Anda di halaman 1dari 6

Annotated Bibliography

Primary Sources

Cervical cancer CT scan. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 24,
2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/132_1280309/1/132_1280309/cite.
This picture of a cervical CT scan was used as a background for a website page.

Collins, Francis. "Henrietta Lacks' 'Immortal' Impact on Medical Research." Interview. Clip
video, 07:04. PBS. Accessed December 5, 2017. http://www.pbs.org/video/henrietta-
lacks-immortal-impact-on-medical-research-1383253839/.
This source was crucial in finding the new rules set in place by the National Institute of
Health to obtain HeLa cells. Also, the reasons Henrietta's relatives were upset is touched
upon in this speech.

GEORGE GEY HOLDING TEST TUBE IN FRONT OF ROLLER DRUM. Photograph. Hopkins
Retrospective. Accessed January 29, 2018. http://retrospective.jhu.edu/our-collection/
george-gey-holding-test-tube-in-front-of-roller-drum?backLink=true.
This image was used in the website to give viewers an idea of what George Gey, the man
who took Lacks's cells, looked like.

Haseltine, Nate. "Contamination Peril In Cell Culture Cited." The Washington Post, September
19, 1966. http://hn.bigchalk.com/hnweb/hn/do/document?
set=search&start=1&rendition=x-article-image&inmylist=false&urn=urn%3Aproquest
%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-article-image
%3B166347032&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD
%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation%3B166347032.
This source was helpful in showing the struggles that researchers had and the precautions
they had to take when working with HeLa cells because there was constant risk of cross
contamination due to how strong and rapidly the cells would grow. The article was
written when tests were beginning to be done on the HeLa cells and researchers were
learning about the cell at the time that this was written.

HeLa cancer cells. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 24, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/132_1244057/1/132_1244057/cite.
This picture was helpful to be able to show viewers what HeLa cells look like.

HeLa cell cultures in an incubation cabinet. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest.


Accessed Jan 22, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/132_1244670/1/132_1244670/cite.
This picture was used in the website to show HeLa cell samples.
HeLa cell researcher at laminar flow cabinet. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica
ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 24, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/132_1245007/1/132_1245007/cite.
This picture was used in the website to show a researcher examining HeLa cells.

Henrietta Lacks. Photograph. http://guides.library.duq.edu/henriettalacks.


This source was helpful because there are only a limited number of pictures of Henrietta
Lacks, and in this picture she looks happy and content with life.

Henrietta Lacks' Death Certificate. Photograph. http://libraryguides.oswego.edu/c.php?


g=191604&p=1264498.
This source was useful and helped us understand more information about factors other
than cancer that went into her death and information about her life when she died. This is
a primary source because it is the actual death certificate from when she died.

Henrietta Lacks with Her Husband. Photograph. Accessed December 13, 2017. http://
libraryguides.oswego.edu/c.php?g=191604&p=1264498.
This photo of Henrietta shows her and her loving husband, who was also a first cousin to
her.

JONAS EDWARD SALK .(1914-1995). American microbiologist. Salk in his laboratory where he
developed the polio vaccine. Photograph, 7 October 1954.. Photograph. Encyclopædia
Britannica ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 28, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/140_1800119/1/140_1800119/cite.
This image was used in the website to compliment the information about the Salk polio
vaccine with a photo of Salk working towards developing it.

Karp, Laurence E. "Immortal Life in the Test Tube." The Washington Post, April 18, 1976. http://
hn.bigchalk.com/hnweb/hn/do/document?set=searchera&start=1&rendition=x-article-
image&inmylist=false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD
%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-article-image%3B120360239&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest
%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation
%3B120360239.
This source was useful in telling us research that was done by scientists in determining
what the cells are comprised of and how they are different from other cells. In addition to
this it covers some of the experiments that were done on them by scientists who first got
their hands on them. It is a primary source because it is a newspaper article detailing how
the cells were used when they were initially released to the world.

Lucey, Brendan P., Grover M. Hutchins, and Walter A. Nelson-Rees. "Henrietta Lacks, HeLa
Cells, and Cell Culture Contamination." Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
133, no. 9 (September 2009): 1463-67. Accessed December 5, 2017. http://
www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/full/10.1043/1543-2165-133.9.1463?code=coap-site.
This source informed us of the specific type of cervical cancer Henrietta Lacks died from,
along with where the cancer spread to (both parametria).

