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Sentences is a set of words that is complete in itself, typically containing a subject and predicate, conveying a statement, question,

exclamation, or command, and consisting of a main clause and sometimes one or more subordinate clauses.Sentence (sentence) is the
wording that expresses a complete idea / obvious that consists of subject and predicate. In a sentence (sentence), it always contains the
predicate verb (verb). So in other words, it can be said that the sentence (sentence) must be arranged at least with their subject and
verb.Sentence preceded by a capital letter and ends by a full stop (period), exclamation mark (exclamation point), or a question mark
(question mark). An independent clause is composed of subject and predicate.

1.Simple sentence
is a sentence type (types of sentences) the most fundamental, which is only composed of one independent clause.Simple single
sentence or phrase is a simple phrase that we usually learn in basic English. That phrase has a pattern sentence consisting of a subject
(subject), verb (verb), objects (object) and adverb (adverb). However, objects and adverbs are optional. During own subject and verb,
the sentence can be called simple sentence. It can also be referred to as an independent clause or clauses are free. You can
communicate an idea clearly using a simple sentence. This sentence structure gives the greatest emphasis to the idea because there are
no distracting dependent clauses. The simple sentence is effective in composing business messages. It is clear, concise, and efficient
for communicatingthe simple sentence is businesslike. Overuse of simple sentences in a message, however, can result in choppy,
singsong monotonyparticularly if the sentences are all short. The first type of sentence in the English language is the simple
sentence. A simple sentence consists of one verb clause. Verb clauses are independent clauses that consist of a subject and a predicate.
Some grammars refer to verb clauses as main clauses, matrix clauses, or superordinate clauses.
Type of sentence is not "simple" (simple) to be understood as a simple sentence itself refers to the pattern of the sentence is not the
complexity of thought (complexity of thought).
Formulas and Examples Simple Sentence
The formula of simple sentence is S + V + O.
Here are some examples of sentences simple sentence:

Subject | Predicate
She | laughed.
The fire alarm | sounded loudly.
A strange girl | visits the library with her father.
Forty-two thousand muskrats and one lone ox | have plotted to destroy the city.
My dog is eating the bone.
She is a good person.
We read the book.
I was doing the hard exercise this morning. (I'm working hard workout this morning)

Indicators Use of Simple Sentence in the Sentence

Although it looks very simple, it's good to come back to understand the meaning of the independent clause and a compound element.
Because of these two elements form a simple sentence sentence.
A simple sentence can be very short, but some are long too, so long as they only have one subject-verb combination. Here, the
subjects are orange and the verbs are green.

I ate.
I ate dinner.
I ate dinner with my brother and sister.
Last night, I ate dinner at a restaurant with my brother and sister.
As you can see, even though some of these sentences are long, each only has one subject and one verb (one clause).

3. Parts of Simple Sentences

All sentences have one main important part: an independent clause. Sometimes, they also include other words, like objects and/or
modifiers.
a. Independent Clause
An independent clause has a subject and a predicate and makes sense on its own as a complete sentence. In fact, an independent clause
itself is a simple sentence! Here are a few:
The cat ate.
He ate ice cream.
He went to the beach.
The wolf ate steak at the zoo.
So, you can see that all of the clauses above work as sentences. All sentences have an independent clause, but all simple sentences
have ONE independent clause.
B. Objects

An object is the word affected by the verb or preposition in a sentence. Objects are usually nouns or pronouns that answer questions
like who, what, where, and when? Here, the objects are purple.

The dog ate bacon. What did the dog eat?


The dog ate bacon at the park. Where did he eat it?
I took my dog to the park. Who did you take there?
We went to the park yesterday. When did you go?

So, you can see that the highlighted objects answer the questions above. They make the sentences more informational than they would
be without objects.
c. Modifiers

A modifier is an adjective or adverb that modifies other words in a sentence to make it more descriptive. They help give a clearer
idea about the things in the sentence. Here, the modifiers are gray. Lets start with a simple sentence:

The panda ate corn.

Now, lets add modifiers:

The fat panda quickly ate the buttery corn.

Modifiers make the sentence more detailed. We now know that the panda was fat, that he ate quickly, and that the corn was buttery!
Modifiers can make sentences much more interesting.

