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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit  

Audience:​ ​Teachers​ ​and​ ​School​ ​Staff  

Created​ ​by:​ ​Liz​ ​Diaz,​ ​Hannah​ ​Lee,​ ​Laura​ ​Liegler,​ ​Brittney​ ​Pacini,​ ​Lauren​ ​Thews,​ ​and​ ​Tien​ ​Tran 
 
Mental​ ​health,​ ​positive​ ​psychology,​ ​and​ ​wellness​ ​are​ ​important​ ​for​ ​promoting​ ​well-being​ ​and  
overcoming​ ​adversities.​ ​Students,​ ​families,​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​can​ ​sometimes​ ​face​ ​adversities  
that​ ​may​ ​harm​ ​functioning.​ ​In​ ​order​ ​to​ ​face​ ​adversities,​ ​we​ ​want​ ​to​ ​create​ ​a​ ​school​ ​climate  
that​ ​incorporates​ ​good​ ​mental​ ​health,​ ​positive​ ​psychology,​ ​and​ ​wellness.  
 

Mental​ ​Health:  

Is​ ​the​ ​emotional,​ ​psychological,​ ​and​ ​social​ ​state​ ​of​ ​well​ ​being​ ​in​ ​an​ ​individual​ ​ ​across​ ​every​ ​stage​ ​of​ ​his/her 
life-​ ​from​ ​early​ ​childhood​ ​and​ ​adolescence​ ​through​ ​adulthood.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​successfully​ ​function​ ​with 
everyday​ ​stressors​ ​of​ ​life,​ ​relationships.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​also​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​work​ ​productively​ ​and​ ​make​ ​an​ ​effective 
contribution​ ​to​ ​the​ ​community. 

Positive​ ​Psychology:  
A​ ​branch​ ​of​ ​psychology​ ​that​ ​focuses​ ​on​ ​the​ ​strengths,​ ​happiness,​ ​and​ ​well​ ​being​ ​of​ ​a​ ​person​ ​to​ ​be​ ​able​ ​to 
thrive​ ​individually​ ​and​ ​cultivate​ ​what​ ​is​ ​best​ ​within​ ​themselves.  

Wellness:  
Wellness​ ​is​ ​state​ ​of​ ​achieving​ ​full​ ​potential​ ​in​ ​mind​ ​and​ ​body​ ​that​ ​is​ ​an​ ​evolving​ ​process​ ​throughout​ ​a 
person’s​ ​life.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​not​ ​the​ ​absence​ ​of​ ​a​ ​disorder​ ​or​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​problems.​ ​Wellness​ ​is​ ​a​ ​dynamic​ ​and 
comprehensive​ ​lifestyle​ ​that​ ​helps​ ​people​ ​to​ ​succeed​ ​emotionally​ ​and​ ​mentally. 
(Source:​ ​https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/wellness/what-is-wellness) 


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

MENTAL​ ​HEALTH​ ​STATISTICS 

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​​​​​​​​

20%​ ​of​ ​youth​ ​ages​ ​13-18​ ​live  37%​ ​of​ ​students​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health  70%​ ​of​ ​youth​ ​in​ ​state​ ​and​ ​local  Nearly​ ​50%​ ​of​ ​youth​ ​aged​ ​8-15 
with​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health  condition​ ​age​ ​14​ ​and​ ​older​ ​drop​ ​out​ ​of  juvenile​ ​justice​ ​systems​ ​have​ ​a  didn’t​ ​receive​ ​mental​ ​health 
condition  school—the​ ​highest​ ​dropout​ ​rate​ ​of  mental​ ​illness  services​ ​in​ ​the​ ​previous​ ​year
any​ ​disability​ ​group 
 
Fact​:​ ​13.3%​ ​of​ ​children​ ​aged​ ​8–15​ ​have,​ ​or​ ​will​ ​have​ ​a​ ​serious​ ​mental​ ​illness

Fact:​ ​More​ ​than​ ​90%​ ​of​ ​children​ ​who​ ​die​ ​by​ ​suicide​ ​have​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​condition  

Fact:​​ ​1​ ​in​ ​5​ ​children​ ​ages​ ​13-18​ ​have,​ ​or​ ​will​ ​have​ ​a​ ​serious​ ​mental​ ​illness.

Fact:​​ ​Mental​ ​health​ ​affects​ ​everyone​ ​regardless​ ​of​ ​culture,​ ​race,​ ​ethnicity,​ ​gender​ ​or​ ​sexual​ ​orientation 
​ ​National​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Mental​ ​Health.​ ​www.nimh.nih.gov
 

WHY​ ​ADDRESS​ ​MENTAL​ ​HEALTH​ ​EARLY?  


■ YOU​ ​can​ ​save​ ​someone’s​ ​life 

■ Increase​ ​possibilities​ ​for​ ​young​ ​children​ ​and​ ​adolescents​ ​to​ ​receive​ ​intervention​ ​and​ ​preventative 

services​ ​before​ ​the​ ​condition​ ​worsens 

■ Able​ ​to​ ​offer​ ​protective​ ​factors​ ​such​ ​as: 

● Empowerment  ● Autonomy  

● Social​ ​Support​ ​Systems  ● Prosocial​ ​Behavior   

● Responsibility​ ​&​ ​Tolerance  ● Skills​ ​for​ ​Life 

● Family​ ​Bonding​ ​&​ ​Attention  ● Promoting​ ​a​ ​Healthy​ ​Start​ ​in​ ​Life 

National​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Mental​ ​Health.​ ​www.nimh.nih.gov


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

HOW​ ​DO​ ​SCHOOLS​ ​PLAY​ ​A​ ​ROLE?  


■ Promote​ ​a​ ​healthy​ ​school​ ​community,​ ​culture,​ ​and​ ​climate 

■ Give​ ​students​ ​a​ ​VOICE 

■ Create​ ​partnerships​ ​and​ ​collaborations​ ​with​ ​community​ ​agencies 

■ Establish​ ​referrals​ ​and​ ​other​ ​ways​ ​to​ ​connect​ ​to​ ​programs​ ​&​ ​services 

■ Create​ ​effective​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures​ ​for​ ​preventative​ ​and​ ​reactive​ ​actions 

■ Encourage​ ​parent​ ​involvement  

■ Maintain​ ​Emerging​ ​Leadership​ ​Issues  

Keep​ ​up​ ​to​ ​date​ ​with​ ​all​ ​school​ ​laws!


■ National​ ​School​ ​Boards​ ​Association ■ Curriculum

■ Equity​ ​&​ ​Discrimination ■ Facilities

■ Employment ■ Health​ ​&​ ​Nutrition

■ Governance ■ Legal​ ​System

■ Special​ ​Education​ ​&​ ​Disabilities ■ Religion

■ Privatization​ ​&​ ​Choice ■ Schools​ ​Safety

■ Student​ ​Rights​ ​&​ ​Discipline ■ Student​ ​Achievement

■ Athletics ■ Technology  


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

SYSTEMS​ ​OF​ ​CARE​ ​APPROACH 


Framework​ ​Overview  The​ ​system​ ​of​ ​care​ ​is​ ​a​ ​spectrum​ ​of​ ​effective​ ​systems,​ ​organizations, 
and​ ​groups​ ​that​ ​provides​ ​services​ ​and​ ​supports​ ​for​ ​children​ ​and​ ​youth​ ​with​ ​or​ ​at​ ​risk​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health 
challenges​ ​and​ ​their​ ​families​ ​(Stroul​ ​&​ ​Friedman,​ ​2011).​ ​Services​ ​are​ ​organized​ ​into​ ​a​ ​community, 
child-centered,​ ​family​ ​focused,​ ​and​ ​culturally​ ​and​ ​linguistically​ ​competent,​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​help​ ​individuals 
function​ ​better​ ​at​ ​home,​ ​in​ ​school,​ ​in​ ​the​ ​community,​ ​and​ ​throughout​ ​life.​ ​The​ ​systems​ ​of​ ​care​ ​are 
organized​ ​around​ ​nine​ ​overlapping​ ​dimensions:​ ​operational​ ​services,​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​services,​ ​social 
services,​ ​recreational​ ​services,​ ​child​ ​and​ ​family​ ​services,​ ​educational​ ​services,​ ​vocational​ ​services, 
substance​ ​abuse​ ​services,​ ​and​ ​health​ ​services​ ​(Fertman,​ ​Delgado,​ ​&​ ​Tarasevich,​ ​2014).​ ​Services​ ​are 
intertwined​ ​and​ ​need​ ​to​ ​work​ ​together​ ​to​ ​support​ ​children​ ​and​ ​their​ ​families.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For​ ​Teachers​ ​and​ ​School​ ​Staff  The​ ​systems​ ​of​ ​care​ ​is​ ​an​ ​approach​ ​and​ ​framework​ ​that 
involves​ ​collaboration​​ ​across​ ​all​ ​agencies,​ ​families,​ ​and​ ​youth.​ ​Members​ ​of​ ​the​ ​school​ ​are​ ​a​ ​part​ ​of​ ​the 
system​ ​of​ ​care​ ​in​ ​the​ ​dimension​ ​of​ ​educational​ ​services.​ ​A​ ​partnership​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​services​ ​could​ ​also 
be​ ​created​ ​in​ ​the​ ​school​ ​setting​ ​through​ ​school-based​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professionals​ ​(school​ ​counselors, 
school​ ​psychologists,​ ​social​ ​workers,​ ​etc.).​ ​Overall,​ ​collaboration​ ​is​ ​an​ ​important​ ​factor​ ​in​ ​the​ ​system​ ​of 
care.​ ​When​ ​multiple​ ​perspectives​ ​are​ ​united​ ​stronger​ ​preventions​ ​and​ ​interventions​ ​are​ ​able​ ​to​ ​made.​ ​With 
students​ ​spending​ ​the​ ​majority​ ​of​ ​their​ ​day​ ​in​ ​the​ ​school​ ​setting,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​the​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​that​ ​are 
in​ ​the​ ​frontline​ ​with​ ​the​ ​children​ ​and​ ​youth. 
 


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

RED​ ​FLAGS​ ​&​ ​WARNING​ ​SIGNS 


 
Warning​ ​signs​ ​may​ ​be​ ​physical,​ ​emotional,​ ​cognitive​ ​(thoughts),​ ​and​ ​behavioral.​ ​These​ ​signs​ ​ ​may​ ​also​ ​be​ ​ ​outside​ ​the​ ​normal​ ​behavior​ ​for​ ​this 
age/stage​ ​of​ ​development.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​also​ ​recommended​ ​to​ ​consult​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professional​ ​to​ ​discuss​ ​any​ ​questions​ ​or​ ​concerns​ ​ ​of​ ​these 
signs.  
 
Pre-K​ ​&​ ​Kindergarten​ ​Student​ ​(Doyle,​ ​2012)  Children​ ​&​ ​Adolescents​ ​(“Red​ ​flags”,​ ​n.d.) 

