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Draft PSG for BSEE

CHED MEMORANDUM ORDER


No. _______
Series of 2017

SUBJECT: POLICIES, STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES (PSGs) FOR THE DEGREE OF


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (BSEE)

In accordance with the pertinent provisions of Republic Act (RA) No. 7722, otherwise known as the
“Higher Education Act of 1994,” and in pursuance of an outcomes-based quality assurance system
as advocated under CMO 46 s. 2012 and as addendum to CMO 37 s. 2012, and by virtue of
Commission en banc Resolution No. ___________ dated ________________ the following policies,
standards and guidelines (PSGs) are hereby adopted and promulgated by the Commission.

ARTICLE I
INTRODUCTION
Sec. 1 Rationale

Based on CMO 37 s. 2012 and the guidelines for the implementation of CMO 46 s. 2012,
these PSGs implement the shift to learning competency-based standards/outcomes-based
education. Specified in these PSGs are the core competencies expected of BS Electrical
Engineering graduates regardless of the type of HEI they graduate from. However, in
recognition of outcomes-based education (OBE) and the typology of HEIs, these PSGs
also provide ample space for HEIs to innovate in the curriculum in line with the assessment
of how best to achieve learning outcomes in their particular contexts and their respective
missions.

ARTICLE II
AUTHORITY TO OPERATE

Sec. 2 Government Recognition

All Private Higher Education Institutions (PHEIs) intending to offer BS Electrical


Engineering must first secure proper authority from the Commission in accordance with
these PSGs. All PHEIs with an existing BSEE program are required to shift to an
outcomes-based approach based on CMO 37 s. 2012 and guided by these PSGs. State
universities and colleges (SUCs), and local universities and colleges (LUCs) should
likewise strictly adhere to the provisions in these PSGs.

ARTICLE III
GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 3 Minimum Standards

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The Articles that follow give minimum standards and other requirements and guidelines.
The minimum standards are expressed with a minimum set of desired program outcomes
as given in Article IV Section 6. To attain such outcomes these PSGs provide the curricular
requirements as given in Article V Section 11. The number of units of this curriculum is
hereby prescribed as the minimum requirement under Section 13 of RA 7722. To assure
alignment of the curriculum with the desired program outcomes, these PSGs provide a
sample curriculum map in Annex II for the HEI to refer to in compliance with the
implementing guidelines of CMO 37 s. 2012.

Using a learner-centered/outcomes-based approach as basis, the Commission provided a


description of Outcomes-Based Teaching and Learning (OBTL) delivery method in Article V
Section 12. Requirements of a course syllabus in OBTL format is given in Article V Section
12 as support to the outcomes-based delivery method and a sample syllabus is provided in
Annex IV.

Based on the curriculum and the means of its delivery, the Commission determined the
minimum physical resource requirements for the library, laboratories and other facilities and
the human resource requirements in terms of administration and faculty. These are
provided for in Article VI.

Sec. 4 Curriculum Design

The HEIs are allowed to design curricula suited to their own contexts and missions
provided that they can demonstrate that the same leads to the attainment of the required
minimum set of program outcomes, albeit by a different route. In the same vein, they have
latitude in terms of curriculum delivery and in terms of specification and deployment of
human and physical resources as long as they can show that the attainment of the program
outcomes and satisfaction of program educational objectives can be assured by the
alternative means they propose.

The HEIs can use the CHED Implementation Handbook for Outcomes-Based
Education (OBE) and the Institutional Sustainability Assessment (ISA) as a guide in
making their submissions for Sections 17 to 23 of Article VII.

These PSGs are aligned with the new K-12 basic education system and the new General
Education requirements, following the OBE system.

ARTICLE IV
PROGRAM SPECIFICATIONS

Sec. 5 Program Description

5.1 Degree Name

Graduates of the program shall be given the degree of BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (BSEE).

