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A STUDY ON QUALITY OF WORK LIFE BALANCE IN DSM TEXTILE AT

KARUR

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

MEANING

Maintaining a balance between work life and personal life is called Work Life
Balance. The meaning of work/life balance has chameleon characteristics. It means different
things to different groups, and the meaning often depends on the context of the conversation
and the speaker's viewpoint. The following are working definitions of terms used regarding
work/life balance; some definitions overlap and some are continuing to evolve.

WORK/FAMILY

It is a term more frequently used in the past than today. The current trend is to use
titles that include the phrase work/life, giving a broader work/life connotation or labeling
referring to specific areas of support (e.g., quality of life, flexible work options, life balance,
etc.)

Work/family conflict

Work/family conflict is a push and pulls between work and family responsibilities.

Work/life balance from the employee viewpoint

It is a dilemma of managing work obligations and personal/family responsibilities.

Work/life balance from the employer viewpoint

Work/life is the challenge of creating a supportive company culture where employees


can focus on their jobs while at work.
Family-friendly benefits

The benefits that offer employees the latitude to address their personal and family
commitments, while at the same time not compromising their work responsibilities.

Work/life programs

This programs (often financial or time-related) established by an employer that offer


employees options to address work and personal responsibilities.

Work/life initiatives

This policies and procedures established by an organization with the goal to enable
employees to get their jobs done and at the same time provide flexibility to handle
personal/family concerns.

Work/family culture

It is the extent to which an organization's culture acknowledges and respects the


family responsibilities and obligations of its employees and encourages management and
employees to work together to meet their personal and work needs.

Indicators

When you have balance you are

 Satisfied with your work and home lives.


 Able to fulfill your responsibilities without guilt or regret.
 Healthy physically and emotionally.
 In control of your life

Loss of balance may cause you to

 Miss work more often and not be as productive at work.


 Your involvement in the community may go down.
CHANGING &INCREASING WORK PRESSURES

A decade back, employees used to have fixed working hours or rather a 9 to 5 job
from Monday to Friday. The boundary between the work and home has disappeared with
time. But with globalization and people working across countries, the concept of fixed
working hours is fading away. Instead of just 7 or 8 a day, people are spending as much as
12-16 hours every day in office.

The technological blessings like e-mail, text messaging and cell phones which were
thought of as tools to connect them to their work being away from their workplace, have
actually integrated their personal and professional lives. Now professionals find themselves
working even when they are on vacations.

The ever-increasing working hours leave the individuals with less time for themselves
and to pursue his hobbies or leisure activities. This hinders the growth of the person as an
individual in terms of his personal and spiritual growth. Professionals working in the BPO
industry, doctors and nurses and especially IT professionals are the few examples who are
facing the brunt of the hazard constantly.

REASONS OF IMBALANCE:

There are various reasons for this imbalance and conflicts in the life of an employee.
From individual career ambitions to pressure to cope up with family or work, the reasons can
be situation and individual specific. The speed of advancement of information technology,
the increasing competition in the talent supply market has led to a "performance-driven"
culture creating pressures and expectations to performance more and better every time. Also,
many a times, many people find it difficult to say "NO" to others especially their superiors.
They usually end up over burdening themselves with work. The increasing responsibilities on
the personal front with age can also create stress on personal and professional fronts.

There was a time when employees showed up for work Monday through Friday and
worked eight- to nine-hour days. The boundaries between work and home were fairly clear
then. But the world has changed and, unfortunately, the boundaries have blurred for many
workers. The main reasons are:
GLOBAL ECONOMY

As more skilled workers enter the global labor market and companies outsource or
move more jobs to reduce labor costs, people feel pressured to work longer and produce
more just to protect their jobs.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Work continues around the world 24 hours a day for some people. If you work in an
international organization, you might be on call around the clock for troubleshooting or
consulting.

ADVANCED COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

Many people now have the ability to work anywhere — from their home, from their
car and even on vacation. And some managers expect this.

LONGER HOURS

Employers commonly ask employees to work longer hours than they're scheduled.
Often, overtime is mandatory. If you hope to move up the career ladder, you may find
yourself regularly working more than 40 hours a week to achieve and exceed expectations.

CHANGES IN FAMILY ROLES

Today’s married worker is typically part of a dual-career couples, which makes it


difficult to find time to meet commitments to family, friends and community.

EFFECTS

Constant struggle and effort to maintain a balance between the work and personal
life can have serious implications on the life of an individual. According to a survey, 81 per
cent of the respondents have admitted that their jobs are affecting and creating stress in their
personal lives. The pressures of the work or personal life can lead to stress. According to
studies, it has been found to that such situation can take a toll on the person's health both
physiologically and psychologically. Heart ailments, cardiovascular problems, sleep
disorders, depression, irritability, jumpiness, insecurity, poor concentration and even
nervous breakdowns are becoming common among the victims of such imbalance. Pressure,
stress or tension in work life can lead to bad social life and vice versa.

SOLUTIONS

Many experts have given different solutions to this problem.

 Time management is one of the best solutions which can help to reduce the imbalance
between the personal and the work life of the employees. Prioritizing the tasks and
planning the activities can help to take out some free time which can be utilized for
other purposes.

 Taking some time out for hobbies and leisure activities, spending time with loved
ones can help to beat the stress.

 Learn to say "no" if required.

 Sharing the responsibilities will help and don't commit for something which is
practically impossible.

 Utilizing the flexible working hours option of the organizations to get some free time.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES

 To analyze how far the employees of DSM TEXTILES AT KARUR are able to
maintain balance between their work life and personal life.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES

 To analyze factors contributing to work life balance of employees.


 To study the factors this hinders work life balance and creates imbalances.
 To suggest measures that should be concentrated to improve work life balance.
SCOPE OF THE STUDY

 People would like to have a neat balance of Work & Life. The scope of balancing
both work and life by a person would be leading to good quality of life and an
enjoyable work life and career progression.
 Work and Life Balance will make a person to maintain the good health and
affordable childcare and eldercare.
 One can concentrate on their personal interests and voluntary work.
 The balancing of work and life keep the persons away from pressurized mentality
which in turn reflect in happier life and good productivity at work.

NEED OF THE STUDY

 The present study concentrates deeply in “Employee Work Life Balance”


which refers to how the employees are balancing the work as well as life.
 The concept of “Employee Work Life Balance” is flexible and elastic and
differs widely with time, industry, social values, degree of industrialization, it
is also moulded according to age-group, gender, social-culture, marital,
economic status, and educational level of employees.
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

 Even though the concept of Organizational Commitment maybe and universally


applicable concept, by nature of present study, it has got only a limited scope with
reference to the organization studied.
 Further the researcher has limited the scope of the study only up to the conforming
the association between personal variables and organizational commitment, even
though the scope for higher level analysis is possible.
 The busy work schedule of the employees was a constraint for the study.
COMPANY PROFILE

DSM Textiles is located at Karur, Tamil Nadu in the Southern part of India. Established in
2001, we are an Eminent Manufacturer, Exporter and Supplier of the Cotton Home furnishing
Textile Products that are a reflection of the dexterity of the artisans of India. We incorporate
the latest trends, Designs and Colors in Our Home Furnishing Textile Products that caters to
the diverse taste and preferences of our discerning clients.

We are backed by a Talented Team of Master Craftsmen with Rich Experience in infusing
life into the Home Furnishing textiles through their dexterous hands. Our dedicated Quality
Control supervisors carefully monitor the entire production process to ensure quality
standards and client specifications are met.

Each of our creations speaks volume of the efforts and craftsmanship that goes into making
them. This is the reason our Home Furnishing Textile Products have found immense
appreciation and accolades in the international market.

DSM Textiles, the Name you can trust for Quality Textiles Products. VKS fabrics offer a
wide range of Textiles Products, Created & Designed to Satisfy Our Buyers Worldwide.

Most of our products are manufactured as per our buyer's design under their Orders and in
their own labels, but We also create designs as per our clients request with our own designers.

DSM Textiles is recognized for its Innovation, Constant Research, Development and
Upgrades to the trends prevailing around World. We constantly evaluate our Clients needs
and observe the evaluation of Consumer Habits. A Specialized Product Development team
and dedicated Sales force are contributing their level best to satisfy our respected clients

- V.K.Sabapathi, Founder.

Being, the family business as Weaving and came from a Weaving Family, DSM Textiles has
a very good knowledge about production, technical aspects and each & every corners of
manufacturing the quality textile products.

Based in Karur, India, We, DSM Textiles manufactures & supplies finest Textiles to Our
Valuable Customers across the World. It has been 14 years, since, we are satisfying our
clients and building a strong relationship both in business and in personal.

