further to see if there are any new ideas that they can come up
with based on the discussion they were quietly having. The procedure for whole body listening is
that your mouth is quiet, your ears are listening, your eyes are on your partner, your shoulders
are facing your partner, you are sitting criss-cross applesauce, hands are in your lap, and even
your shoes and hair are quiet and "listening." And last of all your heart is listening to show the
other person that you care.

o My truly favorite procedure is all the positive reinforcement and positive ways all the
teachers talk to the scholars in such a child-centered way that really puts the
responsibility back on the student and not the teacher. They all realize they have a
choice and that if they make the wrong choice, "that's okay - there will be time during
recess for you to practice making the better choice"... I just love watching the
scholars faces when teachers say these kinds of things.
See Artifact 3 - Philosophy of Education

6(j) The teacher understands the differences between formative and summative
applications of assessment and knows how and when to use each.
Really any time I ask the scholars Who can tell me anything about ______ at the start
of learning something new this is one way to quickly formatively assess what the scholars
know and dont know about the new topic of learning. Formative learning is used simply to
discover what base knowledge your learners have on the given topic at hand. You could also
formatively assess by having the scholars rate themselves on how comfortable they were with the
topic (before) any teaching and learning takes place as I did in my Writers Show Not Tell
lesson plan. After you have taught a lesson (or an entire unit) you can summatively assess, to see
how much they learned throughout the time spent on the topic. This summative assessment also
tell the educator how well they taught based on how well the scholars did. Formative and
summative assessments are absolutely necessary and are incorporated into every lesson whether
we know it or not. We are always checking in with our scholars. Whether it be written or verbal,
we assess both formatively (prior knowledge) and summatively (closure/review) every single
day. If you refer back to my Writers Show Not Tell lesson plan you will see formative assessment
take place throughout, as well as (verbal) summative assessment at the end of the lesson in the
form of recap/review/closing remarks.

7(g) The teacher understands content and content standards and how these are organized
in the curriculum.
Curriculum Area: ELA/Science/Technology
Artifact four is a Science, Technology, and ELA integrated lesson plan on rock
formations designed for fifth grade. I have included a VoiceThread of the lesson as well
as a paper-based copy of the lesson. VoiceThread is an online interactive technology that
essentially records your voice as a blog and when you submit it you will hear your
recording as well as everyone elses. The teacher would record a prompt and then each
scholar would record their response and upload it, allowing each person in the group to
listen to all of the recordings (acting like a discussion). The lesson utilizes Google
Filtered, Kidblog, and an interactive learning module that teaches about rock formations
and then quizzes the scholars on what they learned throughout the module. The teacher
can set it up to have all of the scores sent to him/her and can use the scores as a formative
or summative assessment if they so desire. After the learning module the scholars will
post a blog on Kidblog.org responding to the prompt on rock formations provided by the
teacher. Then they will comment on one post of their peers which will aid in getting the
conversation going (online and will be extended in verbal discussion in class). The
specific learning goal this lesson targets is the Michigan State Standard:
o 5-ESS2-1:
Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere,
hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact. [Clarification Statement: Examples
could include the influence of the ocean on ecosystems, landform shape, and
climate; the influence of the atmosphere on landforms and ecosystems through
weather and climate; and the influence of mountain ranges on winds and clouds in
the atmosphere. The geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere are each
a system.]
See Artifacts 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3 [voice clip, lesson plan, and reflection]

7(l) The teacher knows when and how to adjust plans based on assessment information and
learner responses.
Curriculum Area: English Language Arts
Artifact five is the lesson I created for my scholars on Writers Show Not Tell
because I did a lot of formative assessment throughout to tell me if I needed to
slow down, speed up, give more information or less information. Formative
assessment is really a good friend of mine because I use it before a lesson and
during a lesson several times to let me know how they are feeling about what I am
asking them to do. I also take a summative assessment on how well they think
they did (learning), how well they think I did (teaching), and overall how well
they think the lesson went. I also ask if there is something I could do differently
and am always open to their suggestions and always willing to implement those
suggestions. I also ask them what they liked (what went well) during the lesson, to
reassure me that I did reach them in at least one way. These assessments are
extremely valuable pieces of the lesson that cannot and should not be left out.
These are the pieces that connect the teacher and the scholars. If I continuously
spoke over their heads or in way too simple terms, they would tune me out and no
learning would ever take place. Assessments are necessary to track the scholars
learning and the success of my own teaching.

8(m) The teacher understands how multiple forms of communication (oral, written,
nonverbal, digital, visual) convey ideas, foster self-expression, and build relationships.
Curriculum Area: English Language Arts (Reading Strategy Lesson)
Artifact six is the reading strategy lesson plan (Act It To Storytell It) that I created
and implemented in my Kenowa Hills Alpine Elementary second grade
classroom, during my Teacher Assisting semester (Fall17). In my opinion, it is
impossible to educate the mind without involving the body learning is thinking
and movement integrated. Acting out the story to deepen comprehension and
knowledge of the story is the main objective of this lesson because I realize that
multiple forms of communication need to be present for this kind of learning to
take place. The lesson incorporates all aspects listed above: oral (acting), written
(reading the text), nonverbal (gestures), digital (online example - hook), and
visual (actions). All of these avenues are included in hopes of triggering the
learning process in as many ways as possible. As mentioned above, learning is
thinking (storytelling) and movement (acting) integrated this is when the
learning process begins. Learners construct knowledge, acquire skills, and
develop disciplined thinking processes simply by doing. Doing the work, doing
the story, and most of all doing the learning.
o I began the lesson by drawing on the scholars prior knowledge and then
engaged them even further with an exciting anticipatory set (click live link
here). I showed the scholars a video clip of another second grade scholar
from a different school/district that acted out his story with lots of facial
expressions, different voices, gestures, and even (appropriate) fluctuations
of volume to tell his story the best way that he could. I had my scholars do
the same with a story that we collectively love and know well in our
second grade class Mr. Putter & Tabby Spill the Beans. They were
thrilled to act out their favorite characters and several of them told me how
much they loved doing it. Acting out the story really made the story come
to life for the scholars because they had to think deeper than just reading
the words. They had to think about the specific events that happened, the
order of those events, and the characters - how their faces or bodies might
look, or how they were feeling in that particular moment. They had to
adjust the way they spoke to make their voices and bodies match the
characters in specific scenes. I was thrilled that they had fun while
learning this instructional reading strategy called, Act It to Storytell It from
my Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo. The accommodation
for this lesson was that if you were too nervous to act it out you could act
it out in your mind but when I came to your spot in the room you would
tell me what was happening in your mind. The extension for this lesson
was to have some volunteers act out their story (after some practice time
of course) in front of their peers to show how well the strategy can really
work if you put your whole body and mind into it. I had several
volunteers and we even had to do it a second day because so many
scholars wanted to volunteer and we ran out of time the first day. The
lesson was a huge success.
o See Artifact 6.1 Act It to Storytell It lesson plan
o See Artifact 6.2 Act It to Storytell It PowerPoint