Anda di halaman 1dari 61

FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE

LIQUIDS CODE COMMITTEE

MEMORANDUM

TO: NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals

FROM: R. P. Benedetti

DATE: August 13, 2015

SUBJECT: Agenda for NFPA 30 First Draft Meeting


September 10, 2015 — 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
_________________________________________________________________________________

Ladies and Gentlemen:

Attached is the Agenda for the NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, First Draft meeting of
the NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals, to be held 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM, Thursday, September
10, 2015, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Austin TX.

This Agenda will also be posted to the NFPA 30 Document Information Page at http://www.nfpa.org/30

If you have additional items for the Agenda, please bring them with you to the meeting.

rpb/

cc FLCC Meeting Folder


FLCFUN/NM

FLCFUN.2015-09 Agenda.doc
FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE
LIQUIDS CODE COMMITTEE

MEMORANDUM

TO: NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals

FROM: R. P. Benedetti

DATE: August 13, 2015

SUBJECT: Agenda for NFPA 30 First Draft Meeting


September 10, 2015 — 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
_________________________________________________________________________________

Ladies and Gentlemen:

Attached is the Agenda for the NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, First Draft meeting of
the NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals, to be held 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM, Thursday, September
10, 2015, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Austin TX.

This Agenda will also be posted to the NFPA 30 Document Information Page at http://www.nfpa.org/30

If you have additional items for the Agenda, please bring them with you to the meeting.

rpb/

cc FLCC Meeting Folder


FLCFUN/NM

FLCFUN.2015-09 Agenda.doc
FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE
LIQUIDS CODE COMMITTEE

AGENDA — NFPA 30 First Draft Meeting

NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals


Crowne Plaza Hotel, Austin TX
Thursday, September 10, 2015, 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

1. Call to Order.

2. Introduction of Attendees. Update of Committee Roster. [Attachment № A1]

3. Approval of Minutes of Last Meeting. [June, 2013, San Antonio TX] [Attachment № A2]

4. Report of Committee Chair.

5. Report of Staff Liaison.

 Technical Committee Scope. [See Attachment № A3 for Proposed New Scope]


 Technical Committee Membership Status.
 Document Revision Schedule for Annual 2014 Cycle. [Attachment № A4]

6. Member Reports on Current Issues. [As Necessary]

7. Review and Act on Public Inputs to Amend the 2015 edition of NFPA 30
[Attachment № A5 – Public Inputs to Chapters 2, 3, 6, and 7; Annexes G and I]
[Attachment № A6 – Global Public Inputs: Low Pressure Containers; Reference Standards]

8. Old Business.

 Inconsistencies – Chapter 7 of NFPA 30 and NFPA 497


- Committee Input to Solicit Proposed Amendments
- Form Joint Task Group

 NFPA 30 Liquids Classification vs. OSHA GHS


- Staff Liaison to provide suggested amendments under separate cover.

9. New Business. [NONE]

10. Schedule Next Meeting(s).

11. Adjournment.

FLCFUN.2015-09 Agenda.doc
ATTACHMENT No. A1
08/06/2015
Address List No Phone Robert P. Benedetti
Fundamentals FLC-FUN
Flammable and Combustible Liquids
Christopher J. Wieczorek I 1/14/2005 Robert P. Benedetti 1/1/1994
Chair FLC-FUN Secretary (Staff-Nonvoting) FLC-FUN
FM Global National Fire Protection Association
1151 Boston-Providence Turnpike 1 Batterymarch Park
PO Box 9102 Quincy, MA 02169-7471
Norwood, MA 02062-9102
Alternate: John A. LeBlanc

Peter R. Apostoluk M 1/12/2000 Jonathan R. Barber SE 8/2/2010


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Greif Inc. RCP Inc.
366 Greif Parkway 801 Louisiana, Suite 200
Delaware, OH 43015 Houston, TX 77002

John Slear Bond E 3/1/2011 Gregory C. Brennecke I 10/20/2010


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
State of Alaska Department of Public Safety Liberty Mutual Insurance
Division of Fire & Life Safety 1191 Second Avenue, Suite 900
5700 East Tudor Road Seattle, WA 98101-2997
Anchorage, AK 99507

William V. F. Cosey U 03/03/2014 Curtis W. Crumholt M 3/4/2008


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Takasago International Corporation
2705 Roses Run 4 Volvo Drive
Aiken, SC 29803-7634 Rockleigh, NJ 07647
Alternate: Jason W. Butler

Claire V. De Taeye I 3/1/2011 Carl M. Drechsel U 3/4/2008


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Travelers Insurance Company US Department of the Air Force
75 Town Centre Drive HQ Air Combat Command Civil Engineering A701L
Rochester, NY 14623 129 Andrews Street, Suite 102
Alternate: Timothy S. Murphy Langley AFB, VA 23665

Elson G. Fernandes M 7/14/2004 Felix J. Garfunkel SE 10/20/2010


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Elfent Ltd. Parsons Corporation
186 Shuh Avenue 100 High Street
Kitchener, ON N2A 1H6 Canada Boston, MA 02110-1713

Frederic Gil M 4/14/2005 Dwight H. Havens U 7/24/1997


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
BP Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation
4 Lakeland Dr Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory
Frimley, Surrey, GU16 8LD United Kingdom 20 Bellflower Road
Malta, NY 12020-4431

1
08/06/2015
Address List No Phone Robert P. Benedetti
Fundamentals FLC-FUN
Flammable and Combustible Liquids
Jay J. Jablonski I 7/24/1997 Alwin A Kelly SE 08/11/2014
Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
HSB PLC JENSEN HUGHES
1 State Street, 9th Floor 3610 Commerce Dr Ste 817
Hartford, CT 06103-3199 Baltimore, MD 21227
Alternate: David Upchurch Alternate: John J. Foley

John W. King I 1/14/2005 Richard S. Kraus M 1/1/1990


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Federated Mutual Insurance Company API/Petroleum Safety Consultants
121 East Park Square 210 East Fairfax Street, Apt. 600
Owatonna, MN 55060 Falls Church, VA 22046-2909
American Petroleum Institute
Alternate: Clark D. Shepard

Bob D. Morgan E 3/21/2006 David P. Nugent SE 10/27/2009


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Fort Worth Fire Department Global Risk Consultants
1000 Throckmorton Street 2037 Clover Road
Fort Worth, TX 76102 Northbrook, IL 60062-6422

Alfredo M. Ramirez RT 4/15/2004 John W. Richmond, Sr. M 7/29/2005


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
UL LLC Eastman Chemical Company
333 Pfingsten Road PO Box 511 (B-18)
Northbrook, IL 60062-2096 Kingsport, TN 37663
Alternate: Roland A. Riegel

Peter M. Shank I 4/15/2004 Warren G. Stocker U 7/29/2005


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Nuclear Service Organization Safeway Inc.
1201 Market Street, Suite 1100 11555 Dublin Canyon Road
Wilmington, DE 19801 Pleasanton, CA 94588

Robert Upson M 1/10/2008 Paul Wagner SE 10/20/2010


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
National Fire Sprinkler Association Leber/Rubes Inc. (LRI)
40 Jon Barrett Road 2300 Yonge Street, Suite 2100
Patterson, NY 12563-2164 Toronto, ON M4P 1E4 Canada
National Fire Sprinkler Association

Qingsheng Wang SE 10/23/2013 Robert P. Wethington M 10/18/2011


Principal FLC-FUN Principal FLC-FUN
Oklahoma State University Dow Corning Corporation
494 Cordell South 760 Hodgenville Road
Stillwater, OK 74078-8016 Elizabethtown, KY 42701
Alternate: Jeramie W. Morris

2
08/06/2015
Address List No Phone Robert P. Benedetti
Fundamentals FLC-FUN
Flammable and Combustible Liquids
Jason W. Butler U 04/08/2015 John J. Foley SE 7/14/2004
Alternate FLC-FUN Alternate FLC-FUN
Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC JENSEN HUGHES
2327 Lions Gate Drive 3384 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 550
Augusta, GA 30909-2197 Atlanta, GA 30326
Principal: William V. F. Cosey Principal: Alwin A Kelly

John A. LeBlanc I 1/14/2005 Jeramie W. Morris M 03/03/2014


Alternate FLC-FUN Alternate FLC-FUN
FM Global The Dow Chemical Company
1151 Boston-Providence Turnpike Michigan Operations
PO Box 9102 1790 Building Office 241
Norwood, MA 02062-9102 Midland, MI 48667
Principal: Christopher J. Wieczorek Principal: Robert P. Wethington

Timothy S. Murphy I 03/03/2014 Roland A. Riegel RT 4/15/2004


Alternate FLC-FUN Alternate FLC-FUN
Travelers Insurance Company UL LLC
1000 Windward Concourse 1285 Walt Whitman Road
Alpharetta, GA 30005-2052 Melville, NY 11747-3085
Principal: Claire V. De Taeye Principal: Alfredo M. Ramirez

Clark D. Shepard M 7/19/2002 David Upchurch I 10/29/2012


Alternate FLC-FUN Alternate FLC-FUN
ExxonMobil Corporation HSB PLC
Research & Engineering PO Box 1088
3225 Gallows Road, Room 3A2111 Cornelia, GA 30531
Fairfax, VA 22037 Principal: Jay J. Jablonski
American Petroleum Institute
Principal: Richard S. Kraus

Jeffrey J. Wanko E 4/15/2004 Jack Woycheese SE 1/1/1994


Nonvoting Member FLC-FUN Member Emeritus FLC-FUN
US Department of Labor 1649 Constable Street
Occupational Safety & Health Administration Prescott, AZ 86301
200 Constitution Ave. NW, Room N3119
Washington, DC 20210

Robert P. Benedetti 1/1/1994


Staff Liaison FLC-FUN
National Fire Protection Association
1 Batterymarch Park
Quincy, MA 02169-7471

3
ATTACHMENT No. A2

FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE


LIQUIDS CODE COMMITTEE

Minutes of NFPA 30 Second Draft Meeting

NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals


Doubletree Hotel – San Antonio Downtown
San Antonio TX
Thursday, June 20, 2013
*1:00 PM to 5:00 PM Joint with NFPA 30 Technical Committee on
Storage and Warehousing of Containers and Portable Tanks

I. Participation

J. R. Barber, RCP Incorporated


G. C. Brennecke, Liberty Mutual Insurance
C. V. De Taeye, Travelers Insurance Company
J. J. Foley, Hughes Associates/RJA Group (Alternate to A. A. Kelly)
L. Green, BP Exploration (Alternate to F. Gil)
D. H. Havens, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corp. / Knowles Atomic Power Laboratory
J. J. Jablonski, HSB PLC
R. S. Kraus, Petroleum Safety Consultants (Rep. American Petroleum Institute)
J. A. LeBlanc, FM Global (Alternate to C. J. Wieczorek)
B. D. Morgan, Fort Worth TX Fire Department
R. A. Riegel, UL LLC (Alternate to A. M. Ramirez)
J. Scheffey, Hughes Associates (Alternate to J. Woycheese)
W. G. Stocker, Safeway, Inc.
P. Wagner, Leber/Rubes Inc.
J. J. Wanko, U. S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Nonvoting Member)
C. J. Wieczorek, FM Global, CHAIR
J. Woycheese, Hughes Associates

R. P. Benedetti, National Fire Protection Association, STAFF LIAISON

GUESTS: L. Arango, XL Global Asset Protection Services


S. Ayers, U. S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
(Non-Voting Member – NFPA 30 Correlating Committee)
T. Lentz, AON (NFPA 30 T/C on Storage & Warehousing of Containers)
R. Razowski, The Sherman Williams Company
B. Tate, Ontario Fire Marshals Office
(NFPA 30 T/C on Storage & Warehousing of Containers)

Members Not in Attendance

P. R. Apostoluk, Greif Incorporated


J. S. Bond, Alaska Department of Public Safety – Division of Fire & Life Safety
C. W. Crumholt, Takasago International Corporation
C. M. Drechsel, U. S. Department of the Air Force – HQ Air Combat Command
E. G. Fernandes, Elfent Limited

FLCFUN.2013-06 Minutes.doc
F. J. Garfunkel, Parsons Corporation
F. Gil, BP
G. Hortz, The Dow Chemical Company
M. E. Hurd, Leber/Rubes, Inc. (Alternate to P. Wagner)
T. Izbicki, The RJA Group (Alternate to J. J. Foley)
J. W. King, Federated Mutual Insurance Company
T. Ma, Oklahoma State University
D. P. Nugent, Valspar Corporation
A. M. Ramirez, UL LLC
J. W. Richmond, Sr., Eastman Chemical Company
M. Savage, Middle Department Inspection Agency
P. M. Shank, Nuclear Service Organization
C. D. Shepard, ExxonMobil Corporation
(Alternate to R. S. Kraus - Rep. American Petroleum Institute)
D. Upchurch, HSB PLC (Alternate to J. J. Jablonski)
R. Upson, National Fire Sprinkler Association
R. P. Wethington, Dow Corning Corporation
K. Wolf, Intertek Testing Service

II. Minutes

1. The meeting was called to order at 8:00 AM on Thursday, June 20, 2013 by Technical Committee
Chair Chris Wieczorek.

2. Attendees introduced themselves. The Technical Committee roster was corrected as needed.
An updated roster will be posted on the Technical Committee’s web page.