5.2 Nature of the Field of Study

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Electrical Engineering is a profession that involves the conceptualization, development,
design and application of safe, healthy, ethical, economical and sustainable generation,
transmission, distribution and utilization of electrical energy for the benefit of society and
the environment through the knowledge of mathematics, physical sciences, information
technology and other allied sciences, gained by study, research and practice.

Refer to Annex I for the revised Competency Standards for Electrical Engineering
practice, aligned with the Washington Accord requirements.

The fields of specialization may include, but not limited to, the following:
1) Power System Operation and Protection
2) Power Plant Operation and Maintenance
3) Advanced Electrical Systems Design and Inspection
4) Sales and Entrepreneurship
5) Engineering Education and Research
6) Instrumentation and Control Systems
7) Construction and Project Management
8) Software Development
9) Electricity Market
10) Safety Engineering

5.3 Program Educational Objectives (PEOs)

The BSEE program shall define its PEOs consistent to the vision and mission statements
of the HEI.

PEOs are broad statements that describe the career and professional accomplishments
that the program is preparing graduates to achieve within three to five years from
graduation. PEOs are based on the needs of the program’s constituencies and these
shall be determined, articulated, and disseminated to the general public, via the HEI or
department website and academic manuals by the unit or department of the HEI offering
the program. The PEOs shall be assessed and evaluated periodically for continuous
quality improvement.

5.4 Specific Professions/Careers/Occupations for Graduates

The scope of practice of Electrical Engineering is defined in Section 2a of the prevailing


Electrical Engineering Law or R.A. 7920 and pertains to professional services and
expertise including, but not limited to:
a. Consultation, investigation, valuation and management of services requiring
electrical engineering knowledge;
b. Design and preparation of plans, specifications and estimates for electric power
systems, power plants, power distribution systems including power transformers,
transmission lines and network protection, switchgear, building wiring, electrical
machines, equipment and others;
c. Supervision of erection, installation, testing and commissioning of power plants,
substations, transmission lines, industrial plants and others;
d. Supervision of operation and maintenance of electrical equipment in power plants,
industrial plants, watercrafts, electric locomotives and others;

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e. Supervision in the manufacture and repair of electrical equipment including
switchboards, transformers, generators, motors, apparatus and others;
f. Teaching of electrical engineering professional courses; and
g. Taking charge of the sale and distribution of electrical equipment and systems
requiring engineering calculations or applications of engineering data.

5.5 Allied Programs

The following programs, among others, may be considered as allied to Electrical


Engineering:
1. Computer Engineering
2. Electronics Engineering
3. Mechanical Engineering
4. Civil Engineering
5. Chemical Engineering
6. Industrial Engineering
7. Agricultural Engineering
8. Environmental Engineering
9. Marine Engineering
10. Computer Science
11. Information Technology
12. Control Engineering
13. Audio Engineering

Sec. 6 Institutional and BSEE Program Outcomes

As per CMO 37 s. 2012, program outcomes specify what students are expected to know
and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge, and
behaviors that the students have acquired and developed as they progress through the
program.

The minimum standards for the BSEE program are expressed in the following minimum
set of institutional and program outcomes.

6.1 Institutional Outcomes

a) Graduates of professional institutions shall be able to demonstrate a service


orientation in one’s profession.
b) Graduates of colleges shall be able to participate in various types of employment,
development activities, and public discourses, particularly in response to the needs
of the communities one serves.
c) Graduates of universities shall be able to participate in the generation of new
knowledge or in research and development projects.
d) Graduates of state universities and colleges shall, in addition, have the
competencies to support “national, regional and local development plans.” (RA
7722).
e) Graduates of higher educational institutions (HEIs) shall preserve and promote the
Filipino historical and cultural heritage.

