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Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu

Hiden Mokuroku
Ikkajo

by Katsuyuki Kondo, Menkyo Kaiden


with an historical introduction by Stanley A. Pranin

Translated by Derek Steel and Hisako Ishida

Tokyo
Aiki News
Please note that the author and publisher of this instructional
book are NOT RESPONSIBLE in any manner whatsoever for any
injury that may result from practicing the techniques and/or
activities following the instructions given within. Since the
physical activities described herein may be too strenuous in
nature for some readers to engage in safely, it is essential that
a physician be consulted prior to training.

Published by Aiki News


Matsugae-cho 14-17-103
Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa-ken 228-0813 Japan

Copyright 2000 by Aiki News


All rights reserved
No portion of this book may be reproduced or used in any form, or by any
means, without prior written permission of the publisher.

ISBN 4-900586-60-9

First printing 2000


Book and cover design by Stanley Pranin
Sokaku Takeda, aged 80 years, Osaka 1939
6
Foreword ........................................................................................ 9
Editors Note ................................................................................ 13

An Introduction to Daito-ryu History .......................................... 15

Six Principles of Training ............................................................. 43

Tachiai - 10 Techniques .................. 46 Ushirodori - 5 Techniques ............ 174


Ippondori ..................................... 47 Tateeridori .................................. 175
Kurumadaoshi .............................. 53 Ryokatahineri ............................. 183
Gyakuudedori ............................... 59 Ryohijigaeshi .............................. 189
Koshiguruma ................................ 65 Dakijimedori ............................... 195
Karaminage .................................. 71 Kataotoshi .................................. 201
Uraotoshi ..................................... 77
Obiotoshi ...................................... 83 Hanza Handachi- 5 Techniques .... 206
Kirikaeshi ..................................... 89 Hanminage ................................. 207
Kotegaeshi ................................... 95 Uraotoshi ................................... 213
Shihonage omote ........................ 103 Izori ........................................... 219
Shihonage ura ............................ 109 Kataotoshi .................................. 225
Iriminage ................................... 231
Idori - 10 Techniques ................... 114
Ippondori ................................... 115
Gyakuudedori ............................. 121
Hijigaeshi ................................... 127
Kurumadaoshi ............................ 133
Shimekaeshi ............................... 139
Dakijime ..................................... 145
Karaminage ................................ 151
Kotegaeshi ................................. 157
Nukitedori .................................. 163
Hizajime ..................................... 169

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 7


8
Foreword
The present volume, Daito-Ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo, is be-
ing published on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the Daito-ryu
Aikijujutsu dojo. I would like to begin by expressing my deepest gratitude to
all those who have contributed their time and effort over the years to making
the dojo such a success. First and foremost, I thank my teacher, the late
Tokimune Takeda, as well as all of my teachers and seniors who have sup-
ported me over the years, including those instrumental in helping me to
establish my own dojo even at the young age of twenty-five, despite my youth
and inexperience. On a private note, I would also like to thank my late father
Kiyoshi Kondo for so generously and unconditionally donating the land upon
which the dojo still stands.
My training under Tokimune Takeda Sensei continued for about twenty-
three years, from 1966 when I first became his pupil all the way to about
1989, when his health began deteriorating to the point that he could no
longer teach me directly. Even after that, of course, I still wanted to see him
and went to visit him in the hospital in Abashiri and Kitami a dozen or more
times, visits of which I have fondif somewhat sadmemories.
It has been said that I recieved somewhat special treatment from Tokimune
Sensei. If that is true it was probably because I was the first person to make
such a great effort to journey all the way to Hokkaido to receive his teaching,
not just once, but several times a year. I also sponsored him to come to
Tokyo several times a year, during which visits I took time off from my work
to spend twenty-four hours a day attending to him and learning from him
both in and out of the dojo.
In truth, when first approached about publishing a technical volume on
Daito-ryu, I had quite a few reservations. To begin with, much of the material
in the ikkajo series has already been covered in several videotapes released
some years ago. Further, given the traditionally closed, secretive nature of
Daito-ryu, I worried to what degree it would be appropriate for me to disclose
the oral and inner teachings of the art with which I have been entrusted to
those outside the school. On the other hand, given the growing proliferation of
technical manuals, videos and the like, not to mention the unprecedented
availability of all kinds of information made possible today by the Internet
much of it incorrect and of dubious origin, I might addI decided that it
would be in the best interest of Daito-ryu to publish a written and pictorial

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 9


10
record of the most fundamental points of at least the first portion the schools techni-
cal curriculum, so that these do not become lost to posterity.
Regarding the aforementioned secretiveness inherent in Daito-ryu, it is said that
Sokaku Takeda (the interim restorer of Daito-ryu) never taught the same tech-
nique twice. My teacher Tokimune Sensei (Sokakus son) told me that whenever he
was teaching as his fathers representative, if he showed his students something
more than once in order to have them better understand, his father would scold him
for being foolishly soft-hearted. When I myself was learning from Tokimune, he
often warned me, If you teach the same technique twice, the second time your
students will figure out how to reverse it and defeat you with it. For that reason,
teach something different the second time.
He later explained by saying, If you teach people the true techniques and the next
day they leave the school, then all of the secret and oral teachings of Daito-ryu will
flow outside of the school and be known to the general public. He also said, Out of
a thousand pupils, teach the true techniques only to one or two. Make absolutely
sure of those you chose, and to them alone teach what is real. There is no need to
teach the rest.
The present volume contains descriptions of Daito-ryu techniques just as I learned
them from Tokimune Sensei from the time I began training under him in 1961 until
his death in 1993, now a full 32 years. If there are points that seem different from
other styles, then those are probably the most important areas to focus upon. I hope
that these comments will provide good hints for further study.
I would like to thank Aikido Journal editor Stanley Pranin and all of the staff at Aiki
News for their great efforts on my behalf in bringing this technical volume into being.
I would also like thank my students Shizuo Amano and Derek Steel, the former for
assisting me in preparing the technical explanations and for appearing as my uke in
the photo sequences, the latter for translating portions of the text and assisting me
in preparing the technical explanations in English.
For my part, together with all of my students I hope to continue pursuing the
Daito-ryu tradition left to us by Tokimune Takeda with greater fervor and devotion
than ever, and from my position at the edge of the budo world I hope I may continue
receiving the teaching, encouragement, and reproof of those from whom I still have
so much to learn.

Katsuyuki Kondo
Daito-Ryu Aikijujutsu Hombucho
August 10th, 2000

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 11


12
Editor's Note
The present book represents a landmark in the field of martial arts publi-
cation. It is the first technical volume on Daito-ryu aikijujutsu written by a
menkyo kaiden holder available to the general public. Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
is the most widely practiced of Japans extant jujutsu systems and the tech-
nical predecessor of aikido. This discipline was disseminated in 20th cen-
tury Japan by the famous martial artist Sokaku Takeda. The author of the
present volume, Katsuyuki Kondo Sensei, is the leading disciple of the late
Headmaster Tokimune Takeda and is eminently qualified to undertake this
task of introducing Daito-ryu to an international audience.

I would like to express my gratitude to Kondo Sensei for his tireless efforts
in preparing the texts and photographs for this book. Special thanks also go
to Shizuo Amano Sensei who appears as Kondo Senseis uke in the technical
photos and who assisted with the editing of the Japanese text. Finally, I wish
to thank Derek Steel and Hisako Ishida for their outstanding translation
work and Ikuko Kimura, Yurie Ebisawa, and Toshihiro Takayanagi for their
fine editing efforts.

Stanley A. Pranin
Editor-in-chief, Aikido Journal
September 15th, 2000

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 13


An Introduction to Daito-ryu History
by Stanley A. Pranin

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 15


Portrait of Sokaku Takeda
(1859-1943) at about age 75

16
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Daito-ryu aikijujutsu has in recent years become the best


known of Japans surviving jujutsu systems. Its newly-acquired
recognition is due in large part to the phenomenal international
success of the art of aikido. Sokaku Takedathe man who de-
veloped and taught Daito-ryu aikijujutsu during the first four
decades of twentieth century Japan was the dominant tech-
nical influence on aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba. The com-
plex, symbiotic relationship between Daito-ryu aikijujutsu and
aikido was shaped by historical events that have left the two
arts irrevocably intertwined.
Little known in Japan prior to the emergence of aikido, Daito-
ryu aikijujutsu came to the attention of the martial arts public
in the mid-1980s with the publication of a series of articles in
Aiki News, a Japanese-English magazine on
aikido. The articles published in Aiki News
were based on interviews and contributions
by Sokakus son, Tokimune, Yukiyoshi
Sagawa, Takuma Hisa, Katsuyuki Kondo,
Hakaru Mori, Yusuke Inoue, Seigo Okamoto
and other prominent Daito-ryu teachers.
Prior to this time, the scant information
available on Sokaku Takeda and Daito-ryu
came mainly from aikido sources. Sokaku
Takeda was portrayed as an eccentric mar-
tial arts expert of an irascible nature who
had been involved in numerous violent in-
cidents. Taken out of historical context,
Sokaku and, by way of association, Daito-
ryu, were viewed in a negative light. With
the passage of time and the publication of
testimonies of numerous first-hand
sources, however, the perception of Sokaku
Takeda gradually improved to the point that
he is now generally recognized as one of
Japans most influential martial artists. Early photo of Sokaku at about age 40

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 17


Tanomo Saigo (1830-1903) aka
Chikanori Hoshina

18
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Overview of the Life of Sokaku Takeda


Viewed even from a contemporary perspective, Sokaku
Takeda could only be regarded as somewhat of an anachro-
nism. Born in Fukushima Prefecture in 1859, as a child Sokaku
witnessed first-hand battles of the Aizu War that took place
within walking distance of his home. The small and rebelious
lad seemed fascinated by the spectacle of battle and these vivid
early experiences perhaps were the determining factor in his
later devotion to the martial arts.
Sokakus father, Sokichi, was a country samurai who had
inherited a piece of cultivated land passed down through his
family. Sokichi was an educated man who ran a local temple
school (terakoya) and a country sumo wrestler who had at-
tained the provincial rank of ozeki. He also was a skilled swords-
man and expert in the art of the staff (bojutsu), and taught
these arts in a dojo set up on his property.
As a boy Sokaku was exposed to a variety of martial arts and
is known to have trained in sumo, Hozoin-ryu Takada-ha
sojutsu, Ono-ha Itto-ryu kenjutsu, and likely other local arts.
After his explusion from school by Sokichi at the age of 13 for
bad behavior, Sokaku succeeded in having his father send him
to Tokyo to become a live-in disciple of Kenkichi Sakakibara of
Jikishinkage-ryu fame. Sakakibara operated a dojo well-known
in martial arts circles whose curriculum included the sword,
staff, spear, naginata and an array of other weapons. Sokaku
appears to have spent two to three years in Tokyo in intensive
training at the Sakakibara dojo. Although some have doubted
that Sokaku actually trained under Sakakibara due to the ab-
sence of any confirming documents, no one disputes the fact
that he became an outstanding swordsman. Sokaku clearly
trained in numerous martial systems and often had occasion
to test his skills in matches and duels.
Sokakus stay in Tokyo was cut short by the sudden death of
his older brother Sokatsu in 1876. Sokatsu had earlier entered
the priesthood and, on his unexpected passing, Sokichi deter-
mined that his second son Sokaku would succeed him in this

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 19


Entry in Sokakus eimeiroku from
late1890s containing the name of
Chikanori Hoshina.