3. The Minutes of the previous meeting (August 2012, NFPA, Quincy MA) were unanimously approved
as issued.

4. The Technical Committee Chair welcomed attendees and reviewed the Agenda.

5. The Staff Liaison reported on the following:

 Technical Committee Scope Statement. The Technical Committee agreed to the need for a
revised scope that accurately reflects the Technical Committee’s responsibilities. The Staff
Liaison was directed to develop a revised scope statement for the committee’s review.
 Membership Status. The Staff Liaison reported on recent changes to committee membership
and on the balance of interests on the committees. At this time, there is no balance issue.
 Document Revision Schedule for NFPA 30-2012. The Staff Liaison reviewed the Annual 2014
revision schedule for the 2015 edition of NFPA 30.

6. There were no reports on current issues.

7. The Technical Committee met jointly with the NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Storage and
Warehousing of Containers and Portable Tanks to review and act on a public comment to the
definition of “safety can”. The committees came to a mutually agreed-upon action to resolve the
comment.

8. The Technical Committee reviewed and acted on all other public comments to their First Draft report
on NFPA 30.

9. There was no correspondence requiring the Technical Committee’s attention.

10. There was no old business requiring the Technical Committee’s attention.

11. The Technical Committee discussed the following new business items:

FLCFUN.2013-06 Minutes.doc
 Inconsistencies between Chapter 7 of NFPA 30 and NFPA 497. The Technical Committee
determined that this should be a Task Group effort.

 OSHA Globally Harmonized Standard. The Technical Committee discussed how to address the
differences between the GHS classification scheme for flammable liquids and that of NFPA 30.

 Next Revision Cycle for NFPA 30. The Technical Committee discussed whether it was practical to
use fire point instead of flash point to classify liquids. The Technical Committee determined that
fire point appears to be no better nor worse than flash point and decided not to pursue.

12. The Technical Committee deferred action on scheduling future meetings.

13. The meeting adjourned at 2:15 PM, Thursday, June 20, 2013.

FLCFUN.2013-06 Minutes.doc
ATACHMENT No. A3

NFPA 30 Technical Committee on Fundamentals

This Committee shall have primary responsibility for documents or portions of


documents on the basic requirements for safeguarding against the fire and explosion
hazards associated with the storage, handling, and use of flammable and
combustible liquids. This Committee shall also have responsibility for definitions
specifically related to flammable and combustible liquids and for criteria for the
classification of flammable and combustible liquids.

Responsible for Chapters 1 through 8 and Annexes G and H of NFPA 30, Flammable
and Combustible Liquids Code.
ATTACHMENT No. A4
2017 ANNUAL REVISION CYCLE 
*Public Input Dates may vary according to standards and schedules for Revision Cycles may change.  Please 
check the NFPA Website for the most up‐to‐date information on Public Input Closing Dates and schedules at 
www.nfpa.org/document # (i.e. www.nfpa.org/101) and click on the Next Edition tab.
     
Dates for
Process  Process Step  Dates for  TC with 
Stage  TC  CC 
  Public Input Closing Date*  7/6/15  7/6/15 
  Final Date for TC First Draft Meeting  12/14/15  9/14/15 
Public Input  Posting of First Draft and TC Ballot  2/1/16  10/26/15 
Stage  Final date for Receipt of TC First Draft ballot  2/22/16  11/16/15 
`(First Draft)  Final date for Receipt of TC First Draft ballot ‐ recirc  2/29/16  11/23/15 
  Posting of First Draft for CC Meeting    11/30/15 
  Final date for CC First Draft Meeting    1/11/16 
  Posting of First Draft and CC Ballot    2/1/16 
  Final date for Receipt of CC First Draft ballot    2/22/16 
  Final date for Receipt of CC First Draft ballot ‐ recirc    2/29/16 
  Post First Draft Report for Public Comment  3/7/16  3/7/16 
 

  Public Comment closing date   5/16/16  5/16/16 


  Final Date to Publish Notice of Consent Standards (Standards that  5/30/16  5/30/16 
received no Comments) 
  Appeal Closing Date for Consent Standards (Standards that received  6/13/16  6/13/16 
no Comments) 
  Final date for TC Second Draft Meeting  10/31/16  7/25/16 
Comment  Posting of Second Draft and TC Ballot  12/12/16  9/5/16 
Stage    Final date for Receipt of TC Second Draft ballot  1/2/17  9/26/16 
(Second  Final date for receipt of TC Second Draft ballot ‐ recirc  1/9/17  10/3/16 
Draft)  Posting of Second Draft for CC Meeting    10/10/16 
  Final date for CC Second Draft Meeting    11/21/16 
  Posting of Second Draft for CC Ballot    12/12/16 
  Final date for Receipt of CC Second Draft ballot    1/2/17 
  Final date for Receipt of CC Second Draft ballot ‐ recirc    1/9/17 
  Post Second Draft Report for NITMAM Review  1/16/17  1/16/17 
 

Tech Session  Notice of Intent to Make a Motion (NITMAM) Closing Date  2/20/17  2/20/17 


Preparation  Posting of Certified Amending Motions (CAMs) and Consent  4/17/17  4/17/17 
Standards 
(& Issuance)  Appeal Closing Date for Consent Standards   5/2/17  5/2/17 
  SC Issuance Date for Consent Standards   5/12/17  5/12/17 
 

Tech Session  Association Meeting for Standards with CAMs  6/4‐7/2017  6/4‐7/2017 


 

Appeals and  Appeal Closing Date for Standards with CAMs  6/27/17  6/27/17 


Issuance  SC  Issuance Date for Standards with CAMs  8/10/17  8/10/17 
 

Approved:  October 30, 2012                                                       Revised________________________ 
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...
ATTACHMENT No. A5

Public Input No. 5-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 2.3 ]

2.3 Other Publications.


2.3.1 API Publications.
American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005-4070.
API Specification API SPEC 12B, Bolted Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 15th 16th edition,
2008 2014 .
API Specification API SPEC 12D, Field Welded Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 11th edition, 2008.
API Specification API SPEC 12F, Shop Welded Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 12th edition, 2008.
API 620, Recommended Rules for the API STD 620, Design and Construction of Large, Welded, Low-Pressure
Storage Tanks, 11th 12th edition , Addendum 2, 2010 2013, Addendum 1 , 2014 .
API Standard STD 650, Welded Steel Tanks for Oil Storage, 11th 12th edition, Addendum 2,
2009 2013, Addendum 1, 2014 .
API Standard API STD 653, Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction, 4th 5th edition,
2012 2014 .
API Standard API STD 2000, Venting Atmospheric and Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, 5th 7th edition,
1998 2014 .
API STD 2350, Overfill Protection for Storage Tanks in Petroleum Facilities, 4th edition, 2012.
2.3.2 ASME Publications.
American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME International , Two Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990.
ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 2010 2015 .
ASME B31.3 , Code for Process Piping, 2012 2014 .
ASME Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels, 2010 2015 .
2.3.3 ASTM Publications.
ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
ASTM A 395 A395 /A395M,, Standard Specification for Ferritic Ductile Iron Pressure-Retaining Castings for Use at
Elevated Temperatures, 1999 (reaffirmed 2009) , Reapproved 2014 .
ASTM D 5 D5 /D5M, Standard Test Method for Penetration of Bituminous Materials, 2013.
ASTM D 56 D56 , Standard Test Method for Flash Point by Tag Closed Cup Tester, 2005 (reaffirmed ,
Reapproved 2010 ) .
ASTM D 86 D86 , Standard Test Method for Distillation of Petroleum Products at Atmospheric Pressure, 2012.
ASTM D 92 D92 , Standard Test Method for Flash and Fire Points by Cleveland Open Cup Tester, 2012b.
ASTM D 93 D93 , Standard Test Methods for Flash Point by Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester, 2012 2014 e1 .
ASTM D 323 D323 , Standard Test Method for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method), 2008,
Reapproved 2014 .
ASTM D 3278 D3278 , Standard Test Methods for Flash Point of Liquids by Small Scale Closed-Cup Apparatus,
1996 (reaffirmed , Reapproved 2011 ) .
ASTM D 3828 D3828 , Standard Test Methods for Flash Point by Small Scale Closed Cup Tester, 2012a.
ASTM D 4359 D4359 , Standard Test for Determining Whether a Material is a Liquid or a Solid, 1990 (reaffirmed ,
Reapproved 2012 ) .
ASTM E 119 E119 , Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2012a 2014 .
ASTM F 852 F852 , Standard Specification for Portable Gasoline Containers for Consumer Use, 2008.
ASTM F 976 F976 , Specification for Portable Kerosine and Diesel Containers for Consumer Use, 2008.
2.3.4 CSA America Publications.
Canadian Standards Association, 5060 Spectrum Way, Mississauga 178 Rexdale Blvd, Toronto , ON, L4W
5N6 M9W 1R3 , Canada.
CSA B51, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Pressure Piping Code, 2009 2014, Update 1, 2014 .

4 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

2.3.5 FM Publications.
FM Global, 1301 Atwood 270 Central Avenue , P.O. Box 7500, Johnston, RI 02919.
Approval Standard for Safety Intermediate Bulk Containers, Class Number 6020, December 2010.
FM Approval Standard for 6083, Plastic Plugs for Steel Drums, Class Number 6083, October 2006.
2.3.6 NMFTA Publications.
National Motor Freight Traffic Association, 1001 North Fairfax Street, Suite 600, Alexandria, VA 22314.
National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC), 2012.
2.3.7 NRFC Publications.
National Railroad Freight Committee, 222 South Riverside Plaza, Chicago, IL 60606-5945.
Uniform Freight Classification (UFC), 2005.
2.3.8 STI/SPFA Publications.
Steel Tank Institute, 570 Oakwood Road /Steel Plate Fabricators Association , 944 Donata Ct. , Lake Zurich, IL
60047.
STI SP001, Standard for the Inspection of Aboveground Storage Tanks, 5th edition, 2011.
2.3.9 UL Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062-2096.
ANSI/ UL 30, Standard for Metal Safety Cans, 1995, Revised 2009 2014 .
UL 58, Standard for Steel Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1996, Revised 1998.
ANSI/ UL 80, Standard for Steel Tanks for Oil -Burner Fuels and Other Combustible Liquids, 2007, Revised 2009
2014 .
ANSI/ UL 142, Standard for Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2006, Revised
2010 2014 .
UL 971, Standard for Nonmetallic Underground Piping for Flammable Liquids, 1995, Revised 2006.
ANSI/ UL 499, Electric Heating Appliances, 2008 2014 .
ANSI/ UL 1313, Standard for Nonmetallic Safety Cans for Petroleum Products, 1993, Revised 2007 2012 .
ANSI/ UL 1316, Standard for Glass-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products,
Alcohols, and Alcohol-Gasoline Mixtures, 2006.
ANSI/ UL 1746, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2007,
Revised 2014 .
UL 2080, Standard for Fire Resistant Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2000.
ANSI/ UL 2085, Standard for Protected Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1997,
Revised 2010.
ANSI/ UL 2208, Standard for Solvent Distillation Units, 2005, Revised 2011.
ANSI/ UL 2245, Standard for Below-Grade Vaults for Flammable Liquid Storage Tanks, 2006.
UL 2368, Standard for Fire Exposure Testing of Intermediate Bulk Containers for Flammable and Combustible
Liquids, 2012, Revised 2014 .
2.3.10 UN Publications.
United Nations, Headquarters, New York, NY 10017.
Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, 17th 18th revised edition, 2011 2014 .
2.3.11 U.S. Government Publications.
U.S. Government Printing Government Publishing Office, Washington, DC 20402.
Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, “Navigation and Navigable Waters,” Parts 154, 155, and 156.
Title 46, Code of Federal Regulations, “Shipping,” Parts 30, 32, 35, and 39.
Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, “Transportation,” Parts 100–199.
2.3.12 Other Publications.
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition, Merriam-Webster, Inc., Springfield, MA, 2003.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

Referenced current SDO names, addresses, standard names, and years.