6.2 BSEE Program Outcomes


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Graduates of the BSEE program shall have developed the ability to:

a) Apply knowledge of mathematics and sciences to solve engineering problems;


b) Conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use
engineering judgment to draw conclusions;
c) Apply both analysis and synthesis in the engineering design process, resulting in
designs that meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and
sustainability, in accordance with standards;
d) Function effectively on multidisciplinary teams that establish goals, plan tasks, meet
deadlines, and analyze risk and uncertainty;
e) Identify, formulate and solve complex problems in electrical engineering;
f) Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations;
g) Communicate effectively with a range of audiences;
h) Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic,
environmental, and societal context;
i) Recognize the need for additional knowledge and locate, evaluate, integrate, and
apply this knowledge appropriately;
j) Articulate and discuss the latest developments in the field of electrical engineering;
k) Apply techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice; and
l) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering and management
principles as a member and/or leader in a team to manage projects in
multidisciplinary environments.

Note: A PHEI, at its option, may adopt mission-related institutional and/or program
outcomes that are not included in the minimum set as specified above.

Sec. 7 Sample Performance Indicators

Performance Indicators are specific, measurable statements identifying the performance(s)


required to meet the outcome; confirmable through evidence(s).

Table 1. Sample Performance Indicators of a Program Outcome

Program Outcome Sample Performance Indicators

Identify, formulate and solve Identify and discuss the characteristics of


e complex problems in electrical e.1 various faults that may occur in an
engineering. electrical transmission system.

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Devise possible strategies to determine
e.2 and analyze the effects of faults in an
electrical power system.

Obtain possible solutions to fault analysis


problems using appropriate and/or
e.3
applicable principles of engineering and
mathematics.
Check the accuracy and validity of the
e.4
solution results.

Sec. 8 Program Assessment and Evaluation

Program Assessment refers to one or more processes that identify, collect, and prepare
data to evaluate the attainment of program outcomes and program educational objectives.

Program Evaluation pertains to one or more processes for interpreting the data and
evidences accumulated from the assessment. Evaluation determines the extent at which
the program outcomes and the program educational objectives are achieved by comparing
actual achievement versus set targets and standards. Evaluation results in decisions and
actions for continuous improvement of the program.

All HEIs are encouraged to form a Consultative Body, represented by the stakeholders, to
be part of the assessment and evaluation processes.

8.1. Assessment and Evaluation of PEOs

The Assessment and Evaluation of PEOs may include, among others, feedback from the
stakeholders of the program through surveys or focus group discussions to obtain data on
the extent of achievement of the PEOs.

8.2. Assessment and Evaluation of Program Outcomes

In the case of program outcomes assessment, the defined performance indicators shall be
connected to key courses (usually the Demonstrating or “D” courses in the curriculum
map), and appropriate assessment methods may be applied. These methods may be direct
or indirect depending on whether the demonstration of learning was measured by actual
observation and authentic work of the student or through gathered opinions from the
student or his/her peers.

Table 2. Sample Matrix Linking Performance Indicators with Key Courses and
Assessment Methods

Performance Indicators Key Course(s) Assessment Methods


Identify and discuss various faults that
e.1 may occur in an electrical transmission Power System Analysis Recitation; exams
system.
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Devise possible strategies to determine
Case study; homework;
e.2 and analyze the effects of faults in an Power System Analysis
exams
electrical power system.
Obtain possible solutions to fault
Long-hand computations;
analysis problems using appropriate
e.3 Power System Analysis computer simulation; Final
and/or applicable principles of
exam
engineering and mathematics.
Interpretation of answers
Check the accuracy and validity of the to long-hand calculations
e.4 Power System Analysis
solution results. or computer-aided
simulation results

Table 3. Sample Matrix Linking Assessment Methods with Set Targets and Standards

Key Course(s) Assessment Methods Targets and Standards


Power System Analysis Recitation; exams 90% of the class gets a rating of at least 70%
Case study; homework; 90% of the class gets a rating of at least 70%
Power System Analysis
exams
Long-hand computations;
Power System Analysis computer simulation; Final 75% of the class gets a rating of at least 70%
exam
Interpretation of answers to
long-hand computations or 75% of the class gets a rating of at least 70%
Power System Analysis
computer-aided simulation
results

Note: Other methods of Program Assessment and Evaluation may be found in the CHED
Implementation Handbook for Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) and Institutional
Sustainability Assessment (ISA).

