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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM STUDIES

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT & INFORMATION SYSTEM

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT, IR & OHS

MGT704 16 Credit Points Public Sector Management Trimester 1 2012

UNIT COORDINATOR: TBA


CONTRIBUTING LECTURERS: TBA
TUTORS: N/A

LECTURES: TBA (on FNU Homepage)


LABS: TBA (in class in week 1)

CONSULTATION TIME: Walk-in: TBA (in class in week1)


Or through appointment with the Dept secretary

PREREQUISITE: Any Level 6 MGT unit OR equivalent

E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on


Moodle and Class share. Students are required to check their
emails regularly for communication from the lecturer. Check the
announcements on the Moodle or/and class share.

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS:

Contact Hours 72
Lectures 48
Tutorials (using labs) 24
Self Directed Learning (during term) hours 96
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) hours 24
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) hours 48
Total Learning Hours 240

1
1.0 Welcome

I welcome you to this Unit and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting. This unit
brings together an understanding of strategic development within the public sector with an
appreciation of the key issues in the day to day management of Public Service Organization

2.0 Unit Description

This unit provides students with an understanding of the theory and practice of public sector
management and the paradigm shifts it has embraced to make it more efficient and effective.
The course focuses on the issues relating to the public sector management, its environment, key
processes and systems such as public policy analysis; budgeting, human resource management,
capacity building. In particular the course examines how such processes have changed over time
in the search for better and effective management that features key concepts like performance,
transparency and accountability. Particular attention is also directed to the public sector reforms
in regional countries that heavily draw on NPM concepts. The course provides an in-depth
discussion of the traditional model of public administration and how it is transformed to the
New Public Management (NPM) model.

3. 0 Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

1. Use research skills to evaluate the management practices and the stakeholders in public
sector.
2. Analyze the classical viewpoints of Public administration.
3. Evaluate the role of government in the public sector.
4. Evaluate the role of the state owned institutions.
5. Evaluate the role of new management approach and best practices in managing public
sector institutions..
6. Evaluate the role of public policy in the management of public service delivery.
7. Compare and contrast the previous and current management practices of human
resources.
8. Evaluate the role of good governance and the ethical issues and corrupt practices in
business environment.
9. Analyze transparency and accountability principles as related to good governance.
10. Evaluate the roles and functions of public enterprise in relation to efficiency and
effectiveness of deliverables.
11. Evaluate the importance of capacity building for state owned organizations and
relationship between the state and the citizens.
12. Criticize the changing roles of public sector in the developing countries.

2
4.0 Unit Content and Reading References

Topic 1: MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

The student should be able to evaluate the management practices and the stakeholders in public
sector.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

1.1 Compare and contrast the administration and management concepts.


1.2 Analyze the stakeholders in the management process.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 2: TRADITIONAL MODEL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

3
Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

The student should be able to analyze the classical viewpoints of Public administration.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

2.1 Analyze in-depth discussion of traditional administration.


2.2 Compare and contrast Weber's bureaucracy and Taylor's scientific management.
2.3 Analyze the Administrative management concepts.
2.4 Evaluate the background and reasons for the need to reform.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 3: The role of government and the public sector

4
Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

The student should be able to evaluate the role of government in the public sector.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

3.1 Evaluate the role of government and how has it changed over the years.
3.2 Analyze the design and practice of the public sector as the
machinery of government.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 4: The institutions of the state

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

5
LEARNING OUTCOME:
The student should be able to evaluate the role of the state owned institutions.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:
4.1 Analyze the role of local authorities.
4.2 Evaluate the functions of civil service.
4.3 Evaluate the role of National Health Services.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 5: New Public Management (NPM)

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

6
LEARNING OUTCOME:

The student should be able to evaluate the role of new management approach and best
practices in managing public sector institutions.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

5.1 Analyze the practice of public sector management.


5.2 Evaluate NPM as an alternative to the traditional model.
5.3 Compare and contrast key theories (institutional economics and managerially) underpinning
NPM.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 6: PUBLIC POLICY AND POLICY ANALYSIS

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

7
The student should be able to evaluate the role of public policy in the management of public
service delivery.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

6.1 Critically analyze public policy as the heart of public sector management.
6.2 Compare and contrast the relationship between public policy and public management.
6.3 Evaluate the different models of public policy analysis.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 7: PERSONNEL AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

8
The student should be able to compare and contrast the previous and current management
practices of human resources.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

7.1 Compare and contrast the previous and current practices of personnel management
7.2 Analyze the approaches to performance management.
7.3 Apply performance management system in the business environment.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 8: ETHICS AND CORRUPTION

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

9
The student should be able to evaluate the role of good governance and the ethical issues and
corrupt practices in business environment.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

8.1 Evaluate the nature and extent of corruption.


8.2 Analyze the impact of corruption.
8.3 Evaluate the strategies for controlling corruption.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 9.0: TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

10
The student should be able to analyze transparency and accountability principles as related to
good governance.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

