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Teaching and Learning B.

Ed I year

UNIT – VIII
LEARNING IN AND OUT OF SCHOOL
DAY: 2
Introduction:
Learning inside school gives pleasure and enthusiasm to the students. It is a
natural way of learning. This learning is linked to students’ lives and a variety of
different teaching methods are used in school whereas, out of school learning
consists of curricular and non – curricular learning experiences for pupils. Out of
school experiences are organized with community partners such as museums, sport
facilities, charity initiatives, and more. So, students should be enlightened the
advantages of learning in and out of school here in a detailed study.
LIFE-LONG LEARNING
Language and interactional strategies that determine orientations toward
engaging one’s body and mind in learning. This learning begins in our earliest
experiences of play, physical activity, and opportunities to plan and carry out ideas
and work projects alone and with others. This learning shapes our foundation for
curiosity, eagerness, communication, and persistence in continuing to learn and to
keep on learning.
LIFE-WIDE LEARNING
Experience in management of ourselves and others, of time and space, and
of unexpected circumstances, turns of events, and crises. This learning brings skill
and attitudinal frames for adaptation. Here we figure out how to adapt, to transport
knowledge and skills gained in one situation to another, and to transform direct
experience into strategies and tactics for future use.
LIFE-DEEP LEARNING
Beliefs, values, ideologies, and orientations to life. Life-deep learning
scaffolds all our ways of approaching challenges and undergoing change.
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Religious, moral, ethical, and social learning bring life-deep learning that enables
us to guide our actions, judge ourselves and others, and express to ourselves and
others how we feel and what we believe.
PURPOSE OF LEARNING IN AND OUT OF SCHOOL
School work
We encourage students to be organised and to have a positive attitude to
school, to ensure that they fulfill their potential. To support the development of
organisational skills, the school issues every student with a planner at the
beginning of each school year. Students are expected to keep their planners in good
condition throughout the school year. The Student Planner is full of useful
information for students and is the means of recording the homework which
teachers set each day. It should also be used to communicate messages between
home and school, to record Credits and for parents/careers to authorise absences.
Parents/careers are asked to check and sign their child’s Planner each week. Senior
staff will monitor the use of students’ Planners during the year.
Education during school hours
The school will supply free of charge all books, materials, instruments, etc for use
in connection with education provision during school hours, apart from:

 Basic equipment to include pens, a ruler, pencils, crayons, rubber and pencil
sharpener
 Basic mathematical equipment to include a protractor and calculator – basic
for Years 7-8 and scientific for Years 9-11
 Specialist clothing e.g. aprons for Design and Technology and the approved
PE kit.
 Parents will be asked to provide ingredients for Design & Technology Food
and materials for Resistant Materials, Textiles, and Art etc and will own the

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finished product. Where the school provides these materials, and parents do
not indicate in advance that they will purchase the finished product at cost, it
will become the property of the school
 A charge may be made for non-residential activities involving external
organisations and/or transport for students for the provision of education
during school hours
 There is a charging policy for instrumental tuition. Charges for other
specialist extra-curricular activities may also be made where possible, the
school will undertake to bulk purchase items of equipment/revision guides
etc to sell onto students at a reduced cost
 Charges for personal photocopying plus charging for colour laser printing
will be made.

The school will pay for the first entry for each Key Stage 4 or 5 course
examination or assessment except where in the opinion of the academic and
professional judgement of appropriate and relevant staff it is determined that a
student has not adequately prepared themselves for whatever reason.

Second and any subsequent entries will be charged to parents according to


current examination board tariffs unless there are extenuating circumstances.
Equipment for lessons
Students are expected to have the correct equipment for every lesson. As a
minimum this should include a pencil case with equipment such as pens, pencils,
ruler, rubber and pencil sharpener. A calculator and basic mathematical equipment
such as compasses, protractors etc are also required. Many items are available to
purchase from the Library Stationery Shop at competitive prices. Students also