Sec. 9 Continuous Quality Improvement

There shall be a documented process for the assessment and evaluation of program
educational objectives and program outcomes.

The comparison of achieved performance indicators with declared targets or standards of


performance shall serve as basis for the priority projects or programs for improving the
weak performance indicators. Such projects and programs shall be documented as well as
the results of their implementation. This regular cycle of documentation of projects,
programs for remediation and their successful implementation shall serve as the evidence
for Continuous Quality Improvement.

ARTICLE V
CURRICULUM

Sec. 10 Curriculum Description

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The Electrical Engineering curriculum is designed to meet the BSEE program outcomes
stated in Article IV Section 6.2. This is articulated in a Curriculum Map discussed in
Section 11. The curriculum shall develop electrical engineers who have a background in
mathematics, natural, physical and allied sciences. As such the curriculum contains
courses in college-level mathematics, physics, chemistry, materials and environmental
sciences with emphasis on the development of analytical and creative abilities. The
curriculum also contains mandated general education and elective courses as connected to
the desired program outcomes. This is to ensure that the electrical engineering graduates
can understand and articulate the nature of their special role in society and the impact of
their work on the environment. The curriculum is designed to guarantee a certain breadth of
knowledge of the Electrical Engineering discipline through a set of core courses and to
ensure depth and focus in certain specializations through track elective courses. A
minimum of 240 hours of immersion in electrical engineering activities outside the institution
and a capstone design project or a research project in electrical engineering are the final
requirements of the curriculum.

Sec. 11 Minimum Curricular Requirements

Minimum
Minimum No. of Hours/Week Credit
Classification/ Field / Course Units
Lab/Field
Lecture
Design/Drafting
I. Technical Courses
A. Mathematics 12 0 12
B. Natural Sciences 6 6 8
C. Engineering Sciences 8 3 9
D. Allied Courses 26 18 32
E. Professional Courses 34 48 50
F. Electives 9 0 9
TOTAL (TECHNICAL) 95 75 120
II. Non-Technical Courses
A. Core Courses 24 0 24
B. Electives 9 0 9
C. Mandated Course 3 0 3
Physical Education (8) (8)

NSTP (6) (6)

TOTAL (NON-TECHNICAL) 50 50
GRAND TOTAL 144 72 170

New General Education Curriculum (GEC): Non-Technical Courses

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Lab/Field
GE Core Courses Lecture Credit Units
Design/Drafting
Science, Technology and Society 3 0 3

Contemporary World 3 0 3

Readings in Philippine History 3 0 3

Understanding the Self 3 0 3

Art Appreciation 3 0 3

Purposive Communication 3 0 3

Mathematics in the Modern World 3 0 3

Ethics 3 0 3
Lab/Field
Electives / Mandated Course Lecture Credit Units
Design/Drafting
Technopreneurship 3 0 3
Free Elective - Environmental
Science and Engineering 3 0 3
(recommended)
Free Elective - Information
3 0 3
Technology (recommended)
Life and Works of Rizal 3 0 3
Physical Education 1, 2, 3, 4 (2 units
(8) (8)
each)
National Service Training Program 1
(6) (6)
& 2 (3 units each)
Sub-total (Non-technical Courses) 50 50

Technical Courses

Lab/Field
Mathematics Lecture Credit Units
Design/Drafting
Calculus 1 3 0 3

Calculus 2 3 0 3

Engineering Data Analysis 3 0 3

Differential Equations 3 0 3

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Sub – total (Mathematics) 12 0 12

Natural/Physical Sciences

Chemistry for Engineers 3 3 4

Physics for Engineers 3 3 4

Sub – total (Natural/Physical Sciences) 6 6 8


Lab/Field
Engineering Sciences Lecture Credit Units
Design/Drafting
Computer-aided Drafting 0 3 1

