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HỘI CÁC TRƯỜNG THPT CHUYÊN KÌ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI NĂM HỌC 2016- 2017

VÙNG DUYÊN HẢI & ĐỒNG BẰNG BẮC MÔN THI: TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11
BỘ
Thời gian làm bài: 180 phút
TRƯỜNG THPT CHUYÊN
(không kể thời gian giao đề)
NGUYỄN BỈNH KHIÊM – QUẢNG NAM
Đề thi gồm trang
ĐỀ THI ĐỀ XUẤT

I. LISTENING ( 50 pts)
Part 1. Holt is talking about the influence of the family on a child's personality. For
questions 1-5, choose the correct answer A, B, C or D.
1. In Kate's opinion, what accounts for personality differences between siblings?
A. Every person is born with a nature which is unique.
B. Each child is exposed to a unique set of experiences.
C. Children are influenced by people from outside the family.
D. Parents adopt varying approaches to child-rearing over time.
2. Kate says that, compared to younger siblings, the oldest child in a family will often
______
A. be under greater pressure to do well in life.
B. receive more parental love and affection.
C. develop a more cautious personality.
D. become more ambitious in later life.
3. What docs Kate describe as the typical traits of younger siblings?
A. They tend to be less successful in academic subjects.
B. They tend to be closer to their father than their mother.
C. Their main priority is to establish a distinctive identity.
D. Their interests often closely reflect those of their parents.
4. According to Kate, the extent to which a child is affected by the birth of a younger
sibling depends on________

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A. the personality of that sibling. B. how closc the children arc in age.
C. the number of children in the family. D. how the parents deal with any problems.
5. In Kate's view, a child will go on to develop successful adult relationships if it ______
A. inherits certain social skills. B. is taught to control its emotions.
C. is cared for by a variety of people. D. has a good model of behaviour to follow.

 Write your answers here.


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Part 2. Listen to the radio interview and for questions 6 – 10 and decide which
statements are true (T) or false (F).

6. Roger believes that his work is quite exciting.

7. Roger says that he understands exactly what cats are thinking.

8. If a cat's tail is fluffed up and pointing down, the cat is very angry.

9. When two cats are about to fight, the most aggressive one will have its
ears pointing forwards.

10. Cats can understand if you are friendly to them by the way you talk to
them.

 Write your answers here.


6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Part 3. You will hear people talking in five different situations. For questions 11-15,
Listen and write the answers to each question.

11. Listen to Joan telling Pam about her holiday. Why didn't she and her husband enjoy
themselves?
____________________________________________________________________
12. You are at the airport when you hear this conversation between a member of staff and
a passenger. What is the woman's problem?
____________________________________________________________________
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13. You overhear a man talking to his friend. Why did the man miss his train?
____________________________________________________________________
14. You are in a hotel when you hear this conversation between a man and the
receptionist. What is the problem?
____________________________________________________________________
15. You hear a woman describing her holiday to a friend. What does she complain about?
____________________________________________________________________

 Write your answers here.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

Part 4: Questions 16 – 25. You are going listen to part of a radio programme about
'Impression Management'. Listen and complete the following sentences with a word or
short phrase.

Impression management is the science of (16) __________ appropriately to another


person's body language.

An open posture involves a speaker standing (17) __________ his audience.

An open posture projects (18) __________ to listeners.

Crossed legs and (19) __________ arms are characteristics of a closed posture.

A closed posture suggests that the person is afraid of (20) __________

(21) __________ when listening indicates that the person is accepting what you are
saying, and that he is ready to (22) __________ affirmatively.

When someone stares at (23) __________ , it may be a good idea to (24) __________

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for a little or end the discussion.

Observations of people under (25) __________ have shown that most of us do not
understand the basics of impression management.

 Write your answers here.

16. 17.

18. 19.

20. 21.

22. 23.

24. 25.

II. GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY ( 30 pts)


Part 1. Choose the word or phrase that best fits each blank in the following sentences.
26.They lived in a thatched cottage in a ________ village in the heart of the English
countryside.
A. dense B. conventional C. lush D. quaint
27.As they travelled across the________ landscape, each one of them wondered how it
was possible to grow anything there.
A. barren B. bustling C. grimy D. mundane
28. Elena is a talented singer and has already had three successful albums.
A. deeply B. perceptibly C. remarkably D. absolutely
29. John and Sarah lived in the back of________ and it always took us a whole day to
drive there.
A. the country B. isolation C. nowhere D. beyond
30. The new restaurant in town has a wonderfully relaxing ________.
A. ambience B. environment C. impression D. attitude
31. Sales of the new product line________ the company's profits in the last quarter.
A. cheered B. boosted C. encouraged D. celebrated

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32. The manager was forced to make a________ decision while he was under pressure
and it was one he would live to regret.
A. fresh B. close C. snap D. bitter
33. His diet was ________ in the vitamins he needed in order to be healthy.
A. scarce B. deficient C. packed D. dependent
34. We can trace his problems the time of his accident.
A. in for B. out of C. away from D. back to
35. The new company had been________ with one problem after another and looked as if
it were about to go under.
A. glorified B. tainted C. fraught D. bewildered

 Write your answers here.


26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35.

Part 2: The passage below contains 5 mistakes. Underline the mistakes and write the
corrections in the corresponding numbered boxes. There is an example at the beginning
(0).

WORKING WITH GORILLAS

1 When we woke up, it was (0) poured with rain. Everything was soaking
2 wet and I knew this would have a major affect on the gorilla project we
3 were working on. If we were to meet our goals for the month, we had to be
4 able to travel freely through the forest. However, if it kept on raining, the
5 rivers would flood, doing the tracks impassable. Thus began the worst
6 rainfall and floods in the area in living memory. This would have serious
7 consequences for the animals we were monitoring, who were in dangerous
8 of being killed by bandits if we were unable to keep a watch on them. On
9 occasion, I had been unfortunate enough to come up with some of these
10 poachers and they were very dangerous. They had already wiped out most
11 of the forest elephant popularity in the area and could do the same to our
gorillas if we didn't stop them.

 Write your answers here.

Page 5 of 23 pages
Questions Line Mistake Correction

0 1 poured pouring

36.

37.

38.

39.

40.

Part 3. Fill in each blank with a suitable preposition or a particle to complete the following
sentences.

41. I don’t want to put you _________ but could you work late tonight?
42. He will carry his plan ________ despite all your objections.
43. CBN has just brought ________ a collection of songs from the sixties.
44. My family was so worried about my sister because she decided to run _____ ______
a married man.
45.Kate is feeling ________ _________ the dumps because her boyfriend has left her.

 Write your answers here.

41. 42. 43. 44. 45.

Part 4. Fill in each blank with the most suitable form of the word in brackets.

The last orangutans


The orangutan is our closest living (46) ___________ among the RELATIVE
animal species. There is just a two percent difference in our DNA and
this perhaps (47) ___________ for the number of tourists flocking to COUNT
the rainforests of south-east Asia in the hope of seeing the creatures
in close (48) _____________________. Just glimpsing one is an (49) PROXIMATE
___________ experience. With logging and oil-palm production FORGET
destroying their precious habitat at an ever (50) ___________ pace, QUICK
the animal is on the brink of extinction. Mass tourism itself must take
part of the blame for the creature's demise, but for anyone determined

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to see one, a (51) ___________ center offers the chance to do so in a REHABILITATE
regulated environment. The recent discovery of a new population off
orangutans in a largely (52) ___________ area of Borneo is a bit of ACCESS
positive news in an otherwise bleak situation. A team of
conservationists has (53) ___________ the need to protect the group, LIGH
both by (54) ___________ unwanted tourists, and by ensuring the COURAGE
remote region remains (55) __________ by the sort of development TOUCH
that has done so much damage elsewhere.

 Write your answers here.

46. 47. 48. 49.

50. 51. 52. 53.

54. 55.

PART III: READING (60 pts.)


