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Geometry Area and Volume

Project
Measurement
Area and Surface Area
Volume
Standard and Metric Units
For Grades 6, 7, and 8

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Instructions for Teachers

Purpose:
To give students practice with measuring boxes and cylinders in both
standard English units and metric units; they can also calculate surface
area, perimeter, and volume.

Notes to Teacher:
1. Cereal boxes and other boxes used in the kitchen and around the
house are ideal for this exercise. Cans and other non-box containers
can be used for this project depending on the level of expertise that
your students show.

2. At a minimum, rulers and calculators will be needed. Graph paper


can be used for some of the advanced exercises.

3. This project will cover the following areas in your curriculum:

a. Measurement
b. Standard and metric units
c. Perimeter
d. Area calculations
e. Surface area
f. Volume
g. Fractions
h. Estimation

4. This project could also be used as a cooperative learning group


activity. Students can work in twos or threes and split up the work.

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Classroom Procedure:

1. Have the students bring in boxes and containers several days in


advance of the day planned for this activity.

2. On the day of the project, pass out rulers, calculators, boxes, and the
handouts.

3. Explain the project, split up students into groups if used, and answer
any questions before starting.

4. Supervise students as they go through the project.

5. At the end of the class, ask for feedback as to problem areas, insights
they may have gained, and any recommendations that they may
make.

6. Collect all materials and congratulate your students and yourself on a


successful class. Reward everyone with chocolate treats (optional,
but nice to do).

Additional Notes:
1. You can introduce the topic by having the students estimate their own
heights and then measure themselves and their classmates.

2. If the teacher needs to cover estimation techniques, then have the


students estimate the dimensions before actually measuring the box.
You can discuss with the students how to make their initial guess and
how to make better estimates in the future.

3. Measurements can be rounded to the nearest whole number for ease


of calculation or used as exact measurement in either a fraction or
decimal form, depending on where you are in the curriculum. You

Otto Hanneman © 2014


can even have the students switch back and forth between fractions
and decimals.

4. Note that it is easier and more accurate to measure the diameter of a


circle than the radius. Make sure the students take the largest
measure of the circle for the diameter.

5. “Advanced Explorations” are listed at the end of this lesson plan.


You can include some or all of these exercises or include some
others that you think of as relevant. Let me know of any you try.

Feedback:
I would appreciate any comments, suggestions and recommendations that
you make concerning this lesson. There may be grade related suggestions
that make it better for each level or all levels. Thank you for your
assistance. My contact information is below.

Name: Otto Hanneman

E-mail: hanneman77@yahoo.com

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Name ________________
Date _________________

Geometry Area/Volume Project


Type of Container ______________________

Dimensions: (for box container) (Standard, Metric)


Length _______ , ________
Width ________ , ________
Depth ________ , ________

Surface Area: (Side X Side) - Standard

Surface # 1 - _____ X _____ = _____


Surface # 2 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 3 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 4 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 5 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 6 - _____ X _____ = _____

Total Area (sum #1 to #6) = _____

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Surface Area: (Side X Side) – Metric

Surface # 1 - _____ X _____ = _____


Surface # 2 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 3 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 4 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 5 - _____ X _____ = _____
Surface # 6 - _____ X _____ = _____

Total Area (sum #1 to #6) = _____

Perimeter: (Standard)
Side #1 - _____
Side #2 - _____
Side #3 - _____
Side #4 - _____
Side #5 - _____
Side #6 - _____

Total Length = _____

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Perimeter: (Metric)
Side #1 - _____
Side #2 - _____
Side #3 - _____
Side #4 - _____
Side #5 - _____
Side #6 - _____

Total Length = _____

Volume: (Length X Width X Depth)

Standard _____ X _____ X _____ = _____

Metric _____ X _____ X _____ = _____

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Name ________________
Date _________________

Geometry Area/Volume Project


Type of Container - ______________________
Dimensions: (for cylinder containers) (Standard, Metric)

Height _________, _________


Diameter ________, _______
Calculations:
Circle Area ________, _________
Circumference _______, ________
Area = ; Circumference = 2πr = πd

Surface Area:
Upper and Lower Surfaces (circles):
_________, _________
Side: (Circumference X Height)

_________, _________
Total Surface Area: ________, ________

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Volume Calculations: (Standard, Metric)

Area of Base: ________, _________


Height: ________, _________

Volume = Area of Base X Height


Standard ________ X ________ = ________

Metric ________ X ________ = ________

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Observations: What are some of the items/characteristics
that you noticed while you were working on this project?

1. ____________________________________

2. ____________________________________

3. ____________________________________

4. ____________________________________

5. ____________________________________

Otto Hanneman © 2014


Advanced Explorations:
1. If the cost of cardboard is $0.05 per sq. in., how much will
the material of this box cost?

2. If the cost of printing is $0.01 per sq. in., how much extra will
the printing cost?

3. If the cost of food-specific cardboard is an extra $0.015 per


sq. in., what is the extra cost of the cardboard used for food?

4. If your class used different sized boxes, then graph the


surface area against the volume, with surface area being on
the X-axis and volume on the Y-axis. What do you notice
about this relationship?

5. If students used cans and cylinder containers, try graphing


different combinations of radius or diameter vs. surface area
or volume. You can also use the box graph parameters as
in #4, surface area vs. volume.

Otto Hanneman © 2014