From 2006, it's the turn ofMr. VadivelKanagaSabapathi, the son of Mr.V.
KanagaSabapathitaken the position and continuing the service to their respected clients .After
completing his International Business studies in the United Kingdom, he himself involves in
this wonderful business with great interest & spirit and always loves very much to serve his
respected clients.

INDUSTRY PROFILE

INTRODUCTION TO TEXTIXE

Textiles can be made from many materials. These materials come from four main sources:
animal (wool, silk), plant (cotton, flax, jute), mineral (asbestos, glass fibre), and synthetic
(nylon, polyester, acrylic). In the past, all textiles were made from natural fibres, including
plant, animal, and mineral sources. In the 20th century, these were supplemented by artificial
fibres made from petroleum.

Textiles are made in various strengths and degrees of durability, from the finest gossamer to
the sturdiest canvas. The relative thickness of fibres in cloth is measured in deniers.
Microfibre refers to fibres made of strands thinner than one denier.

Animal textiles

Animal textiles are commonly made from hair, fur, skin or silk (in the silkworms case).

 Wool refers to the hair of the domestic goat or sheep, which is distinguished from
other types of animal hair in that the individual strands are coated with scales and
tightly crimped, and the wool as a whole is coated with a wax mixture known as
lanolin (sometimes called wool grease), which is waterproof and dirtproofcitation
needed. Woollen refers to a bulkier yarn produced from carded, non-parallel fibre,
while worsted refers to a finer yarn spun from longer fibres which have been combed
to be parallel. Wool is commonly used for warm clothing. Cashmere, the hair of the
Indian cashmere goat, and mohair, the hair of the North African angora goat, are types
of wool known for their softness.
 Other animal textiles which are made from hair or fur are alpaca wool, vicuña wool,
llama wool, and camel hair, generally used in the production of coats, jackets,
ponchos, blankets, and other warm coverings. Angora refers to the long, thick, soft
hair of the angora rabbit. Qiviut is the fine inner wool of the muskox.
 Wadmal is a coarse cloth made of wool, produced in Scandinavia, mostly 1000~1500
CE.
 Silk is an animal textile made from the fibres of the cocoon of the Chinese silkworm
which is spun into a smooth fabric prized for its softness. There are two main types of
the silk: 'mulberry silk' produced by the Bombyx Mori, and 'wild silk' such as Tussah
silk. Silkworm larvae produce the first type if cultivated in habitats with fresh
mulberry leaves for consumption, while Tussah silk is produced by silkworms feeding
purely on oak leaves. Around four-fifths of the world's silk production consists of
cultivated silk.

Plant textiles

 Grass, rush, hemp, and sisal are all used in making rope. In the first two, the entire
plant is used for this purpose, while in the last two, only fibres from the plant are
utilized. Coir (coconutfibre) is used in making twine, and also in floormats, doormats,
brushes, mattresses, floor tiles, and sacking.
 Straw and bamboo are both used to make hats. Straw, a dried form of grass, is also
used for stuffing, as is kapok.
 Fibres from pulpwood trees, cotton, rice, hemp, and nettle are used in making paper.
 Cotton, flax, jute, hemp, modal and even bamboo fibre are all used in clothing. Piña
(pineapplefibre) and ramie are also fibres used in clothing, generally with a blend of
other fibres such as cotton. Nettles have also been used to make a fibre and fabric
very similar to hemp or flax. The use of milkweed stalk fibre has also been reported,
but it tends to be somewhat weaker than other fibres like hemp or flax.
 Acetate is used to increase the shininess of certain fabrics such as silks, velvets, and
taffetas.
 Seaweed is used in the production of textiles: a water-soluble fibre known as alginate
is produced and is used as a holding fibre; when the cloth is finished, the alginate is
dissolved, leaving an open area.
 Lyocell is a man-made fabric derived from wood pulp. It is often described as a man-
made silk equivalent; it is a tough fabric that is often blended with other fabrics –
cotton, for example.
 Fibres from the stalks of plants, such as hemp, flax, and nettles, are also known as
'bast' fibres.

Mineral textiles

 Asbestos and basalt fibre are used for vinyl tiles, sheeting, and adhesives, "transite"
panels and siding, acoustical ceilings, stage curtains, and fire blankets.
 Glass fibre is used in the production of spacesuits, ironing board and mattress covers,
ropes and cables, reinforcement fibre for composite materials, insect netting, flame-
retardant and protective fabric, soundproof, fireproof, and insulating fibres.
 Metal fibre, metal foil, and metal wire have a variety of uses, including the production
of cloth-of-gold and jewellery. Hardware cloth (US term only) is a coarse woven
mesh of steel wire, used in construction. It is much like standard window screening,
but heavier and with a more open weave. It is sometimes used together with screening
on the lower part of screen doors, to resist scratching by dogs. It serves similar
purposes as chicken wire, such as fences for poultry and traps for animal control.

Synthetic textiles

All synthetic textiles are used primarily in the production of clothing.

 Polyesterfibre is used in all types of clothing, either alone or blended with fibres such
as cotton.
 Aramidfibre (e.g. Twaron) is used for flame-retardant clothing, cut-protection, and
armor.
 Acrylic is a fibre used to imitate wools, including cashmere, and is often used in
replacement of them.
 Nylon is a fibre used to imitate silk; it is used in the production of pantyhose. Thicker
nylon fibres are used in rope and outdoor clothing.
 Spandex (trade name Lycra) is a polyurethane product that can be made tight-fitting
without impeding movement. It is used to make activewear, bras, and swimsuits.
 Olefin fibre is a fibre used in activewear, linings, and warm clothing. Olefins are
hydrophobic, allowing them to dry quickly. A sintered felt of olefin fibres is sold
under the trade name Tyvek.
 Ingeo is a polylactidefibre blended with other fibres such as cotton and used in
clothing. It is more hydrophilic than most other synthetics, allowing it to wick away
perspiration.
 Lurex is a metallic fibre used in clothing embellishment.
 Milk proteins have also been used to create synthetic fabric. Milk or caseinfibre cloth
was developed during World War I in Germany, and further developed in Italy and
America during the 1930s. Milk fibre fabric is not very durable and wrinkles easily,
but has a pH similar to human skin and possesses anti-bacterial properties. It is
marketed as a biodegradable, renewable synthetic fibre.
 Carbon fibre is mostly used in composite materials, together with resin, such as
carbon fibre reinforced plastic. The fibres are made from polymer fibres through
carbonization.

Production methods

 Weaving is a textile production method which involves interlacing a set of longer


threads (called the warp) with a set of crossing threads (called the weft). This is done
on a frame or machine known as a loom, of which there are a number of types. Some
weaving is still done by hand, but the vast majority is mechanised.
 Knitting and crocheting involve interlacing loops of yarn, which are formed either on
a knitting needle or on a crochet hook, together in a line. The two processes are
different in that knitting has several active loops at one time, on the knitting needle
waiting to interlock with another loop, while crocheting never has more than one
active loop on the needle.
 Spread Tow is a production method where the yarn are spread into thin tapes, and
then the tapes are woven as warp and weft. This method is mostly used for composite
materials; Spread Tow Fabrics can be made in carbon, aramide, etc.
 Braiding or plaiting involves twisting threads together into cloth. Knotting involves
tying threads together and is used in making macrame.
 Lace is made by interlocking threads together independently, using a backing and any
of the methods described above, to create a fine fabric with open holes in the work.
Lace can be made by either hand or machine.
 Carpets, rugs, velvet, velour, and velveteen are made by interlacing a secondary yarn
through woven cloth, creating a tufted layer known as a nap or pile.
 Felting involves pressing a mat of fibres together, and working them together until
they become tangled. A liquid, such as soapy water, is usually added to lubricate the
fibres, and to open up the microscopic scales on strands of wool.
 Nonwoven textiles are manufactured by the bonding of fibres to make fabric. Bonding
may be thermal or mechanical, or adhesives can be used.
 Bark cloth is made by pounding bark until it is soft and flat.

Treatments

Textiles are often dyed, with fabrics available in almost every colour. The dying process
often requires several dozen gallons of water for each pound of clothing.17Coloured designs
in textiles can be created by weaving together fibres of different colours (tartan or Uzbek
Ikat), adding coloured stitches to finished fabric (embroidery), creating patterns by resist
dyeing methods, tying off areas of cloth and dyeing the rest (tie-dyeing), or drawing wax
designs on cloth and dyeing in between them (batik), or using various printing processes on
finished fabric. Woodblock printing, still used in India and elsewhere today, is the oldest of
these dating back to at least 220 CE in China. Textiles are also sometimes bleached, making
the textile pale or white.