5 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Related Public Inputs for This Document

Related Input Relationship


Public Input No. 6-NFPA 30-2015 [Global Input]
Public Input No. 33-NFPA 30-2015 [Section No. I.1.2]

Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: Aaron Adamczyk


Organization: [ Not Specified ]
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Fri Feb 06 00:41:54 EST 2015

6 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 38-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 2.3.1 ]

2.3.1 API Publications.


American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005-4070.
API Specification 12B, Bolted Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 15th edition, 2008. 16th Edition, 2014
API Specification 12D, Field Welded Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 11th edition, 2008.
API Specification 12F, Shop Welded Tanks for Storage of Production Liquids, 12th edition, 2008.
API Specification 12P, Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic Tanks, 3rd Edition, 2008
API Standard 620, Recommended Rules for the Design and Construction of Large, Welded, Low-Pressure
Storage Tanks, 11th edition, Addendum 2, 2010. 12th Edition, 2013
API Standard 650, Welded Steel Tanks for Oil Storage, 11th edition, Addendum 2, 2009. 12th Edition, 2013
API Standard 653, Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction, 5th edition, 2014
API Recommended Pracrice 1604, Closure of Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks, 4th edition,
2012. Reaffirmed 2001
API Standard 2000, Venting Atmospheric and Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, 5th edition 7th Edition , 1998 2014 .
API Standard 2350, Overfill Protection for Storage Tanks in Petroleum Facilities, 4th edition, 2012.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

update referenced documents to latest editions. adds new documents proposed for inclusion by reference
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 09:44:38 EDT 2015

7 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 81-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 2.3.3 ]

2.3.3 ASTM Publications.


ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
ASTM A 395/A395M,, Standard Specification for Ferritic Ductile Iron Pressure-Retaining Castings for Use at
Elevated Temperatures, 1999 (reaffirmed 2009).
ASTM D 5/D5M, Standard Test Method for Penetration of Bituminous Materials, 2013.
ASTM D 56, Standard Test Method for Flash Point by Tag Closed Cup Tester, 2005 (reaffirmed 2010).
ASTM D 86, Standard Test Method for Distillation of Petroleum Products at Atmospheric Pressure, 2012.
ASTM D 92, Standard Test Method for Flash and Fire Points by Cleveland Open Cup Tester, 2012b.
ASTM D 93, Standard Test Methods for Flash Point by Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester, 2012.
ASTM D 323, Standard Test Method for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method), 2008.
ASTM D 3278, Standard Test Methods for Flash Point of Liquids by Small Scale Closed-Cup Apparatus, 1996
(reaffirmed 2011).
ASTM D 3828, Standard Test Methods for Flash Point by Small Scale Closed Cup Tester, 2012a.
ASTM D 4359, Standard Test for Determining Whether a Material is a Liquid or a Solid, 1990 (reaffirmed 2012).
ASTM E 119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2012a 2014 .
ASTM F 852, Standard Specification for Portable Gasoline Containers for Consumer Use, 2008.
ASTM F 976, Specification for Portable Kerosine and Diesel Containers for Consumer Use, 2008.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

date update
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: MARCELO HIRSCHLER


Organization: GBH INTERNATIONAL
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Jul 02 14:29:31 EDT 2015

8 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 78-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 2.3.9 ]

2.3.9 UL Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062-2096.
ANSI/UL 30, Standard for Metal Safety Cans, 1995, Revised 2009 2014 .
UL 58, Standard for Steel Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1996, Revised 1998 2008 .
ANSI/UL 80, Standard for Steel Tanks for Oil -Burner Fuels and Other Combustible Liquids, 2007, Revised
2009 2014 .
ANSI/UL 142, Standard for Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2006, Revised
2010 2014 .
UL 971, Standard for Nonmetallic Underground Piping for Flammable Liquids, 1995, Revised 2006.
ANSI/UL 499, Electric Heating Appliances, 2008 2014 .
ANSI/UL 1313, Standard for Nonmetallic Safety Cans for Petroleum Products, 1993, Revised 2007 2012 .
ANSI/UL 1316, Standard for Glass-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products,
Alcohols, and Alcohol-Gasoline Mixtures, 2006.
ANSI/UL 1746, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2007. ,
Revised 2014
UL 2080, Standard for Fire Resistant Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2000.
ANSI/UL 2085, Standard for Protected Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1997,
Revised 2010.
ANSI/UL 2208, Standard for Solvent Distillation Units, 2005, Revised 2011.
ANSI/UL 2245, Standard for Below-Grade Vaults for Flammable Liquid Storage Tanks, 2006.
UL 2368, Standard for Fire Exposure Testing of Intermediate Bulk Containers for Flammable and Combustible
Liquids, 2012 2014 .
UL 2152 Outline of Investigation for Special Purpose Nonmetallic Containers & Tanks for Specific Combustible or
Noncombustible Liquids, 2015.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

The proposed changes reflect updates to new editions of UL Standards


New reference to UL 2152 Outline of Investigation that includes construction and performance requirements for
nonmetallic tanks for the storage of new and waste cooking oil. UL 2152 is being referenced in revisions to Section
19.7.2.2.2
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RONALD FARR


Organization: UL LLC
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Jul 02 13:26:21 EDT 2015

9 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 84-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 2.3.9 ]

2.3.9 UL Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062-2096.
ANSI/UL 30, Standard for Metal Safety Cans, 1995, Revised 2009.
UL 58, Standard for Steel Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1996, Revised 1998.
ANSI/UL 80, Standard for Steel Tanks for Oil -Burner Fuels and Other Combustible Liquids, 2007, Revised 2009.
ANSI/UL 142, Standard for Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2006, Revised
2010.
UL 971, Standard for Nonmetallic Underground Piping for Flammable Liquids, 1995, Revised 2006.
UL 971A, Outline of Investigation for Metallic Underground Fuel Pipe , 2006.
ANSI/UL 499, Electric Heating Appliances, 2008.
ANSI/UL 1275 Standard for Safety for Flammable Liquid Storage Cabinets , 2014
ANSI/UL 1313, Standard for Nonmetallic Safety Cans for Petroleum Products, 1993, Revised 2007.
ANSI/UL 1316, Standard for Glass-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products,
Alcohols, and Alcohol-Gasoline Mixtures, 2006.
ANSI/UL 1746, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2007.
UL 2080, Standard for Fire Resistant Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2000.
ANSI/UL 2085, Standard for Protected Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 1997,
Revised 2010.
ANSI/UL 2208, Standard for Solvent Distillation Units, 2005, Revised 2011.
ANSI/UL 2245, Standard for Below-Grade Vaults for Flammable Liquid Storage Tanks, 2006.
UL 2368, Standard for Fire Exposure Testing of Intermediate Bulk Containers for Flammable and Combustible
Liquids, 2012.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

This introduces UL 971A, which is used to investigate and list metallic and composite underground piping. A separate
proposal to section 27.4.6.2 adopts this standard by reference. It also introduces UL 1275 which is being added to section
9.5.3
Related Public Inputs for This Document

Related Input Relationship


Public Input No. 85-NFPA 30-2015 [Section No. 27.4.6.2]
Public Input No. 98-NFPA 30-2015 [Section No. 9.5.3]

Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: HOWARD HOPPER


Organization: UL LLC
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Jul 02 16:02:02 EDT 2015

10 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 75-NFPA 30-2015 [ New Section after 3.3 ]

General Definition: Protected Storage


Protected Storage: Storage installed after January 1, 1997, that is protected in accordance with Chapter 16 or
through an alternate means of protection that has been approved by the authority having jurisdiction (See 16.3.5
and Section 16.9 .). This storage classification designates a fire risk that is managed to provide fire control and
limit the extent of fire size at or below the design area of the automatic fire protection system..
General Definition: Unprotected Storage
Unprotected Storage: Any storage configuration that does not meet the definition of protected storage. This
storage classification implies that should a fire occur, the total contents of the fire area may become involved in a
fire, regardless of the fire protection features provided.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

Currently, the definition for Protected Storage and Unprotected Storage is inconsistently listed in general requirements of
Sections 9.3 and 12.3.4, while being listed in the definition section for Section 16.2.2. In addition, these terms are not
formally included in the definitions of Chapter 3. The existing definition of these terms relies solely on a date of installation
and conformance to protection requirements (protected storage shall mean storage installed after January 1, 1997 that is
protected in accordance with Chapter 16. All other storage shall be considered to be unprotected storage ), and does not
provide the expected outcome of these strategic storage classifications during a fire, for the non-engineering user of NFPA
30.

This public input adds one sentence to each definition that attempts to provide the expected outcome in a fire scenario.
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: MICHAEL SNYDER


Organization: Dow Corning
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Tue Jun 30 22:01:49 EDT 2015

11 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 40-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 6.6.1 ]

6.6.1 *
An approved means for prompt notification of fire or emergency to those within the plant the facility and to the
available public or mutual aid fire department shall be provided.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

"plant" is too limiting. Facility is a broader term to use


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 10:49:34 EDT 2015

12 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 41-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 6.9.2 ]

6.9.2
Maintenance and operating practices shall be established and implemented to control control and prevent leakage
and prevent spillage of flammable and combustible liquids.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

changes provides for BOTH prevention and control of leaks and spills
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 10:55:47 EDT 2015

13 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 42-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 6.9.2 ]

6.9.2
Maintenance and operating practices shall be established and implemented to prevent and control leakage and
prevent spillage of flammable and combustible liquids.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

adds prevention to be in agreement with preceding section


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 10:57:30 EDT 2015

14 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 43-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 6.9.5 ]

6.9.5
Aisles established for movement of personnel or materials shall be kept clear of obstructions to permit orderly
evacuation and ready access for manual fire-fighting activities.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

aisles could be for material movement as well as for personnel


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 10:58:57 EDT 2015

15 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 44-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 6.10.1.2 ]

6.10.1.2
These hazards include, but are not limited to, vulnerability to terrorist, arsonist or other malicious attacks.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

adds arson which is especially applicable toe liquid storage


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 11:00:46 EDT 2015

16 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 32-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. 7.1 ]

7.1 Scope.
This chapter shall apply to areas where Class I liquids are stored or handled and to areas where Class II or Class
III IIIA liquids are stored or handled at or above their flash points.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

The current requirements in Section 7.1 conflict with information provided in NFPA 497 (2012), Sections 4.2.7.3 and 5.4.4.