20
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

more respectable vocation. Consequently, the 17-year-old


Sokaku was sent to Tsutsukowake Shrine in Fukushima Pre-
fecture.
The head priest there was Chikanori Hoshina, formerly known
as Tanomo Saigo and a one-time chief councillor of the Aizu
Clan. Hoshina was sympathetic to the cause of Takamori Saigo,
a key figure in the Meiji Restoration, who now found himself at
odds with the Imperial government he helped create. It would
appear that Hoshina briefed Sokaku on the political and mili-
tary situation of the time and, in particular, on Takamoris ac-
tivities in Kagoshima. After a short stay of only a few weeks at
the shrine as an apprentice priest, Sokaku abandoned his du-
ties and set out for Kyushu with the intention of joining
Takamoris army.
Sokaku made his way towards Kyushu via Tokyo and then
Osaka where he spent a period of time training at the Kyoshin
Meichi-ryu kenjutsu dojo of noted swordsman Shunzo Momonoi
[1826-1886]. Events conspired to prevent Sokaku from joining
Takamoris army and he finally abandoned his plan. Nonethe-
less, he did not return home but instead spent the next ten or
so years traveling about the southern part of Japan engaged in
self-training. There are no known documents from this period
of Sokakus life, but various accounts of his training and ad-
ventures were published by his son, Tokimune, in a series of
articles in the Daitokan dojo newsletter during the 1980s.
Likewise, few details are available on Sokakus activities fol-
lowing his period of wandering in southern Japan. It is known
that he spent some time in his native Fukushima Prefecture
during which time he married and fathered two children. He
also accompanied Tsugumichi Saito, a younger brother of
Takamori, to Hokkaido about 1887 when the latter became
head of the Hokkaido Development Project. It seems likely the
Sokaku continued his training in the martial arts during this
period extending into the 1890s and may have begun his teach-
ing career as well. He also visited the above-mentioned
Chikanori Hoshina on several occasions during the latters resi-

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 21


Sokaku posing with group of police,
possibly in Hokkaido circa 1912

22
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

dence at the Nikko Toshogu and Ryozen shrines in Fukushima


Prefecture.
There are those who have written that Hoshinausually re-
ferred to as Tanomo Saigo in such contextsis actually the
person who taught Daito-ryu to Sokaku. This hypothesis is
based mainly on Tanomos associations with Sokaku Takeda
and Shiro Saigo of judo fame. However, Tanomo was an impor-
tant political personnage of the Aizu clan and a great deal of
information on his life including diaries is available. Tanomo
scholars have been unable to find any evidence of his being an
expert martial artist or having taught Daito-ryu or any other
martial art. Until such time as further documentation is forth-
coming, it is difficult to lend any credence to this theory de-
spite the fact that quite a number of so-called Daito-ryu schools
claim a lineage descendent from Tanomo.
Whatever may be the specifics of Sokakus activities during
the last twenty or so years of the 19th century, we can begin to
trace his whereabouts with pinpoint accuracy beginning in the
late 1890s. This is due to the survival of most of his personal
enrollment books (eimeiroku) and ledgers (shareiroku) in which
he had recordedSokaku himself was illiteratedetailed in-
formation on his teaching activities. These books contain the
names and addresses of students, techniques taught, amounts
paid, and other relevant information. Based on these records,
for example, we can ascertain that for the period of 1898 to
1910, Sokakus teaching activities were centered in the Tohoku
region.
In 1910, Sokaku accompanied Akita Prefectural police chief,
Sanehide Takarabe to Hokkaido upon the latters transfer to
Japans underdeveloped, northernmost island. Sokaku decided
to settle in Hokkaido and there remarried. Hokkaido would re-
main the site of his official residence for the rest of his life.
After his assignment with Takarabe, Sokaku began traveling
about Hokkaido teaching Daito-ryu in numerous locales. In
1915, he had his fateful first meeting in the town of Engaru
with 32-year-old Morihei Ueshiba, the man who would later go

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 23


Eimeiroku entry for Morihei Ueshiba
dated March 5, 1915

24
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

on to create aikido.
Ueshiba was amazed at Sokakus martial skills and immedi-
ately became a devoted student. Such was Ueshibas enthusi-
asm for learning Daito-ryu that he invited Sokaku to relocate
to the village of Shirataki where Ueshiba was residing along
with a group of settlers originating from Tanabe in Wakayama
Prefecture. Sokaku actually lived and taught Daito-ryu in
Moriheis home for a period of time and later acquired property
of his own there. Sokaku settled in Shirataki and lived there
with his wife Sue. This union produced seven children includ-
ing Sokakus successor Tokimune.
Ueshiba studied Daito-ryu assiduously for about five years
and stated in an unpublished interview that Sokaku asked him
to become his successor. Ueshiba departed hurriedly from
Shirataki in late 1919 upon receiving news of the illness of his
father. He left his home along with its furnishings to Sokaku.
The association of Sokaku and Morihei Ueshiba would be
renewed in 1922 when Sokaku spent about six
months together with his entire family at Ueshibas
home in Ayabe. Ueshiba had joined a community
of believers of the Omoto religion, a so-called new
Shinto sect. There, with the encouragement of
Onisaburo Deguchi, the religions co-founder,
Ueshiba had set up a dojo in his home where he
was teaching Daito-ryu jujutsu. At the end of his
stay in Ayabe, Sokaku awarded Morihei instruc-
tor certification (kyoju dairi) which entitled him
to teach Daito-ryu on Sokakus behalf. Despite
the fact that their relationship became increas-
ingly strained, the two would meet again on sev-
eral occasions during the next decade. Ueshiba
gradually modified Daito-ryu techniques, eventu-
ally formulating his own system that became
known as aikido.
With the exception of the years of 1921 and
Morihei Ueshiba in Ueshiba Juku
1922, it appears that Sokaku seldom ventured in Ayabe c. 1922

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 25


Takuma Hisa at the time of his award
of the Daito-ryu Menkyo Kaiden from
Sokaku Takeda in1939

Eimeiroku entry bearing seal of Hisa Takuma


stating, I have been taught the 88 menkyo
kaiden techniques of Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu by
Takeda Daisensei and Mr. Tokimune Takeda.

26
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

outside Hokkaido until the mid-1930s. Starting in 1934 we


find Sokaku active in the Tohoku, Kanto, and Kansai areas.
While in Kanto he was often assisted during his instructional
tours by Yukiyoshi Sagawa. Then in 1936, Sokaku appeared at
the office of the Osaka Asahi News announcing himself as the
martial arts instructor of Morihei Ueshiba. The specifics of
this episode are surrounded in controversy. The reasons why
Sokaku showed up unexpectedly and took over instruction of
the Asahi News dojo when Ueshiba had been teaching there
since about 1933 remain unclear. In any event, Sokaku taught
in Osaka for much of the next three years and awarded the
menkyo kaiden to Takuma Hisa and Masao Tonedate in 1939.
These two individuals were the only ones to have received this
highest level transmission scroll from Sokaku.
The last years of Sokakus life were spent for the most part
in Hokkaido. Despite his advanced age, he continued teaching
through the end of his life. Sokaku passed away on April 25,
1943 in Aomori as a result of a stroke. Anecdotal
evidence suggests that some of Sokakus books
and ledgers were burned at the time of his cre-
mation. Since there are gaps in notations for cer-
tain periods of his teaching career this is a possi-
bility. Fortunately, for later martial arts histori-
ans, most of these precious documents have sur-
vived to tell the story of a remarkable martial art-
ist who left a profound effect on Japanese jujutsu
and sowed the seeds that gave birth to aikido.

Tokimune Takeda
Sokakus son and successor, Tokimune Takeda,
was born in Yubetsu, not far from Shirataki, in
1916. He was the first son born to Sokaku from
his marriage to Sue although Sokaku had other
children from two previous messages. Tokimune
began training under his father in Daito-ryu about Tokimune Takeda as a police
1925 and, Sokaku, not surprisingly, proved a se- officer at about age 30

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 27


Portrait of Tokimune taken c. 1980

28
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Tokimune Takeda demonstrating at Budokan in mid-1980s

vere taskmaster. Tokimune lost his mother in 1930 as a result


of a tragic fire that engulfed a local cinema. He was called upon
to help look after his younger siblings in the absence of his
mother.
Soon after Tokimune began his tutelage in Daito-ryu under
his father, it became apparent that he too was very talented in
the martial arts. Sokaku started grooming Tokimune to be his
successor as the elder Takeda spent much of his time in
Shirataki during the 1920s and early 1930s. Tokimune accom-
panied his father when Sokaku went to Osaka in 1939 to award
the menkyo kaiden to Hisa and Tonedate. It should be noted
that the eimeiroku entry for Hisa and Tonedate states these
two were taught the menkyo kaiden techniques by both Takeda
Daisensei and Mr. Tokimune Takeda. Also, Tokimunes name
appears alongside that of his father as the Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu
Somucho (Director of General Affairs) in this eimeiroku. More-
over, the then 23-year-old Tokimune appears in the commemo-

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 29


The first page of one of Sokaku Takedas
eimeiroku listing the names of both Sokaku
Takeda and Tokimune Takeda as Somucho
or Directors of General Affairs.