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require a sturdy school bag large enough to carry files, books etc; handbags are
not appropriate.
We encourage students to use their books and files for reference and revision
and therefore, we expect them to copy up any work missed through absence. We
also encourage students to ask for their teacher’s help if they do not understand any
of the work covered.
Homework
Students are set homework on a regular basis; there is a wide variety of
homework tasks set. Not all homework will be written; some may be reading,
research, learning, memorizing or reviewing. Some homework may consist of long
term projects set over a period of several weeks.
We ask for your co-operation and support regarding the completion of
homework. Please check the homework recorded in your child’s Student Planner
and, if homework appears to be either excessive or insufficient, we would be
grateful if you could contact your child’s Form Tutor or Learning Manager. In
addition to the early morning opening, facilities are available in the Library at
lunchtime and after school until 5pm for students to complete their homework.
Please encourage your child to ask his/her subject teacher or Form Tutor if he/she
is unsure about the homework set. Should your child experience difficulty in
completing homework they may also be referred to the Homework Club at
lunchtimes to support their learning and progress.
Educational visits
A wide variety of visits which support and enhance the curriculum are
available to students during the academic year. Specific information including
methods of payment will be issued in advance of each individual visit. Students
participating in visits out of school are representing Rastrick High School and the
highest standards of behaviour are expected at all times. In addition to being
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educationally valuable, visits must also be safe and staff must be confident that all
students participating will behave sensibly and follow instructions at all times. The
school therefore reserves the right to refuse to allow students to participate in visits
where their behaviour in school or on a previous visit has not been of an acceptable
standard.
Activities:
Student seminar about the topic “Learning in and out school”
Questions:
1. Language and interactional strategies that determine orientations toward
engaging one’s …………. in learning.
a. body
b. mind
c. Both (a) and (b)
2. ……………..brings skill and attitudinal frames for adaptation.
a. Life-wide learning
b. Life-deep learning
c. Lifelong learning
3. ………………scaffolds all our ways of approaching challenges and
undergoing change.
a. Life-wide learning
b. Life-deep learning
c. Lifelong learning
4. ………….shapes our foundation for curiosity, eagerness, communication,
and persistence in continuing to learn and to keep on learning.
a. Life-wide learning
b. Life-deep learning
c. Lifelong learning
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DAY:3
Purpose of Learning in School
It is a concept of traditional but it adopts the natural way of learning. It’s a
pleasure to learn inside the school rather than outside leaning. For the budding
children inside learning helps a lot to learn abundant in naturally. Students learn
new and newer things only in school setting with the help of the teachers and with
models. School is where we have our first experience of formal learning, and how
things go for us here can affect how we learn throughout our lives.
When school is exciting and involving, it gives us confidence in ourselves as
learners, but when it isn’t, we can be turned off and think we can’t learn or that
learning is boring. To make sure children today and tomorrow have good school
experiences to sustain their learning in future, the Campaign works with schools
and teachers to develop good practice.
1. The classroom
The classroom itself is the locus of regular and sustained interactions among
Students and teachers around curriculum. If the classroom is at the heart of
students ‘opportunities to learn, the quality of teachers’ instructional practices are
of Paramount importance. Inside school Quality instructional practices include
linking learning to factors that are important in students’ lives are taught. Different
method is used to make the learning effective and interesting.
Using formative and summative assessments in a systematic manner
provides available information to students and significantly improves learning and
achievement. Setting objectives and providing regular feedback (including praise)
on student progress.
2. Teacher Communities
Teacher communities can affect instruction and other aspects of the
classroom, and thereby can exert an indirect influence on student outcomes.
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Teacher communities have a strongly positive impact on student outcomes in the


school.
3. Features of Learning in School
 Learning is linked to students’ lives
 A variety of different teaching methods are used
 Different learning styles are respected
 High expectations for all students
 Formative evaluations are used systematically
 Teachers set clear objectives, monitor progress, and provide feedback
 Opportunities for classroom participation
 Diversity and individual differences are respected
 Social and emotional learning is valued
 Positive student-teacher and student-student relationships
 Classroom management strategies are systematic
 Disciplinary strategies are consistent and non-coercive
Some other examples of out of school learning are:
 Homework and homework clubs
 Study clubs extending curriculum
 Mentoring by other pupils and by adults, including parents
 Learning about learning
 Community service and citizenship
 Residential activities study weeks or weekends
It has been found that out-of-school learning can be a great opportunity to discover
and develop talent.
IMPORTANCE OF OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING

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Observation learning is learning that occurs through observing the behavior


of others. It is a form of social learning which takes various forms, based on
various processes. In humans, this form of learning seems to not need
reinforcement to occur, but instead, requires a social model such as a parent,
sibling, friend, or teacher. Particularly in childhood, a model is someone of
authority or higher status.
According to Bandura's social cognitive learning theory, observational
learning can affect behavior in many ways, with both positive and negative
consequences. It can teach completely new behaviors, for one. It can also increase
or decrease the frequency of behaviors that have previously been learned.
1. Causal learning
Humans use observational causal learning to watch what other people’s
actions and use that information to find out how something works and how
we can do it ourselves.
2. Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship can involve both observational learning and modeling.
Apprentices gain their skills in part through working with masters in their
profession and through observing and evaluating the work of their fellow
apprentices.
3. Peer model influences
Observational learning is very beneficial when there are positive, reinforcing
peer models involved. Peers will always enhance learning. Peers observe
their friends good behavior and try to imitate.
4. Cultural variation
Cultural variation can be seen in the extent of information learned or
absorbed by children through the use of observation and more specifically
the use of observation without verbal requests for further information.
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Activities:
Discuss about the topic “Observational learning”.
Questions:
1. ……….. is our first experience of formal learning.
a. School
b. home
c. Society
2. If the classroom is at the heart of ………………to learn, the quality of
teachers’ instructional practices are of Paramount importance.
a. students ‘opportunities
b. Student Performance
c. Student Activities
3. Inside …………………………include linking learning to factors that are
important in students’ lives are taught
a. School Quality instructional Practices
b. School instructional Practices
c. School Quality Practices
4. …………..can affect instruction and other aspects of the classroom, and
thereby can exert an indirect influence on student outcomes.
a. Teacher communities
b. Student communities
c. Parent communities
5. …………………. is learning that occurs through observing the behavior of
others.
a. Observation Learning
b. Introspection Learning
c. Associative Learning
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Day:4
EXTENDING CURRICULUM LEARNING TO THE LOCAL AREA
Learning outside the classroom can be used to facilitate Education for
Sustainable Development. This includes short visits into the school grounds and
local community, as well as visits to farms, factories, offices, neighborhood
science centers and natural settings such as a forest, beach or a national park.
Providing students with high quality learning activities in relevant situations
beyond the walls of the classroom is vital for helping students appreciate their first
hand experiences from a variety of different perspectives. An experience outside
the classroom also enhances learning by providing students with opportunities to
practice skills of enquiry, values analysis and clarification and problem solving in
everyday situations.
However, taking students outside the classroom requires careful planning of
the learning activities and attention to the health and safety risks that might be
faced.
1. Constraints on Learning outside the Classroom
Despite the arguments in favor of learning outside the classroom, several key
challenges do need to be faced:
 Organizational factors such as the difficulty of supervising a large group of
students and providing them with the assistance they may need.
 The ‘normal’ lessons missed by teachers and students, and alterations that
have to be made to the school timetable.
 Time needed to plan a worthwhile field trip.
 Cost of transport and accommodation, if required.
 Lack of detailed knowledge of the locality.
 Safety of the students.
 Lack of necessary skills in students.
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Despite these challenges it should not be forgotten that often the most
meaningful and lasting learning takes place when students are actively exploring
the great variety of environments outside the classroom.
Learning outside the classroom also provides opportunities for teachers and
students to get to know each other better through interacting outside the structures
of the classroom and school grounds.
Arts:
Throughout a child’s school life they will be given opportunities to produce
creative work, explore ideas and record their experiences throughout their time at
the school. They will explore drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and
design techniques as well as having opportunities to evaluate and analyze their
own work and that of others.
Computing:
To ensure each child learn the computational skills and language through
creating higher level algorithms. This includes using a programme called ‘scratch’
which enables the children to control a variety of objects/characters using
advanced algorithms.
Developmental Talent:
Curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils develop creative, technical and
practical expertise. The children will build and apply a repertoire of knowledge,
understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and
products.
English:
Teachers are using key objectives from the new curriculum to inform their
planning and to provide quality first teaching for their pupils. The library is being
used effectively to support pupil progress and to develop a culture of reading
across the school.
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Geography:
During class children will begin to use globes and maps to investigate
different countries and will be expected to know the names of continents and
oceans. They will develop an understanding of climate Rivers Mountains and
volcanoes and carry out a local area study.
History:
By the end of the semester, children will have a sound understanding of their
own timeline and the important events that have happened to them. During time
this children will develop a firm understanding of important events which have
influenced the development of the country.
Maths:
To ensure consistency across the school and to involve the parents in the
children’s learning, the maths curriculum may create a written calculation methods
handbook to be initially distributed to parents.
Physical Education:
Physical education can help them be motivated pass this on in peer learning.
They also learn to work co-operatively complete against others and learn etiquette
and fair play. We also encourage children to participate outside of school in
extracurricular activities.
Religious Education:
We believe that the Religious Education taught enables children to become
tolerant and thoughtful individuals. they are able to express their own views whilst
into account those of others.
Encourage most visits from individuals of different faiths and organize visits
to a range of places of worship to allow the children to gain a deeper understanding
of various beliefs. This will help in creating an accepting an open-minded
community.
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Science:
A long term planning for science and mapped out key topics which build on
prior learning and ensure progression across the school may be essential.
Resources must be evaluated to ensure that the children have access to high quality
equipment to enhance their learning.
Activities:
Prepare the report about the topic “extending curriculum learning to the local
area.”
Questions:
1. An experience outside the classroom also enhances learning by providing
students with opportunities to practice ………………….. and
clarification and problem solving in everyday situations.
a. skills of enquiry,
b. values analysis
c. Both (a) and (b)
2. …………………..also provides opportunities for teachers and students to
get to know each other better through interacting outside the structures of
the classroom and school grounds.
a. Learning outside the classroom
b. Learning inside the classroom
c. Learning in and out the classroom
3. ……………….. aims to ensure that all pupils develop creative, technical
and practical expertise.
a. curriculum
b. Lesson Plan
c. School