4. Types of Simple Sentences

There arent exactly different types of simple sentences, but they can be written in different ways. As mentioned, sometimes they
are very short, or sometimes they include modifiers or objects that make them longer.
a. Simple Sentence with ONLY a Subject and a Verb

As mentioned, simple sentences are the shortest possible complete sentences. You can have a simple sentence with only a simple
subject and a predicate, using only two or three words, like this:

I see.
He ran.
We looked.
They cooked.
The dog ate.
The baby cried.

Though only two or three words, these are all independent clauses, so they work on their own as complete sentences!
b. Simple Sentence with other Objects or Modifiers
Not all simple sentences are short. So long as it only has one subject and one predicate, a simple sentence can actually be pretty long.
Take a look at the extra words in these examples:

I see you behind the cotton candy machine!


He ran to the fair as fast as possible.
We ate buttery corn at the famous farmers market.
They prepared cotton candy in an old-fashioned machine.

So, a simple sentence can use lots of modifiers and objects to add details, while at the same time only describing one subject doing one
thing.
Independent clause is a sentence composed of the Subject, Verb, and can be added with other elements. While Compound Element is a
description of the Subject, Verb, or Preposition. We could look at some examples of simple sentences that use information with
compund element.

Subject compound
ex: John and I got the best value for our test. (Jake and I am getting the best value for our tests)

compound Verb
ex: The kids scream and laugh at the same time. (Kids screaming and laughing at the same time)

prepositional Phrase
ex: We take the water in the bucket and put it in our cups.

2. compound sentenses
Definition of compound sentence is a sentence-type that consists of two or more clauses. Compound sentence is a combination of the
two clauses, where a clause is a clause main clause and the second is a complement of the first clause. Two or more clauses are
connected by with similar interests. The second type of sentence in the English language is the compound sentence. A compound
sentence consists of two or more verb clauses joined by (1) a coordinating conjunction or (2) a correlative-coordinating conjunction
pair.
The second type of sentence is the compound sentence. This sentence is composed of two simple sentences joined together by a
comma and a joining word (coordinating conjunction). We could also describe a compound sentence as two independent clauses
joined by a conjunction.There are seven coordinating conjunctions:
and
but
so
or
for
nor
yet.
Formulas and Example Compound Sentence:
Subject + Predicate + Subordinate conjuction + Subject + Predicate
Conjunctive use known in English as a coordinate conjunction, which is usually abbreviated as fanboys, consisting of, for, and, nor,
but, or, yet, and so. Punctuation is used usually in the form of "comma", which is placed right after the connecting words. To
understand more deeply compound sentence, consider the example sentences below: For example, the following sentences are
compound sentences:
Verb Clause | Coordinating Conjunction | Verb Clause
She loved the ocean, | yet | she had never traveled to the sea.
The boys picked burgers, | and | the girls chose chicken sandwiches.
He hoped to buy a new car, | so | he saved up all of his money.
The teacher allowed notes during the test, | but | all of the students failed anyway.
Correlative Conjunction | Verb Clause | Coordinating Conjunction | Verb Clause
Both | the stream flooded the bridge, | and | a fallen stream blocked the road.
Either | he stops his rude behavior, | or | I leave the dinner early.
Either | the news station is experiencing technical difficulties, | or | some really weird events are happening.
Neither | the package arrived on time, | nor | the company received the shipping invoice.
Anne wants to go to the beach, but her little sister insist to go to amusement park
John could not play basketball, nor could he play badminton.
She does not want to learn how to play the piano, yet, she does not want to disobey her mother
I have an important meeting on Monday, so, I can not Attend your graduation ceremony
My little brother wakes up at 5:30 AM and he goes to school at 6:30 AM
I started on time, but I arrived late.
I will accept your offer or decline it; these are the two options.
The law was passed: from 1 April, all cars would have to be tested.
The war was lost; consequently, the whole country was occupied.
The use of a comma to separate two independent clauses without the addition of an appropriate conjunction is called a comma splice
and is generally considered an error (when used in the English language).