Part 1: For questions 56–65, read the following passage and decide which answer (A, B,
C, or D) best fits each gap. Write your answers in corresponding numbered boxes.
WE REALLY CAN TELL IF WE ARE BEING WATCHED
Stories about how people somehow know when they are being watched have been going
around for years. However, few (56)____________ have been made to investigate the
phenomenon scientifically. Now, with the completion of the largest ever study of the so-
called staring effect, there is impressive evidence that this is a recognizable and
(57)____________ sixth sense. The study involved hundreds of children. For the
experiments, they sat with their eyes (58) ____________ so they could not see, and with
their backs to other children, who were told to either stare at them or look away. Time and
time again the results showed that the children who could not see were able to tell when
they were being stared at. In a total of more than 18,000 trials carried out worldwide, the
children (59)____________ sensed when they were being watched almost 70% of the
time. The experiment was repeated with the (60)____________ precaution of putting the
children who were being watched outside the room, (61)____________ from the starers
by the windows. This was done just in case there was some (62)____________ going on

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with the children telling each other whether they were looking or not. This prevented the
possibility of sounds being (63)____________ between the children. The results, though
less impressive, were more or less the same. Dr Sheldrake, the biologist who designed the
study, believes that the results are (64)____________ enough to find out through further
experiments (65)____________ how the staring effect might actually come about.

56. A. tries B. tests C. attempts D. aims


57. A. genuine B. accepted C. received D. sure
58. A. shaded B. wrapped C. masked D. covered
59. A. exactly B. correctly C. thoroughly D. perfectly
60. A. attached B. added C. connected D. increased
61. A. separated B. parted C. split D. divided
62. A. pretending B. lying C. cheating D. deceiving
63. A. delivered B. transported C. transmitted D. distributed
64. A. satisfying B. convincing C. concluding D. persuading
65. A. really B. carefully C. definitely D. precisely

 Write your answers here.

56. 57. 58. 59. 60.


61. 62. 63. 64. 65.

Part 2: For questions 66-75, read the text below and think of the word which best fits
each space. Use only one word in each space. There is an example at the beginning (0).
Laughing is Good for you – Seriously

It is a sad fact (0) that adults laugh far less than children, sometimes (66)….....as much as
a couple of hundred times a day. Just take a look at people’s faces on the way to work or
in the office: you’ll be lucky to see a smile, let (67)………hear a laugh. This is a shame -
especially in (68)………of the fact that scientists have proved that laughing is good for
you. “When you laugh,” says psychologist David Cohen, “it produces the feel-good
hormones, endorphins. It counters the effects of stress (69)………..enhances the immune
system .”
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There are many reasons why we might laugh less in adult life: perhaps we are too work-
obsessed; or too embarrassed to (70)…………our emotions show. Some psychologists
simply believe that children have more naive responses, and as adults we naturally grow
(71) .................. of spontaneous reactions.
Luckily, however, it is possible to relearn the art of laughter. In India” laughter clinics
have been growing (72)………popularity over the last few years, (73)……….to the
efforts of Dr Madan Kataria, whose work has won him a devoted following. Dr Kataria
believes that his laughing techniques can help to strengthen the immune system and lower
stress levels, (74)…………other things. He teaches his patients different laughs or giggles
to relax specific parts of the body. In 1998 when Dr Kataria organized a World Laughter
Day at Bombay racetrack, 10,000 people (75)…………up.
 Write your answers here.

66. 67. 68. 69. 70.


71. 72. 73. 74. 75.