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4. The ………………. is being used effectively to support pupil progress


and to develop a culture of reading across the school.
a. Curriculum
b. Lesson plan
c. Library

5. Physical education can help them be motivated pass this on in peer


learning.
a. Physical Science
b. Bioscience
c. Physical education

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Day:5
APPROACHES TO LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
Two common approaches are (i) Field Teaching and (ii) Field Research.
1. Field Teaching
 Study of topic or theme in class. Teacher talk, textbook study, note taking,
slide viewing, videos, etc.
 Field observations (often teacher directed). Recording of information in the
field.
 Some field interpretation.
 Back in the classroom – further interpretation and explanation together –
writing up field report.
 This is the traditional approach to teaching and learning outside the
classroom. It involves taking students to a field location and delivering a
mini-lecture from which students are expected to take notes. Little
opportunity exists for student input and reaction.
This approach can involve students in the careful observation and description of
a scene or activity and in suggesting possible explanations based on previously
acquired information.
This approach is useful if students are inexperienced in making their own
observations or if they lack confidence in their ability to solve problems. This
approach provides a structured way for them to find their own examples as an
integral part of the learning experience.
2. Field Research
 Identification of a problem as the result of direct observations; or from class
work; or from special interests of students.
 Formulation of and hypothesis as a result of reading, discussion, thinking.
 Field activities to collect data to test hypothesis.
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 Data analysis – processing information.


 Hypothesis testing – accept or reject.
 Discussing and writing up of possible ways to solve the originally identified
problem using information gathered in the field.
This approach represents an inductive approach to learning. It involves
observation, description and explanation but with a problem solving focus.
Students often use techniques similar to those used in historical enquiry,
geographical research or scientific explanation. This is the inductive approach to
fieldwork.
Learning and personal development during the undergraduate years occurs as a
result of students engaging in both academic and non-academic activities, inside
and outside the classroom. To enhance student learning, institutions must make
classroom experiences more productive and also encourage students to devote
more of their time outside the classroom to educationally purposeful activities.
 Recognizing that learning outside the classroom is an essential part of the
learning process for all learners
 bringing learning to life through compelling learning experiences
 developing your curriculum to improve motivation and engagement and
raise standards
 offering a frequent range of learning outside the classroom experiences,
both during and beyond the school day
 building on learners’ experiences as they learn and mature
 making use of a wide variety of expertise to enrich the learning experience
 providing opportunities for individual and group learning
 Recognizing the development needs of young people.