9.1 Analyze the concepts that are prevalent in the literature of public sector management.
9.2 Analyze the importance of transparency and accountability in the public service.
9.3 Evaluate different methods of achieving accountability.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 10: PUBLIC ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

11
The student should be able to evaluate the roles and functions of public enterprise in relation to
efficiency and effectiveness of deliverables.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

10.1 Analyze the different types of public enterprises.


10.2 Evaluate the problems of public enterprises and the ongoing pressures for privatization of
public sector enterprises.
10.3 Compare and contrast the rationale, background, determinants and current trend of
commercialization, corporatization and privatization will be discussed.
10.4 Evaluate the impact of privatization and commercialization on developing countries.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 11: CAPACITY BUILDING AND STATE-CITIZEN RELATIONS

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

12
The student should be able to evaluate the importance of capacity building for state owned
organizations and relationship between the state and the citizens.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

11.1 Analyze the concept of capacity building and ways and means to strengthen the
institutional
capacity of the public sector organizations.
11.2 Analyze the importance and methods of improving relationship between the State and
citizens.

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text: Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London;
Macmillan
3. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
4. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
5. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
6. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
7. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
8. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
9. Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
10. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

Topic 12: PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 14

LEARNING OUTCOME:

13
The student shall be able to understand the changing roles of public sector in the developing
countries.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

12.1 Evaluate the changing nature and emerging role of public sector management in developing
countries.
12.2 Compare and contrast the historical specificities as well as contemporary imperatives
shaping
the practices of public sector management in developing countries will be highlighted.
12.3 Evaluate the future trends in public sector management

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Bergh, V and C. J. M. Jeron (2011) Environment versus Growth A criticism of
degrowth and plea for a-growth, Ecological Economics, 70(5): 881-890.
3. Molinas, L (2010) To What Extent is Asian Economic Growth Harmful for the
Environment? European Journal of Development Research, 22(1): 118-134.
4. Hunt, C. (1998). Public Policy for Pacific Environments and Resources, Pacific Economic
Bulletin, 13(1): 132-137.
5. Holzknecht, H. and Kalit, K.K. (1995). Forest resources: What hope for the future?,
Pacific Economic Bulletin, 10(1): 95-100.

5.0 Resources

The recommended texts are:

Hughes, O. E (2003) Public Management and Administration, 3rd Edition, London; Macmillan
Students must also read the listed readings after every topic.

Supplementary

1. Appana, S. (2003) New Public Management and public enterprise restructuring in Fiji,
Fijian Studies. 1: 1 pp 51-73.
2. Boston, J et.al. (1996), Public Management: The New Zealand Model, New York: OUP.
3. Jan-Erik Lane (2000), New Public Management, London, Routledge.
4. Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. (1996), Public Management as Art, Science and Profession, Chatham
House Publishers.
5. Michael Barzelay (2001), The New Public Management, Russel Sage Foundation.
6. Stephen P. Osborne, Kate McLaughlin and Ewan Ferlie (eds.) (2001), The New Public
Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects, London, Routledge.
7. Tom Christensen, Per Laegreid (2002), New Public Management, Hampshire, Ashgate
Publishing.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 30 slides x 3 1.5 hrs Reading book chapter 1.5 hrs
mins 15 pages x 6 mins

14
Tutorial preparation 1 hr Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 50 hrs/10 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs Reading newspapers, 0.5 hr
mins business magazines, watching
TV news
Research 10hrs/10 1 hr Group discussions 0.5 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 14 Hours

12.0 Assessment

6.1 Grades
(a) The overall mark for the unit depends on performance during the trimester (50%) and
performance in the final examination (50%).

In Class Assessment

1. Mid-trimester Exam 10%


2. Individual Project 20%
3. Case Study Presentation 10%
4. Tutorial Exercise & Participation 10%
Continuous Assessment 50%
5. Final Examination 50%

(b) In order to pass the unit, that is, to obtain a grade of C or better, it is necessary to score
at least 40% (ie 20/50) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students
attend all tutorials/labs/workshops.

6.2 Letter Grade Scale


The following grading scales would be used:
6.1 Grade Marks GPA
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00 High Distinction
A 85-89 4.00-4.27 Distinction
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93 Distinction
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60 High Credit
B 70-74 3.00-3.27 Credit
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93 Credit
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60 Pass
C 55-59 2.00-2.27 Pass
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93 Pass
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60 Fail
D 40-44 1.00-1.27 Fail
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93 Fail
E Below 35 0-0.60 Fail
DNQ Did Not Qualify; student received over 50% of total 0 Fail
marks but did not meet other specified conditions

15
for a pass

W Withdrawn from Unit 0


CT Credit Transfer 0 Cross credit (CT)
NV Null & Void for Dishonest practice 0
I Result withheld/Incomplete assessment 0
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
Aeg Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Terminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

7.0 Programme Regulations and Dissatisfaction with Assessment

The academic conduct of the students are governed by the University Academic and Students
Regulation (UASR). All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office
and familiarize themselves with all academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take
the following steps to get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking
and reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student
may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work
and result will then stand.
Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in
the UASR.