Textiles are sometimes finished by chemical processes to change their characteristics. In the
19th century and early 20th century starching was commonly used to make clothing more
resistant to stains and wrinkles. Since the 1990s, with advances in technologies such as
permanent press process, finishing agents have been used to strengthen fabrics and make
them wrinkle free.18 More recently, nanomaterials research has led to additional
advancements, with companies such as Nano-Tex and NanoHorizons developing permanent
treatments based on metallic nanoparticles for making textiles more resistant to things such as
water, stains, wrinkles, and pathogens such as bacteria and fungi.19

More so today than ever before, textiles receive a range of treatments before they reach the
end-user. From formaldehyde finishes (to improve crease-resistance) to biocidic finishes and
from flame retardants to dyeing of many types of fabric, the possibilities are almost endless.
However, many of these finishes may also have detrimental effects on the end user. A
number of disperse, acid and reactive dyes (for example) have been shown to be allergenic to
sensitive individuals. Further to this, specific dyes within this group have also been shown to
induce purpuric contact dermatitis.

Although formaldehyde levels in clothing are unlikely to be at levels high enough to cause an
allergic reaction, due to the presence of such a chemical, quality control and testing are of
utmost importance. Flame retardants (mainly in the brominated form) are also of concern
where the environment, and their potential toxicity, is concerned. Testing for these additives
is possible at a number of commercial laboratories; it is also possible to have textiles tested
for according to the Oeko-tex certification standard which contains limits levels for the use of
certain chemicals in textiles products

VISION

To transform the company into a modern and dynamic yarn, cloth and processed cloth hand
finished product manufacturing company with highly professionals and fully equipped to
play a meaningful role on sustain able basis in the economy of Tamilnadu. To transform the
company into a modern and dynamic power generating company with highly professionals
and fully equipped to play a meaningful role on sustainable basis in the economy of
Tamilnadu.

MISSION

To provide quality products to customers and explore new markets to promote/expand sales
of the company through good governance and foster a sound and dynamic team, so as to
achieve optimum prices of products of the company for sustainable and equitable growth and
prosperity of the company.

ORGANIZATIOANL STRUCTURE

Founder (V.K.Sabapathi, Founder)

CEO (Mr. VadivelKanagaSabapathi)

HR Manager
CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

The Work-Life Balance Concept

The importance of managing an employee’s WLB has increased markedly over the
past 20 years (De Bruin & Dupuis, 2004). There have been changes in several areas that
directly impact on this issue. Firstly, jobs have become more complex and employees have
been put under pressure to produce quality results in shorter timeframes and with fewer
resources (Hosie, Forster &Servatos, 2004) that has resulted in a redefinition of ‘normal
working hours’. Secondly, the demographic make-up of the labour force (i.e. gender,
ethnicity, dual career couples, religion, multi-generational workplaces etc), and thirdly the
very nature of the employment contract has necessitated that organisations effectively
manage their employee’s wellbeing, stress and job satisfaction (Greenhaus& Powell, 2006).

Organisational interest in the management of the WLB derives from evidence that
“there is little doubt any more that there is a clear connection between the way people are
managed and organisational performance” (Purcell, 2002:1), and that with the onset of
predicted skill-shortages, the ability to offer effective WLB employment opportunities may
become a source of competitive advantage.

Ideally, the WLB concept requires organisations to effectively integrate employees’


work and non-work roles such that levels of multiple-role conflict, and the associated stress
and job-dissatisfaction, are minimised or avoided (De Bruin & Dupuis, 2004; Greenblatt,
2002). In attempts to achieve a WLB, however, western organisations have tended to adopt a
limited set of policies such as on-site child-care facilities, on-site gymnasiums,
telecommuting opportunities, and even on-site sleeping quarters for the employee and their
family (Hacker &Doolen, 2003; Hyman & Summers, 2004). Each has attempted to increase
the flexibility by which employees can enact their work-roles whilst simultaneously enabling
them to enact their family-based roles to the minimum extent necessary.

ISSUES IN WORK-LIFE IMBALANCE

Despite their best intentions, there remains considerable contention about the
effectiveness of organisational WLB policies in delivering flexibility and reducing stress and
job-dissatisfaction in the modern workplace (Eates, 2004; Kirrane& Buckley, 2004).
Researchers have identified two empirical shortcomings within the WLB literature that have
served to undermine its theoretical and practical usefulness. The first relates to the WLB
literature’s almost exclusive focus on the work-family interface at the expense of other
important life-balance issues. Buzzanell et al, (2005) notes that the WLB literature typically
portrays role conflicts for white, married, professional and managerial women, with little
reference to the many other demographics represented in the modern organisation. Shorthose
(2004) and Wise and Bond (2003) go so far as to state that the WLB discipline is essentially
flawed, as it is ‘one-dimensional’, assumes a unitary HR perspective, and that its underlying
management has been one of maintaining the status-quo rather than the adoption of
competitive and future-oriented HR policy.

The second relates to the literature’s inability to clearly define the interaction of work
and non-work roles that impact employees’ working-life (i.e. stress, job satisfaction etc.).
Elloy and Smith (2004) and Spinks (2004), for example, state that because an individual’s
non-work roles are inherently ambiguous and idiosyncratic, organisations are incapable of
understanding how their enactment (or otherwise) impacts each individual. Spinks (2004), in
particular, suggests that organisations are either incapable (or unwilling) to understand their
workforce in sufficient detail, and have instead defaulted to a ‘one-size-fits-all’ policy regime
that has simply enabled employees to ‘stay at work longer’ rather than enable them to enact
their important non-work roles. The inadequacy of current WLB policy regimes is
highlighted by Kiger’s (2005) study that revealed that less than two percent of employees
actually participate in available WLB programs.

Dex and Smith (2002) cite two main causes for this low figure. The first relates to
equity, with many employees reporting that they did not wish to appear a ‘special case’ or to
require ‘special treatment’ to their colleagues. This is supported from the results of Waters
&Bardoel’s (2006) study that found a range of workplace cultural factors that reduced the
willingness of Australian university staff to access WLB policy options.
The second is that the wide range of policies adopted by organisations has been based
on an ill-informed conceptualisation of contemporary WLB, and that this has led to its
ineffective formalisation in HRM practices. The consequence for organisations not taking a
more holistic approach to WLB is increased issues in attraction and retention of employees in
the context of skills shortages in significant occupational groups. The work expectations of
Generation X (born 1965 to 1979) and generation Y (born 1980 onwards) (Mackay, 1997)
place higher importance on WLB than previous generations and these employees will be
attracted to and remain longer with organisations that provide flexibility in accordance with
individual employee expectations (Henry, 2005). There is evidence of an increase in women
managers holding values and goals with greater emphasis on WLB who are opting to leave
organisations and undertaking consulting or contracting work which can permit greater
control of WLB conflict (Beck & Davis, 2005).

The contribution of the WLB literature, therefore, appears limited in its ability to
provide a useful framework for both academics and practitioners alike (Hyman &Summers,
2004). Despite its name, the WLB literature has remained largely focused on the work-
family interface and fails to accurately identify and define the array of work and non-roles
that impact inter alia on an individual’s stress levels and job satisfaction (Hacker &Doolen,
2003; Mellor, Mathieu, Barnes-Farrell &Rogelberg, 2001; Noor, 2004; Pocock, 2005). In
order to overcome these issues, Elloy and Smith (2003: 63) suggest that an effective
conceptualization of the WLB requires:

Guest (1987, 1997 & 2002) suggests for the WLB literature to incorporate a holistic
approach to HR management and better inform organisational HR policy development, its
design and implementation should adopt the following four criteria:
 That the WLB literature maintains a focus on the integration of HR policies
with the organisations vision, goals and strategy. Central to this point is the
consistency between the organisations espoused culture and the context of its
WLB approach;
 That the implementation of WLB policies create a set of internally consistent
employment polices intended to produce employee commitment, flexibility and
quality – mutual flexibility and commitment being a cornerstone of the concept
of a WLB programme;
 That there is recognition of the importance of human resources and of the need
to engage in practices which reflect this understanding. Therefore, managers
internalising (and demonstrating by their behaviour) the importance of human
resources is fundamental to the link between WLB goals and their achievement;
and
 That there is a response by employees to the WLB policies (i.e. an ‘up-take’ of
WLB opportunities by employees) and to the behaviour of the line managers
(i.e. a recognition by employees that their superiors are committed to the
achievement of a meaningful WLB).