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New approaches to the curriculum are designed to enable schools to raise


standards and help all learners meet the challenges of life in our fast-changing
world. We need to find ways of bringing learning to life for all young people.
Learning outside the classroom can achieve this and has similarities to what are
referred to as ‘compelling learning experiences’.
A compelling learning experience is a real and relevant context for learning
through which young people recognize for themselves the importance of learning
to their lives now and in the future.
Planning Achievement:
It is essential to be very clear about the aims and intended learning outcomes of
experiences outside the classroom experiences. Here are some common features of
learning outside the classroom that you may want to build into your plans:
 knowledge, skills and understanding – related to subjects or learning outside
the classroom activity
 Every Child Matters – achieving the five outcomes underpins the planning
and delivery of extended services in and around schools
 social, citizenship or sustainability education e.g. values, attitudes, aesthetic
awareness
 personal skills e.g. problem solving, self-reliance, independence, teamwork
personal enjoyment and motivation
 Adding value through building in e.g. ICT, literacy and numeracy.
Continuity and progression
These issues are key to the success of curriculum design. Perhaps the most
obvious place to begin is from the perspective of the individual learner.
 How can learning be presented to young people in such a way that it meets
your aims and intended learning outcomes?

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 How can it be organised so that it compels them to learn?


 In what ways can learning be made irresistible?
Understanding what you want to achieve through learning outside the
classroom activities provides the key to planning for progression.
Approaches could include a commitment to the frequent use of school grounds
and the local environment, a percentage of curriculum time for learning outside the
classroom in every subject or a regular ‘slot’ in the week for everyone, specific
projects, a visit to a heritage or arts venue, a town-based project, a day at an
education centre, a residential trip, or a trip abroad.
Plan Time:
Issues arising from inflexibility in curriculum design are often cited as
barriers to learning outside the classroom taking place.
A range of strategies have been used in many schools to provide solutions,
instead of the 45-minute to one-hour lesson as the basic building block of the
timetable. Simple changes in the way in which time is chunked can strongly affect
learners’ experiences of schooling and facilitate learning outside the classroom.
Different approaches are being designed that give the learner a varied experience
of the school day, week, term and year.
Examples include:
 Lessons lasting for a half-day or a whole day
 Short learning outside the classroom activities built into ‘normal’ lessons
 Concentrated blocks of time at the start and end of a curriculum theme so
that subjects pull together related learning
 ‘Study weeks’ within a school calendar where the normal cycle is put aside
for more intensive or varied activities

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 In-built longer sessions for certain subjects or areas to overcome the single
lesson barrier
 Pairing subjects together to create longer blocks of time where two teams of
teachers can programme learning outside the classroom jointly
 Creating a new ‘Learning Outside the Classroom (subject)’ slot in the
timetable with at least one longer session per cycle for either a project-based
or personal learning and thinking skills led approach
 Moving from two to one year courses at Key Stage 4 creates longer blocks
of time as fewer subjects are programmed for any given week. This
facilitates collaborative arrangements with other schools, institutions at 14–
19 and providers of learning outside the classroom.
All of these make it easier, especially for secondary schools, to arrange learning
outside the classroom without requiring complex trade-offs with other subject
areas or producing fragmented teaching groups where some learners are absent due
to work at another location.
Plan for teaching and learning
Important for all experiences but essential when working in partnership with the
wider workforce and with learning outside the classroom providers. More detailed
guidance is provided in the next unit on ‘The Learning Experience’ but below is
some handy hints for designing the whole learning outside the classroom
curriculum:
 Plan to capture opportunities for follow-up (data, photos, samples etc)
 Design your curriculum to make effective use of adults others than
teachers/leaders
 Create effective partnerships between teachers, schools and learning outside
the classroom providers

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 Ensure when planning with any partners providing external support, that
there are clear roles for those leading activities
 Include assessment opportunities in designing your curriculum.
Activities:
Student seminar about the title “Approaches to learning outside The
Classroom”
Questions:
1. ………..can involve students in the careful observation and description of a
scene or activity and in suggesting possible explanations based on previously
acquired information.
a. field teaching approach
b. field Research approach
c. field learning approach
2. …………………represents an inductive approach to learning.
a. field learning approach
b. field teaching approach
c. field research approach
3. …………………….. involves observation, description and explanation but
with a problem solving focus.
a. field teaching approach
b. field learning approach
c. field research approach
4. ……………..during the undergraduate years occurs as a result of students
engaging in both academic and non-academic activities, inside and outside the
classroom.
a. Learning
b. personal development
c. Both (a) and (b)