■ Aggression​ ​toward​ ​students​ ​&​ ​caregivers  ■ Increased​ ​tardiness​ ​or​ ​absences  


■ Frequent​ ​&​ ​long​ ​lasting​ ​tantrums​ ​or​ ​outbursts  ■ Angry​ ​or​ ​aggressive​ ​behaviors 
■ Eating​ ​problems  ■ Impulsive​ ​or​ ​reckless​ ​behavior 
■ Seems​ ​spiteful​ ​and​ ​openly​ ​defiant   ■ Overly​ ​irritable,​ ​moody,​ ​or​ ​grumpy 
■ Overactive​ ​and​ ​easily​ ​distracted  ■ Poor​ ​concentration​ ​and​ ​focus-​ ​student​ ​cannot 
■ Cannot​ ​focus​ ​on​ ​an​ ​activity​ ​as​ ​long​ ​as​ ​the​ ​other  focus,​ ​fidgets 
children   ■ Seems​ ​withdrawn,​ ​silent,​ ​lacks​ ​friends:​ ​especially​ ​if 
■ Frequently​ ​fails​ ​to​ ​listen​ ​to​ ​instructions  this​ ​is​ ​a​ ​change​ ​in​ ​behavior 
■ Lacks​ ​friends:​ ​has​ ​trouble​ ​making​ ​friends​ ​or  ■ Appears​ ​overly​ ​anxious,​ ​worried,​ ​or​ ​fearful  
relating​ ​to​ ​other​ ​kids  ■ Lack​ ​of​ ​energy​ ​or​ ​motivation 
■ Anxious:​ ​starts​ ​to​ ​worry​ ​all​ ​the​ ​time  ■ Lack​ ​of​ ​self-esteem:​ ​expressions​ ​of​ ​hopelessness​ ​or 
■ Overly​ ​irritable,​ ​moody,​ ​or​ ​grumpy  worthlessness 
  ■ Poor​ ​grooming​ ​or​ ​hygiene,​ ​disinterest​ ​in 
appearance:​ ​a​ ​deviation​ ​from​ ​the​ ​normal​ ​hygiene​ ​or 
appearance​ ​of​ ​the​ ​student 
■ Unexpected​ ​decline​ ​in​ ​academic​ ​performance 
■ Sleep​ ​problems-​ ​sleeping​ ​at​ ​school​ ​or​ ​in​ ​class 
■ Weight​ ​loss​ ​and​ ​loss​ ​of​ ​appetite 
■ Unexplained​ ​headaches,​ ​stomach​ ​aches,​ ​weakness 
or​ ​nausea​ ​(somatization) 
■ Racing​ ​thoughts,​ ​unrealistic,​ ​grandiose 
(unrealistic/extreme/delusional)​ ​ideas  
■ Substance​ ​abuse 

If​ ​you​ ​notice​ ​ANY​ ​red​ ​flags,​ ​ask​ ​yourself: 


● “Is​ ​this​ ​warning​ ​sign​ ​extremely​ ​different​ ​from​ ​this​ ​student’s​ ​usual​ ​way 
of​ ​behaving?”​-​ ​Is​ ​this​ ​out​ ​of​ ​character​ ​for​ ​this​ ​student?​ ​Is​ ​this​ ​a 
change​ ​in​ ​normal​ ​behavior?  
● “How​ ​frequent?”-​​ ​Are​ ​warning​ ​signs​ ​happening​ ​over​ ​and​ ​over​ ​again? 
Warning​ ​signs​ ​persist​ ​over​ ​a​ ​couple​ ​of​ ​weeks,​ ​and​ ​don’t​ ​go​ ​away.  
● “How​ ​extreme?”​ ​-​ ​If​ ​a​ ​warning​ ​sign​ ​or​ ​behavior​ ​shows​ ​up,​ ​even​ ​if​ ​it​ ​is 
infrequent,​ ​how​ ​and​ ​to​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​is​ ​this​ ​affecting​ ​the​ ​student’s 
functioning? 
If​ ​these​ ​behaviors​ ​are​ ​affecting​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​functioning,​ ​consult​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professional​ ​such​ ​as​ ​a 
counselor​ ​or​ ​school​ ​psychologist​ ​to​ ​figure​ ​out​ ​the​ ​next​ ​steps.


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

COMMON​ ​CONCERNS​ ​WITH​ ​DIAGNOSIS 


 
When​ ​it​ ​comes​ ​to​ ​diagnosing​ ​children​ ​with​ ​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​disorder,​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​must​ ​be​ ​cautious.​ ​ ​Only​ ​those​ ​who​ ​meet​ ​the​ ​requirements 
and​ ​obtain​ ​appropriate​ ​titles,​ ​licensure​ ​and/or​ ​credentials​ ​for​ ​diagnosing,​ ​should​ ​be​ ​the​ ​ones​ ​who​ ​diagnose​ ​children.​ ​ ​Otherwise,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​important 
that​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​understand​ ​the​ ​implications​ ​of​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​diagnosis​ ​on​ ​a​ ​student.​ ​Listed​ ​are​ ​ ​common​ ​concerns​ ​about​ ​mental 
illness​ ​diagnosis.​ ​For​ ​further​ ​questions​ ​and/or​ ​concerns​ ​about​ ​diagnosis,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​recommended​ ​to​ ​consult​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professional.  
 
STIGMA:​ ​ ​People​ ​often​ ​treat​ ​individuals​ ​that  COMORBIDITY:​​ ​A​ ​simultaneous​ ​occurrence​ ​of 
have​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues​ ​negatively.​ ​There​ ​is​ ​a  more​ ​than​ ​one​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​in​ ​one 
stigma​ ​attached​ ​to​ ​being​ ​labeled​ ​as​ ​having​ ​a  individual.Comorbidity​ ​can​ ​cause​ ​individuals​ ​to 
mental​ ​illness.​ ​Individuals​ ​with​ ​this​ ​label​ ​may​ ​be  struggle​ ​if​ ​the​ ​treatments​ ​for​ ​different​ ​disorders 
negatively​ ​affected​ ​by​ ​this​ ​labeling​ ​(Corrigan​ ​&  do​ ​not​ ​coincide​ ​(​American​ ​Psychiatric​ ​Association, 
Watson,​ ​2002).  2010)​. 
   
AMBIGUITY:​ ​ ​There​ ​are​ ​no​ ​clear​ ​causal​ ​factors  LATE​ ​INTERVENTION:​ ​ ​Many​ ​individuals​ ​are 
for​ ​most​ ​mental​ ​disorders​ ​in​ ​the​ ​DSM-5.   diagnosed​ ​in​ ​late​ ​stages​ ​of​ ​their​ ​mental​ ​illness. 
This​ ​makes​ ​it​ ​difficult​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​treatment​ ​for  They​ ​do​ ​not​ ​receive​ ​the​ ​supports​ ​and​ ​resources 
individuals​ ​with​ ​these​ ​disorders​ ​(National  they​ ​need​ ​to​ ​adapt.​ ​Finding​ ​symptoms​ ​and​ ​red 
Institutes​ ​of​ ​Health,​ ​2007).  flags​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​early​ ​on​ ​proves​ ​to​ ​be​ ​the 
  most​ ​effective​ ​way​ ​to​ ​treat​ ​individuals​ ​(National 
MISDIAGNOSIS:​ ​ ​Many​ ​individuals​ ​are  Institutes​ ​of​ ​Health,​ ​2007). 
misdiagnosed​ ​with​ ​mental​ ​disorders.   
Professionals​ ​often​ ​have​ ​a​ ​misunderstanding​ ​of  MEDICATION:​​ ​Many​ ​people​ ​with​ ​mental​ ​illnesses 
the​ ​symptoms​ ​and​ ​causes​ ​of​ ​certain​ ​behavioral  are​ ​only​ ​treated​ ​with​ ​medication.​ ​They​ ​do​ ​not 
and​ ​emotional​ ​problems​ ​(National​ ​Institutes​ ​of  receive​ ​any​ ​other​ ​supports.​ ​Though​ ​this​ ​works​ ​for 
Health,​ ​2007).    some​ ​people,​ ​it​ ​does​ ​not​ ​work​ ​for​ ​all​ ​people 
  (National​ ​Institutes​ ​of​ ​Health,​ ​2007). 
 


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
 

RISK​ ​FACTORS​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​  
http://www.seekingjustice.com

● Risk​ ​factors​ ​are​ ​characteristics,​ ​experiences,​ ​or​ ​behaviors​ ​of​ ​a​ ​child​ ​that​ ​increase​ ​their​ ​likelihood​ ​of​ ​developing 
poor​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​(Stone,​ ​2013). 
● Poor​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​risk​ ​factors​ ​for​ ​ ​fall​ ​under​ ​four​ ​categories:​​ ​Prenatal/Preconception,​ ​Infancy​ ​and​ ​Early 
Childhood,​ ​Middle​ ​Childhood,​ ​and​ ​Adolescence.​ ​ ​With​ ​three​ ​subcategories:​ ​Individual,​ ​Family,​ ​and​ ​Community 
(National​ ​Research​ ​Council​ ​and​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Medicine,​ ​2009). 
● It​ ​is​ ​recommended​ ​to​ ​consult​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professional​ ​to​ ​discuss​ ​any​ ​questions​ ​or​ ​concerns​ ​ ​of​ ​these 
risk​ ​factors.  

Prenatal/Preconception  Infancy​ ​and​ ​Early​ ​Childhood 


Individual  Individual 
■ Low​ ​birth​ ​weight   ■ Head​ ​injury 
■ Malnutrition  ■ Socially​ ​Inhibited 
■ Certain​ ​micronutrient​ ​deficiencies  Family  
Family   ■ Cold/Distant​ ​Mother 
■ Unwanted​ ​pregnancy  ■ Victim/Witness​ ​of​ ​child​ ​abuse/neglect 
■ Teen​ ​pregnancy  ■ Family​ ​dysfunction 
■ Risky​ ​behaviors​ ​of​ ​the​ ​mother​ ​such​ ​as​ ​drug,  ■ Low​ ​socioeconomic​ ​status 
alcohol,​ ​tobacco​ ​use  ■ Parental​ ​drug/alcohol​ ​use 
■ Genetics  ■ Loss​ ​of​ ​a​ ​parent 
Community   Community  
■ Mother​ ​living​ ​in​ ​poverty  ■ Living​ ​in​ ​poverty 
■ Negative​ ​events​ ​in​ ​the​ ​community  ■ Negative​ ​events​ ​in​ ​the​ ​community 
■ Poor​ ​academic​ ​performance​ ​in​ ​early​ ​grades  ■ Poor​ ​academic​ ​performance​ ​in​ ​early​ ​grades 