8.0 Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulation

Plagiarism and dishonest practices are serious offences for which offenders shall be penalized.
Students must read the relevant section of UASR to understand the various types of cases
defined as dishonest practices in academic work and to also know the penalties associated with
these kinds of practices.

9. Final Examination Scripts

9.1. A student may obtain a copy of his/her assessed final exam script(s), and all other
written materials submitted for assessment in a unit, upon application on the
prescribed form and upon the payment of the prescribed administration fee(s).
9.2. A student may view online marking guide for in the final exam paper.

16
9.3. No access to exam scripts shall be permitted after 12 months of the release of results
for any unit.

10. Reconsideration of Assessment and Unit Grades, and Appeals

10.1. A student may apply for reconsideration of the final (end-point) assessment.
10.2. Applications for reconsideration shall be made only after a student has viewed his/her
exam script and the marking guide under the provisions of s14 above, and remains
unsatisfied with the results obtained. The application for reconsideration shall specify
the question(s) which he/she is seeking a reconsideration of, and the basis for this.
10.3. Applications for reconsideration shall be made within five days of the result being
released if the student wishes to pursue a course to which the course(s) under
reconsideration is a prerequisite, or 21 days of the date of release of the results
otherwise. Applications need to be made by lodging a duly completed
Reconsideration of Assessment form, together with the necessary fees for the
reconsideration, to the Academic Office, which shall submit the application to the
respective Dean.
10.4. The Dean or the Head of the Academic Section authorized by the Dean to deal with
applications for reconsideration of grades shall cause the reconsideration to be done
expeditiously and independently.
10.5. Reconsideration of unit grades shall comprise
10.5.1.a careful check that the referred to examination question and part-question was
read by the examiner and given an appropriate mark;
10.5.2.a careful remarking of the question(s) being asked for reconsideration;
10.5.3.a careful check that the total examination mark has been accurately transposed
within the proportions (% coursework vs. % final examination) previously
established by the examiner;
10.5.4.a careful computation of all the marks awarded for the coursework; and
10.5.5.a careful check that the coursework mark has been accurately transposed within
the proportions previously established by the examiner.
10.6. The application shall be considered and a decision communicated to the Academic
Office within five working days of the receipt of the application for reconsideration
from the Academic Office if the course under reconsideration is a prerequisite to a
course that the student is required to undertake in the term immediately following to
complete his/her Programme, or within ten working days otherwise.
10.7. The outcome of the reconsideration shall be communicated to the student by the
Academic Office within two days of the receipt of the report from the Dean.
10.8. If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the application, the student may
apply to the College Academic Appeals Committee for reconsideration of the
grade/result. Appeals shall be made within five working days of the date of the
notification of the outcome of the application for reconsideration. Applications shall
be made by lodging a duly completed form prescribed for this purpose to the
Academic Office, which then shall be sent by the Academic Office to the College
Appeals Committee within one working day of its receipt. The Appeals Committee
shall cause a careful reconsideration of the documents as listed in s15.5 above, as
well as cause to be carried out a careful examination of all or a sample of other

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scripts (with such sample determined by a specified process by the Academic Office)
for the unit to ensure consistency of marking and assessment.
10.9. The College Academic Appeals Committee shall advise the Academic Office of the
outcome of the appeal within five working days from the date of the receipt of the
application from the Academic Office if the course is a prerequisite to a course that
the student would need to do in the term immediately following to complete a
programme or within 15 working days otherwise. The Academic Office shall advise
the student within 24 hours by email or phone.
10.10. A grade may be unchanged, raised or lowered following reconsideration under this
section.
10.11. A student who is dissatisfied with the award of the College Academic Appeals
Committee may appeal further to the Students Appeals Committee for
reconsideration of the decision of the College Academic Appeals Committee. This
appeal must be lodged within two working days from the date of the notification if
the course under reconsideration is a prerequisite to a course that the student is
required to undertake in the term immediately following to complete his/her
Programme or within ten working days otherwise.
10.12. Appeals against the decision of the College Academic Appeals Committee shall be
made by lodging the prescribed application form [Appeal: Reconsideration of
Assessment] to the Academic Office.
10.13. The Students Appeals Committee shall advice the Academic Office of the outcome of
the appeal within five working days of the date of the lodgement of the appeal if the
appeal concerns a prerequisite to another unit that the student needs to do in the
term immediately following to complete the programme, or 20 working days
otherwise.
10.14. A student may be given provisional admission into a unit if the unit whose grade is
under reconsideration or is under appeal is a prerequisite. The admission would be
confirmed if the students application succeeds. If the application fails, the student
shall be deregistered from the unit, with no loss of fee paid for the unit.
10.15. Any and all fee paid for reconsideration of a unit grade , including the fees to get a
copy of the script and to view the marking guide, shall be refunded to the candidate,
if, as a result of the reconsideration or appeals, the grade for the unit is raised.
10.16. The decision of the Students Appeals Committee shall be final.

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