Because the compound conjunctive in this sentence has a similar function in a sentence, sometimes these conjunctions can not show
the specific relationship between the clauses within sentences that can be said to be able to stand on its own. However, these words
should be combined to obtain comprehensive information.

A compound sentence is made up of two or more independent clauses.


The boys sang and the girls danced.
This compound sentence consists of two simple clauses connected by the coordinating conjunction and.
Another example is given below.
Men may come and men may go, but I go on forever.
This compound sentence consists of three independent clauses.
We make compound sentences by joining independent clauses with the help of coordinating conjunctions.
More examples of compound sentences are given below.
You may watch TV or you can go out to play.
You should either sit quietly or go out.
The old man could neither see nor hear.
He took the test several times but he couldnt pass.
He is famous, yet he is very humble.
She was angry, still she kept her cool.
The thieves not only robbed the man of his possessions, but also inflicted injuries on him.
The other main type of sentence that a writer may use is called a compound sentence. Compound sentences contain two or more
pieces of information and the pieces are linked by connectives. Connectives are words such as:
whereas
therefore
Here are three examples of compound sentences with the connectives written in bold:
The boys walked down the road and their parents waved from the house.
The dog came rushing in so the cat ran upstairs.
My friend gave me a lift because it was raining.
One advantage of compound sentences is that a writer can build more detail into their writing. However, one problem is that some
writers can get carried away and write long rambling sentences
A compound sentence is a sentence that has at least two independent clauses joined by a comma, semicolon or conjunction. An
independent clause is a clause that has a subject and verb and forms a complete thought.
An example of a compound sentence is, 'This house is too expensive, and that house is too small.' This sentence is a compound
sentence because it has two independent clauses, 'This house is too expensive' and 'that house is too small' separated by a comma and
the conjunction 'and.'
Compound Sentences and Meaning
When independent clauses are joined with coordinators (also called coordinating conjunctions) commas and semicolons, they do more
than just join the clauses. They add meaning and flow to your writing. First let's look at the coordinators you can use to join
independent clauses.
Note that they form the handy mnemonic FANBOYS. The three you will use most often are 'and,' 'but' and 'or.'
Here's an example of how coordinating conjunctions add meaning:
'I think you'd enjoy the party, but I don't mind if you stay home.'
In this sentence, the coordinator 'but' shows a clear relationship between the two independent clauses, in this case, that the speaker is
making a suggestion that the person being addressed isn't expected to follow it. Without the coordinator 'but,' the relationship isn't
apparent, making the writing choppy and the meaning less clear:

'I think you'd enjoy the party. I don't mind if you stay home.'

You can also join independent clauses with a semicolon (;) , which looks something like a cross between a colon and a comma. If you
join clauses with a semicolon, you add an abrupt pause, creating a different kind of effect, as shown in the sentence below:

'He said he didn't mind if I stayed home; it soon became clear he wasn't being honest.'

You should use a semicolon when the independent clauses are related, but contrast in a way that you want to stand out. In the sentence
above, the contrast is that the person being talked about in the first clause sounded honest when he said he didn't mind if the speaker
stayed home, but in the second clause, the speaker is telling you that the person being talked about was not honest. You could just as
easily have written the sentence using a coordinating conjunction:

'He said he didn't mind if I stayed home, but it soon became clear he wasn't being honest.'

The sentence still means the same as before, but using the coordinator 'but' softens the impact of the second clause.
Comparing Sentence Types

Sentences give structure to language, and in English, they come in four types: simple, compound, complex and compound-complex.
When you use several types together, your writing is more interesting. Combining sentences effectively takes practice, but you'll be
happy with the result.

The simple sentence is an independent clause with one subject and one verb. For example: 'Katniss can survive in the forest.'
The compound sentence is, as noted previously, two or more independent clauses joined with a comma, semicolon or conjunction.
For example: 'Katniss can survive in the forest, and she is a capable archer.'
The complex sentence combines independent clauses with dependent clauses. For example: 'When equipped with her bow and
arrows, Katniss can survive in the forest.'
The compound-complex sentence has at least two independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses. For example: 'When
carrying her bow and arrows, Katniss can survive in the forest, and she is a capable archer.'