Engineering Mechanics 3 0 3

Engineering Economics 3 0 3

Engineering Management 2 0 2

Sub – total (Engineering Sciences) 8 3 9

Lab/Field
Allied Courses Lecture Credit Units
Design/Drafting
Fundamentals of Deformable Bodies 2 0 2

Numerical Methods and Analysis 2 3 3

Electronic Circuits: Devices and Analysis 3 3 4

Basic Thermodynamics 2 0 2

Industrial Electronics 3 3 4

Electromagnetics 2 0 2

Fluid Mechanics 2 0 2
Fundamentals of Electronic
3 0 3
Communications
Logic Circuits and Switching Theory 2 3 3

Microprocessor Systems 2 3 3

Computer Programming 0 3 1

Basic Occupational Safety and Health 3 0 3


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Sub - total (Allied Courses) 26 18 32

Lab/Field Credit
Professional Courses Lecture
Design/Drafting Units
EE Law, Codes, and Professional Ethics 2 0 2
Electrical Standards and Practices 0 3 1
Electrical Circuits 1 3 3 4
Electrical Circuits 2 3 3 4
Electrical Apparatus and Devices 2 3 3
Electrical Machines 1 2 3 3
Electrical Machines 2 3 3 4
Engineering Mathematics for EE 3 0 3
Electrical Systems Design 3 6 5
Power System Analysis 3 6 5
Research Methods 1 3 2
Research Project or Capstone Design 0 6 2

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Project
Instrumentation and Control 3 3 4
Feedback Control Systems 3 3 4
Seminars/Colloquia 0 3 1
On-the-job Training 3 (240 hours) 3
ELECTIVES 1, 2, 3 9 0 9
Sub – total (Professional Courses) 43 48 59

GRA ND TOTAL 145 75 170

Suggested Track Elective Courses*

1. Power System Protection


a. Protection of Generators, Transformers, Bus-bars and Lines
b. Protective Relaying
c. Surge Protection in Power System

2. Advanced Power System Analysis and Design


a. Transmission and Distribution
b. Power Substation
c. Industrial and Commercial Power System

3. Advanced Electrical Systems Design


a. High Rise Building Design
b. Substation Design
c. High-Voltage Underground Cable Design (AC/DC Systems)

4. Entrepreneurship
a. Project Management
b. Project Acceptance, Testing & Documentation
c. Sales and Marketing Management

5. Machine Automation and Process Control


a. Pneumatics & Process Control
b. Electropneumatics
c. Programmable Logic Controllers in Manufacturing

6. Special Studies in Renewable Energy Resources


a. Solar and Wind Energy
b. Waves / Ocean Energy
c. Biomass Energy

*Note: The school may adopt and develop description/specification for each course.

11.1 Curriculum Map

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As per CMO 37 s. 2012, a curriculum map is “a matrix relating all the courses listed in
the program curriculum with one or more of the declared program outcomes.”

The HEIs/LUCs/SUCs shall develop a complete curriculum map for their current or
existing BSEE curriculum. Refer to Annex II for a sample curriculum map that
demonstrates the extent of relationships between the courses and the program
outcomes.

11.2 Sample Program of Study

The institution may enrich the sample model of program of study depending on the
institutional outcomes and the needs of the industry, provided that the minimum
curricular requirements are met and pre-requisites and co-requisites are complied with.

The sample program of study given below is meant for HEIs operating on a semestral
system. HEIs with CHED-approved trimester or quarter systems may adjust their
courses and course specifications accordingly to fit their delivery system, as long as the
minimum curricular and prerequisite requirements are satisfied.