Katsuyuki Kondo posing in his


Shinbukan Dojo in Tokyo in May 2000

30
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

rative photographs snapped on that occasion. These documents


clearly reveal Sokakus intention to have his son succeed him.
With the outbreak of the war in China, Tokimune was called
into military service. Upon his departure overseas, he left
Sokakus books and ledgers in the hands of Yukiyoshi Sagawa
for safekeeping out of concern that he might not return. Fol-
lowing his repatriation after the end of hostilities, Tokimune
relocated to Abashiri and completed the Hokkaido Police Of-
ficer Training Course in 1946. While a member of the police
force, Tokimune received several awards for outstanding ser-
vice in arresting criminals. He joined the Yamada Fishery Com-
pany in 1951 and worked there until his retirement in 1976.
Tokimune established the Daitokan dojo that served as the
honbu dojo of Daito-ryu in 1953. He organized the Daito-ryu
curriculum incorporating into it elements of Ono-ha Itto-ryu to
create what he called Daito-ryu aikibudo. Tokimune adopted
the title of Soke or headmaster in his capacity as the origina-
tor of Daito-ryu aikibudo. However, he maintained a distinc-
tion between his role in this capacity and his status as the
successor of Sokaku in Daito-ryu jujutsu and Daito-ryu
aikijujutsu. In this latter connection, Tokimune retained the
use of the titles somucho and honbucho used by his father.
It appears that one of the main distinctions made by Tokimune
between the art taught by Sokaku and the Daito-ryu aikibudo
he formulated was that the latter art was intended as a do for
the general public much in the same sense as other modern
martial arts.
Tokimune received the Cultural Social Education Award from
Abashiri City on November 3, 1987. By 1989, Tokimunes health
began to deteriorate and he spent most of his last years hospi-
talized until his death on December 2, 1993.

Katsuyuki Kondo
Katsuyuki Kondo was born in Tokyo in 1945. He began his
training in Daito-ryu aikijujutsu under Tsunejiro Hosono and
later Kotaro Yoshida, a friend and senior in Daito-ryu to Morihei

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 31


Katsuyuki Kondo performing at the
Budokan c. 1985

32
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Menkyo Kaiden certification awarded by Tokimune Takeda to Katsuyuki Kondo

Ueshiba. With an introduction from Yoshida, Kondo made pe-


riodic visits to Hokkaido starting in 1961 to practice under
Tokimune Takeda Sensei. Also, Kondo invited the Soke
Tokimune to Tokyo on various occasions to teach. He contin-
ued his training under the Daito-ryu headmaster for some 32
years.
During the period between 1970 to 1973, Kondo received
instruction on many occasions from Takuma Hisa who, as men-
tioned earlier, received the menkyo kaiden from Sokaku Takeda
in 1939. Kondo also studied briefly with Kodo Horikawa and
Kakuyoshi Yamamoto, and other senior students of Sokaku.
He also forged good relations with many leading figures in the
aikido world and the dedication of his Shimbukan dojo was
attended by Soke Tokimune Takeda, Aikido Doshu Kisshomaru
Ueshiba, Yoshinkan Kancho Gozo Shioda, Aikikai 9th dan
Sadateru Arikawa, Sogen Omori Roshi, and various other mar-
tial arts luminaries.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 33


Katsuyuki Kondo posing with Tokimune
Takeda in Abashiri in November 1987

34
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Tokimune certified Kondo as a Daito-ryu instructor (kyoju


dairi) in 1974. In 1988, Kondo was awarded the menkyo kaiden
by Tokimune and also appointed Soke Dairi (representative of
headmaster). Kondo currently operates the Shimbukan Dojo
in Tokyo which has functioned as the Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu
Hombu Dojo since shortly after Tokimune Takedas passing.
Kondo is also one of Japans leading authorities on swords-
man, calligrapher, and Zen master Tesshu Yamaoka.

Succession after Tokimunes death


A word concerning the events that transpired shortly before
and after the death of Tokimune Takeda Sensei is called for
here. Prior to Tokimunes death while he was hospitalized in
Abashiri, his younger brother, Munemitsu, declared himself
Soke. This occurred in early 1991 and Munemitsu sent letters
informing branch dojos of Tokimunes organization of his dec-
laration. The Takeda family and senior students of Tokimunes
group published an expulsion letter in the name of Tokimune
Takeda condemning Munemitsus unilateral act in May 1991
and it had virtually no impact. Munemitsu himself passed away
in 1999.
Then in December 1991, a group of senior students of
Tokimune resigned en masse from Daito-ryu while the Head-
master was hospitalized. Among the principals involved were
Shigemitsu Kato, Gunpachi Arisawa, and Matsuo Sano. Sev-
eral branch dojos from other parts of Japan joined them in
their exodus. The dispute leading to their departure involved
ranking procedures. This group continues to operate in Abashiri
and now claims to be the Daito-ryu Honbu Dojo.
During this period, Tokimune Senseis second daughter, Mrs.
Nobuko Yokoyama, acted as his legal representative. Nonethe-
less, the matter of who would succeed Tokimune was left un-
settled by the Takeda family. Yokoyama completely withdrew
from all involvement in Daito-ryu organizational matters after
her fathers death. Then the husband of Tokimunes eldest
daughter, Mrs. Kyoko Oshima, declared himself Soke in 1994.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 35


Yukiyoshi Sagawa (1902-
1998), one of Sokaku Takedas
most prominent students

Kodo Horikawa (1894-1980),


an early disciple of Sokaku
from Kitami, Hokkaido

36
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Mr. Oshimawho shortly thereafter changed his name to


Takedaalso sent out a letter to the heads of dojos [shibucho]
affiliated with Tokimune asking them to register in his organi-
zation. Masanobu Takeda had no prior involvement in Daito-
ryu and his claim rested entirely on the fact that he was the
husband of Tokimunes eldest daughter. This decision was
made unilaterally as well without a consensus from senior
Daito-ryu students. As was the case with Munemitsus decla-
ration, few in the Daito-ryu world have recognized Masanobu
Takedas claim as headmaster.
Moreover, there is one other person who has assumed the Hakaru Mori, head of the
title of Daito-ryu Soke. This man, also named Munemitsu Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu
Takumakai and successor
Takeda of Aizu, is not to be confused with Tokimunes younger to Takuma Hisa
brother of the same name. He is a great-great grandson of
Sokaku from a son by his first marriage. It appears that this
Munemitsu uses this title while conducting seminars abroad
and has given out rankings including the kyoju dairi when
teaching outside of Japan.
As mentioned above, Katsuyuki Kondo was appointed as
Soke Dairi in 1988 and received the menkyo kaiden from
Tokimune Sensei at the same time. The menkyo kaiden indi-
cates that all of the knowledge of the art has been trasmitted
to the recipient. At the time Kondo received these awards from
Tokimune Sensei, the latter also asked Kondo to assume re-
sponsibility for the training in Daito-ryu of his two grandsons
so that at least one of them could one day succeed as head-
master. However, neither son showed interest in practicing
Daito-ryu and Kondo was forced to abandon his efforts.
Given the state of confusion over the issue of succession
and the fact that he had clearly been singled out by Tokimune
for his technical and administrative abilities, Kondo was called
to a meeting of the heads of those dojos that had remained in
Tokimunes Daito-ryu group. This took place in 1994 and
Kondo formally became the head of this group descendant
from Tokimunes orignal organization. He began using the titles
of Somucho and Honbucho as Sokaku and Tokimune had

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 37


38
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

done before him. It was out of the question for Kondo to act in
the capacity of headmaster as he was not of the Takeda family
bloodline.

Present-day status of Daito-ryu aikijujutsu


Today Daito-ryu aikijujutsu is the most widely practiced of
surviving Japanese jujutsu schools. A disproportionate num-
ber of dojos are located in Hokkaido because of the early activi-
ties of Sokaku and Tokimune. Besides the dojos affiliated with
Katsuyuki Kondo and the various splinter groups that were
once part of Tokimunes Daitokan organization, there are some
four major Daito-ryu groups.
The Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Takumakai was established in
1975 to propagate the teachings of Takuma Hisa and is per-
haps the largest group in numerical terms. The leading figures
of the Takumakai are Hakaru Mori and Takeshi Kawabe. The
Takumakai has in recent years been quite active internation-
ally and Kawabe is a professional instructor.
The Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Kodokai was created by Kodo
Horikawa in 1950. Horikawa received the kyoju dairi from
Sokaku and has affiliated dojos mainly in Hokkaido. The head
of this organization is Yusuke Inoue, the successor of Horikawa.
The late Katsumi Yonezawa taught abroad beginning from the
1970s before later separating from the Kodokai.
The Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Roppokai has its roots in the
Kodokai school. The founder is Seigo Okamoto who was one of
Horikawas leading students. Okamoto relocated to Tokyo and
established the Roppokai in 1977. Although similar in some
respects to the Kodokai, Okamotos art includes many original
elements and is considered a soft style of Daito-ryu. Okamoto
has been active internationally since the 1980s.
The Sagawa dojo located in Tokyo continues in operation
today following the death of Yukiyoshi Sagawa in 1998. Sagawa
was an early student of Sokaku and operated his dojo in Tokyo
for many years. Sagawa limited his activities to his own dojo
and accepted few students. The successors of Sagawa are Tatsuo

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 39


40
An Introduction to Daito-ryu History

Kimura and Ken Takahashi.


There are a large number of independent dojos in Japan
and abroad that use some variation of the name of Daito-
ryu. Some of them trace their lineages back to one of the
Japanese organizations and others refer to themselves as prac-
titioners of Saigo-ha Daito-ryu. The latter groups claims to
such a historical lineage are highly suspect for reasons dis-
cussed earlier.
As far as the mainline of Daito-ryu is concerned, the group
of dojos headed by Katsuyuki Kondo seems to have the stron-
gest claim as the successor of Tokimunes organization. It is
difficult to ignore the degree of recognition and responsibility
accorded to Kondo by Tokimune Takeda during his lifetime,
especially when compared to other senior students. In the end,
it will be those choosing Daito-ryu as a vehicle for martial arts
study who will determine the system and teacher most suited
to their aims.