Part 3: For questions 76-85, Read the following passage and answer the questions that
follow.
The book of the century

A classic of our times or an escapist yarn? Although its popularity is


unparalleled, some intellectuals dismiss The Lord of the Rings as boyish
fantasy. Andrew O'Hehir defends Tolkien's ‘true myth’ as a modern
masterpiece, and attempts to discover the secret of its success.
In January 1997, reporter Susan Jeffreys of the London Sunday Times informed a
colleague that J.R.R. Tolkien's epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings had been voted the
greatest book of the 20th century in a readers' poll conducted by Britain's Channel 4 and
the Waterstone's bookstore chain. Her colleague responded: "What? Has it? Oh dear. Dear
oh dear oh dear."
Attitudes in America are arguably more relaxed about this kind of thing. No one from the
American educated classes expressed much dismay when a 1999 poll of American on-line
bookshop Amazon.com customers chose The Lord of the Rings as the greatest book not
merely of the century but of the millennium. Tolkien's book is so deeply ingrained in

Page 9 of 23 pages
popular culture, after all, that a great many of today's American academics and journalists
probably still have those dog-eared paperbacks they read avidly in eighth grade with their
hallucinatory mid-1970s cover art, stashed somewhere in the attic.
Furthermore, members of the U.S. intelligentsia fully expect to have their tastes ignored, if
not openly derided, by the public at large. To some American intellectuals it seems
gratifying, even touching, that so many millions of readers will happily devour a work as
complicated as The Lord of the Rings. Whatever one may make of it, it's a more
challenging read than Gone With the Wind (runner-up in the Amazon survey), not to
mention Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (fifth place).
Hugely ambitious in scope, The Lord of the Rings occupies an uncomfortable position in
20th century literature. Tolkien's epic poses a stern challenge to modern literature and its
defenders. (Tolkien on his critics: "Some who have read the book, or at any rate have
reviewed it. have found it boring, absurd, or contemptible; and I have no cause to
complain, since I have similar opinions of their works, or of the kinds of writing that they
evidently prefer.") Yet The Lord of the Rings has enjoyed massive and enduring
popularity. It would seem that Tolkien's work supplied something that was missing among
the formal innovations of 20th century fiction, something for which readers were
ravenous. But what was it, and why was it important?
Answering this question properly would probably require a book rather than an article.
But it seems that the crux of the matter lies in Tolkien's wholehearted rejection of
modernity and modernism. This is what so powerfully attracts some readers, and just as
powerfully repels others. In his book J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century. T.A. Shippey
expands on this notion by arguing that Tolkien saw his realm of Middle-earth not as
fiction or invention, but as the recovery of something genuine that had become buried
beneath fragments of fairy tale and nursery rhyme.
"However fanciful Tolkien's creation of Middle-earth was," Shippey writes, "he did not
think that he was entirely making it up. He was 'reconstructing', he was harmonising
contradictions in his source-texts, sometimes he was supplying entirely new concepts (like
hobbits), but he was also reaching back to an imaginative world which he believed had
once really existed, at least in a collective imagination."

Page 10 of 23 pages
The book is also deeply grounded in Tolkien's linguistic expertise - he invented whole
languages for his characters. Sometimes he became so absorbed in the creation of
languages, in fact, that he put the story itself aside for months or years at a time, believing
he could not continue until some quandary or inconsistency in his invented realm had
been resolved. But I Tolkien's immense intellect and erudition s not the source of his
success; without his storytelling gift, The Lord of the Rings would be little more than a
curiosity. And this gift seems to stem straight from his refusal to break from classical and
traditional forms.
Tolkien himself often spoke of his work as something 'found' or 'discovered', something
whose existence was independent of him. It's wise to tread lightly in this sort of
interpretation, but it seems clear that he believed his work to be something given,
something revealed, which contained a kind of truth beyond measure. As a result, his
details have the weight of reality, linguistic and otherwise, and because of this his great
sweep of story feels real as well: you might say that his imaginary castles are built with a
certain amount of genuine stone. Other writers' fantasy worlds are made up. Tolkien's is
inherited.
76. When The Lord of the Rings was voted the greatest book of the 20th century, ______
A. many Americans were annoyed.
B. some people didn't believe it.
C. some people found the fact shocking.
D. American academics disagreed.
77. It is implied in the second paragraph that The Lord of the Rings
A is more popular in the States than in the UK.
B is taught in many schools throughout the world.
C is mainly appreciated by academics and journalists.
D is mostly read by school children.
78. The word “gratifying” in paragraph 3 is closest in meaning to _____
A. horrifying B. surprising C. pleasing D. depressing