Medical research. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 26, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/139_1913026/1/139_1913026/cite.
This picture was used as a background for our resources page on the website.

Members of the Lacks Family. 2012. Photograph. Accessed January 28, 2018. https://
ictr.johnshopkins.edu/community/community-involvement/the-henrietta-lacks-memorial-
lecture/a-new-chapter-in-the-legacy-of-henrietta-lacks-2012/henrietta-lacks-memorial-
lecture-2012-photographs-2/#prettyPhoto.
This picture of Henrietta Lacks' family was used on the compromise page on our website
because the National Institute of Health made compromises with her family about how to
deal with HeLa cel distribution.

National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica


ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 28, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/137_3125722/1/137_3125722/cite.
This image was used in the website to show the National Institutes of Health, where
HeLa cells are currently produced.

New York Times. "UNIT AT TUSKEGEE HELPS POLIO FIGHT." January 10, 1955. http://
hn.bigchalk.com/hnweb/hn/do/document?set=search&start=1&rendition=x-article-
image&inmylist=false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD
%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-article-image%3B93411115&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest
%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation
%3B93411115.
This source gives information about the crucial role that the Tuskegee Institute played in
producing and distributing HeLa cells. The information was used in showing what a
widespread impact Tuskegee's HeLa Distribution Center had on the scientific community
as well as how medical research, like the Salk polio vaccine, was conducted there. It is a
primary source as it is an article about what Tuskegee was doing with the cells from the
time period that they were doing it.

Robertson, Christopher, and Jonathan D. Loe. "Learning the wrong lesson on privacy from
Henrietta Lacks." Washington Post, January 8, 2011. Accessed December 13, 2017.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/learning-the-wrong-lesson-from-henrietta-
lacks/2016/01/08/723877cc-b60a-11e5-a842-0feb51d1d124_story.html?utm_term=.
5d0be2f7aff2.
This newspaper highlights the problems the Lack's family had to deal with while trying to
gain credit for Henrietta's contributions to science. Even though the Lack's family never
got any of the money from the distribution of Henrietta's cells, they were happy she was
able to save lives.
"Simpler Polio Immunity Test Is Reported." The Washington Post, April 14, 1954. http://
hn.bigchalk.com/hnweb/hn/do/document?set=search&start=1&rendition=x-article-
image&inmylist=false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD
%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-article-image%3B288096752&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest
%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation
%3B288096752.
This source was helpful in understanding the medical applications of HeLa cells. It
provided us with information on how the cells were used to create a new and much
simpler test for polio. The source can be considered primary because it is an article
directly from when this test was being created.

Skloot, Rebecca. "Cells that save lives are a mother's legacy. (Deborah Lacks, who works on
cells taken from her dying mother)." New York Times, November 17, 2001, A2. Opposing
Viewpoints in Context (accessed December 13, 2017). http://link.galegroup.com/apps/
doc/A80181163/OVIC?u=bullischl&xid=f2c8124b.
This source was useful in giving information to how confidentiality and patients cells are
dealt with today compared to when Lacks was alive. In addition it showed us the way that
Lacks's family feels about the whole situation through firsthand information about her
daughter discovering more information about the whole controversy.

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE. - A laboratory class at the Tuskegee Institute, c1900. This photograph
has often been reproduced purporting to be George Washington Carver teaching,
although the instructor is clearly another man.. Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica
ImageQuest. Accessed Jan 28, 2018. 

https://quest.eb.com/search/140_1635258/1/140_1635258/cite.
This image was used in the website to show HeLa cell production at the HeLa
Distribution Center at the Tuskegee Institute.

Waikel, Rebekah L., “HeLa Cell,” AccessScience(McGraw-Hill Education, 2017), https://


doi.org/10.1036/1097-8542.311600.
This source grasp an idea of how many HeLa cells have been produced, along with
learning the cells can mutate and have different traits in their mutations.