Middle​ ​Childhood  Adolescence 


Individual  Individual 
■ Poor​ ​social​ ​skills​ ​&​ ​Negative​ ​self​ ​image  ■ Female​ ​gender 
■ Attention​ ​deficit/hyperactivity​ ​disorder  ■ Early​ ​puberty 
■ Antisocial​ ​behavior  ■ Poor​ ​social​ ​skills​ ​&​ ​Negative​ ​self​ ​image 
■ Impulsivity   ■ Extreme​ ​need​ ​for​ ​approval​ ​and​ ​social​ ​support 
■ Early​ ​persistent​ ​behavior​ ​problems  ■ Early​ ​substance​ ​use 
Family  ■ Antisocial​ ​behavior 
■ Parental​ ​mental​ ​illness  Family 
■ Victim/Witness​ ​of​ ​child​ ​abuse/neglect  ■ Low​ ​socioeconomic​ ​status 
■ Marital​ ​conflict/Divorce  ■ Parental​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​&​ ​Family​ ​dysfunction 
■ Overly​ ​authoritative,​ ​permissive​ ​parenting  ■ Victim/Witness​ ​of​ ​abuse/neglect 
■ Low​ ​parental​ ​warmth​ ​&​ ​aspirations​ ​for​ ​child  ■ Negative​ ​family​ ​environment​ ​(may​ ​include 
Community  parental​ ​drug/alcohol​ ​abuse) 
■ Peer​ ​rejection/Alienation​ ​from​ ​peers  ■ Marital​ ​conflict/Divorce 
■ Deviant​ ​peer​ ​group  Community 
■ Stressful​ ​life​ ​events  ■ Peer​ ​rejection 
■ Living​ ​in​ ​poverty​ ​&​ ​Negative​ ​events​ ​in​ ​the  ■ Poor​ ​grades 
community  ■ Living​ ​in​ ​poverty​ ​&​ ​Negative​ ​events​ ​in​ ​the 
■ Availability​ ​and​ ​access​ ​to​ ​alcohol/drugs  community 
(National​ ​Research​ ​Council​ ​and​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Medicine,​ ​2009)  


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

COMMON​ ​MENTAL​ ​HEALTH​ ​DIAGNOSIS 

Here​ ​are​ ​some​ ​common​ ​diagnoses​ ​seen​ ​in​ ​schools​ ​and​ ​examples​ ​of​ ​the​ ​diagnoses: 
 
Attention​ ​Deficit​ ​Hyperactivity​ ​Disorder​ ​(ADHD) 
■ Problems​ ​paying​ ​attention,​ ​staying​ ​focused​ ​or​ ​staying​ ​on​ ​tasks,​ ​easily​ ​distracted 
● https://​www.chadd.org 
Autism​ ​Spectrum​ ​Disorder​ ​(ASD) 
■ Varying​ ​degrees​ ​of​ ​social-interaction​ ​difficulties,​ ​communication​ ​challenges​ ​and​ ​a​ ​tendency​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​in 
repetitive​ ​behaviors 
● https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-atutism/symptoms 
Conduct​ ​Disorder 
■ Bully​ ​or​ ​threaten​ ​others,​ ​lie,​ ​steal,​ ​fight,​ ​engage​ ​in​ ​power​ ​struggles,​ ​challenge​ ​rules 
● http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/conduct-disorder 
Anxiety 
■ Fearful,​ ​distressed,​ ​excessively​ ​worried​ ​or​ ​uneasy,​ ​irritable,​ ​restless,​ ​nervous,​ ​panic​ ​attacks,​ ​headaches, 
stomach​ ​pains 
● https://​www.adaa.org 
Eating​ ​Disorders  
■ Anorexia​ ​Nervosa:​ ​May​ ​see​ ​themselves​ ​as​ ​overweight​ ​when​ ​they​ ​are​ ​dangerously​ ​underweight.​ ​Severely 
restricted​ ​eating,​ ​extreme​ ​thinness,​ ​intense​ ​fear​ ​of​ ​gaining​ ​weight,​ ​distorted​ ​body​ ​image. 
■ Bulimia​ ​Nervosa:​ ​Binge-eating​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​forced​ ​vomiting,​ ​excessive​ ​use​ ​of​ ​laxatives​ ​or​ ​diuretics,​ ​fasting, 
excessive​ ​exercise,​ ​or​ ​a​ ​combination​ ​of​ ​these​ ​behaviors.​ ​Maintain​ ​relatively​ ​normal​ ​weight 
■ Binge-Eating​ ​Disorder:​ ​Lose​ ​control​ ​over​ ​their​ ​eating.​ ​Often​ ​overweight​ ​or​ ​obese 
○ https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/eating-disorders/index.shtml?utm_source=rss&utm_mediu
m=rss 
Depression 
■ Consistent​ ​sadness,​ ​emptiness,​ ​or​ ​ ​irritability​ ​over​ ​a​ ​long​ ​period​ ​of​ ​time​ ​resulting​ ​in​ ​cognitive​ ​or​ ​physical 
changes​ ​that​ ​significantly​ ​affect​ ​an​ ​individual's​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​function 
○ https://​www.adaa.org 
Selective​ ​Mutism 
■ May​ ​be​ ​talkative​ ​and​ ​display​ ​normal​ ​behaviors​ ​in​ ​situations​ ​where​ ​they​ ​feel​ ​comfortable,​ ​stand​ ​motionless 
and​ ​expressionless,​ ​turn​ ​their​ ​heads,​ ​chew​ ​or​ ​twirl​ ​their​ ​hair,​ ​avoid​ ​eye​ ​contact,​ ​withdraw​ ​into​ ​a​ ​corner​ ​to 
avoid​ ​talking 
○ http://www.selectivemutism.org/resources/new-member-packet/20_Tips_for_Parents_of_Children_
with_Selective_Mutism.pdf  


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

LEGAL​ ​ISSUES 
The​ ​Rights​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Student​ ​and​ ​Their​ ​Families
FERPA:​ ​The​ ​Family​ ​Education​ ​Rights​ ​and​ ​Privacy​ ​Act​ ​(FERPA)​ ​protects​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​education​ ​records​ ​and​ ​in 
counseling​ ​only​ ​shares​ ​private​ ​&​ ​personal​ ​information​ ​with​ ​the​ ​consent​ ​of​ ​the​ ​student’s​ ​parent​ ​or​ ​the 
eligible​ ​student​ ​(aged​ ​18​ ​or​ ​older)​ (​ Stone,​ ​2013)​. 

Privacy​ ​Rights​ ​of​ ​Minors:​​ ​Ethically​ ​speaking, 


minors​ ​have​ ​a​ ​right​ ​to​ ​privacy​ ​and​ ​confidentiality. 
However,​ ​as​ ​minors,​ ​their​ ​privacy​ ​rights​ ​legally 
belong​ ​to​ ​their​ ​parents​ ​or​ ​guardians.​ ​Because​ ​the 
law​ ​does​ ​not​ ​protect​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​from 
refusing​ ​to​ ​reveal​ ​sensitive​ ​information​ ​shared​ ​by 
the​ ​student​ ​in​ ​confidence,​ ​if​ ​the​ ​parent​ ​insists​ ​on 
acquiring​ ​the​ ​information,​ ​it​ ​must​ ​be​ ​given.​ ​When 
speaking​ ​with​ ​these​ ​ ​parents​ ​or​ ​guardians,​ ​it​ ​is 
recommended​ ​to​ ​negotiate​ ​the​ ​amount​ ​of 
information​ ​you​ ​share​ ​based​ ​on​ ​ethical​ ​grounds 
in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​protect​ ​the​ ​student’s​ ​right​ ​to​ ​privacy 
(Stone,​ ​2013)​.  

Discrimination​ ​Laws:​​ ​The​ ​Title​ ​VII​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Civil 


Rights​ ​Act​ ​of​ ​1964​ ​prohibits​ ​discrimination​ ​on​ ​the​ ​basis​ ​of​ ​sex,​ ​gender,​ ​race,​ ​color,​ ​national​ ​origin,​ ​and/or 
religion.​ ​Title​ ​IX​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Education​ ​Amendments​ ​of​ ​1972​ ​further​ ​provides​ ​protection​ ​from​ ​discrimination​ ​for 
students​ ​and​ ​California​ ​law​ ​prohibits​ ​discrimination​ ​of​ ​students​ ​based​ ​on​ ​their​ ​sexuality​ ​(Title​ ​VII,​ ​1964;​ ​Title​ ​IX, 
1972)​.  

Students​ ​with​ ​disabilities​ ​are​ ​also​ ​recognized​ ​as​ ​a​ ​discriminated​ ​group.​ ​The​ ​Americans​ ​with​ ​Disabilities​ ​Act 
(ADA)​ ​of​ ​1990,​ ​The​ ​ADA​ ​Amendments​ ​Act​ ​ ​of​ ​2008,​ ​and​ ​Section​ ​504​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Rehabilitation​ ​Act​ ​of​ ​1973​ ​are 
federal​ ​laws​ ​that​ ​protect​ ​students​ ​from​ ​discrimination​ ​based​ ​on​ ​their​ ​disability.​ ​Students​ ​have​ ​a​ ​right​ ​to 
equal​ ​treatment​ ​from​ ​all​ ​school​ ​personnel​ (​ Stone,​ ​2013)​. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

The​ ​Responsibilities​ ​of​ ​Teachers​ ​and​ ​School​ ​Staff 


 

Confidentiality:​ ​School​ ​counselors​ ​recognize​ ​their​ ​primary​ ​obligation​ ​for​ ​confidentiality​ ​is​ ​to​ ​the​ ​student 
but​ ​balance​ ​that​ ​obligation​ ​with​ ​an​ ​understanding​ ​of​ ​the​ ​family​ ​or​ ​guardians’​ ​legal​ ​and​ ​inherent​ ​rights​ ​to​ ​be 
the​ ​guiding​ ​voice​ ​in​ ​their​ ​children’s​ ​lives​ (​ ASCA​ ​Code​ ​of​ ​Ethics,​ ​2010,​ ​A.2.d)​. 

Why​ ​is​ ​Confidentiality​ ​broken?  

1. To​ ​ensure​ ​a​ ​safe​ ​environment​ ​for​ ​all​ ​students​ ​and​ ​staff. 

When​ ​is​ ​Confidentiality​ ​broken? 

1. The​ ​student​ ​expresses​ ​the​ ​desire​ ​to​ ​harm​ ​someone. 


2. The​ s​ tudent​ ​is​ ​in​ ​danger​ ​of​ ​someone​ ​else​ ​harming​ ​them. 
3. The​ s​ tudent​ ​expresses​ ​the​ ​desire​ ​to​ ​harm​ ​himself/herself. 

Mandated​ ​Reporting:​​ ​All​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​are​ ​required​ ​by​ ​law​ ​to​ ​report​ ​any​ ​signs​ ​of​ ​child 
abuse/neglect​ ​to​ ​Child​ ​Protective​ ​Services.  

You​ ​are​ ​not​ ​neither​ ​required​ ​to​ ​have​ ​witnessed​ ​the​ ​abuse​ ​nor​ ​judge​ ​whether​ ​or​ ​not​ ​the​ ​abuse​ ​occurred. 
Warning​ ​signs​ ​of​ ​abuse​ ​or​ ​being​ ​told​ ​of​ ​an​ ​incident​ ​that​ ​may​ ​be​ ​considered​ ​abuse​ ​is​ ​sufficient​ ​grounds​ ​to 
send​ ​in​ ​a​ ​report.​ ​You​ ​are​ ​required​ ​to​ ​submit​ ​the​ ​report​ ​within​ ​two​ ​days​ ​of​ ​becoming​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​the​ ​possible 
abuse. 