Compound Sentence Problems

The joining elements in compound sentences (comma, coordinator, semicolon) aren't just there to make the sentence a compound
sentence. They're there to help you correctly read and understand the sentence, as well. A run-on sentence occurs when two or more
independent clauses are written together without the correct joining elements. Run-on sentences happen in two basic forms, the
comma splice and the fused sentence.
3. complex sentence
Definition of complex sentence in general is a terraced compound sentences, which consists of one independent clause and one or
more dependent clause or otherwise. Independent clause is a clause that can stand on its own and has its meaning intact, at least
consist of subject and predicate. Meanwhile, the dependent clause is a clause that can not stand on its own, so it must be connected
with the main independent clause or sentence that the clause can have meaning. Complex sentence has several sentence patterns, for
more details, we see from the general formula and example sentences in English sentences. Complex sentences can also be referred to
as multi-clause sentences. A complex sentence is a sentence with an independent clause and at least one dependent clause. The
dependent clause is introduced by either a subordinate conjunction (such as although, while, or because) or a relative pronoun (such as
who or which).

A complex sentence is formed when you join a main clause and a subordinate clause with a connective. A subordinate clause is one
that relies on a main clause to make sense.
The connectives in complex sentences are subordinating conjunctions and they tell us about the order or the place in which things
happened or specify a cause or effect relationship between events. Connectives used in complex sentences include after, although, as,
because, if, since, unless, when.
I love roast potatoes, although my mum prefers them mashed.
You need to prepare for the spelling test tomorrow if you want to get all your spellings right.
The big dog barked whenever I knocked on the door.

Complex sentences can also be constructed by including relative clauses (which are subordinate clauses), for example: Tom, who
liked to read, settled down happily with his new book.
A complex sentence contains an independent clause and at least one dependent clause. An independent clause can stand alone as a
sentence and makes a complete thought and a dependent clause can not stand alone, even though it has a subject and a verb.
Complex Sentences from Everyday Life
The independent clause in each of the following sentences is underlined:
Because my coffee was too cold, I heated it in the microwave.
Though he was very rich, he was still very unhappy.
She returned the computer after she noticed it was damaged.
When the cost goes up, customers buy less clothing.

Subordinating Conjunctions
In these examples, the dependent clauses begin with subordinating conjunctions or subordinators. Subordinators are conjunctions
that indicate the subordinate or dependent role of the clause in the sentence.
The following words are some examples of subordinating conjunctions:
although
because
since
unless
when
whereas
which
while
who
whoever
whose
This is by no means a complete list.
Using Subordinate Clauses in Complex Sentences
In complex sentences, subordinate clauses function within the sentence as adjectives, adverbs, or nouns.
An adjective clause is a dependent clause that functions like an adjective; an adjective modifies or describes a noun. In this sentence:
The President chose people who would help him make good decisions,
the dependent clause 'who would help him make good decisions' functions as an adjective to modify 'people.'
An adverb clause is a dependent clause that functions like an adverb; an adverb modifies or describes a verb. In the example
sentence:
When the food arrived, the children ate everything,
the subordinate clause 'when the food arrived' functions as an adverb to modify 'ate.'
A noun clause is a dependent clause that functions like a noun; a noun is a person, place, or thing. In the example sentence:
Whoever signs the lease is responsible for the rent,
the subordinate clause, 'whoever signs the lease,' serves as the subject of the sentence. This sentence is considered a complex sentence
because it has both an independent clause (the entire sentence) and a dependent clause, 'whoever signs the lease.'
Formulas and Sample Complex Sentence

In each clause complex sentence connected by the word interface called subordinate conjunction. Some subordinate conjuction among
others: after, as, before, even though, if, UNLESS, until, since, when, while, Although, Because and so forth. after

The sentence patterns of complex sentence consists of two types:

Subordinate conjunction + dependent clause, independent clause


Independent clause dependent clause

Here are examples of complex sentences each sentence of the sentence:


Pattern 1:

Because she did not bring her wallet, she has to come back home to take the wallet.
While waiting for Michele, Jane meets her old friend on the airport.
What you eat yesterday is tasty cuisine that may contains fatty acids.
Before it's too late, it is better to start it up right now.
Although Mr. Peter is not a young anymore, he is very passionate and energetic.

