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Comprehension Weekly Lesson Plans

Name: Lakin Simmons Student Grade Level: 5th grade

Through the Qualitative Reading Inventory, it was clear that though the student did know how to answer some comprehension questions, she struggled as the level
got closer to 5th grade. To help her better adjust to her grade level, I put together an array of activities with a non-fiction text to see which strategy works best not
only for her, but for students similar to her reading level. She also struggled with some main idea questions in the QRI, which was why I decided to include
summarizing and brainstorming main ideas.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Topic: Comprehending Topic: Comprehending Topic: Comprehending Topic: Comprehending Topic: Comprehending
nonfiction texts nonfiction texts nonfiction texts nonfiction texts nonfiction texts
Standards:
VA SOL Standard 5.6: The VA SOL Standard 5.6: The VA SOL Standard 5.6: The VA SOL Standard 5.6: The VA SOL Standard 5.6: The
student will read and student will read and student will read and student will read and student will read and
demonstrate comprehension of demonstrate comprehension of demonstrate comprehension of demonstrate comprehension of demonstrate comprehension of
nonfiction texts. nonfiction texts. nonfiction texts. nonfiction texts. nonfiction texts.
b) Use prior knowledge and b) Use prior knowledge and b) Use prior knowledge and b) Use prior knowledge and b) Use prior knowledge and
build additional background build additional background build additional background build additional background build additional background
knowledge as context for knowledge as context for knowledge as context for knowledge as context for knowledge as context for
new learning. new learning. new learning. new learning. new learning.
k) Identify new information k) Identify new information k) Identify new information k) Identify new information k) Identify new information
gained from reading. gained from reading. gained from reading. gained from reading. gained from reading.

Objectives: Objectives: Understand-- The Objectives: Understand-- The Objectives: Understand-- The Objectives: Understand-- The
Understand-- The students will students will understand how to students will understand how to students will understand how to students will understand how to
understand how to better better comprehend non-fiction better comprehend non-fiction better comprehend non-fiction better comprehend non-fiction
comprehend non-fiction texts. texts. texts. texts. texts.
KnowStudents will know how KnowStudents will know how KnowStudents will know how KnowStudents will know how KnowStudents will know how
to gather information from a to gather information from a to gather information from a to gather information from a to gather information from a
nonfiction text and truly nonfiction text and truly nonfiction text and truly nonfiction text and truly nonfiction text and truly
comprehend the text using comprehend the text using comprehend the text using comprehend the text using comprehend the text using
discussion and community in discussion and community in the discussion and community in discussion and community in the discussion and comprehension
the classroom. classroom. the classroom. classroom. strategies in the classroom.
Dothe students will have Dothe students will have Dothe students will have Dothe students will have Dothe students will have
discussion with other discussion with other classmates discussion with other discussion with other classmates discussion with other
classmates and the class to and the class to better classmates and practice and practice comprehension classmates and practice
better comprehend the comprehend the nonfiction text. comprehension strategies to strategies to better comprehend comprehension strategies to
nonfiction text. better comprehend the the nonfiction text. better understand the text.
nonfiction text.
Materials: Materials: Materials: Materials: Materials: Bats! Strange and
Bats! Strange and Wonderful- Bats! Strange and Wonderful- Bats! Strange and Wonderful- Bats! Strange and Wonderful- Wonderful
Laurence Pringle Laurence Pringle Laurence Pringle Laurence Pringle Laurence Pringle
Paper/pencil/colored pencils Paper/Pencil Paper/Pencil IPads (4)
Activity: First, I will read the first Whiteboard/Marker
part of the book to the students. Activity: The students will work
We will then discuss many Activity: First, I will ask the Activity: First, we will read the Activity: The students will be with a partner to retell the story
questions about the book as a students to compose a list of last section of the book. After, asked to brainstorm a list of using a voice recorder app,
whole group. interesting facts they learned we will discuss cause/effect what they think are the most where they will show pictures
According to the text, at what yesterday, which will be written relationships, by figuring out important ideas of the text. and narrate. Each group will be
time of the day are bats active? on the white board. why we think bats use After some answers are given, responsible for one part of the
What environments do bats Once this list is composed, we echolocation as a whole group. they will write a summary of the story that we read on Monday,
usually live in? will begin to read where we left Assessment: I will ask each whole book, specifically Tuesday, or Wednesday. The
What is echolocation? off. The students will be told student to write down a highlighting each day. After this, students will have the whole
What facts stood out to you? that if they find more interesting cause/effect relationship on a the students will get together small group time to work on
Are there any other facts that facts as were reading, they piece of paper, and share once with a partner, where they will this.
we did not talk about that you should raise their hand, where everyone is finished. both read aloud their Assessment: The students will
know about bats? we will then write them down. summaries to one another, and share their retelling stories with
Have you seen bats in real life Once the book reading for the write down how their the group (if there is time). If
before? If so, where and when? day is finished, I will ask one summaries differ. not, I will listen to each groups
student to summarize what we Assessment: The students will story, collecting information as
Assessment: As an exit ticket to read. turn in their summaries, where I to whether theyve
each group memberList two Assessment: Once this is will read and see what they comprehended the story or not.
facts that we read that were completed, I will ask the remember and find important in
most interesting to you. students to draw a picture of the text.
where they think bats live, what
their food sources look like, and
how they connect to bats (if
they have seen them before).

Technology Integration: the students will use an app on the iPads that will help them to retell their stories using technology.
Reflection:

This lesson was conducted during an afternoon for about thirty minutes with a lower reading level group. The student I did the Qualitative Reading Inventory on
is in this group, and these students tend to be on the same reading level. I have worked with this group almost every day in practicum, and have come to learn
their strengths and weaknesses collectively, as well as what they excel in. Overall, the whole group does well with grammar, and word study is done at a
separate time of the day, so I decided to focus my efforts on comprehension. This lesson was adapted by the reading specialist, where she read separate books
throughout the week (along with the one I read) to work on comprehension. Through discussion we both see improvements in some of the students
comprehension skills through discussion and conferencing with students.

Overall, the lesson went extremely well. I first read the book (part one), where I stopped frequently throughout the text, to ask questions and see if
students had questions. At the end of the reading, I asked the comprehension questions, Have any of you seen bats before? If so, where and when? This
question sparked lots of discussion (which I expected since bats are common in this area), and the students all had a story or location to share where they had
seen bats in their own lives. This immediately showed the importance of connections for students when working through comprehension. When students are
able to relate to a subject on a personal level, they are more apt to remember the lesson or subject, which was evident here. I then asked questions like, What
environments do bats usually live in? and what is echolocation? These were important questions to ask because they highlighted the main ideas of the
reading, while integrating science into the literacy instruction. I valued this part of the lesson the most, because it showed integration and how though it seems
to be a hard part of teaching, it can end up being easier than it seems. It also helped to grab the attention of my students who are more STEM minded, which is
sometimes hard to do in literacy instruction. Because this is a chatty group, they had lots of good responses, and seemed to understand the scientific element of
the book. The last question I asked was Were there any facts about bats that you know that werent described in the book? This also sparked more
conversation, as it gave students an opportunity to talk about what they already knew about bats. This portion of the lesson took up the most time, as it ended
up taking about 15 minutes of a 30-minute lesson. This left only a few minutes for the students to complete their exit ticket, which could have used at least five
minutes to complete. If I was to redo this lesson, I would probably have to omit a few discussion questions to give more time to the exit ticket. If it was my own
classroom though, I would reserve more time for reading groups as a whole, so that more can be done during these periods.