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79. What does the writer mean in the underlined parts in paragraph 3: “ … so many
millions of readers will happily devour a work as complicated as ….”?
A. never read this book because it is so complicated
B. be willing to read this book, despite the fact that it is very difficult.
C. be heavily influenced by the fact that Tolkien was an expert at languages.
D. be willing to put this book down due to its complication.
80. What do we learn about Gone With the Wind?
A. It was once more popular than The Lord of the Rings.
B. It is seen as more challenging than The Lord of the Rings.
C. It was voted one place behind The Lord of the Rings.
D. It is more touching than The Lord of the Rings.
81. What was Tolkien's reaction to criticism of The Lord of the Rings?
A. He felt it was unjustified. B. He wasn't bothered by it.
C. He couldn't understand it. D. He partly agreed with it.
82. According to Shippey, Tolkien believed that the world he described ____
A. was full of unresolved contradictions.
B. was completely accurate, historically.
C. was imaginative but not pure fantasy.
D. was as incredible as his sources.
83. The word “fragments” in paragraph 5 is closest in meaning to _____
A. small pieces B. lots of solids C. large shapes D. huge sections
84. Making up languages for The Lord of the Rings___________
A. helped Tolkien to take the story forward.
B. was more interesting to Tolkien than writing the story.
C. was sometimes rather frustrating for Tolkien.
D. resulted in lengthy interruptions to Tolkien's writing.
85. According to the writer of the article, the details in Tolkien's work
A. are sometimes rather difficult to follow.
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B. make the story seem more realistic.
C. include some modern elements.
D. can be interpreted in many different ways.
 Write your answers here.

76. 77. 78. 79. 80.


81. 82. 83. 84. 85.

Part 4. For questions 86-95, Read the following passage and do the tasks that follow.
(12 pts)
THE TRUE COST OF FOOD

A. At an organic farming conference in Winnipeg, Canada, a woman in the audience


stood up and said; “Organic foods are not going to become popular with mainstream
consumers until they became quick, convenient, and cheap.” The comment causes
much thinking about the nature of our food system and about what we have done to try
to make foods quick, convenient, and cheap for consumers.

B. At the farm level, our never-ending quest for cheap food is the root cause of the
transformation of agriculture from a system of small, diversified, independently
operated, family farms into a system of large-scale, industrialized, corporately
controlled agribusinesses. The production technologies that supported specialization,
mechanization, and ultimately, large-scale, contract production, were all developed to
make agriculture more efficient – to make food cheaper for consumers. Millions of
farmers have been forced off the land, those remaining are sacrificing their
independence, and thousands of small farming communities have withered and died –
all for the sake of cheap food. These were the consequences of progress, so we were
told. The agricultural establishment has boasted loudly that ever fewer farmers have
been able to feed a growing nation with an ever-decreasing share of consumer income
spent for food.

C. Changes in the food system have brought considerable cost to the environment and
human health. Such problems have been widely documented over recent decades, but it
is only recently that efforts to put a monetary cost on them have begun to emerge.
Page 13 of 23 pages
These costs are telling us something fundamentally important about the real costs of
modern food and farming. A group of scientists at the University of Essex recently
completed the first national study of the environmental and health impacts of modern
farming. They looked at what are called “externalities” – the costs imposed by an
activity that are borne by others. These costs are not part of the prices paid by
producers or consumers. And when such externalities are not included in prices, they
distort the market. They encourage activities that are costly to society even if the
private benefits to farmers are substantial.

D. A heavy lorry that damages a bridge, or pollutes the atmosphere, externalizes some of
its costs – and others pay for them. Similarly, a pesticide used to control a pest imposes
costs on others if it leaks away from fields to contaminate drinking water. The types of
externality encountered in the agricultural sector have four distinct features; 1) their
costs are often neglected; 2) they often occur with a time lag; 3) they often damage
groups whose interests are not represented; and 4) the identity of the producer of the
externality is not always known.