Child​ ​Abuse​ ​is:  

1. When​ ​a​ ​child​ ​has​ ​a​ ​physical​ ​injury​ ​that​ ​was​ ​not​ ​acquired​ ​accidentally.  
2. Subjected​ ​to​ ​cruelty​ ​or​ ​severe/unwarranted​ ​punishment. 
3. Is​ ​abused​ ​or​ ​exploited​ ​sexually. 
4. Is​ ​neglected​ ​by​ ​their​ ​caretaker,​ ​meaning​ ​they​ ​are​ ​deprived​ ​of​ ​food,​ ​clothing,​ ​shelter,​ ​supervision, 
and/or​ ​medical​ ​care  
(​What​ ​is​ ​Child​ ​Abuse,​ ​n.d.). 

In​ ​loco​ ​parentis:​ ​Meaning​ ​“in​ ​place​ ​of​ ​the​ ​parent”,​ ​this​ ​law​ ​dictates​ ​that​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​may​ ​assume 
authority​ ​of​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​well-being​ ​in​ ​absence​ ​of​ ​the​ ​parent.​ ​However,​ ​this​ ​does​ ​not​ ​mean​ ​the​ ​school 

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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
personnel​ ​fully​ ​stands​ ​in​ ​place​ ​of​ ​the​ ​parent.​ ​School​ ​personnel​ ​are​ ​responsible​ ​for​ ​the​ ​well-being​ ​of​ ​each​ ​of 
their​ ​students​ ​as​ ​a​ ​parent​ ​would​ ​just​ ​as​ ​a​ ​parent​ ​would​ ​(Stone,​ ​2013). 

Notable​ ​Court​ ​Cases 


The​ ​following​ ​court​ ​cases​ ​changed​ ​educational​ ​law​ ​and​ ​can​ ​be 
used​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guide​ ​for​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​on​ ​how​ ​they​ ​can​ ​legally 
handle​ ​situations​ ​they​ ​may​ ​encounter. 

Tinker​ ​v.​ ​Des​ ​Moines​ ​(1969)​ ​A​ ​court​ ​case​ ​that​ ​recognized​ ​a 
student's​ ​right​ ​to​ ​free​ ​speech​ ​as​ ​long​ ​as​ ​it​ ​does​ ​not​ ​substantially 
interfere​ ​with​ ​the​ ​operations​ ​of​ ​the​ ​school​ (​ Stone,​ ​2013)​.  

Kowalski​ ​v.​ ​Berkeley​ ​County​ ​School​ ​District​ ​(2012)​ ​A​ ​court 


case​ ​that​ ​determined​ ​that​ ​should​ ​the​ ​“free​ ​speech”​ ​or​ ​bullying 
that​ ​takes​ ​place​ ​off​ ​the​ ​school​ ​grounds​ ​interfere​ ​with​ ​a​ ​student’s 
ability​ ​to​ ​learn,​ ​such​ ​as​ ​severe​ ​cyberbullying​ ​leading​ ​to​ ​the 
student​ ​missing​ ​school,​ ​the​ ​school​ ​has​ ​grounds​ ​to​ ​put​ ​an​ ​end​ ​to​ ​the​ ​harassment​ (​ Stone,​ ​2013)​.  

Tarasoff​ ​vs.​ ​Regents​ ​of​ ​the​ ​University​ ​of​ ​California​ ​(1976)​ ​A​ ​court​ ​case​ ​that​ ​reinforced​ ​the​ ​mental​ ​health 
professionals​ ​duty​ ​to​ ​warn​ ​and​ ​protect​ ​potential​ ​victims​ ​that​ ​their​ ​client​ ​expresses​ ​a​ ​desire​ ​to​ ​harm​ (​ Stone, 
2013)​.  

Eisel​ ​vs.​ ​Montgomery​ ​County​ ​Board​ ​of​ ​Education​ ​(1991)​ ​This​ ​court​ ​case​ ​reminds​ ​and​ ​reinforces​ ​school 
personnel​ ​of​ ​their​ ​duty​ ​to​ ​protect​ ​the​ ​duties​ ​through​ ​their​ ​duty​ ​to​ ​warn​ ​the​ ​parents​ ​of​ ​a​ ​student​ ​who​ ​has 
been​ ​reported​ ​to​ ​be​ ​considering​ ​suicide​ (​ Stone,​ ​2013)​.  

ROLES​ ​OF​ ​SCHOOL​ ​PERSONNEL  


Although​ ​some​ ​school​ ​responsibilities​ ​are​ ​separate,​ ​all​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​should 
collaborate​ ​and​ ​work​ ​as​ ​a​ ​team​ ​to​ ​prevent​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues​ ​and​ ​foster​ ​a​ ​healthy 
school​ ​climate.​ ​Here​ ​are​ ​some​ ​possible​ ​roles​ ​as​ ​it​ ​relates​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health. 

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​School​ ​Leaders  
Principal:​​ ​Brings​ ​in​ ​prevention​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​makes 
big​ ​decisions​ ​about​ ​priorities.​ ​Supervises​ ​instruction 
and​ ​discipline​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​policies​ ​and 
interventions;​ ​enforces​ ​rules,​ ​policies,​ ​and​ ​laws; 
supervises​ ​and​ ​evaluates​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​crises;​ ​and 
creates​ ​a​ ​safe,​ ​collaborative,​ ​school​ ​environment​ ​for 
parents,​ ​students​ ​and​ ​the​ ​community​ ​(​Tracy,​ ​& 
Castro-Guillen,​ ​(n.d.). 

Assistant​ ​Principals:​ ​Supports​ ​the​ ​work​ ​of​ ​the 


principal​ ​and​ ​often​ ​engages​ ​in​ ​student​ ​support 
teams​ ​(​Tracy,​ ​&​ ​Castro-Guillen,​ ​(n.d.). 
 

11 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

School​ ​Faculty 
Teachers:​​ ​First​ ​responders.​ ​Looks​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​red​ ​flags,​ ​warning​ ​signs,​ ​and​ ​student​ ​behaviors​ ​that​ ​are 
different​ ​from​ ​regular​ ​student​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​notify​ ​proper​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​according​ ​to​ ​school​ ​policy. 
Provides​ ​unique​ ​classroom​ ​insight​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​plans.​ ​Directly​ ​implements​ ​special​ ​education​ ​and 
mental​ ​health​ ​plans​ ​and​ ​accommodations​ ​to​ ​promote​ ​effective​ ​student​ ​learning.​ ​Collaborates​ ​with​ ​school 
counselor,​ ​school​ ​psychologist,​ ​and​ ​parents​ ​to​ ​implement​ ​appropriate​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​plans​ ​for​ ​students 
(​Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2013,​ ​p.​ ​114). 

Counselors:​​ ​Conducts​ ​student/parent​ ​counseling,​ ​group​ ​counseling​ ​or​ ​individual​ ​counseling​ ​regarding 
social/emotional​ ​issues.​ ​Mediates​ ​peer-peer​ ​issues,​ ​teacher​ ​and​ ​parent​ ​issues.​ ​Coordinates​ ​releases​ ​of 
information​ ​to​ ​facilitate​ ​work​ ​of​ ​student​ ​support​ ​team.​ ​Provides​ ​curriculum​ ​based​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​classroom 
guidance​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues​ ​and​ ​life​ ​skills.​ ​Serves​ ​as​ ​case​ ​manager​ ​for​ ​crisis​ ​intervention​ ​and​ ​mental 
health​ ​plans,​ ​school-wide​ ​action​ ​plans,​ ​and​ ​implements​ ​interventions​ ​for​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​staff.​ ​Advocates​ ​for 
school​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​teacher​ ​meetings.​ ​Coordinates​ ​referrals​ ​to​ ​outside​ ​services​ ​and​ ​providers,​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as 
informal​ ​supports.​ ​Collaborates​ ​with​ ​teachers,​ ​principal,​ ​school​ ​psychologists,​ ​parents,​ ​and​ ​students​ ​to 
promote​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​plans​ ​and​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​wellness​ (​ ​Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2013,​ ​p.​ ​117). 

School​ ​Psychologists:​​ ​Schedules​ ​meetings​ ​on​ ​initial​ ​concerns,​ ​consultation​ ​&​ ​intervention​ ​on​ ​academic, 
behavioral​ ​and​ ​social​ ​emotional​ ​problems.​ ​Engages​ ​in​ ​classroom​ ​modifications,​ ​progress​ ​monitoring,​ ​and 
reassessing​ ​the​ ​current​ ​plan​ ​and​ ​the​ ​student’s​ ​progress.​ ​Talks​ ​with​ ​parents,​ ​teachers,​ ​other​ ​staff​ ​and 
students.​ ​Conducts​ ​evaluations​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​needs​ ​of​ ​children​ ​and​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns.​ ​Provides 
counseling​ ​and​ ​crisis​ ​intervention,​ ​and​ ​contacts​ ​other​ ​service​ ​providers​ ​when​ ​necessary​ ​(especially​ ​in 
special​ ​education)​ (​ Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2013,​ ​p.​ ​117). 

School​ ​Social​ ​Workers:​​ ​ ​Assists​ ​with​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns,​ ​behavioral​ ​concerns,​ ​positive​ ​behavioral 
support,​ ​academic​ ​and​ ​classroom​ ​support.​ ​Consults​ ​with​ ​teachers,​ ​parents​ ​and​ ​administrators.​ ​Provides 
individual​ ​and​ ​group​ ​counseling/therapy.​ ​Implements​ ​evidence-based​ ​education,​ ​behavior,​ ​and​ ​mental 
health​ ​services.​ ​Promotes​ ​a​ ​school​ ​climate​ ​and​ ​culture​ ​conducive​ ​to​ ​student​ ​learning​ ​and​ ​teaching 
excellence.​ ​Maximizes​ ​access​ ​to​ ​school-based​ ​and​ ​community-based​ ​resources​ ​(​Tracy,​ ​&​ ​Castro-Guillen,​ ​(n.d.). 

School​ ​Support​ ​Staff 


Administrative​ ​Assistants/​ ​Office​ ​Admin:​​ ​First​ ​responders.​ ​Looks​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​red​ ​flags,​ ​warning 
signs,​ ​and​ ​student​ ​behaviors​ ​that​ ​are​ ​different​ ​from​ ​regular​ ​student​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​notifies​ ​parents​ ​and/or 
proper​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​according​ ​to​ ​school​ ​policy.​ ​Provides​ ​unique​ ​perspective​ ​on​ ​student​ ​personality 
and​ ​social​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​talks​ ​to​ ​student​ ​about​ ​concerning​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​warning​ ​signs.​ ​Also​ ​familiar​ ​with 
the​ ​school​ ​climate​ ​and​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​school​ ​culture​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​insight​ ​for​ ​appropriate​ ​mental​ ​health 
interventions​ (​ ​Tracy,​ ​&​ ​Castro-Guillen,​ ​(n.d.). 