Pattern 2:

She tried to keep her house clean though she was very busy.
She will not come until you pick her up.
Roy was ready to go before his friends Came.
Rina go to the train station too early Because she does not want to miss the train.
Mark and James meet Reviews their old friend then they go to the cafe together.
4. complex compound sentence
In a simple understanding of complex compound sentence is a compound sentence that made at least two independent clauses and one
or more dependent clauses. Compound complex sentence is a combination of compound sentence and complex sentence. Thus, in a
sentence can be more than one independent clause and a dependent clause. A complex sentence has one or more dependent clauses
(also called subordinate clauses). Since a dependent clause cannot stand on its own as a sentence, complex sentences must also have at
least one independent clause. A sentence with two or more independent clauses plus one or more dependent clauses is called
compound-complex or complex-compound.

In addition to a subject and a verb, dependent clauses contain a subordinating conjunction or similar word. There are a large number of
subordinating conjunctions in English. Some of these give the clause an adverbial function, specifying time, place, or manner. Such
clauses are called adverbial clauses. Compound-complex sentences are the most complicated sentences, like the name implies. A
compound-complex sentence has at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause. In simple terms, an
independent clause can be a sentence on its own while a dependent clause cannot be a complete sentence.
Compound-complex sentences let us express longer thoughts, with more parts than other sentences let us use. Theyre good tools for
explaining complicated ideas or describing long chains of events.
Examples of compound-complex sentences

Compound-complex sentences are surprisingly common. Here are some examples to help you understand what makes a sentence a
compound-complex sentence.
Example 1

Kate doesnt like cartoons because they are loud, so she doesnt watch them.

This sentence has two independent clauses and one dependent clause. The dependent clause because they are loud cant be a
complete sentence on its own, and thats what makes it dependent. As youve probably figured out, the independent clauses Kate
doesnt like cartoons and she doesnt watch them can be complete sentences on their own.
Example 2

The dog started barking so the cat ran away and I couldnt keep up, so I stopped.

Now were dealing with more clauses, but they still follow the same rules. The independent clauses can still be complete sentences,
while the dependent clause is an incomplete sentence fragment.

Both of these examples have little words called conjunctions that link up the clauses. Read on to the next section to find out more
about conjunctions and the other parts of a compound-complex sentence.

3. Parts of Compound-Complex Sentences


Compound-complex sentences are the most complicated sentences, but once you know how to look for the separate parts it gets easier
to understand them. We already know the basic rules: there must be at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.
There are a few more things you have to know, and then youll be ready to write compound-complex sentences without a problem!
a. Independent Clause
An independent clause will always be able to stand on its own as a complete sentence. That means it has a subject and a predicate.
The subject of the clause will be a noun and the predicate will describe the subject or what the subject is doing.
The independent clauses in a compound-complex sentence are called coordinate. This is a fancy way to say that theyre related to
each other, and that it makes sense for them to be in the same sentence.
Here are a few examples of independent clauses in compound-complex sentences, with the independent clauses highlighted in green.
You can see that theyre related to each other because they have to do with the same subject, and that they can be complete sentences.
Even though she was tired, Abby knew she had to finish the race, so she ran to meet her team.
Usually I take a walk every day while the sun sets, but it was raining today.
She likes to sleep in but she can get up early if she has work.
The parts of these sentences that arent blue are either dependent clauses or conjunctions. Well learn more about conjunctions soon,
and dependent clauses even sooner!
b. Dependent Clause
The dependent clauses in compound-complex sentences will not be complete sentences on their own. They are dependent on the
other clauses of the sentence, because they dont have a full meaning without more information. Even though dependent clauses have
a subject and a predicate like independent clauses, dependent clauses dont express a full thought.
Well use the same examples from earlier to show you dependent clauses. In general, dependent clauses are phrases that add more
information to a compound-complex sentence.
Example 1
Even though she was tired, Abby knew she had to finish the race, so she ran to meet her team.
In the first sentence, the dependent clause Even though she was tired tells us why Abby was having trouble finishing the race. The
clause is also introduced by Even though, which is a subordinating conjunction (youll learn about this in the next section). For now,
lets take a closer look at the second example sentence to see how dependent clauses give us more information.
Example 2
Usually I take a walk every day while the sun sets, but it was raining today.
Like before, the independent clauses are green and the dependent clause is orange. If we take out while the sun sets we can see that
this isnt a complete sentence. But it does give us some interesting information about when I take walks! It answers the question of
when, and it is also introduced by the subordinating word when. By giving us the time that the walks are taken, the dependent clause
tells us more about the situation. Even though we could take out the whole phrase and still have a correct sentence, we would have less
information and a less interesting sentence.
c. Conjunction
Conjunctions are those little connecting words that let us put sentence parts together. In compound-complex sentences, we use
conjunctions to string together all of our independent and dependent clauses. The most common conjunctions are and, or, and but.
There are different types of conjunctions that do different things, and there are more kinds of conjunctions than those covered here,
but these are the important ones for compound-complex sentences.