Stanley Pranin
Los Angeles, July 2000

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 41


42
Six Principles of Training

Six Principles of Training by Katsuyuki Kondo

Daito-ryu is built upon a foundation of six basic elements. These are extremely deep
and complex and mastery of even any one of them requires a great deal of time and
effort. Ones ability to perform Daito-ryu techniques correctly and fully will only de-
velop through constant and strenuous efforts to take all six into account at all times.

Rei - Correct Formal Personal Conduct


The term rei has been translated variously with words such as etiquette, manners,
courtesy, decorum, respect, or propriety. However, rei may be generally understood to
mean the rules of correct formal personal conduct. Historically in Japan such rules
have served in lubricating social and interpersonal relationships and preventing strife
among people. Daito-ryu preserves historical forms of correct personal conduct, not
because they have any particular relevance to the performance of techniques per se,
but because they contain and continue the spiritual mind-set of the traditional war-
rior that pervades and informs the Daito-ryu tradition even today.

Metsuke - Eye Contact


Metsuke refers to the use of the eyes. Essentially there are two types of metsuke
training in Daito-ryu, one called mokushin (lit. the eye of the mind), the other called
ganriki (lit. eye power). Mokushin involves seeing with the eye of the mind, often to
enclose and envelop an opponent. Ganriki, on the other hand, is a sharp, penetrating
gaze that sees an opponents intentions and can be used to dominate and control him.

Maai - Distancing
Maai refers to the physical distance or interval between things. Maai is often the
single most important factor in determining the outcome of a combative encounter.
It sometimes happens, for instance, that a combatant thinks he has established a
favorable maai only to have it suddenly turn out to be to his opponents advantage.
Primarily a form of unarmed combat, Daito-ryu focuses on the diligent study of the
closer maai characteristic of striking and grappling techniques, although other maai
also come into play in some situations.

Kokyu - Breathing
Kokyu refers to breath or breathing. We generate physical power and move-
ment more easily when exhaling or in some cases when stopping our breath, both of
which are states of yang. The opposite is true of inhaling, a yin state. Thus, tech-

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 43


44
Six Principles of Training

niques are usually performed while exhaling, often with one breath from start to
finish. Similarly, it is considered ideal to time any attack to an instant when your
opponent has just exhaled and has just started to inhale again. We take advantage of
the openings in an opponents defenses offered by yin states, with many counterat-
tacks and defenses timed to coincide with the instant your opponent entersor is
made to entera yin state..

Kuzushi - Unbalancing
From ancient times the admonishment to attack where the opponent has been
unbalanced has been a fundamental axiom of Japanese combative theory. In the
name Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu we see that the term aiki has been placed before the
word jujutsu, and it would not be an exaggeration to say that this aiki refers mainly
(though not exclusively) to the principle of kuzushi, or unbalancing, the opponent.
Indeed a great many of Daito-ryus oral transmissions and inner teachings pertain to
the various subtle aspects of kuzushi.

Zanshin - Remaining Mind & Full Effort


The characters for zanshin have the general meanings of remain (zan-) and mind
(-shin). The term is usually interpreted as referring to a mental state in which you
continue to focus your attention on your opponent and the surrounding environment.
I have another interpretation, however, which is that the characters for zanshin can
also refer to the phrase Kokoro wo nokosazu (lit. Leave nothing of the spirit behind).
This means giving of yourself so completely that nothing remains to be given and so
that nothing is held back. When practicing Daito-ryu this means giving your absolute
all to the performance to each and every technique.

On Strikes (Atemi)
Since Daito-ryu is essentially a grappling tradition, most strikes (atemi) with the
hands and feet are done to assist in throwing and pinning techniques. Two of the most
common strikes are done with the nakadaka ipponken, or a fist with the middle knuckle
raised to a point, and the shuto, or the blade-edge of the hand. Also, wherever possible
strikes should be done with the right hand, in keeping with the Daito-ryu tradition of
wielding weapons such as the dagger and short sword with the right hand.

NOTE: Some of the photo sequences in this volume show the demonstrators with
their backs toward the kamidana (Shinto altar) at the front of the dojo. Normally,
techniques are never done this way during practice since facing ones back to the
kamidana is considered a breach of formal dojo etiquette.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 45


Tachiai -10 Techniques
The practice of the ikkajo set
traditionally begins with the idori
(seated) series, however in this volume
the tachiai (standing) series techniques
are shown first because their larger
movements make them easier to see
and understand. Since tachiai
techniques are performed from a
standing position, they allow the
practitioner to take advantage of the
freer movement of his hips and center
of gravity in the process of breaking his
opponents balance and executing
throws and takedowns. In this sense,
they are in contrast to many of the
techniques in the idori and hanza
handachi sets, in which the freedom of
movement of the hips is considerably
more restricted.

46
Ippondori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 47


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 2 2' The instant the opponent raises his arms
to move in with a straight overhead strikein
other words when his attack is in a yin state
apply aiki by immediately stepping in with your
left leg and using your left hand to push his right
elbow up towards his face to unbalance him. Grip
his elbow firmly with your left hand, using your
2 left thumb to control the vital point on the inside
of his arm just above his elbow. (Gripping the
elbow too far toward the forearm is a mistake as
it allows the opponent enough freedom of
2 movement to strike you with his elbow.) With the
opponent controlled in this way, strike his side just
beneath his armpit with the raised middle knuckle
of your right hand, as if thrusting with a dagger.

48
Ippondori

3 4

2
2
3
34 3 3 Continue controlling the opponents elbow
and use the blade of your right hand to wrap
around the opponents right wrist with a
downward cutting motion, at the same time
stepping to the right at about a 45 degree angle.
4 4 Bring the opponent down and pin him firmly
under your own center at his elbow and wrist. Turn
your upper body fully to make sure that your left
shoulder is lower than your right shoulder and that
your left arm is extended fully. Also, your right hand
should be against your hip, the fingers of your left
3 hand should still be gripping the vital point on the
4 opponents elbow firmly, and you should be
applying pressure to the topside of the opponent
wrist with the root of your right index finger.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 49


5 6

67

8
4 9

50
Ippondori

7 8

5 5 Turn your hips counter-clockwise and kick


towards the opponents right side, strongly as if
your intention is to kick all the way through his
body, at the same time thrusting his straightened
arm into the mat as if thrusting with a spear in the
manner of the Hozoin-r yu school of
spearsmanship. Be sure not to raise and lower
your hips as you turn to kick and thrust.
6 7 Finish with a strike to his head with your left
hand as you continue to control the topside of the
opponents wrist with your right hand.
8 Continue to control the opponents wrist and
step back with your left leg.
8
9 Move away by stepping back with your left leg,
maintaining a state of zanshin.

Note
As you begin taking the opponent down to the
mat, your right foot should be pointing at a 45
degree angle from your original direction. The toes
of your lead foot should always be turned in the
same direction as your center. 9

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 51


52
Kurumadaoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 53


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 22 2' The instant the opponent raises his arms
to move in with a diagonal overhead strike, apply
aiki by stepping in with your left foot at a 45 degree
angle and using your left hand to attack the
opponents center. The instant you detect a change
in the vector of the attacking arm (that is, when
you realize that it is a diagonal instead of a straight
strike), rotate the blade of your left hand outwards
to catch and cut down the attacking arm toward
the opponents right rear corner. Simultaneously,
22
strike his solar plexus with the raised middle
knuckle of your right hand. Originally, this strike
3 was done with the blade of the hand to the
opponents carotid artery region, however for safe
practice purposes it has been changed to a strike
33 to the solar plexus.
33 3' Immediately bring your right hand up to
control the opponent at his right shoulder.
Originally, this technique involved forcing the
opponents head back and straight down into the
ground, however for safe practice purposes this
has been changed to pushing him down from the
shoulder.

54
Kurumadaoshi

3 4

2 2

3 3

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 55


5 6

456 4 5 6 Continuing to break the opponents


balance, step forward with your right leg and use
the back of your thigh to sweep his right leg out
78 from under him. Do not attempt to do this unless
9 you have fully unbalanced the opponent; only
bkbl when he is unbalanced is it safe for you to shift
your own center to attempt such a technique.

56
Kurumadaoshi

7 8

9 10

7 8 9 Strike the opponent with your right hand


immediately after he falls. Use your left knee to
apply pressure against the joint of the opponents
right elbow.
bk bl Move away by stepping back with your left
leg then your right leg, maintaining a state of
zanshin.

11

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 57


58
Gyakuudedori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 59


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 22 The opponent moves in to take hold of your
lapel in preparation for some sort of further attack.
Before he is able to close his grip, apply aiki by
shifting your body to the right side and striking his
2 elbow and chin simultaneously from below.
33 Continue your striking movement past the
3
opponents elbow and chin, keep your arms
straight, until both arms are raised high over your
3 head.
4 4 Immediately bring both arms down to
4
execute a second double strike to his brow and
the inside of his elbow simultaneously.
4 55 Grip the back of the opponents right hand in
the palm of your right hand and control his wrist,
5
immobilizing his thumb with your thumb and
gripping the edge of his hand with your little finger.
Simultaneously, grip his right elbow with your left
hand as in ippondori.

60
Gyakuudedori

3 4

5 6

2
3
4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 61


7 8

5 6

5 9
678
bk

6
9bk

62
Gyakuudedori

9 10

9 10

6678 As in ippondori, continue controlling the is different from ippondori. To make this reverse
opponents arm and take a 45 degree-angle step grip effective, keep the palm of your hand tightly
to the right to break the opponents balance against the back of his hand so that there is no
further and bring him down to pin him under your space between, cut your little finger into the crease
own center. Continue to control the opponents of his wrist, and use your thumb to immobilize his
arm at the elbow and wrist and make sure that thumb. Also, turning your right hip inward at this
your right hand is at your right hip. point will allow you to pin the opponents arm even
99bkbk As in ippondori, turn your hips counter- more effectively.
clockwise and kick towards the opponents right blbm Finish with a strike.
side, strongly as if your intention is to kick all the
way through his body, at the same time thrusting
his straightened arm into the mat as if thrusting
into the mat with a spear in the manner of the
Hozoin-ryu school of spearsmanship. Be sure not
to raise and lower your hips as you turn to kick
and thrust. Note your grip on the opponents wrist

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 63


11 12

13 14

blbm bnbo Move away by stepping back with your left


bnbo leg then your right leg, maintaining a state of
zanshin.