NFPA 497 (2012) Section 4.2.7.3:


Class IIIB liquids seldom evolve enough vapors to form ignitible mixtures even when heated, and they are seldom ignited
by properly installed and maintained general purpose electrical equipment. A Class IIIB liquid will cool below its flash point
very quickly when released. Therefore, area classification is seldom needed and Class IIIB liquids are not included in
Table 4.4.2.

NFPA 497 (2012) Section 5.4.4:


Experience indicates that Class IIIB liquids seldom evolve enough vapors to form ignitible mixtures even when heated, and
are seldom ignited by properly installed and maintained general-purpose electrical equipment.

This input seeks to align the requirements and limit mandatory electrical classification for combustible liquids heated above
their flashpoint to Class II and IIIA liquids.
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: MICHAEL SNYDER


Organization: Dow Corning Corporation
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Fri Jun 05 17:42:49 EDT 2015

17 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 65-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. G.1 ]

G.1 General.
The process used to assess the level of security of a facility is generally referred to as security vulnerability
assessment (SVA). The following published guidelines are available to assist the owner and management of a
facility to identify, evaluate, and control security hazards:

(1) NFPA 730, Guide for Premises Security


(2) American Institute of Chemical Engineers–Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS), Guidelines for
Analyzing and Managing the Security Vulnerabilities of Fixed Chemical Sites
(3) API Security Guidelines for the Petroleum Industry
(4) API RP 70, Security for Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations
(5) API RP 70I, Security for Worldwide Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations
(6) API Standard 1164, Pipeline SCADA Security
(7) API/National Petrochemical and Refiners Association, Security Vulnerability Assessment Methodology
(8) American Chemistry Council (ACC), Site Security Guidelines for the U.S. Chemical Industry
(9) ACC Implementation Resource Guide for Responsible Care Security Code of Management Practices: Value
Chain Activities
(10) ACC Transportation Security Guidelines for the U.S. Chemical Industry
(11) DOT, Office of Pipeline Safety, Pipeline Security Information Circular, Information of Concern to Pipeline
Security Personnel, Security Guidance for Natural Gas, and Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Liquefied Natural
Gas Facilities, September 5, 2002
(12) Sandia National Laboratories “Vulnerability Assessment Methodology for Chemical Facilities (VAM-CF)”
(13) U.S. Coast Guard NVIC 11-02 (and other NVICs)

In some cases, a terrorist attack or similar worst-case event will create response complications, such as
interruptions to communication between and among the facility fire brigade or response team; facility management,
and response personnel and outside agencies; damage to response equipment, or loss of needed personnel.
Existing emergency response plans should be updated to address and mitigate such identified potential disruptions
to an effective response. Periodic table-top and full-scale drills are strongly recommended to provide a means for
proper training and identification of plan weaknesses to be addressed.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

correct title
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 15:49:27 EDT 2015

76 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 33-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. I.1.2 ]

I.1.2 Other Publications.


I.1.2.1 ACC Publications.
American Chemistry Council, 700 Second Street, N.E., Washington DC 20002.
Implementation Resource Guide for Responsible Care Security Code of Management Practices: Value Chain
Activities, 2002.
Site Security Guidelines for the U.S. Chemical Industry, 2001.
Transportation Security Guidelines for the U.S. Chemical Industry, 2001.
I.1.2.2 AIChE Publications.
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 3 Park Avenue, 120 Wall Street, FL 23, New York, NY
10016 10005-4020 .
Fisher, H.G., and Forrest, H.S., “Protection of Storage Tanks from Two-Phase Flow Due to Fire Exposure,” Process
Safety Progress, Vol. 14, July 1995, pp. 183–199.
Guidelines for Analyzing and Managing the Security Vulnerabilities of Fixed Chemical Sites, 2003.
Guidelines for Chemical Process Quantitative Risk Analysis, 2nd edition, 1999.
Guidelines for Evaluating Process Plant Buildings for External Explosions and Fires and Toxic Releases , 1996
2012 .
Guidelines for Pressure Relief and Effluent Handling Systems, 1998.
Guidelines for Vapor Cloud Explosion, Pressure Vessel Burst, BLEVE and Flash Fire Hazards, 2nd edition, 2011.
Houser, J., et. al, “Vent Sizing for Fire Considerations: External Fire Duration, Jacketed Vessels, and Heat Flux
Variations Owing to Fuel Consumption,” Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries, Vol. 14 No. 5,
September 2001, pp. 403–412.
Nugent, D.P., Freeman, J.L., and Oliszewicz, M.P., Guidelines for Safe Warehousing of Chemicals, 1998.
I.1.2.3 ANSI Publications.
American National Standards Institute, Inc., 25 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036.
ANSI Z400.1/ Z129.1, Hazardous Industrial Chemicals—Precautionary Labeling, 2005 Workplace Chemicals -
Hazard Evaluation and Safety Data Sheet and Precautionary Labelling Preparation, 2010 .
ANSI Z535.2, Environmental and Facility Safety Signs, 2011.

77 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

I.1.2.4 API Publications.


American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005.
API RP 70, Security for Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations, 1st edition, 2003, reaffirmed 2010 .
API RP 70I, Security for Worldwide Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations, 2004, reaffirmed 2012 .
API RP 12R1, Setting, Maintenance, Inspection, Operation, and Repair of Tanks in Production Service, 1997,
Reaffirmed 2008 .
API RP 500, Recommended Practice for Classification of Locations for Electrical Installations at Petroleum
Facilities Classified as Class I, Division 1 and Division 2, Revision 2 Third Edition , 1998 2012 .
API RP 505, Recommended Practice for Classification of Locations for Electrical Installations at Petroleum
Facilities Classified as Class I, Zone 0, Zone 1, and Zone 2, 2002 1997, reaffirmed 2012 .
API 620 API STD 620 , Recommended Rules for the Design and Construction of Large, Welded, Low-Pressure
Storage Tanks, 11th edition, 2012.
API Standard API STD 650, Welded Steel Tanks for Oil Storage, 11th edition, 2011.
API 653 STD 653 , Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction, 4th edition, 2012.
API RP 752, Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Buildings, 3rd edition, 2009.
API RP 753, Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Portable Buildings, 1st edition,
2007 (R2012) , reaffirmed 2012 .
API Standard API STD 1164, SCADA Security, Second Edition 2 , 2009.
API 1501, Filtration and Dehydration of Aviation Fuels, 1st edition, 1965. (Superseded by EI 1529)
API RP 1604, Removal and Disposal of Used Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks, 3rd edition, reaffirmed
2001 2010 .
API RP 1615, Installation of Underground Petroleum Storage Systems, 6th edition, 2011.
API RP 1621, Bulk Liquid Stock Control at Retail Outlets, 2001 1993, reaffirmed 2012 .
API STD 1631, Interior Lining of Underground Storage Tanks, 5th edition, reaffirmed 2010.
API RP 1632, Cathodic Protection of Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks and Piping Systems, 3rd edition,
reaffirmed 2010.
API RP 2003, Protection Against Ignition Arising Out of Static, Lightning, and Stray Currents, 7th edition, 2008.
API STD 2015, Cleaning Petroleum Storage Tanks, 6th 7th edition, reaffirmed 2006 2014 .
API RP 2016, Guidelines and Procedures for Entering and Cleaning Petroleum Storage Tanks, 1st edition,
reaffirmed 2006.
API RP 2214, Spark Ignition Properties of Hand Tools, 4th edition, 2004. (Withdrawn)
API STD 2217A, Guidelines for Work in Inert Confined Spaces in the Petroleum Industry, 4th edition, 2009.
API RP 2218, Fireproofing Practices in Petroleum and Petrochemical Processing Plants, 2nd 3rd edition,
1999 2013 .
API RP 2219, Safe Operating Guidelines for Vacuum Trucks in Petroleum Service, 3rd edition, 2005, reaffirmed
2012 .
API STD 2350, Overfill Protection for Storage Tanks in Petroleum Facilities, 4th edition, 2012.
API Security Guidelines for the Petroleum Industry, 3rd edition, 2005.
API Standard API STD 2610, Design, Construction, Operation, Maintenance, and Inspection of Terminal and
Tank Facilities, 2nd edition, 2005, reaffirmed 2010 .
“An Engineering Analysis of the Effects of Oxygenated Fuels on Marketing Vapor Recovery Equipment,”
September 1990.
API PUBL 4589,Fugitive Hydrocarbon Emissions from Petroleum Production Operations, 1993.
API/National Petrochemical and Refiners Association, Security Vulnerability Assessment Methodology, 2nd edition,
2004.
I.1.2.5 Association of Canadian Distillers Publications.
Association of Canadian Distillers, Suite 518, 90 Rue Sparks, Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 5B4, Canada.
“Fire Tests of Distilled Spirits Storage Tanks,” Client Report CR-5727.1, 2001.

78 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

I.1.2.6 ASTM Publications.


ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
ASTM C 1055 C1055 , Standard Guide for Heated System Surface Conditions that Produce Contact Burn Injuries,
2003 (Reaffirmed 2009) , reapproved 2014 .
ASTM D 4206 D4206 , Standard Test Method for Sustained Burning of Liquid Mixtures Using the Small Scale
Open-Cup Apparatus, 1996 (reaffirmed 2007) , reapproved 2013 .
ASTM D 4207 D4207 , Standard Test Method for Sustained Burning of Low Viscosity Liquid Mixtures by the Wick
Test, 1991. (Withdrawn)
ASTM D 4956 D4956 , Standard Specification for Retroreflective Sheeting for Traffic Control, 2011a 2013 .
ASTM D 6469 D6469 , Standard Guide for Microbial Contamination in Fuels and Fuel Systems,2012 2014 .
ASTM E 119 E119 , Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2012a 2014 .
ASTM E 502 E502 , Standard Test Method for Selection and Use of ASTM Standards for the Determination of
Flash Point of Chemicals by Closed Cup Methods, 2007e1, reapproved 2013 .
ASTM Manual on Flash Point Standards and Their Use, 1992.
I.1.2.7 ISO Publications.
International Organization for Standardization, 1, ch. de la Voie-Creuse, Case postale 56, CH-1211 Geneva 20,
Switzerland ISO Central Secretariat, BIBC II, 8 , Chemin de Blandonnet , CP 401 , 1214
Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland .
ISO 13732–1, Ergonomics of the Thermal Environment -- Methods for the Assessment of Human Responses to
Contact with Surfaces Part 1: Hot Surfaces, 2006 edition .
I.1.2.8 NACE Publications.
National Association of Corrosion Engineers NACE Internationl , 1440 South Creek Drive, Houston, TX 77084.
NACE RP- SP 0169,Recommended Practice, Control of External Corrosion on Underground or Submerged
Metallic Piping Systems, 1996 2013 . (Supersedes NACE RP- 0169)
NACE SP 0285, Recommended Practice, External Corrosion Control of Underground Storage Tank Systems by
Cathodic Protection, 2002. 2011 . (Supersedes NACE RP-0285)
I.1.2.9 NEIWPCC Publications.
New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission, 85 Merrimac Street, Boston, MA 02114.
Tank Closure Without Tears: An Inspector’s Safety Guide, May 1988.
I.1.2.10 NIOSH Publications.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton
Road, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Criteria for Recommended Standard for Working in Confined Spaces, 1979.
NIOSH 87–113, A Guide to Safety in Confined Spaces, 1987.
I.1.2.11 NORA Publications.
National Oilheat Research Alliance, 600 Cameron Street, Suite 600, Alexandria, VA 22314.
Oilheat Technician's Manual, 2002.
I.1.2.12 Oil and Gas Journal Publications.
PennWell Publishing Co., 3050 Post Oak Boulevard, 1455 West Loop South, Suite #400 , Houston, TX 77056
77027 .
“Module Ventilation Rates Quantified,” W. E. Gale, December 23, 1985, p. 41.
I.1.2.13 PEI Publications.
Petroleum Equipment Institute, P.O Box 2380, Tulsa, OK 74101-2380.
PEI RP100, Recommended Practices for Installation of Underground Liquid Storage Systems, 2011.
PEI RP200, Recommended Practices for Installation of Aboveground Storage Systems for Motor Vehicle Fueling ,
2008 2013 .
PEI RP600, Recommended Practices for Overfill Prevention for Shop-Fabricated Aboveground Tanks, 2012.