Therefore, the degree to which employers can support the achievement (and benefits
associated with) effective WLB/HR policy depends on two main considerations: the manner
in which the WLB is defined and formalised within HR policy, and/or how managers respond
to employee requests for WLB relief. In terms of its formalisation, organisations need to be
aware of the extent to which WLB is operationalised– that is, whether it is to be regarded as a
‘right’, a ‘right to request’, or as a matter of managerial discretion. In terms of managerial
responses, organisations need to decide whether to apply an authoritarian approach (i.e. ‘hard
HR’), a paternal approach (i.e. ‘benevolent’), or a commitment (i.e. ‘Soft HR’) approach to
employee requests for WLB relief. It is this intersection between corporate culture, as
enacted, in rituals and practices modelled by organisational leaders that set the tone for
employees’ responses to WLB initiatives. Where leaders work very long hours, tend to take
little annual leave and then in small amounts, demand travel at short notice (Sinclair, 2005)
and require employee availability at the leader’s whim and wears these sacrifices as ‘badges
on honour’, it follows that employees are, at best, cautious in utilising WLB.

The achievement of an effective WLB-HR policy interface has largely failed in Australia
given the issues discussed above, and an exploration of possible remedies represents the
research opportunity for this paper.

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE IN FOURRTS, CHENNAI: AN OUTLOOK FROM


JEROME M.ROSOW’S PERCEPTION (2008)
-by PremaManoharan, 2010

The QWL is one of the aspects useful to retain resources. This approach considers
people as ‘assets’to the organization rather than as ‘costs’ and motivates people by satisfying
not only their economic needs but also their social and psychological ones.

 Quality of work life focuses on all aspects of workers’ life and the satisfaction of the
workforce in an organization. The definition of Jerome M Rosow, President of the
Work in American Institute, about QWL is considered for the study. The identified
seven critical factors which will affect the quality of work life-pay, employee benefits,
job security, alternative work schedules, Occupational stress, participation and
democracy in the workplace are studied.
 Good health is the primary goal of the society and this study was done by researcher
to find out whether a company in health care industry takes care of its employees too.
 Questionnaires were used to collect the primary data and the statistical tools used are
percentage analysis, chi-square test.
 The sample size and the time limitation were the main constraints.
EMPLOYEES MIRRORING ON QUALITY OF WORK LIFE- AN EMPIRICAL
EVALUATION (2010)
- byJ.ARTHI & DR.KIRUPA, PRIYADARSHINI.M

In this paper researcher through light on Quality of work life (QWL) that has
increasingly gained recognition, as employees want to feel respected at work for what they do
and who they are. Today's business climate is increasingly characterized by rapid change and
Fierce competition. Organizations must adapt to this environment if they are to survive and
prosper.

 Proactive managers and human resource departments respond to this challenge by


finding new ways to improve productivity. As a goal, QWL aims to improve
organizational effectiveness through the creation of more challenging, satisfying and
effective jobs and work environments.
 Here researcher projects the ideas from the research conducted in a selected
organization and the consolidation of results reveal the major influential factors of
QWL.
 They also give a suggestive model to achieve favorable QWL environment in
anyorganisation.

A WAY OF LIFE: JOB STRESS AND TURNOVER INTENTION (2008)

- By R.T.NIRMAL KUMAR, S.DEEPA and M.KEERTHIGA

In this paper the researcher focuses on the job stress. According to him, man's life
today faces all sorts of challenges, obstacles that hamper normal functioning and most of the
time it is too hard to handle. In a nut shell, stress is ubiquitous these days, becoming an
increasingly global phenomenon affecting all countries, all professions and all categories of
workers, families and society in general. It is a physical and mental response to everyday
demands, particularly those associated with change.
Stress is the change that drives the worker from normal psychological and physical
condition (Behr and Newman, 1978).Stress takes heavy toll of the person’s health and his
capacity to adjust with others. They state about the few years’ evidence has accumulated
from around the world to show that the most Common cause of destructive ill health is stress
at work.

As a result of which, an individual faces many psychological as well as


psychosomatic disorders. A stressful workplace is rarely a productive one. Therefore the
researcher says that employers must develop stress management key to retain the existing
employees in the workplace. As it, become very important for organizations to retain their
employees, in today's competitive environment.

This research helps to understand the relationship between job stress, Personality
Characteristics and intent to leave employment, which aid administrators seeking to attract
and retain employees.

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE IN TODAY’S ERA

- By DR. A. ARUMUGAM & K. SIVAGAMA SHUNMUGA SUNDARI(2009)

Here the researcher discusses about Quality of work life (QWL) denotes all the
organizational inputs which aims at the employee's satisfaction and enhancing organizational
effectiveness. It is referred to as favorable or unfavorable of the job environment for people.
Many early QWL efforts focus on job enrichment.

Researcher states that today QWL gives much concern about decent wages,
convenient working hours, conducive working conditions etc. In a deeper sense, QWL refers
to the quality life of individuals in their working organizations. QWL provides for the
balanced relationship among work and non-work and family aspects of life.

In this paper the researcher discusses several notable factors that influence QWL are
adequate & fair compensation, safety and healthy working conditions, opportunity to use &
develop human capabilities, opportunities for career growth etc. This study was carried out to
find out the evolution of QWL and some ameliorative criteria for measuring QWL. It is
concluded that there is vast change in QWL and to find out the latest changes in QWL.
CHAPTER III

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

“A Research is a careful investigation or inquiry; especially through search for new


facts in any branch of knowledge .It is a systemized effort to gain more knowledge.”

Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may


be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. It is necessary for
the researcher to know not only the research methods or technique but also the methodology.
Researcher always needs to understand the assumption underline various technique and they
need to know the criteria by which they can decide that certain technique and procedures will
be applicable to certain problems and other will not.

TYPE OF RESEARCH:

The method of conducting research deals with research design, data collection method,
sampling method. It explained about the nature of research work to be done such as
descriptive nature of research, which is used in this study.

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH:

The researcher has adopted descriptive research design for the purpose of this survey.
Descriptive studies are that study which is concerned with describing the characteristics of a
particular individual, or of a group.

TYPES OF DATA

1) Primary data

2) Secondary data
PRIMARY DATA:

First time collected data are referred to as primary data. In this research the primary data
was collected by means of a Structured Questionnaire. The questionnaire consists of number
of questions in printed form. It has both open-end closed end questions in it.

Section I- Personal Data: This section includes questions soliciting the respondent’s details
such as Age, Gender, Marital status, Education, Designation, section and Work experience.

Section II- Scale for measuring the issues: It comprises of single open ended type and
various close ended questions which includes yes no type, scaling and other optional
questions.

SECONDARY DATA:

Data which has already gone through the process of analysis or were used by someone
else earlier is referred to secondary data. This type of data was collected from the books,
journals, company records etc.

SOURCE OF DATA:

The data has been collected from the employees of DSM TEXTILE AT KARUR

SAMPLING UNIT:

Sampling unit refers to process of defining the target population that will be sample.
Hence for the present study, data was collected by means of questionnaire from the
employees.

SAMPLE SIZE:

Sample size plays a critical role, because the generalizability of the conclusion depends
on sample size. Sample size for the present study is 70.

SAMPLING METHOD:

Sampling means the method of selecting a sample from a given universe with a view to
draw conclusions about the universe. Sample means representative of universe selected for
the study. Sampling is a process of units (e.g. People) from a population of the interest

Sampling method is divided into 2 types


1) Probability Method

2) Non Probability Method

The sampling method that was chosen is entirely non probabilitistic in nature. In non
probabilitistic method the researcher has adopted convenience sampling method.

In this method, the researcher select the accessible population members from which to
get information and the items selected are easy to approach or easy to measure.

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES:


In this research the tools such as Simple percentage analysis, chi square, ANOVA and
correlation are used for data analysis.