Secondary Sources

Collins, Dr. Francis. "HeLa Cells: A New Chapter in An Enduring Story." NIH Director's Blog.
Last modified August 7, 2013. Accessed December 3, 2017. https://directorsblog.nih.gov/
2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story/.
This source was beneficial in creating my website because it gave specific numbers to
how many studies used HeLa cells. Also, it named some of the diseases the cells helped
create vaccines for.
Editors, AccessScience, ed. "Importance of HeLa cells." Access Science. Last modified 2014.
http://accessscience.com/content/importance-of-hela-cells/BR0826141.
This source explained properties of HeLa cells such as the how they can contaminate
other cells very easily, and what makes them different from normal somatic cells.

First Year Book. "Polio." University of Maryland. Last modified 2011. Accessed December 13,
2017. http://fyb.umd.edu/2011/polio.html.
This source gave us more information about Polio as a whole, and the research that went
into finding a vaccine for it. HeLa cells played a crucial roll in the studies that occurred
while developing a vaccine.

"Henrietta Lacks." In Contemporary Black Biography. Vol. 101. Detroit: Gale, 2012. U.S.
History in Context (accessed December 2, 2017). http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/
K1606007066/UHIC?u=bullischl&xid=77bd2847.
This source helped develop a timeline for Henrietta's cancer. Also, through this source we
learn about The John Hopkin's Hospital policies for that time period and why they took
her cells without asking.

"Henrietta Lacks." In Encyclopedia of World Biography. Vol. 31. Detroit: Gale, 2011. U.S.
History in Context (accessed December 2, 2017). http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/
K1631009594/UHIC?u=bullischl&xid=13c3ebda.
This was one of the best sources in learning more about Lack's family life, along with
other specifics of her cancer. Specific doctors' names were included, and what each of
them did in the cancer treatment process.

"Henrietta Lacks." Britannica Academic. https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/


Henrietta-Lacks/487992.
This source was used in a variety of ways covering Lack's early family life, how she was
treated for cancer, and the modern day impact her case has had on the rights that patients
get. It is a secondary source as it is a recount of her life told by someone who did not
personally experience it.

The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System.
"The Legacy of Henrietta Lacks." John Hopkins Medicine. Accessed December 2, 2017.
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/henriettalacks/index.html.
This source was beneficial in helping up learn more about HeLa cells because it gave us
the doubling period for cells, how they got the name "HeLa", and Henrietta's first
symptoms.

"Lacks, Henrietta." Scholastic Grolier Online. https://go.scholastic.com/C/article/


100/232/10023254.html?highlightTerm=henrietta%20AND%20lacks.
This source covers a variety of topics including different forms of research that use HeLa
cells, the reaction of Lacks's family when they found out about the cells, and her family
life and growing up. It is a secondary source that talks about her life based off of
information that was acquired through other sources.

Longwill, Leanne. "WHOSE CELL LINE IS IT ANYWAY." Muse, February 2016, 14-18. http://
web.b.ebscohost.com/scirc/command/detail?vid=11&sid=289b3ab9-8346-4c9f-
af32-387046593a5a%40sessionmgr120&bdata=JnNpdGU9c2NpcmMtbGl2ZQ%3d
%3d#db=sch&jid=PVO.
This source gives information about failed research before HeLa cells, how they were
taken from Lacks's body, and the distribution of them along with information about how
much they were sold for. It is a secondary source as the information comes from an
author who researched the topic.

"Sickle Cell Anemia and Research Funding." University of Maryland. Last modified 2011.
Accessed December 13, 2017. http://fyb.umd.edu/2011/sickle-cell.html.
This source was helpful in deepening our understanding in how HeLa cells were used in
research to learn about other illnesses, even though HeLa cells stemmed from cervical
cancer.

Singh, Nishi. HeLa Cells of Henrietta Lacks.


This source was useful in giving details about a great variety of details about Lacks's life
ranging from her cancer, cause of death in addition to cancer, and modern day uses of her
cells. It is a book written by an author who researched her and therefore is a secondary
source.

Skloot, Rebecca. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. N.p.: Crown Publishing Group, 2010.
This book provided insider information because the author met with family members of
Henrietta Lacks to track down the truth about what happened to her while she was in the
hospital, and what happened with her cells her death.