79 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

I.1.2.14 SFPE Publications.


Society of Fire Protection Engineers, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue 9711 Washington Blvd , Suite 1225 W 380 ,
Bethesda Gaithersburg , MD 20814 20878 .
Directory of Fire Tests Involving Storage of Flammable and Combustible Liquids in Small Containers, 3rd edition,
by David P. Nugent, Schirmer Engineering Corporation, 2006.
Engineering Guide: Assessing Flame Radiation to External Targets from Pool Fires, 1999.
Engineering Guide: Predicting 1st and 2nd Degree Skin Burns from Thermal Radiation, 2000.
Engineering Guide to Fire Exposures to Structural Elements, 2004.
Engineering Standard on Calculating Fire Exposures to Structures, 2010.
Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering, 2008.
I.1.2.15 STI/SPFA Publications.
Steel Tank Institute, 570 Oakwood Road /Steel Plate Fabricators Association , 944 Donata Ct. , Lake Zurich,
IL 60047.
SP001, Standard for Inspection of Aboveground Storage Tanks, 5th edition, 2011.
STI-P3, Specification and Manual for External Corrosion Protection of Underground Steel Storage Tanks, 2012
2014 .
STI R931, Double Wall AST F921 Installation and Testing Instructions , 2012 2014 .
STI RP 892, Recommended Practice for Corrosion Protection of Underground Piping Networks Associated with
Liquid Storage and Dispensing Systems, 2012.
STI RP R011, Recommended Practice for Anchoring of Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2006.

STI, ACT-100®, Specification for External Corrosion Protection of FRP Composite Steel Underground Tanks, F894,
1997 2013, revised 2014 .
Keeping Water Out of Your Storage System, 2004 2006 .
I.1.2.16 UL Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062-2096.
ANSI/ UL 30, Standard for Metal Safety Cans, 1995, Revised 2009 2014 .
ANSI/ UL 142, Standard for Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2006, Revised
2010 2014 .
ANSI/ UL 263, Standard for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2011, revised 2015 .
ANSI/ UL 1313, Standard for Nonmetallic Safety Cans for Petroleum Products, 2005, Revised 2007 2012 .
UL 1316, Standard for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products,
Alcohols, and Alcohol-Gasoline Mixtures, 1994, Revised 2006.
ANSI/ UL 1709, Standard for Rapid Rise Fire Tests of Protection Materials for Structural Steel, 2005, Revised
2011.
ANSI/ UL 1746, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2007,
revised 2014 .
I.1.2.17 ULC Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories of Canada, 7 Underwriters Road, Scarborough Toronto , Ontario M1R 3B4 , Canada
M1R 3A9 .
CAN/ULC-S603.1, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Tanks for
Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2011.
I.1.2.18 UN Publications.
United Nations Publications, 2 United Nations Plaza, Room DC2-853, New York, NY 10017.
Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, 17th 18th revised edition, 2011 2014 .

80 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

I.1.2.19 U.S. Government Publications.


U.S. Government Printing Government Publishing Office, Washington, DC 20402.
DOT, Office of Pipeline Safety, Pipeline Security Information Circular, Information of Concern to Pipeline Security
Personnel, Security Guidance for Natural Gas, and Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Liquefied Natural Gas
Facilities, September 5, 2002.
U.S. Coast Guard NVIC 11–02 and other NVICs
EPA Protocols for Generating Unit-Specific Emission Estimates for Equipment Leaks of VOC and HAP, 1987
(Document No. 87-222-124-10-02).
EPA/Radian Study, 1979.
Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA) 2226, Excavation & Trenching Operations, 1990.
Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 800-898, “GMP for Medical Devices.”
Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.106, “Flammable and Combustible Liquids.”
Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.1200, “Hazard Communication.”
Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 154–156, “Navigation and Navigable Waterways.”
Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 280, “Technical Standards and Requirements for Owners and
Operators of Underground Storage Tanks.”
Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 100–199, “Hazardous Materials Transportation.”
I.1.2.20 Other Publications.
Sandia National Laboratories, “Vulnerability Assessment Methodology for Chemical Facilities (VAM-CF)”

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

Updated SDO names, addresses, standard names, numbers, and editions.


Related Public Inputs for This Document

Related Input Relationship


Public Input No. 6-NFPA 30-2015 [Global
Input]
Public Input No. 5-NFPA 30-2015 [Section Updated SDO names, addresses, standard names, numbers, and
No. 2.3] editions.

Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: Aaron Adamczyk


Organization: [ Not Specified ]
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Sat Jun 06 15:42:55 EDT 2015

81 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 39-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. I.1.2.4 ]

82 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

I.1.2.4 API Publications.


American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005.
API RP 70, Security for Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations, 1st edition, 2003.
API RP 70I, Security for Worldwide Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Operations, 1st Edition, 2004.
API Specification 12R1, Setting, Maintenance, Inspection, Operation, and Repair of Tanks in Production Service,
2008.
API RP 500, Recommended Practice for Classification of Locations for Electrical Installations at Petroleum
Facilities Classified as Class I, Division 1 and Division 2, Revision 2 3rd edition , 1998 2012 .
API RP 505, Recommended Practice for Classification of Locations for Electrical Installations at Petroleum
Facilities Classified as Class I, Zone 0, Zone 1, and Zone 2, 2002.
API Standard 620, Recommended Rules for the Design and Construction of Large, Welded, Low-Pressure
Storage Tanks, 11th 12th edition, 2012 2013 .
API Standard 650, Welded Steel Tanks for Oil Storage, 11th 12th edition, 2011 2013 .
API Standard 653, Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction, 4th 5th edition, 2012 2014 .
API RP 752, Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Buildings, 3rd edition, 2009.
API RP 753, Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Portable Buildings, 1st edition,
2007 (R2012).
API Standard 1164, Pipeline SCADA Security, Edition 2, 2009.
API Bulletin 1501, Filtration and Dehydration of Aviation Fuels, 1st edition, 1965. 4th edition (historical document)
API RP 1604, Removal and Disposal Closure of Used Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks, 3rd edition,
reaffirmed 2001.
API RP 1615, Installation of Underground Petroleum Storage Systems, 6th edition, 2011.
API RP 1621, Bulk Liquid Stock Control at Retail Outlets, 2001 5th Edition, 1993 .
API RP 1631, Interior Lining of Underground Storage Tanks, 5th edition, reaffirmed 2010.
API RP 1632, Cathodic Protection of Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks and Piping Systems, 3rd edition,
reaffirmed 2010 (historic document) .
API Standard 2003, Protection Against Ignition Arising Out of Static, Lightning, and Stray Currents, 7th edition,
2008.
API Standard 2015, Cleaning Petroleum Storage Tanks, 6th 7th edition, reaffirmed 2006 2014 .
API RP 2016, Guidelines and Procedures for Entering and Cleaning Petroleum Storage Tanks, 1st edition,
reaffirmed 2006.
API Publication 2214, Spark Ignition Properties of Hand Tools, 4th edition, 2004. (not an active document)
API Standard 2217A, Guidelines for Work in Inert Confined Spaces in the Petroleum Industry, 4th 5th edition,
2009 2015 .
API Publication 2218, Fireproofing Practices in Petroleum and Petrochemical Processing Plants, 2nd 3rd edition,
1999 2013 .
API Publication 2219, Safe Operating Guidelines for Vacuum Trucks in Petroleum Service, 3rd edition, 2005.
API Standard 2350, Overfill Protection for Storage Tanks in Petroleum Facilities, 4th edition, 2012.
API Security Guidelines for the Petroleum Industry, 3rd edition, 2005.
API Standard 2610, Design, Construction, Operation, Maintenance, and Inspection of Terminal and Tank Facilities,
2nd edition, 2005.
API Publication , “An Engineering Analysis of the Effects of Oxygenated Fuels on Marketing Vapor Recovery
Equipment ,” September 1990.
API Publication 4589, Fugitive Hydrocarbon Emissions from Petroleum Production Operations, 1st Edition, 1993.
API/National Petrochemical and Refiners Association, Security Vulnerability Assessment Methodology, 2nd edition,
2004.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

update referenced documents


Submitter Information Verification

83 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Submitter Full Name: RICHARD KRAUS


Organization: APIPETROLEUM SAFETY CONSULTAN
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Mon Jun 22 09:57:35 EDT 2015

84 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 82-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. I.1.2.6 ]

I.1.2.6 ASTM Publications.


ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
ASTM C 1055, Standard Guide for Heated System Surface Conditions that Produce Contact Burn Injuries, 2003
(Reaffirmed 2009).
ASTM D 4206, Standard Test Method for Sustained Burning of Liquid Mixtures Using the Small Scale Open-Cup
Apparatus, 1996 (reaffirmed 2007).
ASTM D 4207, Standard Test Method for Sustained Burning of Low Viscosity Liquid Mixtures by the Wick Test,
1991.
ASTM D 4956, Standard Specification for Retroreflective Sheeting for Traffic Control, 2011a.
ASTM D 6469, Standard Guide for Microbial Contamination in Fuels and Fuel Systems, 2012.
ASTM E 119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2012a 2014 .
ASTM E 502, Standard Test Method for Selection and Use of ASTM Standards for the Determination of Flash Point
of Chemicals by Closed Cup Methods, 2007e1.
ASTM Manual on Flash Point Standards and Their Use, 1992.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

date update
Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: MARCELO HIRSCHLER


Organization: GBH INTERNATIONAL
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Jul 02 14:30:19 EDT 2015

85 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 80-NFPA 30-2015 [ Section No. I.1.2.16 ]

I.1.2.16 UL Publications.
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062-2096.
ANSI/UL 30, Standard for Metal Safety Cans, 1995, Revised 2009 2014 .
ANSI/UL 142, Standard for Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, 2006, Revised
2010 2014 .
ANSI/UL 263, Standard for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, 2011. Revised 2015
ANSI/UL 1313, Standard for Nonmetallic Safety Cans for Petroleum Products, 2005, Revised 2007 2012 .
UL 1316, Standard for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products,
Alcohols, and Alcohol-Gasoline Mixtures, 1994, Revised 2006.
ANSI/UL 1709, Standard for Rapid Rise Fire Tests of Protection Materials for Structural Steel, 2005, Revised 2011.
ANSI/UL 1746, Standard for External Corrosion Protection Systems for Steel Underground Storage Tanks, 2007.
Revised 2014

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

The proposed changes reflect updated editions of UL Standards.


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: RONALD FARR


Organization: UL LLC
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Jul 02 14:01:08 EDT 2015

86 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...
ATTACHMENT No. A6

Public Input No. 21-NFPA 30-2015 [ Global Input ]

This Global Public Comment is a follow-up to Global Public Input No. 50 and a l l linked
Public Inputs submitted to the First Draft, which proposed a change of containers from
"containers, portable tanks, and intermediate bulk containers" to "containers, low pressure
cylinders, portable tanks, and intermediate bulk containers". This simply added the
designation of a 'low pressure cylinder' to the list of containers that were covered by NFPA
30.
The NFPA 30 Technical Committee was unsure whether this new designation of products should be
listed in NFPA 30, NFPA 30B, NFPA 58, or a new section altogether. Due to only limited testing
provided, it was decided that an inter- committee Task Group including members of NFPA 30, 30B,
and 58 would determine the appropriate means to address this issue and make recommendations
to the NFPA Standards Council. The test data supplied to NFPA was generated by
3rd parties (Intertek Group plc in conjunction with the University of Colorado) under contract by 3M.
Since the Technical Committee met to discuss the First Draft, new DOT legislation has been
approved and put into place as of January 7, 2013 (See attached "Federal Register Vol. 78 No. 4").
Approved by the US DOT's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), this
change echoes the changes in UN Classification on 'Chemical under pressure'. In the updated
Federal Register, the Hazardous Materials Table (HMT) has been updated to include six
specifications of "Chemical under pressure": UN3500-UN3505.
In the Register, PHMSA claims "The 'Chemical under pressure, n.o.s.' HMT entries are added to
address shipments of liquids or solids (e.g. adhesives, coatings, and cleaners) combined with a gas
or gas mixtures utilized to expel the contents from pressure vessels." Special Provision 362, which
states that "classification of these materials is to be based on hazard characteristics of the
components in the propellant, the liquid, or the solid forms", was amended to include the six new
UN numbers that specify "Chemical under pressure".
Furthermore, Special Provision TP40 and T50 provide more detailed instruction for correct
transportation of "Chemical under pressure" in various circumstances.
Along with this new support, all claims made in Global Public Input No. 50 should be considered as
well.
Attached to this Global Public Comment is the Updated Federal Register as well as a list of the
Public Inputs submitted to the First Draft Report that this Global Public Comment affects; a
summary of results generated by 3rd party tests have been attached (video was unable to attach to
this Public Comment; however, this video is now a public document following the First Draft
Report).
It is recommended that any change pertaining to this Public Comment be applied to all past Public
Inputs.