CHAPTER – IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

TABLE 4.1

TABLE REPRESENTING GENDER OF RESPONDENTS:

S. No Gender No of Respondents Percentage


1 Male 52 74
2 Female 18 26
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 74% of the respondent from male and 26% of the
respondent from female.
CHART 4.1

CHART REPRESENTING GENDER OF RESPONDENTS:

GENDER OF RESPONDENTS
80

70

60
PERCENTAGE

50

40
Male-74% Chart representing the gender
30 of respondents
20
Female-26%
10

0
Male Female
GENDER
TABLE 4.2

TABLE REPRESENTING AGE GROUP OF RESPONDENTS

S. No Age Group No of respondents Percentage


1 Below 25 yrs 1 1
2 25-35 yrs 13 19
3 35-45 yrs 20 28
4 45-55 yrs 22 32
5 Above 55 yrs 14 20
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 32% of the respondent are from age group of 45-55, 28%
and 20% of the respondent are from age group of 35-45 and Above 55% respectively,19%
of the respondent are from age group of 25-35 and 1% of the respondent are from age group
of below 25 yrs.
CHART 4.2

CHART REPRESENTING AGE GROUP OF RESPONDENTS

AGE GROUP OF RESPONDENTS


35

30

25
PERCENTAGE

20

15 32%
28 %
10 19% 20%

0 1%
Below 25 yrs 25-35 yrs 35-45 yrs 45-55 yrs Above 55 yrs
AGE
TABLE 4.3

TABLE REPRESENTING THE DESIGNATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

S. No Designation No of respondents Percentage


1 Superintendent 21 30
2 Inspector 31 44
3 Senior Tax Assistant 10 14
4 Deputy office superintendent 8 12
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 44% of the respondent is Inspectors, 30% of the
respondents are superintendents, 14% of the respondents are Senior Tax Assistants and 12%
of the respondents are Deputy Officer Superintendent.
CHART 4.3

CHART REPRESENTING THE DESIGNATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

DESIGNATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

12

30
14 Supt
Inspector
STA
DOS

44
TABLE 4.4

TABLE REPRESENTING THE SECTION OF THE RESPONDENTS

S.No Section No of respondents Percentage


1 Administrative 10 14
2 Statistics 10 14
3 Vigilance 5 8
4 Preventive 12 17
5 Accounts 15 21
6 Internal Audit 18 26
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 26% of the respondent are internal audit section,21% of the
respondent areAccounts,17% are from preventive section and 8 % are from vigilance
section,14% of the respondent are administrative section,14% of the respondent are statistics
section.
CHART 4.4

CHART REPRESENTING THE SECTION OF THE RESPONDENTS

SECTION OF THE RESPONDENTS


30
26
25
21
20
PERCENTAGE

17

15 14 14

10 8

0
Administrative Statistics vigilance Preventive Accounts Internal Audit
SECTION
TABLE 4.5

TABLE REPRESENTING EDUCATION QUALIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS:

S.No Qualification No of respondents Percentage


1 SSLC 4 6
2 HSC 2 3
3 UG 43 61
4 PG 21 30
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 53% and 33% of respondents has UG and PG
Qualification respectively, 8% of respondents are SSLC and 6% of respondents are HSC.
CHART 4.5

EDUCATION QUALIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS:

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
70

60
PERCENTAGE

50

40

30 61

20
30
10
6 3
0
EDICTAIONAL QUALIFICATION
SSLC HSC UG PG
TABLE 4.6

TABLE REPRESENTING THE EXPERIENCE OF RESPONDENTS.

S.No Experience No of respondents Percentage


1 Less than 5 yrs 16 14
2 5-10 yrs 13 12
3 10-15 yrs 11 10
4 15-20 yrs 23 21
5 Above 20 yrs 47 43
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 43% of the respondent are from respondents having
above 20 yrs of experience.21% of the respondent are15-20 yrs of experience, 14% of the
respondent are respondents having less than 5 yrs of experience, 12%10% of the respondent
are from respondents having experience of 5-10 yrs and 10-15 yrs respectively.
CHART 4.6

CHART REPRESENTING THE EXPERIENCE OF RESPONDENTS.

EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS


50
45 43

40
35
30
25 21
20
14
15 12
10
10
5
0
Less than 5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs Above 20 yrs1
TABLE 4.7.

TABLE REPRESENTING THE MARITAL STATUS OF RESPONDENTS

S.No Marital status No of Respondents Percentage


1 Married 61 87
2 Unmarried 9 13
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 84% of respondents are married and 16% of respondents are
unmarried.
CHART 4.7.

CHART REPRESENTING THE MARITAL STATUS OF RESPONDENTS

MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS

Unmarried 13%

Married -87%
TABLE 4.8

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH SALARY AND


BENEFITS

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 14 20
2 Satisfied 41 59
3 Neutral 10 14
4 Dissatisfied 4 6
5 Highly dissatisfied 1 1
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 59% of the respondents are satisfied about their salary and
benefits 20% of respondents are highly satisfied,14% of the respondents are neutral,6% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with salary and benefits and only 1% of the respondents are
highly dissatisfied
CHART 4.8

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH SALARY AND


BENEFITS

level of satisfaction with salary and benefits


70
59
60

50

40

30
20
20
14

10 6
1
0
Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied
TABLE 4.9

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH WORK


ASSIGNMENT

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 14 20
2 Satisfied 43 61
3 Neutral 9 14
4 Dissatisfied 3 4
5 Highly dissatisfied 1 1
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 61% of the respondents are satisfied with their
work assignment, 20% of the respondents are highly satisfied with their work
assignment,14% of the respondents are neutral,4% of the respondents are dissatisfied with
their work assignment and only 1% of the respondent are highly dissatisfied with their work
assignment.
CHART 4.9

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH WORK


ASSIGNMENT

level of satisfaction with work assignment


70

60
61
50

40

30

20
20
10 14

0 4
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral dissatisfied 1
Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.10

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH TRANSFER


POLICIES

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 2 3
2 Satisfied 32 46
3 Neutral 18 26
4 Dissatisfied 10 14
5 Highly dissatisfied 8 11
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 46% of the respondents are satisfied with the transfer
policies,26% of the respondents are neutral, 14% of the respondents are dissatisfied,11% of
the respondents are highly dissatisfied and 2% of the respondents are highly satisfied
CHART 4.10

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH TRANSFER


POLICIES

level of satisfaction with transfer policies

50
45
40
35
30
25
46
20
15
26
10
14 11
5
0 3
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.11

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE


PROMOTION POLICY

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 0 0
2 Satisfied 16 23
3 Neutral 11 16
4 Dissatisfied 23 33
5 Highly dissatisfied 20 28
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 33% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the promotion
policies, 28% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied, 23% of the respondents are satisfied,
16% of the respondents are neutral, and no one is highly satisfied
CHART 4.11

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE


PROMOTION POLICY

level of satisfaction with promotion policies


35

30

25

20
33
15
28
23
10
16
5

0 0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.12

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH BONUS


PROVIDED

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 2 3
2 Satisfied 21 30
3 Neutral 14 20
4 Dissatisfied 18 26
5 Highly dissatisfied 15 21
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 30% of the respondents are satisfied with the bonus provided
for them, 26% of the respondents are dissatisfied, 21% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied 20% of the respondents are neutral, and only 3% of the respondents are highly
satisfied
CHART 4.12

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH BONUS


PROVIDED

Level of satisfaction with promotion policies


35

30

25

20

15 30
26
10 20 21

5
3
0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.13

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE MEDICAL


CHECKUP

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 0 0
2 Satisfied 13 19
3 Neutral 12 17
4 Dissatisfied 22 31
5 Highly dissatisfied 23 33
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 33% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the medical check
up provided by the concern, 31% of the respondents are dissatisfied ,19% of the respondents
are satisfied with the medical checkup,17% of the respondents are neutral, and. no one is
highly satisfied with the medical checkup.
CHART 4.13

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE


MEDICAL CHECKUP

Level of satisfaction with the medical checkup

35

30

25

20
31 33
15

10 19 17

5
0
0
Highly satisfied satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied highly
dissatisfied
TABLE 4.14

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE


RECOGNIZED LIST OF HOSPITALS

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 3 5
2 Satisfied 26 37
3 Neutral 25 36
4 Dissatisfied 8 11
5 Highly dissatisfied 8 11
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 37% of the respondents are satisfied with the authorized list of
hospitals provided by the concern, 36% of the respondents are neutral, 11% of the
respondents are dissatisfied and 11% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied and 5% of the
respondents are highly satisfied.
CHART 4.14

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE


RECOGNIZED LIST OF HOSPITALS

recognized list of hospitals provided


40

35

30

25

20
37 36
15

10

5 11 11
5
0
Highly satisfied satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.15

TABLE REPRESENTING THE SATISFACTION OF QUANTITY AND QUALITY


OF FOOD PROVIDED IN THE CANTEEN:

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 1 1
2 Satisfied 24 34
3 Neutral 25 37
4 Dissatisfied 13 18
5 Highly dissatisfied 7 10
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that 1% of the respondents are highly satisfied about the quality and
quantity of food provided in the canteen, 34% of the respondents are satisfied, 37% of the
respondents are neutral, 18% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 10% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied
CHART 4.15

CHART REPRESENTING THE SATISFACTION OF QUANTITY AND QUALITY


OF FOOD PROVIDED IN THE CANTEEN:

Level of satisfaction with quantity and


quality of food
40

35

30

25

20
37
34
15

10 18
5 10
0 1
Highly satisfied satisfied Neutral dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.16

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE RATE OF


FOOD AVAILABLE IN THE CANTEEN

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 7 10
2 Satisfied 42 60
3 Neutral 14 20
4 Dissatisfied 7 10
5 Highly dissatisfied 0 0
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 60% of the respondents are satisfied about the rate food
available in the canteen, 20% of the respondents are neutral, 10% of the respondents are
highly satisfied 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied about the rate of food in the canteen
and no one is highly dissatisfied.
CHART 4.16