64
Koshiguruma

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 65


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2333 ' As the opponent moves in to take a
cross-handed grip (in preparation to throw and/
or strangle you), apply aiki at the instant of contact
by cross-stepping off the centerline with your right
foot while turning your chin to the left (to avoid
being strangled) and striking him in the solar
3
plexus with both fists.
44 Grip the opponents left elbow from above
3 with your right hand (pressing your thumb into the
vital point near the top of his forearm), and the
opponents right elbow from below with your left
hand (pressing your thumb into the vital point on
3 the inside of his arm just above the elbow).
4567 55 Push your left hand up and back and pull
your right hand down and forward to create
circular motion that breaks the opponents
balance, at the same time turning your body and
stepping in front of the opponent so that he begins
to ride around the circumference of your hips.
4

66
Koshiguruma

3 4

5 6

3
3
4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 67


7 8

5
89bkbl

68
Koshiguruma

9 10

67 Continue this unbalancing motion to throw


him to the front, straightening your knees as you
do so. Since this technique is a hip wheel type
throw, be sure not to load the opponent directly
onto your hips as you would when executing a
hip throw; instead ensure that he rides around
them with only slight contact.
89bkbl Pull your right foot back and finish with
a strike.

11

Note
It is highly unlikely that an attacker would try to
strangle you from a standing position with the kind
cross-handed lapel grab used in this technique,
and in most instances such an attack would serve
only as a set-up for a throw or takedown leading
to groundfighting. Since a skilled groundfighter
could render you unconscious with a choke or
strangle within 4 or 5 seconds, it is essential to
avoid this situation by striking with an atemi
immediately.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 69


70
Karaminage

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 71


1 2

In most of the techniques in the ikkajo tachiai


series, aiki is applied by taking the initiative to
respond before the opponents attack has a
chance to make full contact, karaminage begins
with your opponent actually taking hold of you.
This type of practice assumes that you were too
1
late to counter his grab (for example using
2 gyakuudedori) and must therefore deal with the
34 next phase of his attack (which can be any type of
strike, punch, or kick, but is represented in this
basic form by a straight overhead strike).
3
3 1 Face the opponent.
2 The opponent takes hold of the front of your
clothing with his left hand and attacks with a
straight overhead strike.

72
Karaminage

3 4

3 3

3 3 3 ' 4 5 Since you failed to react quickly


enough to deal with the first part of the opponents
attack (grabbing your clothing), take the second
opportunity (when he raises his arm to strike) to
unbalance him by applying aiki as in ippondori.
Since the opponent still has a grip on your clothing,
he has the advantage of being able to pull you
into an elbow strike. To prevent this, continue
breaking his balance by gripping his right elbow
with your left hand and applying pressure with the
base of your right index finger against the topside
of his wrist.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 73


5 6

5 6 6 6' Continue to unbalance the opponent and


control his arm at the wrist to prevent his elbow
from bending into a strike, then release your left
666 hand and use it to strike him in the solar plexus
from below.
7 7 7 Turn your chin out of the way and pluck the
opponents left wrist off your clothing from below
with your left hand. Make this a large, strong
movement that entwines the opponents arms
7 tightly so that his elbows are locked together, one
straight, the other bent. Originally, this technique
8889
was designed to break the opponents right
elbow by forcefully snapping his entwined arms
together against one another, however for
practice purposes simply keep his arms entwined
as you turn and pull him down (or throw him) onto
the mat.

74
Karaminage

7 8

6 7

6 8

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 75


9 10

10
11

bk
bl
bkbl

11
89 Use the opponents entwined arms to draw
him down under your center and onto the mat.
bkbk Keeping the opponents arms firmly entwined,
pin him on the mat by pressing the bone in his left
forearm against the vital point just above the back
of his extended elbow. To ensure that the
opponent cannot kick you, pin him so that his hips
are turned over toward the ground.
blbl Finish with a strike.

76
Uraotoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 77


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent comes to grab your sleeve in
preparation for some sort of further attack.
3 Just as the opponent begins to close his grip
3 on your sleeve, apply aiki by gripping his right
sleeve from below with your left hand and
stepping in strongly with your left foot to
unbalance him to his right rear (toward the vertex
of an imaginary triangle, the base of which is the
line between his two feet).

78
Uraotoshi

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 79


5 6

45 45 As you unbalance the opponent backwards,


strike his solar plexus with your right hand, then
slide your right hand strongly, palm up, under his
6 armpit and across his back.
6 677899 With your right arm as close as
possible to the opponents body and without
raising your hips, step in behind the opponent with
78
your right leg and rotate your upper arm strongly
counterclockwise so that your palm turns toward
the mat. When performing this part of the
technique, do not wrap your arm around the
9
opponent, load him onto your hips, or change the
679 level of your hand as you throw. Finish with a strike
(not shown).

Note
This is an example of a basic aiki nage
technique in that it places a stronge emphasis on
timing, rhythm, and sensitivity to the opponents
position, movement, and intentions.

80
Uraotoshi

7 8

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 81


82
Obiotoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 83


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent moves in to take a cross-handed
grip (in preparation to throw and/or strangle you).
3

3
4

84
Obiotoshi

3 4

33 As in koshiguruma, apply aiki at the instant


of contact by cross-stepping off the centerline with
your right foot while turning your chin to the left
(to avoid being strangled) and striking him in the
solar plexus with both fists.
4 Take hold of the opponents belt from below with
your right hand and shoot your left hand up
between his arms from below.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 85


5 6

56

78
9
bk
5

5 5 6 7 8 Use your left hand to thrust the


opponents chin up and back and step behind him
with your left foot to force him back and down onto
the mat. Originally, this technique involved forcing
the opponent to land on the back of his head,
however for practice purposes release his head
before it reaches the mat so that he can fall safely
9 Finish with a strike.

Note
Strike the opponent quickly to avoid being taken
to the ground.

86
Obiotoshi

7 8

9 10

bk Maintain a state of zanshin and move away in


the direction of the opponents head (away from
any potential kicks).

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 87


88
Kirikaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 89


1 2

1 Kirikaeshi (lit., quick turnaround reversal, is an


2 important technique in jujutsu in general because
of the way it takes advantage of an opponents
33
reflexive movement. This version is said to have
originated as a way to defend against an attacker
attempting to take the luggage one is carrying for
ones lord without necessarily having to drop it.
45
1 Face the opponent.
2 The opponent advances to take hold of your two
sleeves to control your arms and/or take what you
are carrying.

90
Kirikaeshi

3 4

33 Just as the opponent begins to close his grip 4 5 When the opponent reflexively attempts to
on your sleeves, apply aiki by cross-stepping with pull back to regain his balance, take advantage
your right foot and shifting off the centerline, filling of this movement by quickly reversing your
your fingers with ki, and pulling the opponent off direction and pivoting on your right foot to step in
balance to the side. When the opponent reaches between his legs from behind with your left leg
to grab your sleeves, do not offer them or move (so that your foot fully crosses the line between
them too soon to avoid his attack; rather, draw his feet). Simultaneously, raise your right arm and
his intention out by applying inviting aiki that thrust your left arm across his upper body, palm
precisely matches the timing of his reaching arms. facing down and back, unbalance him strongly to
his rear.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 91


5 6

67

7
89
bk
6

6677 Turn your left arm in an counterclockwise


movement across the opponents upper body and
toward his armpit (so that your palm comes to face
upwards) and thrust the fingers of your right hand
toward his eyes to throw him backwards over your
left leg.

92
Kirikaeshi

7 8

7
9

8 9 Turn and step so that your right leg is forward


and finish with a strike.
bk Move away in the direction of the opponents
head, maintaining a state of zanshin.

10

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 93


94
Kotegaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 95


1 2

1 Face the opponent.


22 The opponent advances to take hold of your
two wrists in preparation for some sort of further
attack. Do not move to offer your wrists as the
opponent approaches; rather, keep them at your
sides to make him reach for you as much as
possible in order to force him into a slightly weaker
balance.

1
2

3
4

34

96
Kotegaeshi

3 4

3 4

3344 The opponent grips your two wrists firmly.


(In other words, as in karaminage, your response
has been too slow and he has been able to obtain
a firm grip.) Expand the fingers of both hands
explosively to fill them with ki and step back slightly
with your left leg to draw the opponent off
balance.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 97


5 6

5 6

5
5
6

6
78

7
8

678

98
Kotegaeshi

7 8

7 8

5566 Swing both arms out to the sides wide


to open the opponents arms, then bring your Note
hands together again in a strong clap to disrupt
the opponents attention. (Make this clap as loud Apply aiki to unbalance the opponent by
as possible.) performing steps 6 through 8 in a single smooth,
7788 Bring your two palms up toward your continuous motion.
face as if raising a hand mirror toward your eyes,
drawing your elbows closed as you go. Making
sure that his palms stick to the backs of your
wrists, use this movement to draw the opponents
elbows straight and float his balance forward and
upward so that he rises up onto his toes.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 99


9 10

9 9 Use your right hand to take hold the opponents


right hand from below. Grip his thumb the base
using your four fingers and control the back of his
bkblbmbnbo hand near the smallest knuckle with your thumb.
bkbl Extend your right arm and thumb and cut
down with the blade of your left hand to into the
crease of the opponents wrist to bend it, fold his
hand over so that his own little finger points back
at his shoulder.
bn

100
Kotegaeshi

11 12

13
13

bmbnbnbo When the opponent is unbalanced


completely, release your left hand and place it
against the back of the opponents hand to
continue the cutting motion to throw him down
to his right rear corner.

14

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 101


15 16

17
17

bp bp As the opponent falls, step as needed to


bq reposition yourself at the top of his head.
bq Draw the opponents arm out over his head and
press and turn his extended elbow in toward his
ear to pin the joint.
br brbr Apply enough pressure against the opponents
elbow joint so that his hips raise off the ground
br enough to prevent him from kicking. Finish with a
strike.