When I stepped out into the bright sunlight, from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind. (S. E. Hinton,
The Outsiders)

This complex sentence contains an adverbial clause, When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house.
The adverbial clause describes when the action of the main clause, I had only two things on my mind, took place.

A relative clause is a dependent clause that modifies a noun or noun phrase in the independent clause. In other words, the relative
clause functions similar to an adjective.

Let him who has been deceived complain. (Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote)
You, who have never known your family, see them standing around you. (J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone)

In the first example, the restrictive relative clause who has been deceived specifies or defines the meaning of him in the independent
clause, Let him complain. In the second example, the non-restrictive relative clause who have never known your family describes you
in the independent clause, You see them standing around you.

A noun clause is a dependent clause that functions like a noun. A noun clause may function as the subject of a clause, or as a predicate
nominative or an object.

What she had realised was that love was that moment when your heart was about to burst. (Stieg Larsson, The Girl with the Dragon
Tattoo)

In this sentence the independent clause contains two noun clauses. The noun clause What she had realized serves as the subject of the
verb was, and that love was that moment serves as complement. The sentence also contains an adverbial clause, when your heart was
about to burst.
Formulas and Sample Complex Compound Sentence

In general, the formula of a complex compound sentence can be seen below, but this formula can change the pattern, can be adapted to
the type of clause is used.

Independent clauses + Coordinate Junction + Independent + Subordinate clause Junction + Dependent Klause

To better understand the complex compound sentence, consider the example of compound complex sentences the following sentence:

Complex sentence:
while he was walking on the park, he found a lost dog and neclace. (When he was walking in the park, he found a lot of dogs and
necklaces)
Compound senetence:
but he did not return the dog to the owner. (But he does not return the dog to its owner)
The combined them into a complex compound sentence:
while he was walking on the park, he found a lost dog and neclace, but he did not return the dog to the owner. (When he was
walking in the park, he found a lot of dogs and necklaces, but she does not return the dog to its owner)

To better understand this material, in addition to the example sentence above, here are some other examples of complex compound
sentence:

My mother was angry to me and she did not give me permission to go out on the weekend the which I plan to go to the movie. (My
mom was angry with me and he did not give me permission to go out on the weekends where I plan on seeing the movie)
You can use my laptop or my phone and whatever in this room, but do not use the notebook or else out of my room Because it's not
mine. (You may use your notebook or any telephone and daam room, but do not use a notebook or others outside the room because it
was not mine)
Jane, who works out twice a week, has a base figure; therefore, she always looks healthy and energetic. (Jane who works twice a
week have an ideal body; therefore, he always looked healthy and energetic)

Terms of Use Punctuation Complex Compound Sentence

Because the complex compound sentence is basically a combination of compound sentence and complex sentence, the rules of
punctuation used is in accordance with both.

Compound Sentence:

The right to use a comma before the coordinate conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)
If conjunctions used are conjunctice adverb (furthermore, however, when, and others), a semicolon is used before conjunctions and
conjunctive comma after the
If the independent clause is closely connected, it can be used semicolon to combine the two

Complex Sentence:

If the clause is in the middle of a sentence (adjective clause that explains the subject), the clause may be flanked by commas
If you are in the beginning of the sentence (adverbial clause), the end of the clause by comma