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE RATE OF


FOOD AVAILABLE IN THE CANTEEN

Level of satisfaction with the rate of food


available in the canteen
70

60

50

40

30 60

20

10 20
10 10
0 0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.17

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH GRIEVANCE


REDRESSEL

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Highly satisfied 0 0
2 Satisfied 52 47
3 Neutral 39 36
4 Dissatisfied 16 15
5 Highly dissatisfied 3 2
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 47% of the respondents are satisfied about the
grievance redressed, 36% of the respondents are neutral, 15% of the respondents are
dissatisfied 2% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied and no respondents are highly
satisfied.
CHART 4.17

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH GRIEVANCE


REDRESSEL

Level of satisfaction with grievance redressel


50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied
TABLE 4.18

TABLE REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR SEATING ARRANGEMENT

S. No Rate No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Very good 23 21
2 Good 45 41
3 Average 29 26
4 Poor 13 12
5 Very poor 0 0
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that , 41% of the respondents rated good with seating
arrangement , 26% of the respondents are says that average of seating arrangement , 21% of
the respondents are says that very good with seating arrangement,12% of the respondents
says that poor with seating arrangement and no respondents rated very poor for seating
arrangement.
CHART 4.18

CHART REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR SEATING ARRANGEMENT

45
SEATING ARRANGEMENT
40
35
30
percentage

25
41
20
15 26
21
10
12
5
0 0
Very good Good Average Poor Very poor
OPINION
TABLE 4.19

TABLE REPRESENTING THE OPINION ABOUT COMPUTER


CONFIGURATION:

S. No Rate No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Very good 25 23
2 Good 56 51
3 Average 29 26
4 Poor 0 0
5 Very poor 0 0
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that , 51% of the respondents rated good with computer
configuration , 26% of the respondents are says that average of computer configuration, 23%
of the respondents are says that very good with computer configuration,0% of the
respondents says that poor with computer configuration and no respondents rated very poor
for computer configuration
CHART 4.19

CHART REPRESENTING THE OPINION ABOUT COMPUTER


CONFIGURATION:

COMPUTER CONFIGURATION:
60

50

40
PERCENTAGE

30

20

10

0
Very good Good Average Poor Very poor
OPINION
TABLE 4.20

TABLE REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR VENTILATION, A/C

S. No
Rate No. of percentage
Respondents
1 Very good 10 9
2 Good 36 33
3 Average 35 32
4 Poor 18 16
5 Very poor 11 10
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 33% of the respondents rated good with ventilation and
A/C., 32% of the respondents are says that average of ventilation and A/C , 09% of the
respondents are says that very good with ventilation and A/C.16% of the respondents says
that poor with ventilation and A/C and 10% of the respondents rated very poor for
ventilation and A/C.
CHART 4.20

CHART REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR VENTILATION, A/C

35
RATING FOR VENTILATION, A/C
30

25
PERCENTAGE

20
33 32
15

10
16
5 9 10

0
Very good Good Average Poor Very poor
OPINION
TABLE 4.21

TABLE REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR LIGHTS

S. No Rate No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Very good 31 28
2 Good 53 48
3 Average 26 24
4 Poor 0 0
5 Very poor 0 0
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that 48% of the respondents rated good with lighting
facility, 24% of the respondents are says that average of lighting facility, 28% of the
respondents are says that very good with lighting facility ,20% of the respondents says that
poor with lighting facility and no respondents rated very poor for lighting facility.
CHART 4.21

CHART REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR LIGHTS

THE RATING FOR LIGHTS

0
24 Very good
28
Good
Average
Poor
Very poor
48
TABLE 4.22

TABLE REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR FIRE-EXTINGUISHER

S. No Rate No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Very good 0 0
2 Good 0 0
3 Average 59 54
4 Poor 24 22
5 Very poor 27 24
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

From the above table we infer that no respondents rated good with fire extinguisher and
54% of the respondents are says that average of fire extinguisher and no respondents are says
that very good with fire extinguisher,22% of the respondents says that poor with fire
extinguisher and 24% of the respondents rated very poor for fire extinguisher.

CHART 4.22

CHART REPRESENTING THE RATING FOR FIRE-EXTINGUISHER


60
RATING FOR FIRE-EXTINGUISHER
50

40

30
54

20

22 24
10

0 0 0
Very good Good Average Poor Very poor
TABLE 4.23

TABLE REPRESENTING THE SUPERIORS ARE COOPERATIVE

S. No Variables No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Strongly agree 12 17
2 Agree 43 61
3 Moderate 11 16
4 Disagree 4 6
5 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shoes that 61% of the respondents agreed that their superiors are
cooperative, 17% of the respondents strongly agreed, 16% of the respondents are moderate, 6
% of the respondents are disagreed and no one is strongly disagreed that their superiors are
cooperative.
CHART 4.23

CHART REPRESENTING THE SUPERIORS ARE COOPERATIVE

The superiors are cooperative


70
61
60

50

40

30

20 17 16

10 6
0
0
Strongly agree Agree Moderate Disagree Strongly disagree

TABLE 4.24

TABLE REPRESENTING THE SATISFACTION WITH THE WORK SPACE

S. No Levels No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Strongly agree 8 11
2 Agree 34 49
3 Moderate 21 30
4 Disagree 2 3
5 Strongly disagree 5 7
Total 70 100
INFERENCE:

From the above table, we infer that 49% of the respondents are agreed about their
workspace satisfaction, 30% of the respondents are moderate, 11% of the respondents are
strongly agreed that they are satisfied about their work space, 7% of the respondents are
highly disagreed about their workspace satisfaction,3% of the respondents are disagreed .

CHART 4.24

CHART REPRESENTING THE SATISFACTION WITH THE WORK SPACE

The satisfaction of work space


49
50
45
40
35 30
30
25
20
15 11
7
10
3
5
0
Strongly agree Agree Moderate Disagree Strongly
disagree

TABLE 4.25

TABLE REPRESENTING FREEDOM TO OFFER SUGGESTIONS

S. No Variables No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Strongly agree 7 6
2 Agree 45 42
3 Moderate 32 29
4 Disagree 21 19
5 Strongly disagree 5 4
Total 110 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 42% of the respondents agreed that they are given freedom to
offer suggestions on official matters, 29% of the respondents are moderate, 19% of the
respondents disagreed, 6% of the respondents are strongly agreed and 4% of the respondents
strongly disagreed.

CHART 4.25

CHART REPRESENTING FREEDOM TO OFFER SUGGESTIONS

The freedom to offer suggestions

Strongly disagree 4

disagree 19

Moderate 29

Agree 42

Strongly agree 6

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

TABLE 4.26
TABLE REPRESENTING THE REWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE

S. No Variables No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Strongly agree 1 1
2 Agree 33 47
3 Moderate 27 39
4 Disagree 2 3
5 Strongly disagree 7 10
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that that 47% of the respondents agreed they are getting reward for
outstanding performance, 39% of the respondents are neutral, 10% of the respondents
strongly disagreed, 3% of the respondents disagreed and 1% of the respondents strongly
agreed.

CHART 4.26

CHART REPRESENTING THE REWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE


The reward for outstanding performance

Strongly disagree 10

Disagree 3

Moderate 39

Agreed 47

Strongly agree 1

0 10 20 30 40 50

TABLE 4.27

TABLE REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH TRAINING

S. No Level of satisfaction No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Strongly agree 3 4
2 Agree 37 53
3 Moderate 21 30
4 Disagree 9 13
5 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 53% of the respondents are satisfied, 30% of the respondents
are neutral, 13% of the respondents are dissatisfied only 3% of the respondents are highly
satisfied with the training given for them, and no respondents are highly dissatisfied about the
training given for them.
CHART 4.27

CHART REPRESENTING THE LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH TRAINING

The level of satisfaction with training


60

50

40

30
53
20
30
10
13
4
0 0
Strongly agree Agree Moderate Disagree Strongly disagree

TABLE 4.28

TABLE REPRESENTING THE REQUIREMENT OF THE SPECIALITY


HOSPITALS TO BE ADDED IN THE LIST OF HOSPITALS PROVIDED.

S.No Variables No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 49 70
2 No 21 30
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that 70% of the respondents required that the speciality hospitals to
be added in the list of hospitals provided by the concern, 30% of the respondents do not
require the specialty hospitals to be added in the list of hospitals provided.

CHART 4.28

CHART REPRESENTING THE REQUIREMENT OF THE SPECIALITY


HOSPITALS TO BE ADDED IN THE LIST OF HOSPITALS PROVIDED.