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Day:6
Appropriate:
To ensure that learning outside the classroom is truly embedded in your
curriculum it should be built into planning, so that you systematically develop it
for the young people in your school or other setting. You will need to decide which
way of delivering learning outside the classroom best suits your needs.
Consideration will need to be given to frequency and length of time.
There are many opportunities:
 play
 investigation
 Exploration
 journeying
 fieldwork
 adventure
 expeditions and of course
 Residential.
Opportunities:
Learning outside the classroom should be a part of planned teaching and
learning time. However, there are further opportunities during the extended day,
break times, during holidays and in youth activities outside formal learning hours.
Try to plan a range of learning outside the classroom activities throughout the year.
Many can take place inside museums, heritage sites, places of worship and so on.
Outside activities can be offered all year round; it has been said: ‘there’s no such
thing as bad weather just bad clothing!’
Activities:
The choice of where to experience learning outside the classroom is endless.
The place you decide on can influence how effective the learning is. It is important
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that the place you choose for learning suits what you have planned to achieve. The
frequency is likely to mean that many activities or experiences Learning Outside
the Classroom Curriculum Planning take place close to your usual place of
learning, for example school grounds or within walking distance. However, you
will also need to plan for a range of activities further away and for residential
experiences. Learning opportunities outside the classroom offer the richest
resources available and are often free!
Before developing your own plans it is important to remember that learning
outside the classroom is seated firmly in learning and that most learners should not
have to wait for very long during a week before being engaged in first-hand, active
learning experiences.
Involving staff:
Any school considering expanding its learning outside the classroom
provision should begin by consulting staff. Such a consultation should have four
aims.
1. To make the case for learning outside the classroom to all staff
2. To encourage all staff to plan and participate
3. To identify staff — teachers and support staff — willing to lead learning outside
the classroom activities
4. To identify any professional development needs arising from learning outside
the classroom implementation
Involving young people
Any learning outside the classroom programme will need to engage the
interest of the children and young people who take part. A starting point should be
the young people’s current experience of learning outside the classroom, but
successful programmes are likely to develop from practice that involves young
people in the planning and delivery of the whole experience.
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Involving parents
We cannot assume that all parents will be automatically enthusiastic about
learning outside the classroom. Some will have concerns about safety and may also
need to be reassured about activities where they may not immediately see the
learning value. The best answer to these concerns is to involve parents from the
very beginning.
Parents of children with disabilities, learning difficulties and other special
needs should always be consulted and involved with the planning of learning
outside the classroom. This gives them the opportunity to share essential
information with staff, for example, knowledge they may have about their child
reacts to certain situations outside school.
Involving governors
Effective governance provides strategic leadership and accountability.
Governors have a key role in learning outside the classroom, but are not education
professionals and rely on sound advice in order to fulfill their role.
Opportunities for Learning outside the Classroom
Students can learn in a number of outside environments including:
• The school grounds and environs
• Urban centers
• The local community
• Rural and natural areas
Activities:
Student seminar about the title “Approaches to learning outside The
Classroom”
Questions:
1. …………….the classroom should be a part of planned teaching and learning
time.
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a. Learning outside
b. Learning inside
c. Both (a) and (b)
2. Effective governance provides strategic ………..and accountability.
a. leadership
b. Learning style
c. Teaching Style
3. Parents of children with ………..learning difficulties and other special needs
should always be consulted and involved with the planning of learning
outside the classroom.
a. Disabilities.
b. Low intelligence
c. High intelligence
4. Students can learn in a number of outside environments including…….
a. The school grounds and environs
b. Urban centers, Rural and natural area.
c. Both (a) and (b)