Additional Proposed Changes

File Name Description Approved


NFPA_30_SWC_PC_16_Rejected_But_Held_to_be_emulated.pdf Public Comment #16.
DOT_PHMSA_Federal_Register_Vol_78_No_4.pdf DOT PHMSA Federal Register
Michael_Jacobs_3M_First_Draft_Public_Input_List_Held.pdf Public Input List
Test report for 3rd party testing on low
3M_Cylinder_Testing_Report.pdf
pressure cylinders.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

NOTE: The following Public Input appeared as "Reject but Hold" in Public Comment No. 16 of the A2014 Second Draft
Report for NFPA 30 and per the Regs. at 4.4.8.3.1.

Classifying flammable liquids under low pressure.


Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: TC ON FLC-SWC


Organization: NFPA

1 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu Apr 09 11:29:08 EDT 2015

2 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM
National Fire Protection Association Report

Public Comment No. 16-NFPA 30-2013 [ Global Input ]

This Global Public Comment is a follow-up to Global Public Input No. 50 and
all linked Public Inputs submitted to the First Draft, which propsed a change of
containers from "containers, portable tanks, and intermediate bulk containers"
to "containers, low pressure cylinders, portable tanks, and intermediate bulk
containers". This simply added the designation of a 'low pressure cylinder' to
the list of containers that were covered by NFPA 30.
The NFPA 30 Technical Committee was unsure whether this new designation of
products should be listed in NFPA 30, NFPA 30B, NFPA 58, or a new section
altogether. Due to only limited testing provided, it was decided that an inter-
committee Task Group including members of NFPA 30, 30B, and 58 would
determine the appropriate means to address this issue and make recommendations
to the NFPA Standards Council. The test data supplied to NFPA was generated by
3rd parties (Intertek Group plc in conjunction with the University of Colorado) under
contract by 3M.
Since the Technical Committee met to discuss the First Draft, new DOT legislation
has been approved and put into place as of January 7, 2013 (See attached "Federal
Register Vol. 78 No. 4"). Approved by the US DOT's Pipeline and Hazardous
Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), this change echoes the changes in UN
Classification on 'Chemical under pressure'. In the updated Federal Register, the
Hazardous Materials Table (HMT) has been updated to include six specifications of
"Chemical under pressure": UN3500-UN3505.
In the Register, PHMSA claims "The 'Chemical under pressure, n.o.s.' HMT entries
are added to address shipments of liquids or solids (e.g. adhesives, coatings, and
cleaners) combined with a gas or gas mixtures utilized to expel the contents from
pressure vessels." Special Provision 362, which states that "classification of these
materials is to be based on hazard characteristics of the components in the
propellant, the liquid, or the solid forms", was amended to include the six new UN
numbers that specify "Chemical under pressure".
Furthermore, Special Provision TP40 and T50 provide more detailed instruction for
correct transportation of "Chemical under pressure" in various circumstances.
Along with this new support, all claims made in Global Public Input No. 50 should be
considered as well.
Attached to this Global Public Comment is the Updated Federal Register as well as a
list of the Public Inputs submitted to the First Draft Report that this Global Public
Comment affects; a summary of results generated by 3rd party tests have been
attached (video was unable to attach to this Public Comment; however, this video is
now a public document following the First Draft Report).
It is recommended that any change pertaining to this Public Comment be applied to
all past Public Inputs.

Additional Proposed Changes

Page 1 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

File Name Description Approved


Department of
Transportation's
Pipeline and
DOT_PHMSA_Federal_Register_Vol_78_No_4.pdf
Hazardous Materials
Safety Adminstration
Federal Register.
Related Public Inputs
Michael_Jacobs_3M_- submitted to the
_First_Draft_Public_Input_List.pdf Technical Committee
for the First Draft
Test report for 3rd
3M_Cylinder_Testing_Report.pdf party testing on low
pressure cylinders

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Comment


Classifying flammable liquids under low pressure.

Page 2 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

Related Item
Public Input No. 48-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 1.3.2]
Public Input No. 49-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 1.3.3]
Public Input No. 50-NFPA 30-2012 [Global Input]
Public Input No. 63-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 1.3.4]
Public Input No. 66-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 1.3.5]
Public Input No. 67-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 1.3.6]
Public Input No. 68-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 3.3.34]
Public Input No. 69-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 3.3.50]
Public Input No. 70-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.1.4]
Public Input No. 71-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.3.9 [Excluding any Sub-
Sections]]
Public Input No. 72-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.3.9.1]
Public Input No. 73-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.3.9.2]
Public Input No. 74-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.3.10]
Public Input No. 75-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.4.3 [Excluding any Sub-
Sections]]
Public Input No. 76-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.4.2 [Excluding any Sub-
Sections]]
Public Input No. 77-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 9.12.1]
Public Input No. 78-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 12.3.5]
Public Input No. 79-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 12.6.2.2]
Public Input No. 80-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 12.8.1]
Public Input No. 81-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. A.16.1.1]
Public Input No. 82-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 13.1]
Public Input No. 83-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 13.3.8]
Public Input No. 84-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 14.1]
Public Input No. 85-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 15.1]
Public Input No. 86-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 15.3 [Excluding any Sub-
Sections]]
Public Input No. 87-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 15.3.2]
Public Input No. 88-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 15.4.1]
Public Input No. 89-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.1.1]
Public Input No. 90-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.2.3]
Public Input No. 91-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.4.1.1]
Public Input No. 92-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.4.1.2]
Public Input No. 93-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.4.1.3]
Public Input No. 94-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.5.2.1]
Public Input No. 95-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.5.2.2]
Public Input No. 96-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.5.2.3]
Public Input No. 97-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 16.5.2.4]
Public Input No. 98-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 18.4.8]
Public Input No. 99-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 18.4.9]
Public Input No. 100-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 18.5.2 [Excluding any Sub-
Sections]]
Public Input No. 101-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. 18.5.4.1]

Page 3 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

Public Input No. 102-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. A.16.2.3]


Public Input No. 103-NFPA 30-2012 [Section No. E.2.3.3]
Public Input No. 113-NFPA 30-2012 [New Section after 3.3.12.1]

Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: Michael Jacobs


Organization: 3M
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Thu May 02 08:58:56 EDT 2013

Committee Statement

Page 4 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

Committee Rejected but held


Action:

Page 5 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

Resolution: At the August 2012 NFPA 30 First Draft Meeting, the NFPA 30 Technical
Committee on Storage and Warehousing of Containers and Portable Tanks
reviewed a series of Public Inputs (PI No. 50 et al) to the 2012 edition of
NFPA 30 that would have included requirements for storage, handling, and
use of low pressure containers used to dispense flammable and combustible
liquids (e.g., for adhesives application, coatings application and similar uses)
by means of a compressed gas. These low pressure containers are currently
not within the scope of NFPA 30. In the course of its deliberations, the
Technical Committee considered whether these types of containers would be
better addressed in NFPA 30B, Code for the Manufacture and Storage of
Aerosol Products. However, the current scope of NFPA 30B is limited in its
application to aerosol products in “…metal..containers ..up to a maximum of
1000ml..”. Thus, neither document appears to address low pressure
containers, as described in the original public inputs. At the time of the First
Draft Meeting, the Technical Committee concluded that an intercommittee
Task Group was needed to determine how best to address the subject. At the
time, four options presented themselves: - Coverage under NFPA 30,
Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code - Coverage under NFPA 30B,
Code for the Manufacture and Storage of Aerosol Products - Coverage under
NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code - Establishing an enirely new code
development project At the June 2013 Second Draft Meeting, the following
product issues were discussed: The low pressure containers are typically
significantly larger in size, and are now using U.S. Depat. of Transportation-
approved containers. The products fall into four general categories: 1.
Ignitable liquid – flammable propellant 2. Non-Ignitable liquid – flammable
propellant These two categories are of most concern. There can be a
substantial amount of flammable gas in one of these containers, creating a
hazard similar to the filling operation of aerosols products. It may be
appropriate to protect them that way. Currently, these containers are in
storage at manufacturing sites, in warehouses, and at user locations, without
clear guidance on the proper level of protection. 3. Ignitable liquid – non-
flammable propellant. In this case, use of these containers appear to be no
different than pressurized dispensing, which is already covered in NFPA 30.
There is room for improvement for this category, but the bottom line is control
of discharge, i.e., if container or piping vents, the result is limited to only
discharge of the inert gas. 4. Non-ignitable liquid – non-flammable propellant.
There appears to be no need of requirements from a fire protection
standpoint for a product with a non-ignitable liquid and a non-flammable
propellant. The Technical Committee on Storage and Warehousing of
Containers and Portable Tanks has concluded that there are three options: 1.
Amend the Scope of NFPA 30 to address low pressure containers. But, this
would involve formation of a new Technical Committee (under the NFPA 30
project) to address the subject, because none of the current NFPA 30
technical committees have the appropriate expertise. Also, the new technical
committee would need to include representation from the Technical
Committee on Aerosol Products and representation by manufacturers of the
containers and user industries. 2. Amend the Scope of NFPA 30B to include
low pressure containers. It is not unlikely that NFPA 30B technical Committee
has the appropriate expertise to deal with this issue, either. Likely, it, too,
would have to create a new committee, ass described above. 3. Create a
new project to develop a new code or standard that would deal strictly with
low pressure containers exclusively. This might function under either of the
above-named technical committees or might require formation of an entirely
new committee, depending on subsequent review of NFPA's Standards
Council. Therefore, the Technical Committee on Storage and Warehousing of
Containers and Portable Tanks has decided to first seek guidance from the
NFPA Standards Council as to their preferred direction and then proceed
accordingly.

Copyright Assignment

Page 6 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
National Fire Protection Association Report

I, Michael Jacobs, hereby irrevocably grant and assign to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) all
and full rights in copyright in this Public Comment (including both the Proposed Change and the Statement of
Problem and Substantiation). I understand and intend that I acquire no rights, including rights as a joint author,
in any publication of the NFPA in which this Public Comment in this or another similar or derivative form is
used. I hereby warrant that I am the author of this Public Comment and that I have full power and authority to
enter into this copyright assignment.