Requirement of speciality hospitals to be added


in th list of hospitals provided

No-30%

Yes-70%

TABLE 4.29

TABLE REPRESENTING THE REQUIREMENT OF HEALTH AND FITNESS


CLUB
S.No Variables No. of Respondents percentage

1 Yes 59 84
2 No 11 16
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 84% of the respondents required the health and fitness club
and 16% of the respondents do not require the health and fitness club.

CHART 4.29

CHART REPRESENTING THE REQUIREMENT OF HEALTH AND FITNESS


CLUB

Requirement of health and fitness club


No-16%

Yes 84%
TABLE 4.30

TABLE REPRESENTING THE REGULAR FEEDBACK ON PERFORMANCE

S. No Variables No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Always 12 17
2 Often 10 14
3 Occasionally 10 14
4 Rare 31 44
5 Never 7 10
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 44% of the respondents are getting feedback rarely, 17% of the
respondents are always getting feedback on their performance, 14% of the respondents are
getting feedback often ,14% of the respondents are getting feedback occasionally, and
only10% of the respondents never getting feedback.

CHART 4.30

CHART REPRESENTING THE REGULAR FEEDBACK ON PERFORMANCE


The regular feedback on performance

45
40
35
30
25
42
20
15 24
10 14 13
5 7
0
Always Often Occasionally Rarely Never

TABLE 4.31

TABLE REPRESENTING THE OPINION ABOUT THE OVERALL QUALITY OF


WORK LIFE

S. No Variables No. of percentage


Respondents
1 Excellent 6 8
2 Very good 21 31
3 Typical 38 54
4 Fair 5 7
5 poor 0 0
Total 70 100

INFERENCE:

The above table shows that 54% of the respondents feel that the overall quality of work life
is typical, 31% of the respondents feel very good,8 % of the respondents feel that the overall
quality of work life is excellent, 7% of the respondents feel fair and no respondents feel that
the overall quality of work life is poor.

CHART 4.31

CHART REPRESENTING THE OPINION ABOUT THE OVERALL QUALITY OF


WORK LIFE

Opinion about the overall quality of worklife

60 54

50

40
31
30

20
8 7
10
0
0
Excellent Very good Good Poor Very Poor
ANOVA TEST

Table representing the relationship between the Designation of the respondents and the
level of satisfaction with salary and benefits

Assumption:

H0: There is no significant relationship between the educational qualification of the


respondents and the level of satisfaction with salary and benefits
H1: There is no significant relationship between the educational qualification of the
respondents and the level of satisfaction with salary and benefits

level of satisfaction with salary and benefits Total


Highly Highly
dissatisfied Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied satisfied
Designation of Supt
0 1 4 10 4 19
the respondents
Inspector 1 1 4 21 6 33
Senior Tax
0 1 0 6 3 10
Assistant
Deputy officer
0 1 2 4 1 8
superintendent
Total 1 4 10 41 14 70

ANOVA

Sum of Mean
Squares df Square F Sig.
Between
1.008 3 .336 .469 .705
Groups
Within
47.292 66 .717
Groups
Total 48.300 69

Inference: Significant value 0.705 is greater than 0.05, hence null hypothesis is accepted.
Therefore it is concluded that the designation doesn’t influence the level of satisfaction with
salary and benefits

4.33 Table representing the relationship between Designation of the respondents and
the level of satisfaction with work assignment

Level of satisfaction with work assignment


Highly Dissatisfie Highly
dissatisfied d Neutral Satisfied satisfied Total
Designation of Supt 0 1 1 13 4 19
the respondents Inspector 1 2 1 23 6 33
Senior Tax
0 1 2 5 2 10
Assistant
Deputy officer
0 1 2 3 2 8
superintendent
Total 1 5 6 44 14 70

Correlation

Asymp.
Std. Approx. Approx.
Value Error(a) T(b) Sig.
Interval by Pearson's R
-.120 .123 -.997 .322(c)
Interval
Ordinal by Spearman
-.118 .128 -.978 .331(c)
Ordinal Correlation
N of Valid Cases 70

Inference: The above table infers that there is negative correlation between the designation
and level of satisfaction with the work assignment. Therefore designation doesn’t influence
the level of satisfaction with the work assignment.
4.34 Table representing the relationship between the gender of the respondents and the
level of satisfaction with transfer Policies

Level of satisfaction with Transfer Policies Total


Highly Dissatisfie Highly
Neutral Satisfied
dissatisfied d satisfied

Gender of Male 6 10 10 25 1 52
the
respondents Female 2 2 8 5 1 18
Total 8 12 18 30 2 70

Chi-Square Tests

Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)

Pearson Chi-Square 4.669(a) 4 0.32


Likelihood Ratio 4.461 4 .047
Linear-by-Linear
.032 1 .859
Association
N of Valid Cases 70

Inference:
The significant value 0.32 is greater than 0.05, hence null hypothesis is accepted.
Therefore it is concluded that there is no relationship between the gender of the respondents
and transfer policies.

4.35 Table representing the relationship between Age group of the respondents and the
level of satisfaction with medical check up

Level of satisfaction with medical check up Total


Highly
Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied
dissatisfied
Age group of Below 25 yrs 0 0 1 0 1
the respondents 25-35yrs 6 2 2 3 13
35-45yrs 8 7 1 4 20
45-55 yrs 8 7 4 3 22
Above 55 yrs 3 4 4 3 14
Total 25 20 12 13 70

Chi-Square Tests

Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)

Pearson Chi-
10.635(a) 12 .560
Square
Likelihood Ratio 10.074 12 .609
Linear-by-Linear
.311 1 .577
Association
N of Valid Cases 70
Inference: Significant value 0.560 is greater than 0.05, hence null hypothesis is accepted. So
it is inferred that there is no relationship between age group and medical checkup.

4.36 Table representing the relationship between the marital status of the respondents
and the level of satisfaction with transfer Policies

H0: There is no significant relationship between the marital status of the respondents and the
level of satisfaction with transfer policies

H1: There is significant relationship between the marital status of the respondents and the
level of satisfaction with transfer Policies

Level of satisfaction with Transfer Policies Total


Highly Highly
Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied
dissatisfied satisfied
Marital
Single 4 0 1 4 0 9
status
Married 4 10 17 28 2 61
Total 8 10 18 32 2 70

ANOVA

Sum of Mean
df F Sig.
Squares Square
Between
3.562 1 3.562 3.146 .081
Groups
Within 77.009 69 1.132
Groups
Total 80.571 70

Inference: Significant value 0.081 is greater than 0.05, hence null hypothesis is accepted.
Therefore it is concluded that there is no relationship between the marital status of the
respondents and the level of satisfaction with transfer Policies

4.37 Table representing the relationship between the designation and the Opinion about
overall Quality of work life
Assumption:
H0: There is no significant relationship between designation and the Opinion about overall
Quality of work life
H1: There is significant relationship between designation and the Opinion about overall
Quality of work life

Opinion about overall Quality of worklife


Very Excellen
Poor Fair Typical Good t Total
Designation of Supt 0 1 10 7 1 19
the respondents Inspector 1 1 14 13 4 33
Senior Tax
0 0 7 2 1 10
Assistant
Deputy officer
0 2 6 0 0 8
superintendent
Total 1 4 37 22 6 70

ANOVA

Sum of Mean
df F Sig.
Squares Square
Between 4.087 3 1.362 2.322 .043
Groups
Within
38.713 67 .587
Groups
Total 42.800 70

Inference: Significant value 0.043 is lesser than 0.05, hence null hypothesis is rejected. It is
concluded that the designation influences the opinion about the overall quality of work life.

4.38 Table representing the relationship between the experience of the respondents and
level of satisfaction with promotion policies

Level of satisfaction with Promotion policies Total


Highly Highly
dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied
dissatisfied satisfied
Less than 5
5 3 0 2 0 10
Experience of yrs
the respondents 5-10 yrs 0 1 1 1 0 3
10-15 yrs 2 2 1 1 1 7
15-20 yrs 2 5 4 2 0 13
Above 20 yrs 9 13 5 10 0 37
Total 18 24 11 16 1 70

Correlation

Asymp.
Approx. Approx.
Value Std.
T(b) Sig.
Error(a)
Interval by
Pearson's R .099 .124 .822 .414(c)
Interval
Ordinal by Spearman .078 .125 .647 .520(c)
Ordinal Correlation
N of Valid Cases 70

Inference:

The above table shows that there is positive correlation between experiences of the
respondents with promotion policies. Therefore it is concluded that the experience influences
the level of satisfaction with promotion policies.