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Day:1
LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
 Learning Outside the Classroom (LOtC) is the use of places other than the
classroom for teaching and learning. It is about getting children and young
people out and about, providing them with challenging, exciting and
different experiences to help them learn.
 Learning outside the classroom is a tool for teaching and learning which has
been proven to raise attainment and achievement, improve behaviour and
improve the engagement of all groups of pupils, including those who are
hard to engage inside the classroom environment.
 Learning outside the classroom can happen at almost any time and almost
anywhere. The ‘places’ where learning happens can have a significant effect
on how a young person engages with a subject or an idea. Learning outside
the classroom can happen at almost any time and almost anywhere –
outdoors or indoors: in the school grounds, on the high street, in the local
park, in museums and art galleries, on mountain tops and rivers, or
elsewhere in the world.
 As an essential way of learning it should not be restricted to the summer or
as an ‘add-on’ after examinations.
 We believe that young people should have access to frequent, continuous
and progressive experiences in the school grounds, educational visits further
afield and residential, and that these experiences should be utilized as a tool
for teaching, learning and delivering the curriculum across all subject areas.
 Learning outside the classroom should be built into planning for all learners,
every week and all year round. It is a powerful tool that is proven to raise

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attainment, bolster social, emotional and personal development and


contributes to the health and well being of children and young people.
Where does learning outside the classroom take place?
Define learning outside the classroom as: ‘The use of places other than the
classroom for teaching and learning.’
This can include:
 School grounds
 Local woods, parks or nature reserves
 Street & townscapes
 Places of worship & sacred spaces
 Museums, theatres, galleries & music venues
 Libraries & archives
 City farms & community gardens
 Farms & the countryside
 Zoos & botanic gardens
 Heritage & cultural sites
 Field study & environmental centres
 Cultural, language & fieldwork visits
 Remote wild & adventurous places
 Expeditions abroad
School grounds & immediate surroundings
The range of possible activities may be limited by the size and nature of the
site. Even so, most immediate surroundings can offer some or all of the following
possibilities:
 play areas — for problem-solving/team-building games and activities
 habitats such as playing fields, hedges, meadows and ponds — for field
study and science
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 school garden or growing areas — for science, sustainability and food


education
 whole site — for orienteering, outdoor literacy (e.g. storytelling) and
practical numeracy activities, visual and performing arts (e.g. murals,
sculptures, mosaics, music and drama)
 paved areas— for D.T. and outdoor experiments
 wooded areas— for Forest School activities
 playing fields — overnight camping experiences
 playground equipment and climbing/traversing walls— for adventurous
activities.
The built environment
 Learning to see the value of well designed spaces
 The built environment is made up of historic and contemporary buildings
and the spaces between them, including parks, streets and housing.
 Learning about the built environment is learning to see the value of well
designed spaces and the relationship between the natural environment and
local community.
Heritage sites
 The term ‘heritage site’ is a broad one, including museums, libraries,
archives, science and exploratory centres, monuments, religious or public
buildings, gardens or parks, archaeological sites and historic houses.
 Most heritage venues are inquisitors of valuable items. They are home to
expert conservators and academic researchers; and rather than simply
presenting their collections, they actively promote understanding and
enjoyment through experience-based learning.
 Heritage sites can support not only the history curriculum, but also fieldwork
activities in science and geography, as well as provide inspiration for
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literacy and practical context for maths problems, and support for a host of
other curriculum subjects.
Arts & creativity
 Different art forms include the visual arts and crafts, music, dance, drama
and theatre, literature, film, broadcast and digital media.
 Within each of these categories are many more sub-groups: music might
refer to western classical, world music, jazz, rock and pop, while the visual
arts and crafts includes photography, painting, drawing, print-making,
sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, textiles — and more.
 Artists can operate in any art form, not just the visual arts.
 While there is increasing recognition that people can be creative in any
domain of learning or activity, it is also true that the arts offer particularly
fertile opportunities for young people to express themselves creatively and
to experience the creative achievements of others.
The natural environment / field studies
 Learning outside the classroom in the natural environment can encompass a
range of places or habitats.
 These can include: school grounds, local parks, allotments, wasteground,
hedges, walls, gardens, nature reserves, woodland, country parks, farmland,
zoos, botanic gardens, quarries, cliffs, coastal areas, ponds, rivers,
moorlands and mountains.
Adventurous activities
Adventurous activities include:
 Climbing — for example rock climbing, abseiling, ice climbing, gorge
walking, ghyll scrambling, sea level traversing, high- and low-level ropes
courses