Nurse:​ ​Administers​ ​medications,​ ​provides​ ​a​ ​safe​ ​place,​ ​deals​ ​with 


underlying​ ​reasons​ ​for​ ​some​ ​physical​ ​symptoms​ ​(e.g.​ ​child​ ​has 
stomach​ ​ache​ ​every​ ​math​ ​class),​ ​brings​ ​student​ ​to​ ​attention​ ​of​ ​team 
if​ ​needed,​ ​deals​ ​with​ ​children​ ​in​ ​crisis,​ ​supports​ ​parents​ ​of​ ​children 
with​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​needs​ ​(e.g.​ ​help​ ​parents​ ​understand​ ​the​ ​child’s 
medications),​ ​educates​ ​the​ ​parent​ ​about​ ​the​ ​child’s​ ​condition, 
handles​ ​documents​ ​of​ ​allegations​ ​of​ ​child​ ​abuse/neglect,​ ​consults 
with​ ​physicians,​ ​collaborates​ ​with​ ​school​ ​social​ ​worker​ ​on 
attendance​ ​issues,​ ​conducts​ ​screening​ ​for​ ​vision,​ ​hearing, 
immunization​ ​follow​ ​up,​ ​determines​ ​transportation​ ​needs​ ​for 
children​ ​with​ ​health​ ​issues​ ​(Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2013,​ ​p.​ ​117). 

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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
Custodian;​ ​Bus​ ​Driver;​ ​Campus​ ​Proctors;​ ​Cafeteria​ ​Workers:​ F​ irst​ ​responders.​ ​Looks​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​illness 
red​ ​flags,​ ​warning​ ​signs,​ ​and​ ​student​ ​behaviors​ ​that​ ​are​ ​different​ ​from​ ​regular​ ​student​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​notifies 
proper​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​according​ ​to​ ​school​ ​policy.​ ​Provides​ ​unique​ ​perspective​ ​on​ ​student​ ​personality 
and​ ​social​ ​behaviors​ ​at​ ​lunch/breaks​ ​and​ ​outside​ ​of​ ​the​ ​classroom.​ ​Can​ ​also​ ​be​ ​the​ ​first​ ​to​ ​notice​ ​when​ ​a 
student​ ​is​ ​in​ ​crisis​ ​or​ ​when​ ​a​ ​serious​ ​situation​ ​happens​ ​on​ ​campus. 

Coaches:​​ ​First​ ​responders.​ ​Look​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​illness​ ​red​ ​flags,​ ​warning​ ​signs,​ ​and​ ​student​ ​behaviors​ ​that​ ​are 
different​ ​from​ ​regular​ ​student​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​notify​ ​parents​ ​and/or​ ​proper​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​according​ ​to 
school​ ​policy.​ ​Provide​ ​unique​ ​perspective​ ​on​ ​student​ ​personality​ ​and​ ​social​ ​behavior​ ​and​ ​talk​ ​to​ ​student 
about​ ​concerning​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​warning​ ​signs. 

Other​ ​Very​ ​Important​ ​People​ ​in​ ​the​ ​School 


Students:​​ ​Allies​ ​to​ ​other​ ​students.​ ​Help​ ​detect​ ​personal​ ​or​ ​other​ ​student​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns​ ​by​ ​talking 
to​ ​teachers,​ ​school​ ​counselors,​ ​principals,​ ​school​ ​psychologists​ ​or​ ​other​ ​school​ ​personnel. 

Parents:​​ ​Allies​ ​to​ ​the​ ​schools.​ ​Help​ ​detect​ ​student​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns,​ ​actively​ ​participate​ ​on 
community​ ​interagency​ ​teams​ ​and​ ​school​ ​boards​ ​to​ ​help​ ​design,​ ​implement,​ ​and​ ​evaluate​ ​services​ ​and 
curriculum​ ​for​ ​their​ ​children​ ​(Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2013,​ ​p.​ ​126). 
 

“Throw​ ​kindness​ ​around​ ​like​ ​confetti”-unknown   


 

Steps​ ​in​ ​Addressing​ ​School​ ​Wide​ ​Mental​ ​Health  


To​ ​have​ ​a​ ​happy​ ​thriving​ ​school,​ ​we​ ​want​ ​to 
improve​ ​the​ ​school​ ​climate​ ​and​ ​improve​ ​student 
mental​ ​health​ ​services.​ ​For​ ​this​ ​to​ ​be​ ​effective 
we​ ​need​ ​to​ ​take​ ​certain​ ​steps​ ​to​ ​make​ ​those 
improvements: 
 
● 1st:​ ​We​ ​look​ ​at​ ​school​ ​policies​ ​and 
make​ ​sure​ ​they​ ​are​ ​implemented​ ​&​ ​up 
to​ ​date 
● 2nd:​ ​We​ ​screen​ ​all​ ​children!​ ​Particularly 
those​ ​we​ ​think​ ​may​ ​be​ ​having​ ​a​ ​difficult 
time​ ​in​ ​school 
● 3rd:​ ​We​ ​use​ ​the​ ​multi-tiered​ ​approach 
to​ ​address​ ​all​ ​students,​ ​including​ ​at​ ​risk​ ​students,​ ​and​ ​high​ ​risk​ ​students 
● 4th:​ ​We​ ​implement​ ​programs​ ​to​ ​address​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns 
● 5th:​ ​We​ ​monitor​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​our​ ​interventions​ ​and​ ​get​ ​feedback​ ​to​ ​make​ ​them​ ​effective 
 

13 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
School​ ​Policies​ ​are​ ​written​ ​guidelines​ ​that​ ​meet​ ​the​ ​legal​ ​requirements​ ​to​ ​operate​ ​a​ ​school​ ​or 
community​ ​organization.​ ​A​ ​school​ ​district’s​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures​ ​are​ ​created​ ​to​ ​set​ ​the​ ​expectations​ ​and 
boundaries​ ​for​ ​how​ ​schools​ ​and​ ​communities​ ​interact​ ​with​ ​one​ ​another.​ ​When​ ​all​ ​members​ ​are​ ​equally 
aware​ ​of​ ​the​ ​policies,​ ​it​ ​makes​ ​it​ ​easier​ ​to​ ​address​ ​the​ ​students’​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concerns​ ​and​ ​problems. 
Mental​ ​health​ ​policies​ ​within​ ​school​ ​districts​ ​may​ ​include​ ​individual​ ​policies​ ​related​ ​to​ ​suicide,​ ​threats, 
bullying,​ ​harassment,​ ​crisis​ ​response, 
tobacco,​ ​and​ ​substance​ ​abuse.  
T​here​ ​are​ ​many​ ​advantages​ ​to​ ​having 
effective​ ​school​ ​district​ ​mental​ ​health 
policies.​ ​Policies​ ​and​ ​procedures​ ​focusing 
on​ ​the​ ​prevention​ ​of​ ​drug​ ​use​ ​and​ ​mental 
health-related​ ​problems​ ​create​ ​an 
environment​ ​that​ ​fosters​ ​safety​ ​and 
success​ ​for​ ​students.​ ​For​ ​school​ ​officials’ 
keeping​ ​up​ ​to​ ​date​ ​and​ ​understanding 
why​ ​policies​ ​are​ ​important​ ​is​ ​the​ ​first​ ​step 
in​ ​implementing​ ​them.​ ​When​ ​working​ ​in​ ​a 
school​ ​district​ ​you​ ​would​ ​want​ ​to 
acknowledge​ ​and​ ​be​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​what’s 
included​ ​in​ ​the​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures. 
Being​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​these​ ​policies​ ​will​ ​keep​ ​you 
proactive​ ​when​ ​addressing​ ​students’ 
mental​ ​health​ ​concerns.​ ​Here​ ​are​ ​some 
questions​ ​to​ ​consider​ ​when​ ​thinking​ ​about​ ​your​ ​school​ ​district’s​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures. 
Screening  
Students​ ​with​ ​internalized​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​disorders,​ ​such​ ​as​ ​depression​ ​or​ ​anxiety,​ ​are​ ​less​ ​likely​ ​to​ ​be 
treated​ ​for​ ​their​ ​disorder​ ​as​ ​opposed​ ​to​ ​students​ ​with​ ​disorders​ ​manifesting​ ​in​ ​externalized​ ​behavior,​ ​such 
as​ ​ADHD.​ ​Because​ ​of​ ​this,​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​promote​ ​mental​ ​health,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​recommended​ ​schools​ ​screen​ ​for 
distress/mental​ ​illness​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​promote​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​in​ ​all​ ​of​ ​their​ ​students. 

 
Weist​ ​et​ ​al.​ ​(2007)​ ​describes​ ​a​ ​process​ ​in​ ​which​ ​a​ ​school​ ​may​ ​begin​ ​to​ ​introduce​ ​formal​ ​screening​ ​programs 
into​ ​their​ ​policies.​ ​First​ ​they​ ​must​ ​assure​ ​that​ ​they​ ​address​ ​each​ ​of​ ​the​ ​following​ ​before​ ​they​ ​begin: 
❏The​ ​availability​ ​of​ ​a​ ​trained​ ​staff​ ​and​ ​other​ ​resources. 
❏The​ ​availability​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professionals​ ​who​ ​are​ ​trained​ ​in​ ​screening. 

14 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
❏Technical​ ​assistance​ ​in​ ​system​ ​development​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​ensure​ ​consent​ ​from​ ​parents​ ​and​ ​a​ ​student’s 
willingness​ ​to​ ​participate. 
❏A​ ​selection​ ​of​ ​screening​ ​measures​ ​appropriate​ ​for​ ​the​ ​target​ ​age​ ​groups. 
❏Logistics​ ​such​ ​as​ ​when​ ​and​ ​where​ ​to​ ​conduct​ ​the​ ​screenings​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​selection​ ​of​ ​alternative 
activities​ ​for​ ​students​ ​who​ ​were​ ​not​ ​given​ ​parental​ ​consent​ ​to​ ​be​ ​screened. 
❏Resolution​ ​of​ ​liability​ ​concerns. 
 
Once​ ​each​ ​of​ ​these​ ​are​ ​accounted​ ​for,​ ​Weist​ ​et​ ​al.​ ​(2007)​ ​continues​ ​with​ ​the​ ​five​ ​elements​ ​of​ ​successful 
formal​ ​screening​ ​programs: 

Inclusive​ ​Planning:​​ ​It​ ​imperative​ ​that​ ​all​ ​important​ ​stakeholders,​ ​such​ ​as​ ​the​ ​families​ ​of​ ​the​ ​children,​ ​mental 
health​ ​providers,​ ​and​ ​others,​ ​be​ ​involved​ ​in​ ​the​ ​planning​ ​process​ ​of​ ​the​ ​screenings.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​also​ ​recommended​ ​that 
the​ ​schools​ ​involve​ ​community​ ​agencies​ ​as​ ​further​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​families. 