By checking this box I affirm that I am Michael Jacobs, and I agree to be legally bound by the above
Copyright Assignment and the terms and conditions contained therein. I understand and intend that, by
checking this box, I am creating an electronic signature that will, upon my submission of this form, have the
same legal force and effect as a handwritten signature

Page 7 of 7
http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetcher?commentParams=%28Comment... 8/13/2013
wreier-aviles on DSK7SPTVN1PROD with

(8) (9) (10)


1040

Hazardous materials Packaging (§ 173.***) Quantity limitations (see Vessel stowage


Hazard Special
descriptions and Identifica- Label §§ 173.27 and 175.75)
Symbols class or PG provisions
proper shipping tion Nos. codes
division (§ 172.102)
names Cargo

VerDate Mar<15>2010
Exceptions Non-bulk Bulk Passenger Location Other
aircraft
aircraft/rail only

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8A) (8B) (8C) (9A) (9B) (10A) (10B)

Cartridges for weapons, 1.4S UN0014 .... II ............... 1.4S .......... .......................... 63 ............. 62 ............. None ......... 25 kg ........ 100 kg ...... 01 ............. 25
blank or Cartridges,
small arms, blank or

18:13 Jan 04, 2013


Cartridges for tools,
blank.

* * * * * * *

Jkt 229001
G Chemical under pressure, 2.2 UN3503 .... ................... 2.2, 8 ........ 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... Forbidden 100 kg ...... D ............... 40
corrosive, n.o.s.
G Chemical under pressure, 2.1 UN3505 .... ................... 2.1, 8 ........ 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... Forbidden 75 kg ........ D ............... 40
flammable, corrosive,
n.o.s.

PO 00000
G Chemical under pressure, 2.1 UN3501 .... ................... 2.1 ............ 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... Forbidden 75 kg ........ D ............... 40
flammable, n.o.s.
G Chemical under pressure, 2.1 UN3504 .... ................... 2.1, 6.1 ..... 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... Forbidden 75 kg ........ D ............... 40
flammable, toxic, n.o.s.

Frm 00054
G Chemical under pressure, 2.2 UN3500 .... ................... 2.2 ............ 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... 75 kg ........ 150 kg ...... B
n.o.s.
G Chemical under pressure, 2.2 UN3502 .... ................... 2.2, 6.1 ..... 362, T50, TP40 None ......... 335 ........... 313 ........... Forbidden 100 kg ...... D ............... 40
toxic, n.o.s.

Fmt 4701
* * * * * * *
Iodine monochloride, liq- 8 UN3498 .... II ............... 8 ............... IB2, T7, TP2 .... 154 ........... 202 ........... 242 ........... 1 L ............ 30 L .......... D ............... 40, 66, 74,
uid. 89, 90
Iodine monochloride, 8 UN1792 .... II ............... 8 ............... B6, IB8, IP2, None ......... 212 ........... 240 ........... Forbidden 50 kg ........ D ............... 40, 66, 74,

Sfmt 4700
solid. IP4, N41, T7, 89, 90
TP2.

* * * * * * *
Krill meal ......................... 4.2 UN3497 .... II ............... 4.2 ............ 155, IB6, IP2, None ......... 212 ........... 242 ........... No limit ..... No limit ..... B ............... 25, 88, 128
T3, TP33.
III .............. 4.2 ............ 155, IB8, IP3, None ......... 213 ........... 242 ........... No limit ..... No limit ..... A ............... 128
T1, TP33.

E:\FR\FM\07JAR2.SGM
* * * * * * *
AW Mercury contained in 8 UN3506 .... III .............. 8, 6.1 ........ A191 ................ 164 ........... None ......... None ......... No limit ..... No limit ..... B ............... 40, 97
manufactured articles.

07JAR2
* * * * * * *
G Nitriles, liquid, toxic, 6.1 UN3276 .... I ................ 6.1 ............ 5, T14, TP2, None ......... 201 ........... 243 ........... 1 L ............ 30 L .......... B ............... 52
n.o.s. TP13, TP27.
II ............... 6.1 ............ IB2, T11, TP2, 153 ........... 202 ........... 243 ........... 5 L ............ 60 L .......... B ............... 52
TP27.
Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 4 / Monday, January 7, 2013 / Rules and Regulations

III .............. 6.1 ............ IB3, T7, TP1, 153 ........... 203 ........... 241 ........... 60 L .......... 220 L ........ A ............... 52
TP28.
G Nitriles, solid, toxic, n.o.s. 6.1 UN3439 .... I ................ 6.1 ............ IB7, IP1, T6, None ......... 211 ........... 242 ........... 5 kg .......... 50 kg ........ D ............... 52
TP33.
II ............... 6.1 ............ IB8, IP2, IP4, 153 ........... 212 ........... 242 ........... 25 kg ........ 100 kg ...... B ............... 52
T3, TP33.
III .............. 6.1 ............ IB8, IP3, T1, 153 ........... 213 ........... 240 ........... 100 kg ...... 200 kg ...... A ............... 52
TP33.
Michael Jacobs
3M Company Industrial Adhesives and Tapes Division
3M Center Bldg 230-1S-36
St. Paul, MN 55144

NFPA 30 First Draft Public Input #s with the related sections of NFPA 30 by Michael Jacobs of
3M Company:

 48: Section 1.3.2


 49: Section 1.3.3
 50: Global
 63: Section 1.3.4
 66: Section 1.3.5
 67: Section 1.3.6
 68: Section 3.3.34
 69: Section 3.3.50
 70: Section 9.1.3
 71: Section 9.3.9
 72: Section 9.3.9.1
 73: Section 9.3.9.2
 74: Section 9.3.10
 75: Section 9.4.3
 76: Section 9.4.2
 77: Section 9.12.1
 78: Section 12.3.4
 79: Section 12.6.2.2
 80: Section 12.8.1
 81: Section A.16.1.1
 82: Section 13.1
 83: Section 13.3.8
 84: Section 14.1
 85: Section 15.1
 86: Section 15.3
 87: Section 15.3.2
 88: Section 15.4.1
 89: Section 16.1.1
 90: Section 16.2.3
 91: Section 16.4.1.1
 92: Section 16.4.1.2
 93: Section 16.4.1.2
 94: Section 16.5.2.1
 95: Section 16.5.2.2
 96: Section 16.5.2.3
 97: Section 16.5.2.4
 98: Section 18.4.8
 99: Section 18.4.9
 100: Section 18.5.2
 101: Section 18.5.4.1
 102: Section A.16.2.3
 103: Section E.2.3.3
 113: Section 3.3.12.3

Flammable and combustible liquids contained in a cylinder designed per DOT regulations and relief
devices designed per CGA regulations at low internal working pressures (<260 psi @77F) exhibit fire
hazards at high temperatures that are no greater than currently accepted receptacles that contain
flammable liquids or portable tanks.

Science and test data have shown that under fire conditions flammable liquids in well designed cylinders
under low pressure can be safely stored under the same code as Flammable liquids.
A well designed cylinder is constructed and certified to Dept of Transportation (DOT) standards and has
pressure relief devices installed to Compressed Gas Association (CGA) standards.

Testing has shown that a cylinder constructed to DOT 39 and DOT4BW240 has walls and welded seams
that can withstand an internal pressure increase until the relief devices open to lower the pressure. By
standards this is at a minimum of four times the working pressure. This is would be two times the
pressure under fire conditions. This is a very adequate safety margin.

Testing has shown that the two styles of relief devices (frangible disk and spring loaded valve) installed
per CGA specification open at a minimum of four times the working pressure and two times pressure
under actual fire conditions. This is a very adequate safety margin.

Testing has shown that the relief device orifice per CGA regulations are wide to allow internal pressure
to vent at a high enough rate in CFM (cubic feet per minute) to prevent any pressure increase past the
designated relief pressure limit. The cylinder seams will not burst because the relief device is
adequately sized.

Testing has shown that the volume of flammable vapor expelled through the relief device does not
dislocate the cylinder. Relief valve discharges do not dangerously “rocket” the cylinder as can happen
with unchained high pressure cylinders (3,000 psi).

Science has shown that the product formulations in the cylinder cannot autoignite or create a boiling
liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).

**MORE TESTING REPORTS WILL BE SUBMITTED AS A HARD COPY TO SUPPLEMENT THIS CHANGE AND
ALL CHANGES LINKED TO THIS GLOBAL INPUT
Flammable Liquid in a Low Pressure Cylinder Flame Test Report
Reference: NFPA 30, Global Public Input #50

Norm Sato

Michael Jacobs

June 2012
ABSTRACT

In this experiment, the behavior of low pressure cylinders containing flammable liquids in
extreme situations of heat and open flame was studied. Three different sizes of low pressure
cylinders – 5, 25, and 50 gallon – were put in direct contact with open flame to emulate the
situation wherein the storage area for low pressure cylinders catches fire. Through testing, it was
determined that low pressure cylinders containing flammable liquids behave in a manner equal to
or less hazardous in a fire than flammable liquids in currently approved containers. The resulting
data within NFPA 30 Global Public Input 50 and all linked Public Inputs, related to inclusion of
low pressure cylinders in NFPA 30: Flammable and Combustible Liquids.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Innovative new products frequently do not fit established regulatory templates, creating
inconsistent warehousing or storage conditions – see FAQs in Appendix A. Current liquid based
spray adhesives products (larger than aerosol) covered by this submission is unique and required
testing under two NFPA test methods: (1) the design of the cylinder to DOT standards; and (2)
the design of the pressure relief devices to CGA standards. The resulting cylinder designs
function in manner equal to or less hazardous in a fire than flammable liquids in currently
approved containers.

The purpose of the testing, report, and submission to NFPA is to support the inclusion of
flammable liquid adhesives in low pressure cylinders into NFPA 30: Flammable and
Combustible Liquids. Video and photographic data is available to support this submission.

TEST MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT, AND PROCEDURE

The basic setup for this experiment, as shown in Figure 1, included a low pressure cylinder that
was heated through direct contact with an open flame provided by propane torches. A pressure
gauge was attached to the main valve opening of the low pressure cylinder. This gauge reports
pressure to the test operator, allowing testing to be shut down if internal pressure was to exceed
the relief valve specifications. Above the low pressure cylinder was another open flame
provided by a propane torch. This was used as a ‘flare’ or ‘pilot light’ to ignite any of the
material that escapes through the relief valves.

In addition to the basic setup, extra precautions were taken by building concrete retaining walls
around three sides of the experiment and each low pressure cylinder tested was chained to the
ground. Cameras were set up to record video of the test from distance. All testing was done
outside.
FIGURE 1. Simple diagram of flame test set-up.

Three different sizes of cylinders, as described in Appendix B, were tested: 5 gallon, 25 gallon,
and 50 gallon cylinders. The 5 gallon cylinder has a “frangible disk” relief valve found on the
cylinder wall itself. When the frangible relief disk fails (breaks), a 0.12 in2 orifice should be
opened providing an escape route for contents inside the cylinder. The 5 gallon cylinder used in
this test has manufacturer specifications claiming the relief valve will open between 360 and 520
psig. Both the 25 and 50 gallon cylinders have a spring loaded relief valve found on the back
side of the main valve. When the gauge pressure of the cylinder reaches a certain level, the
spring should be stretched enough to open an orifice and let some of the pressure escape from the
cylinder. After a noticeable amount of gas has been released, the pressure inside the cylinder
will decrease, causing the spring close the orifice. Both cylinders used in this test have
manufacturer specifications claiming the relief valves will open between 360 and 480 psig.

All cylinders were heated by the propane torches until either a relief valve opened or the internal
pressure exceeded relief valve specifications. For the 5 gallon containing a frangible disk relief
valve, propane torches used for heating were extinguished following rupture of the frangible
disk. The test was continued with a 10 minute observation and cool down period. Water was
used to speed the cooling of the cylinder following the 10 minute observation. For the low
pressure cylinders containing a spring relief valve, propane torches used for heating were
extinguished following the second opening of the relief valve. The test was continued until the
pressure relief valve would not re-open, followed by a 10 minute observation and cool down
period. Water was used to speed the cooling of the cylinder following the 10 minute
observation.

RESULTS

5 GALLON CYLINDER

Pressure was recorded once every second during the test. Figure 2 shows the change in pressure
over time for the testing of the 5 gallon cylinder.

400
350 Pmax = 360.1 psig
Internal Pressure (psig)

300 Frangible Disk Rupture

250
200
150
100
50
0
0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400
Time Elapsed (sec)

FIGURE 2. Internal Pressure (psig) vs Time Elapsed (sec) during the testing of the 5 gallon cylinder.