102
Shihonage omote

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 103


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent advances to take hold of your
two wrists in preparation for some sort of further
attack.
3

4
4

104
Shihonage omote

3 4

344 Just as the opponent begins to close his


grip on your wrists, grip his right wrist lightly with
your right hand and apply aiki by turning your left
hand in a spiralling, rising motion that draws his
elbow straight and float his balance upward so
that he rises up onto his toes. The movement of
your left hand, including the spiralling motions of
your thumb, little finger, and the back of your hand,
are the most important part of drawing the
opponents elbows straight; your right hand serves
primarily as a guide only.
4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 105


5 6

6 8

56 566 Keeping the opponents elbow straight and


6 his body unbalanced, step across his centerline
with your left foot so that you displace his center
7 and your hands pass across his abdomen. As you
move in, raise your arms up as if raising a sword
above your head, so that the opponents wrist,
elbow, and shoulder become locked against your
89bk
left arm. Make this movement (and the next) large
in order to keep control of the opponents wrist,
elbow and shoulder and keep him unbalanced.
7 With the opponent off balance and his arm
8
locked at the wrist, elbow and shoulder, turn your
bl body clockwise with a large circular motion that
continues to unbalance the opponent. Keep your
hands well in front of your own head as you turn
to ensure that you cannot be pulled over
backwards.

106
Shihonage omote

7 8

9 10

889bk Throw the opponent by bringing your


hands down as if cutting diagonally with a sword,
loosening your grip to release the tension on the
opponents wrist, elbow, and shoulder joints so
that he can fall safely. Originally this throw was
done with the opponents wrist, elbow, and
shoulder joints all locked to dislocate one or more
of them, however for practice purposes loosen
your grip to allow the opponent to fall safely.
bl Finish with a strike.

Note 11
Although true of all Daito-ryu techniques, unbalanced and the technique working
Shihonage offers a particularly good example of continuously from start to finish.
the importance of keeping the opponent

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 107


108
Shihonage ura

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 109


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent advances to grip and control your
left wrist with his right hand in preparation for
3
some sort of further attack.

3
4
4

110
Shihonage ura

3 4

3 4

33 Just as the opponents grip begins to close


on your wrist, apply aiki by filling your fingers with
ki and pivoting your body around to the outside
on your left foot, using the turning of your body to
remove yourself from the line of his attack and
unbalance him in the direction he was moving. As
you pivot, take hold of his wrist with your right hand
from above and also maintain the connection
between his palm and the back of your left wrist.
4 4 Continue turning your body in the same
direction by shifting your weight from your left leg
to your right leg, maintaining all of the points
described in steps 56 and 7 of shihonage
(omote).

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 111


5 6

56 56 Throw the opponent by bringing your hands


and arms down as if cutting diagonally with a
sword, as described in steps 8 9 and b k of
shihonage omote. As in shihonage omote, loosen
your grip to allow the opponent to fall safely.

Headmaster Tokimune Takeda executing ryotedori aiki technique

112
Headmaster Tokimune Takeda throwing senior student Toshikazu Tezuka at Daitokan dojo, c. 1968

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 113


Idori -10 Techniques
Unlike techniques in the tachiai and
ushirodori series, ikkajo idori series
techniques are practiced from a seated
position that considerably restricts the
movement of the hips in all directions.
Particularly, since the hips cannot sink any
lower than they already are, there is hardly
any possibility of breaking the opponents
balance by sinking your center
downwards or trying to move your center
under his. Consequently, even for
techniques with names and basic
movements similar to those in the tachiai
series, performing idori techniques
successfully involves a completely different
approach that relies much more on subtle
upper body shifting, deft hand movement,
excellent coordination of the legs, hips and
arms even while kneeling, and the subtle
extension and application of ki.

Note: Some of the photo sequences in


this volume show the demonstrators with
their backs toward the kamidana (Shinto
altar) at the front of the dojo. Normally,
techniques are never done this way
during practice since facing ones back to
the kamidana is considered a breach of
formal dojo etiquette. However, in some
cases maintaining photographic
consistency has made such an
orientation unavoidable. Whenever this
situation occurs in the dojo, a formal
apology is always made toward the
kamidana beforehand.

114
Ippondori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 115


1 2

1 1 Face one another.


2 2 The opponent prepares to attack.
333' The instant the opponent raises his arms
3
to move in with a straight overhead strikein
other words when his attack is in a yin state
apply aiki by immediately shifting in on your left
knee and using your left hand to push his right
elbow up towards his face to unbalance him. Grip
his elbow firmly with your left hand, using your
3 left thumb to control the vital point on the inside
of his arm just above his elbow. (Gripping the
3
elbow too far toward the forearm is a mistake as
4 it allows the opponent enough freedom of
movement to strike you with his elbow.)
4

116
Ippondori

3 4

3
3
4

44 Gripping the opponents elbow firmly with


your left hand, strike his side just beneath his
armpit with the raised middle knuckle of your right
hand, as if thrusting with a dagger to the place
under the armpit where traditional armor would
have left an unprotected area.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 117


5 6

56 56 Continue controlling the opponents elbow


and use the blade of your right hand to wrap
around the opponents right wrist with a
7 downward cutting motion, at the same time
7 stepping with your right knee at a 45 degrees
8 angle to the right using knee-walking, and bring
him down beneath your center.
8

118
Ippondori

7 8

7 8

77 Turn to the left and thrust your left knee firmly


into the opponents armpit to control his
movement. Pin his arm on the mat so that it forms
an angle of at least 90 degrees with his body.
88 Continue controlling the opponents wrist
firmly by applying pressure with the base of your
right index finger and finish with a strike.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 119


9 10

99 Move away in the direction of the opponents


head, continuing to control his arm by applying
pressure to the topside of his wrist.
bk Maintain a state of zanshin.

9
bk

120
Gyakuudedori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 121


1 2

1
2

2
3
4
4 2
5

1 Face the opponent.


22 When the opponent tries to take hold of your
lapel area, before he is able to close his grip, apply
aiki by shifting your body to the right side and
striking his elbow and chin simultaneously from
below.

122
Gyakuudedori

3 4

5 6

3 Continue your striking movement past the


opponents elbow and chin, keep your arms
straight, until both arms are raised high over your
head.
4 4 Immediately bring both arms down to
execute a second double strike to his brow and
the inside of his elbow simultaneously.
5 Grip the opponents arm at the elbow with your
left hand and the back of his hand with your right
hand to immobilize it and control the wrist joint.
4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 123


7 8

7 8

67
7
8
8

9
bk
bl

124
Gyakuudedori

9 10

677 Step using knee-walking with your right


knee 45 degrees to the right to continue
unbalancing the opponent and pull him down and
underneath your center, continuing to control his
wrist joint.
88 Turn to the left and thrust your left knee firmly
into the opponents armpit to control his
movement. Make sure that his arm forms an angle
of at least 90 degrees with his body. Also, use your
little finger to cut into the opponents wrist joint
and your thumb to immobilize his thumb. Keep
the palm of your hand tightly against the back of
his hand so that there is no space between them.
11

9 Finish with a strike.


bkbl Continue applying pressure to the opponents
wrist as you move away, maintaining a state of
zanshin.

Note
It is important to keep your opponent
continuosuly under control for the technique
to be effective.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 125


126
Hijigaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 127


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 22 When the opponent comes to grab and pull
your lapel area, apply aiki by pinning his right hand
against your chest and advancing one step using
knee-walking at the instant of contact, at the same
time striking his solar plexus with your right hand.
In this way match the opponents pulling motion
and unbalance him to his right rear corner.
2 333 ' Use the inside thumb-side edge of your
3 wrist to hook into the opponents elbow from
below to control it and begin to turn your hips and
body clockwise. Originally, this technique involved
3 breaking the opponents elbow with a strong
3 jerking motion of your arm at this point. For
practice purposes, however, simply to hook the
opponents elbow in the curve between your
45 thumb and forearm so that it can bend as you
throw him.

128
Hijigaeshi

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 129


5 6

6 45 Continue turning your body 180 degrees and


acting on the opponents elbow to throw him to
your rear.
6 Finish with a strike.

130
Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 131
132
Kurumadaoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 133


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent attacks with a diagonal overhead
strike.
3
333' The instant the opponent raises his arms
to move in with a diagonal overhead strike, apply
aiki by shifting in with your left knee at a 45
degrees angle and using your left hand to attack
the opponents center. At the instant you detect a
3 change in the vector of his attacking arm (that is,
3 when you realize that it is a diagonal instead of a
straight strike), rotate the blade of your left hand
4
outwards to catch and cut down the opponents
attacking arm toward his right rear corner.
Simultaneously, strike his solar plexus with your
right hand, then bring your right hand up to his
shoulder.
4

134
Kurumadaoshi

3 4

3
3
4

44 Continue breaking the opponents balance


and throw him down to his right rear corner.
Originally, this technique involved driving the back
of the opponents head into the mat, however for
practice purposes simply grip his right wrist with
your left hand and press down and back on his
right shoulder (instead of his head) with your right
hand. Because the premise of this technique is that
the opponent is thrown forcefully onto the back of
his head, there is no need to pin his arm firmly at
the end; simply hold it down at the shoulder and
wrist.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 135


5 6

5 5 Finish with a strike.


6 6 Move away, maintaining a state of zanshin.

136
45 year-old Headmaster Tokimune Takeda at Shineikan dojo in Tokyo, c. 1961

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 137


138
Shimekaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 139


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 22 As the opponents moves in to take a cross-
handed grip (in preparation to throw and/or
strangle you), apply aiki by shifting off the
centerline, pulling your chin to the side, and using
both hands to strike his solar plexus.
3 3 3 ' 4 5 Grip the opponents arms as
described in koshiguruma and use a circular
pushing up and pulling down motion to break his
2 balance forward. Pivot on your left knee to
continue the motion into a throw.
33345

140
Shimekaeshi

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 141


5 6 7

6
7

6 Finish with a strike.


7 Move away, maintaining a state of zanshin.

142
7

Shizuo Amano, 5th dan, at second Daito-ryu seminar in Baltimore, Maryland, 1998

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 143


144
Dakijime

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 145


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


23 233 As the opponents moves in to take a cross-
handed grip (in preparation to throw and/or
strangle you), apply aiki by shifting off the
centerline, pulling your chin to the side, and using
both hands to strike the opponents solar plexus.