Collaborative​ ​Relationships:​​ ​Established​ ​agreements​ ​between​ ​the​ ​school​ ​and​ ​community​ ​stakeholders​ ​should 
be​ ​reviewed​ ​and​ ​clarified​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​promote​ ​collaboration​ ​and​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​address​ ​liability​ ​concerns. 

Logistics:​ ​The​ ​frequency​ ​and​ ​dates​ ​of​ ​the​ ​screenings​ ​must​ ​be​ ​determined.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​recommended​ ​that​ ​schools​ ​use 
data​ ​from​ ​their​ ​community​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​which​ ​age​ ​groups​ ​are​ ​at​ ​risk​ ​in​ ​their​ ​area​ ​and​ ​would​ ​benefit​ ​the 
most​ ​from​ ​screening. 

Training,​ ​Supervision,​ ​and​ ​Support:​ ​Training​ ​is​ ​required​ ​for​ ​all​ ​staff​ ​members​ ​involved​ ​in​ ​the​ ​screening 
process.​ ​Supervision​ ​over​ ​these​ ​staff​ ​members​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​constant​ ​vigil​ ​over​ ​their​ ​collaborative​ ​relationships​ ​is 
also​ ​necessary​ ​towards​ ​a​ ​successful​ ​screening​ ​process.​ ​Staff​ ​should​ ​be​ ​trained​ ​to​ ​recognize​ ​signs​ ​and​ ​risk​ ​factors 
of​ ​poor​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​the​ ​necessary​ ​support​ ​and​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​the​ ​student​ ​and​ ​their​ ​families. 

Integration:​ ​Screening​ ​should​ ​only​ ​be​ ​one​ ​portion​ ​of​ ​a​ ​full​ ​continuum​ ​of​ ​effective​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​programs​ ​in 
schools.​ ​Data​ ​should​ ​be​ ​continuously​ ​be​ ​collected​ ​and​ ​analyzed​ ​to​ ​be​ ​used​ ​to​ ​improve​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​services 
while​ ​also​ ​advocating​ ​for​ ​positive​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​and​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​reform​ ​in​ ​schools. 
 
Progress​ ​Monitoring 
Progress​ ​monitoring​ ​is​ ​used​ ​to​ ​guide​ ​the​ ​most​ ​effective​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​intervention,​ ​assess​ ​students’ 
academic​ ​performance,​ ​quantify​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​rate​ ​of​ ​improvement​ ​or​ ​responsiveness​ ​to​ ​instruction​ ​or 
intervention,​ ​and​ ​evaluate​ ​the​ ​effectiveness​ ​of​ ​instruction​ ​or​ ​intervention.​ ​Progress​ ​monitoring​ ​can​ ​be 
useful​ ​for​ ​tracking,​ ​improving,​ ​and​ ​adjusting​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​treatment​ ​and​ ​interventions.​ ​Progress 
monitoring​ ​can​ ​be​ ​implemented​ ​with​ ​individual​ ​students​ ​or​ ​an​ ​entire​ ​class. 
❖ Progress​ ​can​ ​be​ ​monitored​ ​frequently,​ ​weekly,​ ​bi-​ ​monthly,​ ​monthly,​ ​etc. 
❖ Feedback​ ​from​ ​teachers,​ ​parents,​ ​programs,​ ​and​ ​services​ ​can​ ​be​ ​collected 
❖ Self​ ​monitoring​ ​by​ ​students​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​to​ ​see​ ​how​ ​they​ ​view​ ​the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​the​ ​counseling 
❖ Questions​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​appropriateness​ ​of​ ​the​ ​intervention​ (​ Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2014,​ ​p.​ ​182-184)​:  
➢ Is​ ​the​ ​student​ ​involved?  
➢ Are​ ​the​ ​child​ ​and​ ​family’s​ ​goals​ ​being​ ​met?  

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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
➢ Does​ ​the​ ​plan​ ​need​ ​to​ ​be​ ​improved​ ​or​ ​changed?  
➢ What​ ​are​ ​the​ ​outcomes,​ ​and​ ​do​ ​they​ ​show​ ​that​ ​the​ ​intervention​ ​is​ ​effective? 

http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/graphics/blog/wright_student_intv_progress_monitoring_worksheet_example.png 
 
Example​ ​of​ ​progress​ ​monitoring​ ​worksheet​ ​(can​ ​be​ ​modified​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health).

 
Multi-tiered​ ​Approach 
The​ ​multi-tiered​ ​systems​ ​of​ ​supports​ ​model​ ​(MTSS)​ ​is​ ​a​ ​three-tiered​ ​model​ ​used​ ​for​ ​guiding​ ​the​ ​selection​ ​of 
school-based​ ​support,​ ​prevention​ ​and​ ​intervention​ ​models.​ ​This​ ​ ​model​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​to​ ​help​ ​students​ ​at 
different​ ​levels​ ​of​ ​need.​ ​According​ ​to​ ​Merrell​ ​et​ ​al.​ ​(2011)​ ​Tier​ ​I​ ​is​ ​referred​ ​to​ ​as​ ​the​ ​primary​ ​prevention​ ​level, 
in​ ​which​ ​programs​ ​target​ ​students​ ​school-wide.​ ​The​ ​primary​ ​prevention​ ​programs​ ​address​ ​approximately 
80%​ ​of​ ​all​ ​students,​ ​with​ ​other​ ​students​ ​needing​ ​additional​ ​supports.​ ​Tier​ ​II​ ​consist​ ​of​ ​secondary​ ​programs 
that​ ​target​ ​approximately​ ​15%​ ​of​ ​the​ ​student​ ​population​ ​who​ ​are​ ​at​ ​greater​ ​risk​ ​for​ ​developing​ ​problems. 
Tier​ ​III​ ​focuses​ ​on​ ​5%​ ​of​ ​students​ ​who​ ​are​ ​high-risk​ ​and​ ​have​ ​intensive​ ​needs.​ ​Screeners​ ​are​ ​developed​ ​to 
help​ ​determine​ ​what​ ​level​ ​of​ ​intervention​ ​is​ ​best​ ​suited​ ​for​ ​a​ ​student.​ ​Once​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​level​ ​of​ ​need​ ​has 
been​ ​identified,​ ​progress​ ​monitoring​ ​is​ ​consistently​ ​conducted​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​if​ ​the​ ​programs​ ​are​ ​working 
effectively​ ​for​ ​students.  

16 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

http://jpsmath.weebly.com/response-to-intervention-rti.html 
 
 
Tier​ ​1:​ ​Primary​ ​Prevention  
Universal​ ​or​ ​primary​ ​level​ ​programs​ ​are​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​prevent​ ​emotional,​ ​behavioral,​ ​and​ ​academic​ ​problems. 
These​ ​supports​ ​or​ ​interventions​ ​are​ ​targeted​ ​school-wide​ ​for​ ​all​ ​students.​ ​Often​ ​supports​ ​at​ ​this​ ​level​ ​do​ ​not 
require​ ​parent​ ​permission​ ​for​ ​students​ ​to​ ​access​ ​and​ ​participate​ ​in.​ ​Just​ ​by​ ​being​ ​a​ ​part​ ​of​ ​a​ ​community 
organization​ ​activity,​ ​students​ ​can​ ​receive​ ​access​ ​and​ ​participate.​ E ​ xamples:​ ​student​ ​support​ ​teams,​ ​health 
curriculum​ ​content,​ ​assemblies,​ ​classroom​ ​programs,​ ​conflict​ ​resolution,​ ​nursing​ ​services,​ ​and 
extracurricular​ ​activities​ ​(Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2014,​ ​p.​ ​141).  
 
 
Tier​ ​2:​​ ​ ​Secondary​ ​Prevention 
Selected​ ​and​ ​indicated​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​services:​ ​Interventions​ ​that​ ​are​ ​targeted​ ​to​ ​some​ ​students​ ​that​ ​are​ ​at 
risk​ ​for​ ​a​ ​particular​ ​issue.​ ​The​ ​purpose​ ​is​ ​early​ ​identification​ ​to​ ​treat​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​problems,​ ​reduce 
frequency,​ ​and​ ​limit​ ​negative​ ​consequences. 
Examples:​ ​student​ ​support​ ​teams​ ​&​ ​different​ ​school-based​ ​small​ ​group​ ​counseling​ ​programs​ ​that​ ​can 
address​ ​one/each​ ​of​ ​the​ ​following:​ ​developmental​ ​concerns,​ ​family​ ​relationships,​ ​anger​ ​management, 
conflict​ ​resolution,​ ​drug​ ​problems,​ ​violence,​ ​suicide,​ ​dropouts,​ ​personal​ ​relationships​ ​and​ ​stress 
management​ ​(Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2014,​ ​p.​ ​141). 
 
 
 

17 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
 
 
Tier​ ​3:​ ​Tertiary​ ​Prevention 
Individualized,​ ​intensive​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​services:​ ​Interventions​ ​designed​ ​for​ ​high-risk​ ​students​ ​that​ ​need 
more​ ​comprehensive​ ​and​ ​individualized​ ​services​ ​over​ ​a​ ​longer​ ​period​ ​of​ ​time​ ​and​ ​are​ ​showing​ ​signs​ ​of​ ​a 
mental​ ​disorder.​ ​These​ ​services​ ​include​ ​student​ ​support​ ​teams,​ ​Individualized​ ​Education​ ​Plans​ ​(IEP’s),​ ​504 
plans,​ ​case​ ​management,​ ​and​ ​other​ ​comprehensive​ ​services.​ ​The​ ​purpose​ ​of​ ​these​ ​Tier​ ​3​ ​interventions​ ​is​ ​to 
provide​ ​specific​ ​students​ ​with​ ​the​ ​tools​ ​and​ ​resources​ ​they​ ​need​ ​to​ ​succeed​ ​academically​ ​and​ ​personally 
and​ ​minimize​ ​the​ ​intensity​ ​and​ ​progression​ ​of​ ​their​ ​problem​ ​behaviors/mental​ ​disorder.​ E ​ xamples: 
One-on-one​ ​counseling,​ ​referrals​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​assessment,​ ​special​ ​education,​ ​hospitalization,​ ​drug 
treatment,​ ​crisis​ ​intervention,​ ​and​ ​family​ ​intervention​ ​(Fertman​ ​et​ ​al.,​ ​2014,​ ​p.​ ​119-314). 
 

FAQ’s​ ​ ​and​ ​Resources 


Although​ ​this​ ​toolkit​ ​has​ ​tons​ ​of​ ​useful​ ​information,​ ​there​ ​are​ ​other​ ​resources​ ​such​ ​as​ ​websites,​ ​blogs,​ ​and 
community​ ​clinics​ ​that​ ​can​ ​provide​ ​extra​ ​information​ ​and​ ​support​ ​for​ ​addressing​ ​and​ ​intervening​ ​for​ ​mental 
health​ ​in​ ​the​ ​schools. 
 

Where​ ​can​ ​I​ ​find​ ​other​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​information? 