4.39 Table representing the relationship between the designation and rating for
ventilation and A/c
Rating for Ventilation, A/C
Very Excellen Total
Poor Fair Typical
Good t
Supt 1 7 3 5 3 19
Inspector 7 5 10 10 1 33
Designation of Senior Tax
0 1 3 4 2 10
the respondents Assistant
Deputy officer
2 1 1 3 1 8
superintendent
Total 10 14 17 22 7 70

Correlation

Asymp.
Approx. Approx.
Value Std.
T(b) Sig.
Error(a)
Interval by
Pearson's R .061 .128 .501 .618(c)
Interval
Ordinal by Spearman
.074 .127 .611 .543(c)
Ordinal Correlation
No of Valid Cases 70
.

Inference:

The above table shows that there is positive correlation between the designation and
rating for ventilation and A/C. Therefore it is concluded that the designation influences the
rating for ventilation and A/C.

CHAPTER V

FINDING, SUGESSTION AND CONCLUSION

FINDING:
 Merely 74 % of data are collected from male and 26% of data are collected from
female
 Merely 19%, 28%, 32% of the respondents belong to age group of 25-35 yrs , 35-45
yrs and 45-55 yrs respectively.20% and 1% of the respondents belongs to age group
of above 55 yrs below 25 yrs.
 61% and 30% of the respondents has UG and PG Qualification respectively.6% are
SSLC and 3% are HSC.
 Merely 14% of the respondents are having less than 5 yrs of experience, 12 %,10%,
21% of the respondents are having 5-10 yrs,10-15 yrs and 15-20 yrs of experience and
43 % of the respondents are having above 20 yrs of experience.
 Merely 87% of the respondents are married and 13% of the respondents are
unmarried.
 59% of the respondents are satisfied with their salary and benefits and only 6% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with their salary and benefits.
 Merely 61% of the respondents are satisfied in their work assignment and only 4% are
dissatisfied in their work assignment.
 Merely 19% of the respondents are satisfied with medical checkup and 31 % of the
respondents are dissatisfied with the medical facilities provided by the concern.
 70% of the respondents required that the specialty hospitals to be added in the list of
authorized hospital provided by the concern.
 Merely 84% of the respondents required the health and fitness club.
 Merely 49% of the respondents agreed that they are comfortable with the workspace
allotted for them and only 3% of the respondents are disagreed.
 Merely 46% of the respondents are satisfied about the transfer policies and only 14%
of the respondents are dissatisfied.
 30% of the respondents are satisfied with bonus provided and 26% of the respondents
are dissatisfied.
 34% of the respondents are satisfied and 18% of the respondents are dissatisfied with
the quality and quantity of food available in the canteen.
 60% of the respondents are satisfied and only 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied
about the rate of food available in the canteen.
 Only 23% of the respondents are satisfied with the promotion policies and 33% of the
respondents are dissatisfied.
 Merely 61% of the respondents agreed that their superiors are cooperative and only
6% of the respondents are disagreed.
 Merely 31% of the respondents feel that the overall quality of work life is very good
and no respondents feel poor.
 Only 17% of the respondents are getting always feedback for their performance and
44% of the respondents are getting feedback on yearly report basis and 10% of the
respondents are never getting feedback.
 53% of the respondents are satisfied with the training given for them and only 13% of
the respondents are dissatisfied.
 47% of the respondents are agreed that they are getting reward for their outstanding
performance.
 42% of the respondents agreed that they are given freedom to offer suggestion on
official matters and 19% of the respondents are disagreed.
 21% of the respondents rated 5 out of 5 for seating arrangement, 41% of the
respondents rated 4 out of 5 for seating arrangement and no respondents rated 1 out of
5 for seating arrangement.
 23% of the respondents rated 5 out of 5 for computer configuration, 51% of the
respondents rated 4 out of 5 and no one rated 2 out of 5 and 1 out of 5 for computer
configuration.
 9% of the respondents rated 5 out of 5 for ventilation and A/C
 28% of the respondents rated 5 out of 5 for lightings, 48% of the respondents rated 4
out of 5 and no respondents rated 2 out of 5 and 1 out of 5 for lighting facility.
 No one rated 5 out of 5 and 4 out of 5 for fire extinguisher.
 There is no relationship between the gender of the respondents and transfer policies
 There is no relationship between age group and medical checkup
 The designation of the respondents influences the opinion about the overall quality of

work life.

 The designation doesn’t influence the level of satisfaction with salary and benefits

SUGGESTION OF THE STUDY

 The organization can give flexible working hours to their employees in the
organization and hence they can get relaxed for their next day.
 Fun at work can be encouraged to keep the employees relaxed at work.
 The gender has no way relation with the stress but still facilities and other
compensation can be provided to the female workers.
 Organization should conduct stress relieving programs like yoga and meditation for
the employees regularly in order to reduce the stress level.
 Sessions on time management, work planning can be provided to employees by their
managers.
 By creating a friendly circumstance within the organization, the employees would
enjoy working with their colleagues not considering the age or gender.
 Work can be shared among team mates in order to complete the tasks on or before
time. This will not be a burden for an individual employee.
 Employees should be satisfied by providing their appraisal/bonus/incentives on time
which will make them happy at work in turn they will lead their life happily.
CONCLUSION

The study was conducted in DSM TEXTILE AT KARUR, on the topic Work Life
Balance. Based on the study conducted the following conclusions were drawn. It was found
that, even though most of the employees are of the age below 25, they suffered from stress
related diseases. Most of the employees have problems concerning fixed working hours. The
employees at DSM TEXTILE AT KARUR get two days off in a week still they are not
able to spend quality time with their family because of work pressure.

Work life balance of employees can be enhanced by considering the above


suggestions.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

 Mamoria C B &Gankar S V (2004),“Personnel Management”, Himalaya Publishing


House.
 P Nick Blanchard and James W Thacker (2008),“Work life balance, Strategies, and
Practices”, Prentice Hall.
 Micheal Armstrong (1996),“A Hand Book of Personnel Management Practice”,
Kogan Page Ltd.
 DR.S. Shajahan (2004),“A Hand Book of Research Methods for Management”, Jaico
Pub House.
 P.R. Vittal& V. Malini (2004),“A Hand Book of Statistical & Numerical Methods”,
Margham Publications.
 Robert L. Mathis Jhon H. Jacjson (2006),“A Hand Book of Human Resource
Management”,Kogan Page Business Books.

ARTICLES:

 RameeshaKalra& Monika Bhatia, Lecturers School of Management - Ansal Institute


of Technology, Gurgaon

WEBSITES:

 www.google.co.in/human resources/work and life


 www.citehr.com/balancing work and life
 www.hrfolks.com/studyonworkandlife
 www.virtusa.com/aboutus/company-overview.asp
ANNEXURE

A STUDY ON QUALITY OF WORK LIFE BALANCE IN DSM TEXTILE


INDUSTRY AT KARUR

QUESTIONNAIRE

PERSONAL DETAILS:

1. Name

2. Gender

a) Male
b) Female
3. Age

a) below 25 yrs
b) 25-35 yrs
c) 35-45 yrs
d) 45-55yrs
e) Above 55 years
4. Educational Qualification

a) SSLC
b) +2
c) UG
d) PG
5. Designation

a) Superintendent
b) Inspector
c) Senior Tax Assistant
d) Deputy Officer Superintendent
6. Marital status

a) Single
b) Married

7. Experience

a) Less than 5 yrs


b) 5-10 yrs
c) 10-15 yrs
d) 15-20yrs
e) Above20 yrs
List out your satisfaction level regarding the following

S. No Pay and Privileges’ Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly


satisfied dissatisfied
8 Salary and benefits
9 Work Assignment
10 Transfer policies
11 Promotion policies
12 Bonus
13 Medical Check up
14 List of recognized
hospitals
15 Quality & Quantity of
food provided in canteen
16 Rate of food provided in
canteen
17 Grievance Redressed

2. Please rate the following infrastructure

S.No Infrastructure Very good Good Average poor Very Poor


18 Seating Arrangement
19 Computer configuration
20 Ventilation, A/c
21 Lights
22 Fire extinguisher

3. List out your opinion about the following statements

S.No Statements Strongly Agree Agree Moderate disagree Strongly


disagree

23 The superiors are


cooperative
24 I am comfortable
with the present
workspace allotment
25 I am given freedom
to offer suggestions
on official work
26 I am rewarded for
my outstanding
work.
27 I am satisfied with
training
given for me

4. List out your requirements for the following questions.

S. No Requirement Yes No
28 Do you require any specialty hospital to be
added in the list of hospitals provided?

29 Do you require health and fitness club?

5. How often will you get feedback on your performance?

Always Often Occasionally Rare Never

6. Your Opinion about overall quality of work life


Excellent Very good Typical Fair poor