E. The study sought to put a cost on these externalities in the UK. It concentrated on the
negative side-effects of conventional agriculture – in particular the environmental and
health costs. Two types of damage cost were estimated; 1) the treatment or prevention
costs incurred to clean up the environment and restore human health to comply with
legislation or to return these to an undamaged state and 2) the administration costs
incurred by public agencies for monitoring environmental, food and health
implications. It is conservatively estimated that the total costs are £2.34 billion for
1996 alone in the UK. Significant costs arise from contamination of drinking water
with pesticides (£120 million per year), nitrate (£16m), Cryptosporidium (£23m) and
phosphate and soil (£55m), from damage to wildlife, habitats, hedgerows and dry stone
walls (£124m), from emissions of gases (£1,113m), from soil erosion and organic
carbon losses (£96m), and from food poisoning (£169m).

F. Water is an interesting case. Twenty-five million kilograms of pesticides are used each
year in farming – and some of these get into water. It costs water companies £120
million each year to remove pesticides – not completely, but to a level stipulated in law

Page 14 of 23 pages
as acceptable. Water companies do not pay this cost – they pass it on to those who pay
water bills. This represents a hidden subsidy to those who pollute. Some of the costs
are straightforward to measure, others more difficult. How do we know about the
effects of the greenhouse gases methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide produced by
farming? Economists have been able to put a£/tonne cost on these gases based on
agreed estimates about the effects of future climate change. The study has been very
conservative, using lower estimates of costs. But still the costs are great.

G. Each of these costs should provoke questions about how they could be reduced or even
removed. Where does this leave us in policy terms? Is it conceivable that we could
evolve sustainable agriculture systems that maximize their production of positive
externalities – goods that the public enjoys and is willing to pay for – as well as
minimizing the environmental and health costs? The answer is clearly yes. We know
enough about sustainable methods of farming to be confident. Sustainable farming has
substantially lower negative externalities than conventional farming. We roughly
estimate these to be no more than a third – perhaps £60 - £70 per hectare. Sustainable
farming also has higher positive externalities – the other side of the equation.

H. Although it only represented around 3% of the total EU utilized agricultural are (UAA)
in 2000, organic farming has in fact developed into one of the most dynamic
agricultural sectors in the European Union. The organic farm sector grew by about
25% a year between 1993 and 1998 and, since 1998, is estimated to have grown by
around 30% a year. Organic farming has to be understood as part of a sustainable
farming system and a viable alternative to the more traditional approaches to
agriculture. Since the EU rules on organic farming came into force in 1992, tens of
thousands of farms have been converted to this system, as a result of increased
consumer awareness of, and demand for, organically grown products.

I. The sustainability of both agriculture and the environment is a key policy objective of
today’s common agricultural policy (the “CAP”):
.“Sustainable development must encompass food production alongside conservation
of finite resources and protection of the natural environment so that the needs of people

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living today can be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet
their own needs.”
. This objective requires farmers to consider the effect that their activities will have
on the future of agriculture and how the systems they employ shape the environment.
As a consequence, farmers, consumers and policy makers have shown a renewed
interest in environmentally friendly farming. UK Farm Minister Margaret Beckett has
announced a series of new measures, backed by 500 million pounds sterling of funding
over the next three years, to specifically help British farmers reduce their dependence
on subsidies, as well as to protect the environment and promote healthy, local food.
The long-awaited Strategy for Sustainable Farming and Food contains “green” targets
for farms, promotion of local foods and other measures to bring farmers closer to
consumers.