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 Water sports — for example canoeing, kayaking, dragon boating, wave


skiing, white-water rafting, improvised rafting, sailing, sail boarding,
windsurfing
 Trekking — for example hill-walking, mountaineering, fell-running,
orienteering, pony trekking, off-road cycling, off-piste skiing
 Caving — for example caving, pot-holing, mine exploration
 Challenges and skills — for example archery, quad bikes, assault courses,
mountain boarding, initiative exercises.
Study, sports & cultural tours
 Tour operators can take a group of young people anywhere in the world for
any educational purpose. They can build travel arrangements,
accommodation and learning content into a coordinated programme that
removes much of the organisational work from group leaders.
 Tours can give young people an unparalleled window on the world
 They can give young people an unparalleled window on the world. Every
type of content is possible — cultural visits, historical and language studies,
a series of concerts performed by the school choir, a visit to a partner school
or youth project abroad, sports tournaments, activity holidays and ski
courses, to name but a few.
 All young people require the knowledge, skills and understanding to live in,
and contribute to, a global society and this begins with an understanding of
the world in which we live, including the languages, values and cultures of
different societies.
 The first-hand experience gained in the context of a study, cultural or sports
tour is one way of enabling young people to acquire this mix of knowledge,
skills and understanding.

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 All of these activities, in their different ways, help to develop self-esteem,


self-confidence and independence. They also give young people the
opportunity to experience other cultures, meet and develop new friendships
and thus broaden their horizons and knowledge.
ADVANTAGES OF LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
It is essential that young children get frequent and regular opportunities to
explore and learn in the outdoor environment and this should not be seen as an
optional extra. The Curriculum, which covers children aged birth to the end of the
Reception year, became statutory and places strong emphasis on the importance
and value of daily outdoor experiences for children’s learning and development.
In recent years there has been a cultural shift in our society that has reduced
the access and use of outdoors for many young children. Contributory factors
include increased fear amongst adults in relation to children’s safety and
technological advances leading to an overwhelming prominence of more sedentary
indoor activities, such as television, video and computer games. Here are some
powerful arguments for taking every opportunity to take young children beyond
their immediate indoor environment:-
 Learning outside the classroom supports the development of healthy and
active lifestyles by offering children opportunities for physical activity,
freedom and movement, and promoting a sense of well-being.
 Learning outside the classroom gives children contact with the natural world
and offers them experiences that are unique to outdoors, such as direct
contact with the weather and the seasons.
 Playing and learning outside also help children to understand and respect
nature, the environment and the interdependence of humans, animals, plants,
and lifecycles.

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 Outdoor play also supports children’s problem-solving skills and nurtures


their creativity, as well as providing rich opportunities for their developing
imagination, inventiveness and resourcefulness.
 Children need an outdoor environment that can provide them with space,
both upwards and outwards, and places to explore, experiment, discover, be
active and healthy, and to develop their physical capabilities.
 The outdoor environment offers space and therefore is particularly important
to those children who learn best through active movement. Very young
children learn predominately through their sensory and physical experiences
which supports brain development and the creation of neural networks.
 For many children, playing outdoors at their early years setting may be the
only opportunity they have to play safely and freely while they learn to
assess risk and develop the skills to manage new situations
 Learning that flows seamlessly between indoors and outdoors makes the
most efficient use of resources and builds on interests and enthusiasms.
 Anyone who takes children outside regularly sees the enjoyment, and sense
of wonder and excitement that is generated when children actively engage
with their environment.
Activities:
Discussion about the topic “Learning outside the classroom and its advantages”
Questions:
1. ………..can happen at almost any time and almost anywhere.
a. Learning outside the classroom
b. Learning inside the classroom
c. Both (a) and (b)

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2. Learning outside the classroom is a powerful tool that is proven to raise


attainment, bolster social…………….…development and contributes to the
health and well being of children and young people.
a. emotional and personal
b. Physical and Personal
c. intellectual and personal
3. Learning outside the classroom in the natural environment can encompass a
range of places or habitats.
a. Learning outside the classroom
b. Learning inside the classroom
c. Both (a) and (b)
4. Adventurous activities include:
a. Climbing
b. Caving
c. Challenges and skills
5. ………..outside also help children to understand and respect nature, the
environment and the interdependence of humans, animals, plants, and
lifecycles.
a. Playing
b. learning
c. Both (a) and (b)

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