146
Dakijime

3 4

3 4

3 44 Place the blade of your left hand across the


4 vital point at the outer inside top of the opponents
forearm and grip the fingers of this hand from
below with your right hand. Use the blade edge
of your left hand, reinforced by the right, to cut
4 the opponent strongly down and into your center.
At the same time, use your left shoulder to apply
pressure against opponents extended right
elbow.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 147


5 6

6
7

56 5 6 6 Continuing to control both of the


opponents arms in this way and pivot on your left
knee to throw him down.
6 7 Finish with a strike.
7

Note
Strike the opponent quickly to avoid being taken
to the ground.

148
Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 149
150
Karaminage

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 151


1 2

1 While in most of the techniques in the ikkajo


2 tachiai series aiki is applied by taking the initiative
to respond before the opponents attack has a
3
chance to make full contact, karaminage begins
4 with your opponent actually taking hold of you.
This type of practice assumes that you were too
late to counter his grab (for example, using
gyakuudedori) and must therefore deal with the
next phase of his attack (which can be any type of
strike or punch, but is represented in this basic
form by a straight overhead strike).

1 Face the opponent.


2 The opponent moves in to take hold of your lapel
and attack with a straight overhanded strike.

152
Karaminage

3 4

3 The opponent takes a firm grip on your lapel


before you are able to respond.
4 As the opponent strike raises his arm to strike,
apply aiki as in ippondori to break his balance.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 153


5 6

6
6

7 5

Note
It is important to keep your opponent
continuosuly under control for the technique
to be effective.

154
Karaminage

7 8

7 8

55 Since the opponent still has a grip on your 77 Turn your chin out of the way and pluck the
clothing, he has the advantage of being able to opponents left wrist from below with your left
pull you into an elbow strike. To prevent this, hand with a large, strong motion and pull his
continue breaking his balance by gripping his right wrists strongly in opposite directions to entwine
elbow with your left hand and applying pressure his two arms together tightly so that his elbows
with the base of your right index finger against are locked together, one straight, the other bent.
the topside of his wrist. 88 Originally, this technique was designed to
66 Continue to unbalance the opponent and break the opponents right elbow by forcefully
control his arm at the wrist to prevent his elbow snapping his entwined arms together against one
from bending into a strike, then release your left another, however for practice purposes, simply
hand and use it to strike him in the solar plexus keep his arms entwined as you turn and pull him
from below. down (or throw him) onto the mat.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 155


9 10

11
11

89 9bk Keeping the opponents arms firmly entwined,


pin him on the mat by pressing the bone in his left
forearm against the vital point just above the back
of his extended elbow. To ensure that the
8 opponent cannot kick you, pin him so that his hips
are turned over toward the mat.
blbl Finish with a strike.
bk

blbl

156
Kotegaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 157


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent advances to take hold of your
two wrists in preparation for some sort of further
3
attack. Do not move to offer your wrists as the
opponent approaches; rather, keep them close to
3 your body to make him reach for you as much as
possible in order to force him into a slightly weaker
4
balance.
4 33 Allow the opponent to close his grip on your
5 wrists fully so that his mind and energy become
focused on his grip. As the opponents grabs your
wrists, open your hands explosively, fill your fingers
with ki, and swing your arms outwards to
5 unbalance him forward.
66 445566 Bring your two palms up toward
your face as if raising a hand mirror toward your
eyes, drawing your elbows closed as you go.
Making sure that his palms stick to the backs of
your wrists, use this movement to draw the
opponents elbows straight and float his balance
forward and upward.

Note
345 Apply aiki to unbalance the opponent by
performing steps 3 through 6 in a single smooth
continuous motion.

158
Kotegaeshi

3 4

5 6

3
4
5

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 159


7 8

7 7 Use your right hand to take hold of the


opponents right hand from below. Grip his thumb
at the base using your four fingers and control the
back of his hand near the smallest knuckle with
your thumb.
899 Extend your right arm and thumb and cut
down with the blade of your left hand into the
crease of the opponents wrist to bend it, folding
his hand over so that his own little finger points
back at his shoulder. When he is unbalanced
6 completely, release your left hand and place it
against the back of the opponents hand to
continue the cutting motion to throw him down to
his right rear corner.
bk Draw the opponents arm out over his head as
he falls.
7 blbl Press and turn the opponents extended
7 elbow in toward his ear to pin the joint with
enough pressure to cause his hips to raise off
89
the ground enough to prevent him from kicking.

9
bk
bl

bl

160
Kotegaeshi

9 10

11 12

7 9

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 161


13 14

bmbn Finish with a strike.


bo Move away, maintaining a state of zanshin.

11

bmbn
bo

162
Nukitedori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 163


1 2

1 1 Face the opponent.


2 2 The opponent advances to take hold of your
two wrists in preparation for some sort of further
3
attack.
333'3 Just as the opponents grip begins to
close toward your wrists, apply aiki to unbalance
the opponent by cutting with your left little finger
down and to the left, simultaneously bringing the
thumb of your right hand up toward your ear to
333 release your wrist from the opponents grip.
44 Immediately strike the opponents temple
with your right hand and bring your left hand up
4 and around in a large circle, keeping the opponent
unbalanced as you go and locking his thumb
against your left wrist, until you can grip the back
of his right hand with your right hand.
4

164
Nukitedori

3 4

3 3

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 165


5 6

5
5
6

789 5
8

166
Nukitedori

7 8

8
9

55 Draw the opponents right wrist down toward


your right knee.
66 Pin the opponents wrist under your knee in
such a way that all of his weight falls onto the end
of his wrist. Control his fall, checking his right hip
with your left hand if necessary, so that he stops
falling with his center of gravity halfway between
up and down and floats there in a way that makes
if difficult for him to shift either way.
7889 Strike immediately while the opponent
remains in this not-quite-fallen, not-quite-able-
to-rise position.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 167


168
Hizajime

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 169


1 2

1
2

3
2
23
4
4
1 Face the opponent.
22 Just as the opponent advances to take hold
of your two wrists, apply aiki to unbalance him by
shifting backwards with your left knee while
turning both palms upwards and pulling them
toward the creases of your thighs.

2 3

170
Hizajime

3 4

3 4

33 Shift another step to the rear with your right 4456 Continue drawing the opponent forward
knee and bring the opponents wrists up and until you can pin his wrists, back to back, firmly
around in a large motion to strike the backs of between your knees. Stop his forward motion so
them together (not shown). that he stops falling with his center of gravity
halfway between up and down and floats there
in a way that makes if difficult for him to shift either
way.

Note
Photo 3 gives the impression that the right knee
stops in an upright position, however this is only a
transitional stage as the opponent is drawn
forward. The right knee never actually stops in an
upright position.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 171


5 6

5 78899 Raise both hands high and strike both


of the opponents elbows to finish.
bk Release the opponents wrists from between
your knees so that he falls onto his front and move
6 away.
7
89
8
9
bk

172
Hizajime

7 8

9 10

8 9

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 173


Ushirodori - 5 Techniques
Ushirodori techniques offer an
opportunity to practice using the five senses
to feel the opponents attack and intuit the
position of his body and limbs without
actually being able to see them directly.
Since there is no advance visual warning,
they also require complete spontaneity of
response in order to unbalance the
opponent before he has a chance to obtain
a solid grip on your body.

174
Tateeridori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 175


1 2

1 1 Turn to face your back to the opponent.


2 22333' As the opponent comes to take a grip
on the back of your collar, sense his approach and
2
just as his fingers begin to close on your collar raise
your right hand above your head and pivot
3 counterclockwise on your left foot to turn and strike
his solar plexus with your left hand.
4 Continue your turning motion to duck your head
under the opponents right arm

3
3
4

176
Tateeridori

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 177


5 6

5 55 As you duck under the opponents arm, allow


his wrist to fall into your raised right hand. Grip
the back of his right hand with your right hand as
in gyakuudedori, using your thumb to immobilize
5 his thumb and cutting into his wrist joint with your
67 little finger.

6
6
7
89

Note
345 Apply aiki by doing steps 3 through 5 in a
single continuous motion.

178
Tateeridori

7 8

5
6
6

666' Grip the opponents right elbow with your


left hand and continue to control his wrist.
77 Use your right hand, the side of your head,
and a large, sweeping movement of your whole
body in unison against his right arm to break his
balance to your right as in gyakuudedori and pin
him under your center.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 179


9 10

89 As in gyakuudedori, control the opponents


wrist and elbow and turn to kick through his side
and thrust his arm into the mat as if thrusting with
a spear.
bkbl Finish with a strike.

bkbl
bm
bnbo

180
Tateeridori

11 12

13 14

bmbnbo Step back with your left leg, continuing to


control the opponents wrist and arm, then move
away while maintaining a state of zanshin.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 181


182
Ryokatahineri

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 183


1 2

1 1 Turn to face your back to the opponent.


2 2 The opponent approaches to take hold of your
shoulders.
3
333' Sense the opponents approach, and just
as his fingers begin to close on your shoulders
3 raise your left hand over your head and pivot
clockwise on your right foot, drawing him off
3
balance using the twisting motion of your
4 shoulders. Strike the opponents side as you turn
is possible.
4 4 Bring your left leg down between the
opponents legs from behind and shoot your left
4 arm down between his arms and across his body,
palm down, to unbalance him to his rear.

Note
34 Apply aiki by doing steps 3 and 4 in a single
continuous motion.

184
Ryokatahineri

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 185


5 6

5567 Throw the opponent as in kirikaeshi by


turning your left arm in an counterclockwise
movement across the opponents upper body and
toward his armpit (so that your palm comes to face
upwards) and thrust the fingers of your right hand
toward his eyes to throw him backwards over your
left leg.

567

5
89
bk
bl

186
Ryokatahineri

7 8

9 10

89 Finish with a strike.


bkbl Step back and move away while maintaining
a state of zanshin.

11

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 187


188
Ryohijigaeshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 189


1 2

1 1 Turn to face your back to the opponent.


2 2 The opponent approaches to grip your two
arms at the vital points on the insides just above
3
your elbow joints.
33 Sense the opponents approach, and just as
3 his fingers begin to close on your elbows, close
your armpits, expand your fingers, and open your
hands out, up and over with a large motion to
draw the opponent off balance. This large turning
4 motion of your arms should cause his elbows to
round outward and the backs of his hands to turn
inward.