Questions 86-91.
The Reading Passage has 9 paragraphs A-I.
From the list of headings below choose the 6 most suitable headings for paragraphs C, D,
F, G, H and I.
Write the appropriate numbers (i-xi).
NB There are more headings than paragraphs, so you will not use them all.
List of Headings
i Fewer farmers and decreasing cost of food
ii A renewed interest in environmental-friendly agriculture
iii Features of externalities in agricultural production
iv Transformation of farming to industrialized agribusiness
v Aim and focuses of the study
vi Difficulties of calculating external costs
vii The concept of externalities
viii The case of water pollution
ix Sustainable farming and its merits
x Issues raised by external costs of food
xi The conversion to organic farming

Page 16 of 23 pages
Example Answer
Paragraph B iv

1 Paragraph C _______
2 Paragraph D _______
3 Paragraph F _______
4 Paragraph G _______
5. Paragraph H _______
6. Paragraph I _______

 Write your answers here.


87. 88. 89. 90. 91.
86.

Questions 92-10
Choose NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS from the passage to complete the summary
below.
The first national study of the environmental impacts of modern farming has defined
externalities as the additional expenses caused by other activities and those not paid by
(92)__________. Externalities misrepresent the market by encouraging farmers to
pursue (93)__________ at the cost of the society. As externality in agricultural
production is usually shown with a time lag, its costs often tend to (94) _________ .
While the victims’ interests are not represented, exactly who has produced the
externalities often remains a mystery. The study measures two types of externalities; the
costs of (95) _ ____ for the environment and human health to recover to the original
state, and the money spent by public agencies on monitoring environmental and food
safety.

 Write your answers here.

92. 93. 94. 95.

Part 5: Answer questions 96 – 105, by referring to the magazine article in which four
successful career women talk about emigrating to New Zealand.

Page 17 of 23 pages
A Nicky Meiring B Jenny Orr
C Sarah Hodgett D Lucy Kramer

Which woman...
96. mentions a negative point about a job she has had?
97. explains an advantage of choosing to pursue her career in New Zealand?
98. appreciates the approach to achieving goals in New Zealand?
99. expresses a sense of regret about leaving her country?
100. appreciates the honesty she feels exists in New Zealand?
101. denies conforming to a certain stereotype?
102. appreciates New Zealand for its sense of calm and normality?
103. mentions her move to a different area in the same field?
104. states that her original nationality puts her in an advantageous position?
105. recommends that New Zealanders take more pride in their country?

The Brain Gain

With New Zealand becoming renowned as a great place to live, it was the first-choice
destination for a new generation of talented migrants looking for a better life. Sharon
Stephenson talks to four of them

A Nicky Meiring, Architect

Listen to Nicky Meiring talk about South Africa and it soon becomes evident that she's
mourning for a country she once called home. 'The current economic situation has made
South Africa quite a hard place to live in,' she says, 'but I do miss it.' Nicky first arrived in
Auckland in 1994 and got a job in an architectural practice in Auckland where she soon
settled in. She says 'New Zealand often feels like utopia. I just love the tranquility and the
fact you can lead a safe and ordinary life.' She lives and works from a renovated factory
where her mantelpiece is littered with awards for the design of her summer house on Great
Barrier Island. 'Although the design of buildings is fairly universal, houses here are
generally constructed of timber as opposed to brick and when it comes to the engineering
of buildings, I have to take great heed of earthquakes which isn't an issue in South Africa,'
she says. 'But the very fact that my training and points of reference are different means I

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have something to offer. And I'm so glad I have the opportunity to leave my stamp on my
new country."

B Jenny Orr, Art Director

American Jenny Orr's southern accent seems more at home in the movies than in New
Zealand's capital, Wellington. 'I'm from Alabama, but no, we didn't run around barefoot
and my father didn't play the banjo!' she jokes, in anticipation of my preconceptions.
Having worked in corporate design for ten years in the USA, she was after a change and
thought of relocating to New Zealand. It didn't take long for her to land a job with an
Auckland design firm, where she was able to gain experience in an unfamiliar but
challenging area of design -packaging -and before long, she was headhunted to a direct
marketing agency which recently transferred her to Wellington. While she admits she
could have the same salary and level of responsibility at home, 'it would probably have
been harder to break into this kind of field. I'm not saying I couldn't have done it, but it
may have taken longer in the US because of the sheer number of people paying their dues
ahead of me.' Ask Jenny how she's contributing to this country's 'brain gain' and she
laughs. 'I don't see myself as being more talented or intelligent but opposing views are
what make strategies, concepts and designs better and I hope that's what I bring.'