FIRST YEAR

First Year - First Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Pre-Requisite
Lec L/F/D units
Calculus 1 3 0 3
Chemistry for Engineers 3 3 4
Computer-aided Drafting 0 3 1
Mathematics for Engineers 3 0 3
Understanding the Self 3 0 3
Readings in Philippine History 3 0 3
NSTP 1 3 0 3
PE 1 2 0 2
SUB-TOTAL 20 6 22

Note: L/F/D stands for Laboratory, Field Work, Design or Drafting

First Year - Second Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Pre-Requisite
Lec L/F/D Units
Calculus 2 3 0 3 Calculus 1
Engineering Data Analysis 3 0 3
Physics for Engineers 3 3 4 Calculus 1
Purposive Communication 3 0 3
Contemporary World 3 0 3
NSTP 2 3 0 3
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PE 2 2 0 2
SUB-TOTAL 20 3 21

SECOND YEAR

Second Year - First Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Prerequisite
Lec L/F/D Units
Differential Equations 3 0 3 Calculus 2
Electrical Circuits 1 3 3 4 Physics for Engineers; Calculus 2
Engineering Mechanics 3 0 3 Physics for Engineers; Calculus 2
Art Appreciation 3 0 3
Science, Technology and
3 0 3
Society
Basic Thermodynamics 2 0 2 Physics for Engineers
Computer Programming 0 3 1
PE 3 2 0 2
SUB-TOTAL 19 6 21

Second Year - Second Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Prerequisite
Lec L/F/D Units
Engineering Math for EE 3 0 3 Differential Equations
Fundamentals of Deformable
2 0 2 Engineering Mechanics
Bodies
Electrical Circuits 2 3 3 4 Electrical Circuits 1
Electronic Circuits: Devices
3 3 4 Electrical Circuits 1
and Analysis
Fluid Mechanics 2 0 2 Physics for Engineers
Information Technology 3 0 3
Physics for Engineers; Differential
Electromagnetics 2 0 2
Equations
PE 4 2 0 2
SUB-TOTAL 20 6 22

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THIRD YEAR

Third Year - First Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Pre-Requisite
Lec L/F/D Units
Numerical Methods and
2 3 3 Engineering Math for EE
Analysis
Logic Circuits and Switching Electronic Circuits: Devices and
2 3 3
Theory Analysis
Engineering Economics 3 0 3 3rd year standing
Electronic Circuits: Devices and
Industrial Electronics 3 3 4
Analysis
Fundamentals of Electronic Electronic Circuits: Devices and
Communications 3 0 3 Analysis
Electrical Machines 1 2 3 3 Electromagnetics; Electrical Circuits 2
Ethics 3 0 3
SUB-TOTAL 18 12 22

Third Year - Second Semester

No. of Hours Total


Courses/Subjects Pre-Requisite
Lec L/F/D Units
Microprocessor Systems 2 3 3 Logic Circuits and Switching Theory
Electrical Apparatus and Devices 2 3 3 Electrical Circuits 2
Electrical Machines 2 3 3 4 Electrical Machines 1
Basic Occupational Safety and
3 0 3 Ethics
Health
Environmental Science and
3 0 3
Engineering
EE Law, Codes, and Professional
2 0 2 Ethics
Ethics
Feedback Control Systems 3 3 4 Engineering Math for EE; Electronic
Circuits: Devices and Analysis
SUB-TOTAL 18 12 22

SUMMER
On-the-Job Training 3 240 hrs 3 3rd year standing

FOURTH YEAR

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Fourth Year - First Semester

Minimum Hours Pre-Requisite


L/F/D
Subjects Lec Units
Electrical Standards and EE Law, Codes, and Professional
0 3 1
Practices Ethics
Electrical Systems Design 3 6 5 Electrical Machines 2
EE Elective 1 3 0 3 4th year standing
Engineering Management 2 0 2 Engineering Economics
Research Methods 1 3 2 Engineering Data Analysis
Instrumentation and Control 3 3 4 Feedback Control Systems
Life and Works of Rizal 3 0 3
SUB-TOTAL 15 15 20

Fourth Year - Second Semester

No. of Hours
Subjects Lec L/F/D Units Pre-Requisite
Power Systems Analysis 3 6 5 Electrical Standards and Practices
EE Elective 2 3 0 3 EE Elective 1
EE Elective 3 3 0 3 EE Elective 1
Research Project or Capstone
0 6 2 Research Methods
Design Project
Seminars/Colloquia 0 3 1 Graduating
Technopreneurship 3 0 3
SUB-TOTAL 12 15 17