● Community:​ ​Non-profits,​ ​community​ ​clinics,​ ​government​ ​websites,​ ​families,​ ​other​ ​schools,​ ​etc. 
● School:​​ ​School​ ​psychologists,​ ​school​ ​counselors,​ ​school​ ​social​ ​workers,​ ​etc. 
● Technology:​​ M​ ental​ ​health​ ​blogs​ ​(Ex:​ ​http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/),​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​apps 
for​ ​iphone/android​ ​(Ex:​ ​Code​ ​Blue,​ ​Lantern,​ ​Optimism),​ ​webinars,​ ​NPR,​ ​TED​ ​talks,​ ​American 
Psychological​ ​Association​ ​(APA),​ ​American​ ​School​ ​Counseling​ ​Association​ ​(ASCA),​ ​National 
Association​ ​of​ ​School​ ​Psychologists​ ​(NASP),​ ​university​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​toolkits,​ ​NIMH,​ ​WHO,​ ​etc. 

How​ ​can​ ​I​ ​take​ ​care​ ​of​ ​myself​ ​to​ ​ensure​ ​I​ ​don’t​ ​burnout?  
● Identifying​ ​and​ ​Planning​ ​for​ ​Triggers 
● Managing​ ​Responses​ ​to​ ​Stress 
● Personal“Crisis”Plan 
● Create​ ​a​ ​plan​ ​of​ ​support​ ​group​ ​such​ ​as​ ​physical,​ ​mental,​ ​and​ ​emotional​ ​health 
● Create​ ​Home​ ​to​ ​Work​ ​and​ ​Work​ ​to​ ​Home​ ​Transition 
● Hobbies/Enjoyment 
● Ensure​ ​connection​ ​to​ ​Others:​ ​outings,​ ​laughing,​ ​family​ ​time,​ ​bonding 
● Spiritual​ ​Renewal/Meaning​ ​Making 
● For​ ​more​ ​info​ ​go​ ​to:​ ​https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/recovering-from-burnout.htm 

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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 

What​ ​do​ ​I​ ​need​ ​to​ ​know​ ​about​ ​medications?  


The​ ​best​ ​source​ ​of​ ​information​ ​regarding​ ​medications​ ​is​ ​the​ ​physician​ ​prescribing​ ​them.​ ​He​ ​or​ ​she​ ​should 
be​ ​able​ ​to​ ​answer​ ​questions​ ​such​ ​as: 
● What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​medication​ ​supposed​ ​to​ ​do​ ​and​ ​when​ ​should​ ​it​ ​begin​ ​to​ ​take​ ​effect? 
● How​ ​is​ ​the​ ​medication​ ​taken​ ​and​ ​for​ ​how​ ​long? 
● What​ ​food,​ ​drinks,​ ​other​ ​medicines,​ ​and​ ​activities​ ​should​ ​be​ ​avoided​ ​while​ ​taking​ ​this​ ​medication? 
● What​ ​are​ ​the​ ​side​ ​effects​ ​and​ ​what​ ​should​ ​be​ ​done​ ​if​ ​they​ ​occur? 
● What​ ​do​ ​I​ ​do​ ​if​ ​a​ ​dose​ ​is​ ​missed? 
● Is​ ​there​ ​any​ ​written​ ​information​ ​available​ ​about​ ​this​ ​medication? 
● Are​ ​there​ ​other​ ​medications​ ​that​ ​might​ ​be​ ​appropriate?​ ​If​ ​so,​ ​why​ ​do​ ​you​ ​prefer​ ​the​ ​one​ ​you​ ​have 
chosen? 
● How​ ​do​ ​you​ ​monitor​ ​medications​ ​and​ ​what​ ​symptoms​ ​indicate​ ​that​ ​they​ ​should​ ​be​ ​raised, 
lowered,​ ​or​ ​changed? 
All​ ​medications​ ​should​ ​be​ ​taken​ ​as​ ​directed​ ​and​ ​teachers​ ​and​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​should​ ​always​ ​consult​ ​with​ ​a 
medical​ ​professional​ ​for​ ​questions​ ​regarding​ ​medications. 

What​ ​can​ ​parents​ ​do​ ​to​ ​help?  


● Be​ ​attentive​ ​and​ ​supportive​ ​of​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​and​ ​teachers​ ​needs 
● Attend​ ​important​ ​meetings 
● Be​ ​involved​ ​in​ ​any​ ​process​ ​regarding​ ​the​ ​student’s​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​concern 
● Participate​ ​in​ ​parent​ ​engagement​ ​and​ ​training​ ​opportunities 
● Mental​ ​Health​ ​Professionals​ ​can​ ​help​ ​parents​ ​by​ ​having​ ​FAQ​ ​resources​ ​readily​ ​available​ ​and​ ​easy 
“go-to”​ ​resources​ ​on​ ​hand 

 
Teacher​ ​and​ ​Classroom​ ​Resources: 
❖ Classroom​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​mental​ ​health: 
http://au.professionals.reachout.com/teaching-and-learning/classroom-resources 
❖ Classroom​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​for​ ​teachers​ ​in​ ​high​ ​school:​​ ​Managing​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​in​ ​the​ ​classroom, 
how​ ​to​ ​help​ ​a​ ​student,​ ​how​ ​to​ ​work​ ​with​ ​families,​ ​self-care,​ ​community​ ​resources,​ ​etc: 
https://www.classroommentalhealth.org/ 
❖ Classroom​ ​behavior​ ​resources​ ​related​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health: 
https://www.hincksdellcrest.org/ABC/Teacher-Resource/Welcome 
❖ National​ ​association​ ​of​ ​special​ ​education​ ​teachers​ ​website:​​ h ​ ttp://www.naset.org/3433.0.html 
❖ Teach​ ​magazine:​​ ​http://www.teachmag.com/archives/7220 
❖ Supporting​ ​the​ ​well​ ​being​ ​of​ ​young​ ​minds​ ​in​ ​schools​ ​website: 
http://www.youngminds.org.uk/training_services/training_and_consultancy/for_schools/resources
_for_teachers 
❖ Webinars​ ​for​ ​childrens’​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​and​ ​emotional​ ​or​ ​behavioral​ ​disorders: 
http://www.pacer.org/cmh/resources/featured-resources/ 
❖ Mindfulness​ ​guided​ ​audio​ ​recordings:​​ ​http://marc.ucla.edu/ 

 
 

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Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
Whole​ ​School​ ​Resources:  
❖ UCLA​ ​school​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​project​ ​virtual​ ​toolbox: 
http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/summit2002/toolbox.htm 
❖ Response​ ​to​ ​Intervention​ ​(RTI)​ ​for​ ​the​ ​whole​ ​school​ ​information:​ ​implementing​ ​interventions​ ​for 
mental​ ​health​ ​in​ ​a​ ​large​ ​scale:​ ​ ​http://www.rtinetwork.org/about-us 
❖ School​ ​counselor​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​resources: 
http://www.schoolcounselor.org/school-counselors-members/professional-development/learn-mor
e/student-mental-health-resources 
❖ School​ ​personnel​ ​tactics​ ​to​ ​bring​ ​more​ ​resources​ ​to​ ​schools: 
http://www.schoolhealthcenters.org/start-up-and-operations/start-an-sbhc/for-educator/ 
❖ Mental​ ​health​ ​resources​ ​from​ ​CA​ ​department​ ​of​ ​Education: 
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/cg/mh/mhresources.asp 
❖ Orange​ ​County​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​resources:   
http://www.ocde.us/HealthyMinds/Pages/Resources.aspx 
❖ Positive​ ​behavior​ ​supports​ ​and​ ​intervention​ ​information:​​ ​https://www.pbis.org/school 
❖ Mental​ ​illness​ ​fact​ ​sheet: 
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/treatment-of-children-with-mental-illness-fact-shee
t/index.shtml 
❖ Common​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​diagnoses​ ​fact​ ​sheet: 
http://www.acmh-mi.org/get-information/childrens-mental-health-101/common-diagnosis/  
 
Tools​ ​for​ ​Mental​ ​Health​ ​Support​ ​in​ ​Schools 
Below​ ​are​ ​some​ ​tools​ ​you​ ​can​ ​use​ ​to​ ​help​ ​you​ ​support​ ​students​ ​with​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues.​ ​This​ ​section​ ​also​ ​includes 
ways​ ​in​ ​which​ ​you​ ​can​ ​expand​ ​your​ ​knowledge​ ​on​ ​the​ ​treatment​ ​and​ ​implications​ ​of​ ​these​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues.​ B ​ e 
sure​ ​to​ ​check​ ​in​ ​with​ ​the​ ​school’s​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professional​ ​when​ ​considering​ ​implementation​ ​or​ ​interventions. 

Coping​ ​Skills​ ​Toolbox​ ​:  


❖ This​ ​is​ ​for​ ​students​ ​who​ ​need​ ​support​ ​with​ ​anxiety​ ​and/or​ ​stress.​ ​The​ ​box​ ​is​ ​filled​ ​with​ ​things​ ​that 
help​ ​a​ ​specific​ ​child​ ​calm​ ​down. 
❖ Includes:​ ​coloring​ ​pages,​ ​crayons,​ ​sensory​ ​items,​ ​stress​ ​ball,​ ​mindfulness​ ​audio​ ​recordings,​ ​hourglass 
sand​ ​timers,​ ​etc.  

Feelings​ ​thermometer​ ​:  


❖ This​ ​helps​ ​young​ ​students​ ​identify​ ​feelings​ ​and​ ​emotions​ ​in​ ​a​ ​visual/tangible​ ​way. 
❖ Example:​ ​http://www.mathematicshed.com/uploads/1/2/5/7/12572836/insideoutemotherm.pdf 

Emotion/Anxiety/Depression/Stress​ ​Scales:  
❖ Helps​ ​students​ ​understand​ ​their​ ​own​ ​emotions​ ​and​ ​helps​ ​the​ ​counselor/teacher/psychologist​ ​to​ ​see 
how​ ​serious​ ​symptoms​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​issues​ ​are. 
❖ http://dpi.wi.gov/sspw/mental-health/behavioral-screening-tools 

School-Wide​ ​Evaluation​ ​Tool:  


❖ This​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​to​ ​ ​evaluate​ ​the​ ​school-wide​ ​action​ ​plan​ ​at​ ​your​ ​school. 
❖ https://www.pbis.org/common/cms/files/pbisresources/SET_Manual_02282012.pdf 

School​ ​Climate​ ​Survey:  


❖ This​ ​survey​ ​is​ ​designed​ ​for​ ​teachers​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​get​ ​a​ ​feel​ ​of​ ​the​ ​school​ ​environment,​ ​climate,​ ​and 
needs.  
❖ http://www.schoolclimatesurvey.com/files/Teacher_ASC_Survey_2006_Verson_2.1.5.1.pdf 

