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OpenBTS

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia OpenBTS

OpenBTS From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia OpenBTS <a href= 2.8 / October 15, 2011; 2 months ago Operating system Unix-like Available in C++ GSM protocol stack AGPL ( free software ) openbts.sf.net OpenBTS ( Open Base Transceiver Station ) is a software-based GSM access point, allowing standard GSM-compatible mobile phones to make telephone calls without using existing telecommunication providers' networks. OpenBTS is notable for being the first free software implementation of the industry-standard GSM protocol stack . It is written in C++ and released as free software under the terms of version 3 of the GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL). Contents [ hide ]1 Open GSM infrastructure2 History3 Platforms4 Security5 Field tests " id="pdf-obj-0-6" src="pdf-obj-0-6.jpg">

Stable release

2.8 / October 15, 2011; 2 months ago

C++

Type

GSM protocol stack

License

Website

OpenBTS (Open Base Transceiver Station) is a software-based GSM access point, allowing standard GSM-compatible mobile phones to make telephone calls without using existing telecommunication providers' networks. OpenBTS is notable for being the first free software implementation of the industry-standard GSM protocol stack. It is written in C++ and released as free software under the terms of version 3 of the GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL).

Contents

[edit] Open GSM infrastructure

OpenBTS replaces the traditional GSM operator core network infrastructure from the base transceiver station upwards. Instead of forwarding call traffic through to an operator's mobile switching center, the calls are terminated on the same box by forwarding the data onto the Asterisk PBX via SIP and Voice over IP.

The Um air interface uses a software-defined radio transceiver with no specialized GSM hardware. The original implementation used a USRP from Ettus Research, but has since been expanded to support multiple devices ranging from full-scale base stations to an embedded femtocell.

[edit] History

The project was started by Harvind Samra and David A. Burgess [1] with the aim of the project to drastically reduce the cost of GSM service provision in rural areas, the developing world, and hard to reach locations such as oil rigs. [2] The project was initially conducted through Kestrel Signal Processing, the founders' consulting firm.

On September 14, 2010 at the Fall 2010 DEMO conference, the original authors launched Range Networks as a start up company to commercialize OpenBTS-based products. [3]

[edit] Platforms

A large number of experimental installations have shown that OpenBTS can run on extremely low overhead platforms. These including some CDMA handsets - making a GSM gateway to a CDMA network. Computer security researcher Chris Paget reported [4] that a handheld device, such as an Android phone, could act as a gateway base station to which handsets can connect; the Droid then connects calls using an on-board Asterisk server and routes them to the PSTN via SIP over an existing 3G network.

[edit] Security

At the 2010 DEF CON conference, it was demonstrated with OpenBTS that GSM calls can be intercepted due to the fact that in GSM the handset does not authenticate the base station prior to accessing the network. [5]

OpenBTS has been used by the security research community to mount attacks on cellular phone baseband processors. [6] Previously, investigating and conducting such attacks was considered impractical due of the high cost of traditional cellular base station equipment.

[edit] Field tests

Large scale live tests of OpenBTS have been conducted in the United States in Nevada and northern California using temporary radio licenses applied for through Kestrel Signal Processing.

[edit] Burning Man

During the Burning Man festival in August 2008, a week-long live field test was run under special temporary authorization license. [7][8] Although this test had not been intended to be open to Burning Man attendees in general, a number of individuals in the vicinity succeeded in making real out-going calls after a mis-configured Asterisk PBX installation allowed test calls prefixed with an international code through. [9] The Burning man test successfully connected about 120 phone calls to 95 different numbers in area codes over North America.

At the 2009 Burning Man festival, a larger test setup was run using a 3-sector system. [10] For the 2010 festival, an even larger 2-sector 3-carrier system was tested.

At the 2011 festival, the OpenBTS project set up a 3-site network with VSAT gateway and worked in conjunction with the Voice over IP services company Voxeo to provide much of the off-site call routing. [11][12]

[edit] Niue

During 2010, an OpenBTS system was permanently installed on the island of Niue and became the first installation to be connected and tested with by telecommunication company. Niue is a very small island country with a population of about 1,700 - too small to attract mobile telecommunications providers. The cost structure of OpenBTS suited Niue, which required a mobile phone service but did not have the volume of potential customers to justify buying and supporting a conventional GSM basestation system. [13]

In March 2011, the single BTS system was removed without the permission of its owner and replaced with a commercial solution from network integrator Challenge Networks based around a commercial system from vendor Lemko. This replacement project was funded entirely with aid from the government of New Zealand. As of September 2011, the calling rates on this new system are high enough to severely limit its use by most Niueans.

[edit] See also

<a href=Free software portal " id="pdf-obj-3-3" src="pdf-obj-3-3.jpg">
 

[edit] References

[edit] External links

[edit] Official

[edit] Other

Burning Man test network photographs at Flickr.

[edit] Media

Mills, Elinor. Phones at Burning Man: Can you hear me now? CNET News, September

10, 2009. Retrieved December 6, 2011. Corbet, Jonathan.The trouble with OpenBTS, LWN.net, February 24, 2009. Retrieved

December 6, 2011. Burgess, David. Extending VoIP to the GSM Air Interface, eComm 2009. Retrieved

Network World, August 30, 2010. Retrieved December 6, 2011. McMillan, Robert. Coming Soon: A New Way to Hack Into Your Smartphone, PC World, Jan 17, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2011.

[edit] Related Projects

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 <a href=Burning Man test network photographs at Flickr.  OpenBTS Wiki in Chinese [ edit ] Media  Mills, Elinor. Phones at Burning Man: Can you hear me now? CNET News, September  10, 2009. Retrieved December 6, 2011. Corbet, Jonathan . The trouble with OpenBTS , LWN.net, February 24, 2009. Retrieved  December 6, 2011. Burgess, David. Extending VoIP to the GSM Air Interface , eComm 2009. Retrieved  December 6, 2011. Bort, Julie. Burning Man's open source cell phone system could help save the world ,  Network World, August 30, 2010. Retrieved December 6, 2011. McMillan, Robert. Coming Soon: A New Way to Hack Into Your Smartphone , PC World, Jan 17, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2011. [ edit ] Related Projects  AirprobeOpenBSCOsmocomBB View page ratings Rate this page What's this? Trustworthy Objective Complete Well-written I am highly knowledgeable about this topic (optional) Categories :Free software programmed in C++GSM standardSpecial Temporary Authorization GSM stationsTelecommunications for developmentLog in / create accountArticleTalkReadEditView history " id="pdf-obj-4-100" src="pdf-obj-4-100.jpg">

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