Research Project or Capstone Design Project – shall focus on the established program
research agenda of the HEI and may involve, among others, any of the following areas:
1. Alternative Energy Resources
2. Innovative Electrical Equipment Design
3. Development of software for Electrical Circuit Analysis and Design, Electrical Systems
Analysis and Design, and Power System Analysis and Design
4. Design of means of transportation using electricity
5. Development of low-cost sustainable eco-materials for electrical installations
6. Other projects related to the practice of the Electrical Engineering profession

On-the-job-training / practicum – shall require a minimum of 240 hours. At the discretion of


the HEIs, industry immersion may be substituted with student projects that will enhance,
modernize, and elevate the level of effectiveness and relevance of electrical engineering
education.

Seminars/Colloquia – seminars shall involve relevant topics and latest developments in the
electrical engineering field; attendance in colloquia and/or presentation of student research
project or capstone design project.

Sec. 12 Outcomes-Based Teaching and Learning (OBTL) System

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OBTL is a student-centered approach where the courses contained in the program
curriculum are designed to achieve intended student outcomes. It is an approach in which
teachers facilitate and students find themselves actively engaged in their learning.

Its primary focus is on the clear statements of what students should be able to do with what
they know after completing a course (intended learning outcomes). Once these intended
learning outcomes or course outcomes (ILOs or COs) have been established, appropriate
teaching/learning activities (TLAs) are developed. A TLA is any activity which stimulates,
encourages or facilitates learning of one or more ILOs. The final OBTL component involves
the Assessment Tasks (ATs), which measure how well students can use their new abilities
to solve real-world problems, design, demonstrate creativity and logical thinking, and
communicate effectively, among others. An AT can be any method of assessing how well a
set of ILOs has been achieved.

A key component of a course design (syllabus) using OBTL is the constructive alignment
of ILOs, TLAs, and ATs. “Constructive” refers to the idea that students construct meaning
through relevant learning activities; “alignment” refers to the situation when teaching and
learning activities, and assessment tasks, are aligned to the course outcomes.

The OBTL approach shall be reflected in all course syllabi to be implemented by the faculty.

Sec. 12.1 Sample Course Syllabus in OBTL Format

The teaching and learning activities and assessment tasks should be constructively aligned
toward the attainment of the course outcomes. Course outcomes refer to what learners are
expected to know and be able to do at end of the course. Teaching and learning activities
refer to activities or sets of activities that will engage the students in achieving the course
outcomes. Assessment tasks refer to the tools that determine how well the students have
achieved the course outcomes.

The course syllabus shall contain at least the following components:


1. General course information (title, description, credit units, prerequisite requirements);
2. Course outcomes and their relationship to the student outcomes;
3. Course coverage that relates the course outcomes to topics covered, teaching and
learning activities and assessment methods;
4. Other information such as learning resources, classroom policies, final grade
evaluation, grading system, etc.

Refer to Annex IV for a sample course syllabus in OBTL-format.

ARTICLE VI
REQUIRED RESOURCES

Sec. 13 Administration

The administration of the college of engineering shall provide academic governance


and leadership to engineering programs by exerting efforts to achieve program
educational objectives and program outcomes. As such, the college shall have a full-
time dean and full-time department or program chair who are adept in the principles of

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outcomes-based education (OBE) and have adequate training to implement the
elements of OBE and OBTL required by CMO 37 s. 2012.

The dean of the college of engineering who shall lead in the development, monitoring,
assessment, evaluation and continuous improvement of engineering programs shall
have the following qualifications:
a. Holder of any BS Engineering degree;
b. Registered engineer with valid PRC Id, if applicable;
c. Holder of a master’s degree, preferably with a doctoral degree, in engineering,
management, engineering education, natural science, mathematics, or allied or
other related fields;
d. With at least three years of experience in teaching engineering courses; and
e. With at least three years of experience in academic administration.