20 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
Externalizing​ ​and​ ​Internalizing​ ​Behavior​ ​Scales:  
❖ For​ ​teachers​ ​or​ ​counselors​ ​to​ ​observe​ ​a​ ​student’s​ ​internalizing​ ​or​ ​externalizing​ ​behavior 
➢ Internalizing: 
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw1vB9Fj0NQ7SGUwWTk1Y3kwVXlOVHBaVHl6dUNkZkVtZ0
FR/view?usp=sharing 
➢ Externalizing: 
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw1vB9Fj0NQ7dlFmekNEUFZWWGp6X0FQaXV5WEtkbFctZ1
lz/view?usp=sharing 

Screening​ ​and​ ​Intervention​ ​Record​ ​Form:  


❖ Tiered​ ​approach​ ​to​ ​creating​ ​a​ ​PBIS​ ​plan​ ​for​ ​your​ ​school 
❖ https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw1vB9Fj0NQ7WlV0U0s3VVJtWnhuU0lOWThvdVRYZlRjcFRz/view?u
sp=sharing 

Teen​ ​Mental​ ​Health​ ​Diagnosis​ ​Checklists:  


❖ A​ ​list​ ​of​ ​checklist​ ​tools​ ​for​ ​diagnosing​ ​youth​ ​with​ ​mental​ ​disorders.​ ​As​ ​school​ ​professionals,​ ​you​ ​will 
not​ ​be​ ​diagnosing​ ​any​ ​students,​ ​but​ ​these​ ​checklists​ ​can​ ​help​ ​you​ ​understand​ ​the​ ​signs​ ​and 
symptoms​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​disorders​ ​in​ ​youth.  
❖ All​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​diagnosis​ ​should​ ​be​ ​performed​ ​by​ ​licensed​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professionals​ ​only. 
❖ http://teenmentalhealth.org/care/health-professionals/clinical-tools/ 

Mental​ ​Health​ ​First​ ​Aid​ ​Training:  


❖ An​ ​8-hour​ ​training​ ​on​ ​how​ ​to​ ​help​ ​and​ ​support​ ​someone​ ​that​ ​has​ ​been​ ​diagnosed​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mental 
illness.​ ​Anyone​ ​can​ ​participate.  
❖ https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/cs/ 
 
Checklists​ ​for​ ​Teachers​ ​and​ ​School​ ​Staff​ ​Members  
The​ ​school​ ​setting​ ​is​ ​a​ ​unique​ ​setting​ ​where​ ​teachers​ ​have​ ​a​ ​powerful​ ​impact​ ​on​ ​individual​ ​students.​ ​Here 
are​ ​some​ ​suggested​ ​checklists​ ​that​ ​can​ ​be​ ​utilized​ ​within​ ​the​ ​school.​ ​There​ ​are​ ​also​ ​other​ ​checklists,​ ​not 
listed,​ ​that​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​as​ ​well.​ ​Not​ ​only​ ​can​ ​you​ ​work​ ​to​ ​reduce​ ​the​ ​stigma​ ​associated​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health, 
you​ ​can​ ​also​ ​educate​ ​and​ ​encourage​ ​other​ ​school​ ​staff​ ​members​ ​to​ ​seek​ ​out​ ​appropriate​ ​supports​ ​for 
students.  
❖ Below​ ​is​ ​a​ ​quick​ ​checklist​ ​of​ ​what​ ​you​ ​can​ ​do​ ​as​ ​a​ ​teacher​ ​and​ ​staff​ ​member​ ​to​ ​better​ ​support 
your​ ​students.  
❏Be​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​the​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures​ ​in​ ​your​ ​school​ ​district​ ​related​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health  
❏​ ​Make​ ​sure​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​procedures​ ​are​ ​kept​ ​up​ ​to​ ​date 
❏Work​ ​to​ ​create​ ​a​ ​positive​ ​school​ ​culture​ ​and​ ​climate  
❏Be​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​red​ ​flags​ ​ ​and​ ​warnings​ ​sides​ ​related​ ​to​ ​mental​ ​health  
❏Provide​ ​coping​ ​strategies​ ​and​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​students  
❏Refer​ ​students​ ​to​ ​school​ ​based​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​professionals 
❏Use​ ​research​ ​based​ ​instruction​ ​to​ ​support​ ​all​ ​students  
❏Educate​ ​yourself​ ​on​ ​the​ ​resources​ ​available​ ​within​ ​the​ ​community  
❏Work​ ​collaboratively​ ​with​ ​the​ ​school​ ​team,​ ​parents,​ ​and​ ​community​ ​members 
21 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
 
The​ ​following​ ​suggested​ ​checklists​ ​were​ ​obtained​ ​from:​ h
​ ttp://www.rtinetwork.org/about-us 
 
❖ Checklist​ ​of​ ​processes​ ​during​ ​the​ ​implementation​ ​stage​ ​of​ ​interventions:  
http://www.rtinetwork.org/images/content/downloads/get%20started/hall_checklist.pdf 
 
❖ Checklist​ ​for​ ​school​ ​personnel​ ​to​ ​evaluate​ ​and​ ​implement​ ​the​ ​mental​ ​health​ ​component​ ​of 
your​ ​school​ ​crisis​ ​and​ ​emergency​ ​plan: 
http://www.nctsnet.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/Challenger%20Newsletter%20Checklist-final-sw_rvs
d.pdf 
 
❖ Problem​ ​solving​ ​checklist​ ​for​ ​interventions:​​ ​assessing​ ​integrity​ ​of​ ​4​ ​steps​ ​in​ ​the​ ​intervention 
process​ ​(problem​ ​identification,​ ​problem​ ​analysis,​ ​intervention,​ ​and​ ​response​ ​to​ ​the​ ​intervention): 
file:///Users/Pacini/Documents/CSP%20500/meeting_checklist%20(2).html 
 
❖ Critical​ ​components​ ​checklist:​ ​used​ ​to​ ​evaluate​ ​the​ ​degree​ ​to​ ​which​ ​the​ ​intervention​ ​steps​ ​are 
evidenced​ ​in​ ​intervention​ ​reports. 
file:///Users/Pacini/Documents/CSP%20500/critical_components%20(2).html 
 
 

22 
Mental​ ​Health​ ​Toolkit 
References 

1. Addressing​ ​Mental​ ​Health​ ​Needs...​ ​-​ ​School​ ​Social​ ​Work​ ​Association​ ​of​ ​America.​ ​(n.d.).​ ​Retrieved 
October​ ​14,​ ​2016,​ ​from​ ​http://www.sswaa.org/?600 
2. American​ ​Psychiatric​ ​Association.​ ​(2013).​ D ​ iagnostic​ ​and​ ​statistical​ ​manual​ ​of​ ​mental​ ​disorders​ ​(5th 
ed.).​ ​Arlington,​ ​VA:​ ​American​ ​Psychiatric​ ​Publishing. 
3. American​ ​School​ ​Counselor​ ​Association.​ ​(2010).​ ​Ethical​ ​standards​ ​for​ ​school​ ​counselors.​ ​Retrieved 
from​ ​http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/EthicalStandards2010.pdf 
4. Anderson,​ ​M.,​ ​&​ ​Cardoza,​ ​K.​ ​(2016,​ ​August​ ​31).​ ​Mental​ ​health​ ​in​ ​schools:​ ​A​ ​hidden​ ​crisis​ ​affecting 
millions​ ​of​ ​students.​ ​Retrieved​ ​October​ ​14,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/08/31/464727159/mental-health-in-schools-a-hidden-crisis-af
fecting-millions-of-students 
5. Corrigan,​ ​P.​ ​W.,​ ​&​ ​Watson,​ ​A.​ ​C.​ ​(2002,​ ​February).​ ​Understanding​ ​the​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​stigma​ ​on​ ​people​ ​with 
mental​ ​illness.​ ​World​ ​Psychiatry​,​ ​1​(1),​ ​16-20.​ ​Retrieved​ ​from 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1489832/ 
6. Doyle,​ ​K.​ ​B.​ ​(2012).​ ​Childhood​ ​Mental​ ​Health:​ ​Toddler​ ​and​ ​Preschooler​ ​Red​ ​Flags.​ ​Retrieved​ ​October 
06,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
http://www.pregnancy.org/article/childhood-mental-health-toddler-and-preschooler-red-flags 
7. Fertman,​ ​C.I.,​ ​Delgado,​ ​M.​ ​M.,​ ​&​ ​Tarasevich,​ ​S.​ ​L.​ ​(2013).​​ ​Promoting​ ​Child​ ​and​ ​Adolescent​ ​Mental 
Health​.​ ​Burlington,​ ​MA:​ ​Jones​ ​&​ ​Barlett​ ​Learning 
8. Harding,​ ​R.​ ​H.,​ ​MD.​ ​(2011,​ ​November​ ​27).​ ​Recognizing​ ​the​ ​Signs​ ​of​ ​Student​ ​Mental​ ​Health​ ​Problems. 
Retrieved​ ​October​ ​06,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
http://www.seenmagazine.us/Articles/Article-Detail/articleid/1822/recognizing-the-signs-of-student
-nbsp-mental-health-nbsp-problems 
9. Merrell,  K. W., Ervin, R. A., & Peacock, G. G. (2011). ​School Psychology for the 21st Century: Foundations 
and​ ​Practices​ ​(Second).​ ​New​ ​York,​ ​NY:​ ​The​ ​Guilford​ ​Press.  
10. NAMI:​ ​National​ ​Alliance​ ​on​ ​Mental​ ​Illness.​ ​(n.d.).​ ​Retrieved​ ​October​ ​11,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
http://www.nami.org/ 
11. National​ ​Institutes​ ​of​ ​Health​ ​(US).​ ​(2007).​ ​Biological​ ​sciences​ ​curriculum​ ​study:​ ​Information​ ​about 
mental​ ​illness​ ​and​ ​the​ ​brain.​ ​In​ ​National​ ​Center​ ​for​ ​Biotechnology​ ​Information:​ ​NIH​ ​curriculum 
supplement​ ​series​.​ ​Retrieved​ ​from​ ​https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK20369/ 
12. National​ ​Research​ ​Council​ ​and​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Medicine.​ ​(2009).​ P ​ reventing​ ​mental,​ ​emotional,​ ​and 
behavioral​ ​disorders​ ​among​ ​young​ ​people:​ ​Progress​ ​and​ ​possibilities​.​ ​Washington,​ ​DC:​ ​The​ ​National 
Academies​ ​Press. 
13. NIMH​ ​»​ ​Eating​ ​Disorders.​ ​(n.d.).​ ​Retrieved​ ​October​ ​11,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/eating-disorders/index.shtml 
14. Recovering​ ​From​ ​Burnout:​ ​Finding​ ​Passion​ ​for​ ​Your​ ​Role​ ​Again.​ ​(n.d.).​ ​Retrieved​ ​November​ ​25,​ ​2016, 
from​ ​https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/recovering-from-burnout.htm 
15. Red​ ​Flags:​ ​Information​ ​for​ ​Teachers​ ​and​ ​Other​ ​School​ ​Staff.​ ​(n.d.).​ ​Retrieved​ ​October​ ​6,​ ​2016,​ ​from 
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information​ ​for​ ​Teachers.pdf 
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