The maximum pressure reached during the testing was 360.1 psig, 193 seconds into the test. At
this point, the frangible disk broke and a rush of gas escaped from the cylinder immediately,
dropping the pressure to 181.7 psi, at 200 seconds. From then on, pressure gradually decreased
as the liquefied propellant (dimethyl ether in this case) vaporized and escaped through the orifice
under the frangible disk. Vapors that escaped from the relief valve caught on fire from the flare
above.

25 GALLON CYLINDER

Pressure was recorded once every second during the test. Figure 3 shows the change in pressure
over time for the testing of the 25 gallon cylinder.
450
Internal Pressure (psig)
400 Pmax = 410.0 psig

350
300
250 Cool down with water begins
200
150
100
50
0
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600
Time Elapsed (sec)

FIGURE 3. Internal Pressure (psig) vs. Time Elapsed (sec) during the testing of the 25 gallon cylinder.

The maximum pressure reached during testing was 410.0 psig, 283 seconds into the test. This
was the first time the pressure relief valve opened. Propane torches were left on while gas
escaped from the cylinder. Within two seconds of the relief valve opening, the spring loaded
valve closed at a pressure of 352.2 psi. The cylinder continued heating and pressure increased
again until the relief valve opened the second time at 397.7 psig, 302 seconds into the test.
Following the second relief valve closure, propane torches were extinguished. Due to
thermodynamic interia, the spring relief valve opened two more times to relieve pressure. Figure
4 shows, in more detail, change in pressure over time during with the spring relief valve opened
and closed. Vapors that escaped from the relief valve caught on fire from the flare above.
430.0
Spring relief valve opens
410.0

390.0

370.0

350.0

330.0

310.0
Spring relief valve opens
290.0 Heat off

270.0

250.0
250 300 350 400 450

FIGURE 4. Internal Pressure (psig) vs. Time Elapsed (sec) during the testing of the 25 gallon cylinder.

50 GALLON CYLINDER

Pressure was recorded once every second during the test. Figure 5 shows the change in pressure
over time for the testing of the 50 gallon cylinder.
500
450 Pmax = 446.3 psig

400
350
300
250 Cool down with water begins

200
150
100
50
0
0 500 1000 1500 2000

FIGURE 5. Internal Pressure (psig) vs. Time Elapsed (sec) during the testing of the 50 gallon cylinder.

The maximum pressure reaching during testing was 446.3 psig, 361 seconds into the test. This
was the first time the pressure relief valve opened. Propane torches were left on while gas
escaped from the cylinder. Within two seconds of the relief valve opening, the spring loaded
valve closed at a pressure of 387.9 psi. The cylinder continued heating and pressure increased
again until the relief valve opened the second time at 441.8 psig, 398 seconds into the test.
Following the second relief valve closure, propane torches were extinguished. Despite this, the
spring relief valve opened two more times to relieve pressure. Figure 6 shows, in more detail,
change in pressure over time during with the spring relief valve opened and closed. Vapors that
escaped from the relief valve caught on fire from the flare above.

500
480 Spring relief valve opens

460
440
420
400
380
360
340 Spring relief valve closes
320
Heat off
300
250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750

FIGURE 6. Internal Pressure (psig) vs. Time Elapsed (sec) during the testing of the 50 gallon cylinder.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

The pressure of the escaping vapor was determined to be low enough that the safety chains used
are not needed.

Safety of the relief valves is confirmed; the data presented shows that relief devices specified by
CGA open at 50% of the burst strength (see Appendix B) of the cylinders, allowing a very large
safety margin.

Testing shows that the DOT cylinder construction is more than adequate in design to withstand
fire situations listed under NFPA 30: Flammable and Combustible Liquids.
APPENDIX A: FAQs

1. Q: Why do existing regulations not clearly apply to cylinder spray adhesives?


A: Cylinder spray adhesives consist of a spray gun connected by a flexible rubber hose to a
metal tank that is filled with dissolved resin in a solvent, under gas pressure. This innovative
product does not exactly fit into current UN and DOT transportation regulations or current
NFPA warehouse and storage fire codes, causing confusion and questions as fire marshals,
inspectors and insurance agents evaluate the underlying science. Understanding the product
and revising current regulations is key to establishing safe and consistent storage conditions.

2. Q: Are all cylinder spray adhesives Flammable?

A: No, flammability varies according to the product ingredients. Our products that contain
both flammable and non-flammable solvents and propellants:

Table 1. Description of various types of adhesives


Adhesive Solvent Propellant
1 Non Flammable Flammable Flammable
2 Non Flammable Non Flammable Flammable
3 Non Flammable Flammable Non Flammable
4 Non Flammable Non Flammable Non Flammable

3. Q: The final product is a solid glue, why not store it as a solid?

A: This product, as stored, does not fit the definition of a solid. The solvents and propellant
have dissolved the solid raw materials into a liquid mixture, so it can be sprayed. The 20-
30% non flammable solid adhesive remains only after the carrier solvents and propellants
have dissipated. The viscous mixture does lower the flammability characteristics of the pure
solvent and the propellant gases.

4. Q: Could this product be covered under the Aerosol codes per NFPA 30B?
A: This product has been described as a cost effective alternative to the aerosol spray can for
the high volume user. This product does not exactly fit the definition of an aerosol container
as the size is too large.
“NFPA 30B 3.3.2 Aerosol Container: A metal can or plastic container, up to a maximum
size of 1000 ml (33.8 fl oz).”

5. Q: Could this product be covered as a Gas, as the cylinders resemble my backyard BBQ
liquid propane tanks?

A: The tanks we use are very similar because the US Department of Transportation (DOT)
regulates the construction, shipment, inspection and storage during transport of pressurized
metal cylinders. All of our non-refillable cylinders are certified to DOT 39 construction
requirements per 49 CFR 173. This includes the materials and burst strength of the cylinder
wall, the main valve and the pressure relief disks and valves. Our cylinders are shipped and
stored during transport as a GAS under current DOT regulations as this is the most
expeditious.

6. Q: If it is shipped as a Flammable Liquified Gas, why not store it as a gas under NFPA
55?

A: We believe that DOT shipping regulations and NFPA storage codes for Gas cylinders are too
restrictive and inappropriate for this product line. This product does not exactly fit the
definition of a Liquefied Gas. The gas propellant is usually in the formula at less than 15%
by weight. Gas is present in the small “headspace” above the liquid resin. 85% of the
container is the non-volatile solid adhesive dissolved in a flammable liquid solvent. The
small amount of gas propellant is at a low pressure of about 200 psi as it does not take much
pressure to force the liquid out of the container. Some of the gas has mixed with the liquid,
much like a carbonated soda can.

7. Q: If DOT shipping regulations are inappropriate for this product line is DOT
considering amendments to those regulations?

A: Europe has already rewritten its regulations to contain new United Nation (UN) shipping
codes which very closely fit our product line (UN3501). We hope that DOT will accept the
UN codes and rewrite applicable DOT regulations in the near future. The UN3501 shipping
codes are already included in the 2012 Emergency response guidebook.

8. Q: Is this product a flammable liquid?

A: This product does not exactly fit the definition of a liquid but it is close as 85% of the
container volume is liquid. The remaining 15% headspace allows the propellants to come to
equilibrium with the solution. The headspace allows for a safety margin in the event of a fire
which can cause the internal pressure to increase.

“NFPA 30 4.3.1 Flammable liquids, (1) Class IA Liquid —Any liquid that has a flash point
below 73°F (22.8°C) and a boiling point below 100°F (37.8°C)”

9. Q: Could this product be covered under the NFPA 30 Flammable Liquid regulations?
A: Yes, we believe our product is a stable Class 1A flammable liquid under low pressure and
this might be the current best fit. There is precedent. Aerosol spray cans were stored as
Flammable liquids under this code before NFPA 30B was created in 1990.

“Prior to 1990 the storage of flammable aerosols were set forth in NFPA 30, Flammable and
Combustible Liquids Code, where they were treated as Class IA flammable liquids. NFPA 30
2011 pp4”

10. Q: Is this product a viscous flammable liquid?


A. The primary product is a viscous liquid with a viscosity over 100 cps. A viscous mixture does
lower the flammability characteristics of the pure solvents as acknowledged in NFPA 30
16.2.5.

11. Q: Does NFPA 30 allow the storage of US-DOT approved Metal containers?

A: Yes, storage of US-DOT approved Metal containers is allowed,

“NFPA-30 Chapter 9.4.1Only the following approved containers, intermediate bulk


containers, and portable tanks shall be used for Class I, Class II, and Class IIIA liquids:

(1) Metal containers, metal intermediate bulk containers, and metal portable tanks meeting
the requirements of and containing products authorized by the U.S. Department of
Transportation Hazardous Materials Regulations in Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations,
Parts 100–199, or by Part 6 of the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous
Goods”

12. Q: Does NFPA 30 or DOT consider this product a Portable tank?

A: We do not believe our cylinders fit the definition of a Portable Tank because our product has
a capacity less than 1,000 lbs and less than 60 gallons.

“NFPA-30 Chapter 9 Definitions, Cylinder means a pressure vessel designed for pressures
higher than 40 psia and having a circular cross section. It does not include a portable tank,”

“NFPA 30 3.3.47.5 Portable Tank. Any vessel having a liquid capacity over 60 gal (230 L)
intended for storing liquids and not intended for fixed installation.”

“DOT-49CFR171.8 Portable tank means a bulk packaging (except a cylinder having a water
capacity of 1,000 pounds or less)”

13. Q: Would this product qualify as Bulk Packaging under NFPA 30?

A: We do not believe our cylinders fit the definition of Bulk Packaging as tanks are too small.

“Table 9.4.3 Maximum Allowable Size: bulk packaging has a maximum capacity greater
than 450 L (119 gallons) as a receptacle for a liquid. “Non-bulk packaging means a
packaging which has: (1) A maximum capacity of 450 L (119 gallons) or less as a
receptacle for a liquid.”
APPENDIX B: Cylinder Specifications

Table 2. Cylinder Specifications

Cylinder Characteristic 5 Gallon 25 Gallon 50 Gallon


Capacity (lbs H2O) 48.77 238 476
Volume (cf) 0.78125 3.81 7.63

Working Pressure (psig) 200 200 200


Burst Pressure (psig) 650 960 960

Relief Type Frangible Disk Spring Relief Spring Relief


Relief Pressure (psig) 360-520 360-480 360-480
Relief Area (orifice) 0.120" +/- 0.005" n/a n/a
Relief Capacity (CFM Air) n/a 240 240

CGA Relief Requirement (CFM Air) 80.32 362.63 725.27


Estimated or Known CGA Relief Capacity 67.913 240 240
National Fire Protection Association Report http://submittals.nfpa.org/TerraViewWeb/ContentFetche...

Public Input No. 6-NFPA 30-2015 [ Global Input ]

Throughout standard remove references to the following and replace with the following:

(1) ANSI/UL and replace with UL.


(2) API Specification and replace with API SPEC.
(3) API Standard and replace with API STD.
(4) ANSI/ASME B31.3 and replace with ASME B31.3.
(5) ANSI Z129.1 and replace with ANSI Z400.1/Z129.1.
(6) API # and so on and replace API STD # or API RP #.

Statement of Problem and Substantiation for Public Input

Recommended updates to correlate with PI-5 and PI-7.


Related Public Inputs for This Document

Related Input Relationship


Public Input No. 5-NFPA 30-2015 [Section No. Referenced current SDO names, addresses, standard names,
2.3] and years.
Public Input No. 33-NFPA 30-2015 [Section No.
I.1.2]

Submitter Information Verification

Submitter Full Name: Aaron Adamczyk


Organization: [ Not Specified ]
Street Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Submittal Date: Fri Feb 06 00:46:52 EST 2015

3 of 86 8/13/2015 2:39 PM