44

34

190
Ryohijigaeshi

3 4

3 4

444' At the same time, also take several steps


backwards to strike the opponents groin area with
your hips. Take even three or four steps if
necessary. The combined drawing motion of your
arms and this strike will cause him to ride up on
his toes and over your hips.
4

Note
Apply aiki by doing steps 3 and 4 in a single
continuous motion.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 191


5 6

192
Ryohijigaeshi

7 8

9 10

5 555' Step all the way behind the opponent with


55 your right leg and place your right arm across his
chest to unbalance him to the rear.
6 6 Throw the opponent as in kirikaeshi by turning
your right arm in an clockwise movement across
78 the opponents upper body and toward his armpit
(so that your palm comes to face upwards) and
9bk thrust the fingers of your left hand toward his eyes
to throw him backwards over your right leg.
78 Step to face the fallen opponent and finish
with a strike.
9bk Step back and move away while maintaining
a state of zanshin.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 193


194
Dakijimedori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 195


1 2

1 1 Turn to face your back to the opponent.


2 2 The opponent approaches to hold you around
the waist with his arms.
34
333' Sense the opponents approach, and just
as his arms begin to slip around your waist, take
a slight cross-step forward with your right foot and
strike the back of the his right hand with the raised
middle knuckle of your left hand. (Since this can
33 be very painful, for practice purposes substitute a
simple slap to the back of his hand.)
44 Use your right hand to take a reverse grip on
the opponents wrist (which you have loosened by
4 striking it) and begin to peel it down and away
from your body.

Note
Apply aiki by doing steps 3 and 4 in a single,
continuous motion.

34

196
Dakijimedori

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 197


5 6

5 5 Grip the back of the opponents right hand with


your right hand as in gyakuudedori and pivot
clockwise on your right leg, taking hold of his
elbow with your left hand as soon as it comes into
678 range, and kick him in the side with your left leg.
678 Draw the opponent under your center,
controlling his wrist and elbow as in gyakuudedori,
and thrust his arm into the mat as if thrusting with
a spear.

198
Dakijimedori

7 8

9 10

9bk 9bk Finish with a strike.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 199


11 12

bl Step back, continuing to control the opponents


wrist and arm.
bmbn Step back and move away while maintaining
a state of zanshin.

13

bl
bm
bn

200
Kataotoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 201


1 2

1 1 Turn to face your back to the opponent.


2 2 The opponent approaches to hold you with his
arms around the upper part of your shoulders.
3

3
4

202
Kataotoshi

3 4

333' Sense the opponents approach, and just 44 Grip the opponents right wrist with your left
as his arms begin to wrap around your shoulders, hand and reach back with your right hand with a
apply aiki by lifting your elbows up strongly (to large movement to grip his right arm as far back
prevent him from obtaining a firm hold) and taking as possible. (Originally this technique may have
a half step forward with your left foot to draw him involved grabbing the opponents hair.) Wrap your
off balance or step back with your right leg. right arm behind with a large motion.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 203


5 6

5 6

567 55667 Pull the opponents right arm firmly to


your chest and drop your right knee to the mat to
throw the opponent over your shoulder and right
56 leg. Throw fully with the feeling of bringing your
right shoulder all the way down to the mat.
89
bk

204
Kataotoshi

7 8

9 10

8 9 Finish with a strike.


bk Step back and move away while maintaining a Note
state of zanshin.
This technique is a particularly important one
for practicing sensing an unseen opponent
attacking from behind, and for throwing in a single
continous movement matched to a single
exhalation of your breath.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 205


Hanza Handachi - 5 Techniques
The ikkajo hanza handachi (lit., half seated,
half standing) series assumes that you are
seated and defending against a standing
attacker, a situation that places you at a distinct
disadvantage since your seated position
considerably restricts your freedom of
movement while your standing opponent is
free to move. In such a situation your only
recourse is to take advantage of openings
made possible by the difference in height
between you and your standing opponent.
Like the idori series, many hanza handachi
techniques were developed to accommodate
living customs prevalent in the Edo period
(namely, sitting on the floor and certain rules
proscribing standing indoors), however they
also embody principles that can be used in the
modern world to reduce your disadvantage in
situations where your opponent is much taller.
Also, most ikkajo hanza handachi
techniques involve the attacker attempting to
control your movement and/or capacity to
wield a weapon, in many cases to allow an
accomplice to attack from another direction.
For this reason, the ikkajo hanza handachi
series is also called Goho no Jin(lit., a battle
camp with five directions), because it
contains techniques for throwing opponents
attacking from various positions toward one
another in five representative directions (left
to right, right to left, front to rear, rear to front,
and front to directly downward) as part of a
defensive strategy.

206
Hanminage

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 207


1 2

1 1 Sit with your opponent to your right.


2 The opponent comes to attempt to control your
2
right wrist with his left hand (in a traditional setting
to prevent you from drawing your sword).
3

345

208
Hanminage

3 4

3 Do not offer your wrist or begin to move too


soon; rather, wait as long as possible in order to
force the opponent to lean all the way down into
a slightly weaker balance. Just as his grip begins
to close on your wrist, open your fingers and fill
them with ki and begin to turn toward him on your
right knee.

Note
It is important to apply aiki to break the
opponents balance at the instant he attempts to
grab your wrist. Further, your left hand is used
primarily to reinforce the effect of your aiki
unbalancing technique and, in this sense, serves
only to guide, not grip, the opponents arm.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 209


5 6

55 44556 Continue turning toward the opponent


and entering even more deeply under his center
with your right knee. Simultaneously grip his left
wrist lightly with your left hand and apply aiki by
667 turning your right hand in a spiralling, rising motion
that draws his elbow straight and floats his
balance upward. Continue and bring your hands
888
up toward your own forehead so that the
opponent floats up onto his toes. At this point it is
ideal if your right arm and the opponents left arm
form a more or less straight vertical line as you lift
him up from directly below.
*Apply aiki by doing steps 3 through 5 in a single
continuous motion.
67 With the opponents arm straight and his
body floated upwards, subtly shift your center
back and down and draw your hands back toward
your forehead to draw him toward you and
around behind you.
888 ' As the opponent (still up on his toes) is
drawn behind you, quickly turn your body 180
degrees to the left, passing your hands and his
arm in front of your face, and place your forehead
on the vital point behind his left elbow just above
the joint.

210
Hanminage

7 8

5 8

8
6

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 211


9 10

11 12

99bkbl 99bkbl Lock the opponents elbow joint against


your forehead and throw him through a
coordinated movement of your forehead and
bm upper body and a downward-cutting motion of
your right hand.
bm Finish with a strike.

212
Uraotoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 213


1 2

1 1 Sit with your opponent to your left.


2 233 The opponent approaches to control your
left wrist with his right hand. Do not offer your wrist
or begin to move too soon; rather, wait as long as
3 possible in order to force him to lean all the way
3 down into a slightly weaker balance.

214
Uraotoshi

3 4

4 Just as the opponents grip is about to close on


your left wrist, open your fingers and fill them with
ki, pivot counterclockwise on your right knee, and
cut to the left and down with the edge of your left
hand to unbalance the opponent in the direction
he was moving.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 215


5 6

5
7

5 55 6 Throw by continuing to cut to the left and


down with the edge of your left hand and using
your right hand to sweep behind the opponents
5 right knee.
67 7 Maintain a state of zanshin.

216
Second Daito-ryu seminar in Baltimore, Maryland, 1998

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 217


218
Izori

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 219


1 2

1 1 The opponent approaches from the front to


2 attempts to control both of your wrists.
2 Do not offer your wrists or begin to move too
soon; rather, wait as long as possible in order to
force him to lean all the way down into a slightly
weaker balance. Just as the opponents grip is
about to close on your wrists, apply aiki by closing
your armpits and turning your hands into the
34 shape of a morning glor y blossom with a
spiralling, rising motion that draws his elbow
straight and floats him upward onto his toes.
3
4

220
Izori

3 4

3 4

33 With the opponents arms straight and his


body floated upwards, draw your hands toward
your forehead and lean back slightly to draw him
toward you.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 221


5 6

567

44567 Suddenly, open your hands out to the


sides and drop your body so that your arms swing
down and around to catch the opponents legs
from below. Continue this motion to sweep him
off his feet and throw him strongly over your
shoulder.

222
Headmaster Tokimune Takeda with kyoju dairi Shinpachi Suzuki at Daitokan dojo, 1968

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 223


224
Kataotoshi

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 225


1 2

1 1 Sit with your back to the opponent.


2 2 The opponent approaches to hold you around
the upper part of your shoulders with his arms.
344 Sense the opponents approach, and just
34 as his arms begin to wrap around your shoulders,
apply aiki by lifting your elbows up strongly (to
prevent him from obtaining a firm hold) and
stepping forward with your left leg to draw him
4 off balance.

226
Kataotoshi

3 4

5 6

4 5

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 227


7 8

567 5567 Grip the opponents right wrist with your


left hand and reach back with your right hand with
a large movement to grip his right arm as far back
as possible. (Originally, this technique may have
5 involved grabbing the opponents hair.) Pull the
8 opponents right arm firmly to your chest and
throw the opponent over your right shoulder.
Throw fully with the feeling of bringing your right
shoulder all the way down to the mat.
8 Finish with a strike.

228
Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 229
230
Iriminage

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 231


1 2

1 1 Sit facing the opponent.


2 2334 The opponent approaches to attempt to
control both of your wrists. Do not offer your wrists
34
or begin to move too soon; rather, wait as long as
possible in order to force him to lean all the way
down into a slightly weaker balance. Just as the
opponents grip is about to close on your wrists,
apply aiki using the same kind of unbalancing
movement as in tachiai shihonage (omote) (but
from a seated position) and stand your right knee
up.
3
4

232
Iriminage

3 4

3 4

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 233


5 6

5
6
6
7
8
8
9bk
6

5 Continuing to unbalance the opponent, stand


up on your right leg and step forward with your
left to displace the opponents center. (This
movement is similar to tachiai shihonage (omote),
except that it is done from a much lower position.)
66 Turn your body clockwise, keeping your hands
in front of your head, and throw the opponent
down onto his back into the spot where you were
just sitting, keeping his elbow bent and pinned to
the mat.

234
Iriminage

7 8

9 10

788 Position yourself above the opponents


head and press down on his bent elbow to make
his hips rise off the mat enough to prevent him
from kicking.
9bk Finish with a strike.

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo 235