C Sarah Hodgett, Creative Planner

What happens when all your dreams come true? Just ask Sarah Hodgett. Sarah says that
she had always dreamed of a career in advertising. 'But I was from the wrong class and
went to the wrong university. In the UK, if you're working class you grow up not
expecting greatness in your life. You resign yourself to working at the local factory and
knowing your place.' New Zealand, on the other hand, allowed her to break free of those
shackles. 'It's a land of opportunity. I quickly learned that if you want to do something
here, you just go for it, which is an attitude I admire beyond belief.' Within a month of
arriving, she'd landed a job in customer servicing with an advertising agency. Then, when
an opening in research came up, she jumped at the chance. 'My job is to conduct research
with New Zealanders,' she explains. 'So I get to meet people from across the social
spectrum which is incredibly rewarding.' Being a foreigner certainly works in her favour,
says Sarah. 'Because a lot of my research is quite personal, respondents tend to see me as'
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impartial and open-minded and are therefore more willing to share their lives with me.'
She certainly sees New Zealand in a good light. 'I wish New Zealanders could see their
country as I do. That's why it saddens me that they don't think they're good enough on the
global stage.'

D Lucy Kramer, School Director

Born in Sydney, Australia, Lucy Kramer left for London when she was 23 to further her
career as a stockbroker. 'London certainly lived up to my expectations and I had a very
exciting, very hectic lifestyle,' Lucy explains. But after four years she felt burnt out and
was becoming increasingly disillusioned with her job. 'People at work were far too
competitive for my liking,' she says. It was at this time she made two life-changing
decisions. 'I signed up for a teacher- training course and shortly after that met my partner,
Graeme. He asked me to come back to New Zealand with him and I didn't hesitate.' It
wasn't long before she found work in a large Auckland school and, since then, she has
rapidly worked her way up to a management position. 'It's fair to say I'm not earning what
I used to but my New Zealand colleagues are much more easy- going. A good atmosphere
more than makes up for the drop in salary. Another thing that impresses me is that you can
leave your stuff on a seat in a cafe and it'll still be there half an hour later. People are
pretty trustworthy here. Sometimes it bothers me that we're so remote -you can feel a bit
cut off from what's going on in the rest of the world, but on the whole, I'd say it's one of
the best moves I ever made.'

 Write your answers here.

96. 97. 98. 99. 100.


101. 102. 103. 104. 105.

PART IV: WRITING ( 60 pts)

Part 1:
a/ Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first one, using
the word given. Don’t change the word given. You must use between three and eight
words including the word given.
106. I haven't been told clearly what I'll have to do in my next project at work. required

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It hasn't been made________________________________me in my next project at work.
107.In my opinion, it was an absolute miracle that they survived the accident. short
The fact that they survived the accident was____________________________________,
in my opinion.
108.I tried as hard as I could to make sure that this problem would not arise. power
I___________________________________________________this problem from arising.
b/ For each of the sentence below, write a new sentence as similar as possible in meaning
to the original sentence but using the word given. This word must not be altered in any
way.
109. The whole team was in a happy mood. (SPIRITS)
________________________________________________________________________
110. How do our sales compare with those of other firms? (RELATION)
________________________________________________________________________
Part 2. Chart description.

The bar graph below shows the numbers of employed persons by job type and sex
for Australia in the year 2003.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information below.
You should write at least 150 words.

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Part 3. Essay writing

Government investment in public transport and reductions in public transport


prices will greatly help the fight against transport pollution.

Do you agree or disagree with the above statement?

Write your essay of about 300 - 350 words to express your view. Use specific reasons and examples to
support your answer.

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-----------The end-----------

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Người ra đề: Nguyễn Thanh Liêm
THPT Chuyên Nguyễn Bỉnh Khiêm – Quảng Nam
0982.881.892
thanhliemnbk2012@gmail.com

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