The BSEE Department under the College of Engineering shall be administered by a


Program Chair/Department Head with the following qualifications:
a. Holder of a BSEE degree;
b. Holder of a MSEE degree or a master’s degree in engineering education,
management, or a master’s degree in engineering major in EE;
c. Registered Electrical Engineer with valid PRC ID;
d. With at least three years of teaching experience; and preferably with at least three
years of experience in industry or academic administration.

The college dean may serve as concurrent department or program chair of his
discipline in extreme cases of low enrolment in the program.

The Program Chair shall be allowed a maximum academic load of 50 % of a full-time


teacher’s teaching load. He shall provide leadership and active involvement in
curriculum development and coordination of curricular offerings; syllabi review and
revision; program assessment and evaluation procedures; research and related
activities of the department; recruitment, placement, and professional development of
faculty members and staff of the department; and budgeting, allocations and
requisitions.

Sec. 14 Faculty

There shall be an adequate number of competent and qualified faculty members to


teach all of the curricular areas of the BSEE program and an appropriate student-faculty
ratio to effectively and efficiently implement the minimum requirements set by CHED
and the Professional Regulations Commission.

College administration shall encourage the development of the faculty to obtain their
doctoral degrees in relevant fields so that the school will exceed the minimum
requirements stated below for all engineering schools.

14.1 Full-time and Part-time Faculty Qualifications

a. Only faculty members meeting both governmental and institutional standards shall
be hired for any teaching position;
b. At least 60% of the faculty handling the professional courses are on full-time
basis;
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c. All full-time faculty members teaching professional courses shall have master’s
degrees relevant to the courses they are handling (MORPHE);
d. All faculty members teaching professional courses shall have valid PRC ID
relevant to the courses they are handling;
e. Faculty members teaching engineering design and other professional courses
shall preferably have relevant industry experience; and
f. All faculty members shall be adequately trained in the principles and practice of
OBE and OBTL.

14.2 Teaching Load

The teaching load and responsibilities of each faculty member shall be limited only
within the area of his specific training and/or field experience and the maximum number
of academic preparations shall not be more than four different courses.

For full-time faculty members:


a. The maximum teaching load shall be 24 academic units per week; however, a
faculty member with at least above average performance rating may be allowed
an additional six academic units beyond the allowed normal teaching load;
b. There shall be substantial time devoted for community outreach and extension
services; and
c. There shall be substantial time devoted for relevant research work.

For part-time faculty members:


a. The maximum teaching load shall be 12 academic units per week;
b. There shall be substantial time devoted for student advising on campus.

14.3 Duties

The faculty shall sustain active participation and involvement in the following:
a. Curriculum review and revision, decision-making, and implementation of the
academic program;
b. Program assessment and evaluation, and implementation of continuous
improvement of the program;
c. Development, improvement, and achievement of course outcomes (COs);
d. Enrichment of teaching and learning activities (TLAs);
e. Development and improvement of assessment tasks, constructively aligned with
COs and TLAs;
f. Student advising activities;
g. Linkages, professional/community extension services and community outreach
programs;
h. Review and recommendations with regards to the library and other learning
resources and the modernization/upgrading of the laboratory equipment and
facilities; and
i. Professional development in research, scholarly work, and electrical engineering
practice.

14.4 Teaching Performance

The administration of each school/college of engineering shall have a defined set of


procedures for improving the classroom performance of its faculty members, which
shall include evaluation by the students and the department/program chair.
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The department/program chair shall observe and evaluate the teaching capabilities of
the faculty members at least once during the school year and he/she shall discuss with
the concerned faculty members his/her observations and evaluation, together with the
student evaluation results .

Sec. 15 Library and Other Learning Resources

The library services and other learning resources shall be adequate to support the
scholarly and professional activities of the students and faculty. A progressive
development plan and implementation report shall be periodically prepared as evidence
in this regard.

The library collection and other learning resources shall be adequate and regularly
updated to support the achievement of all program and course outcomes.

There shall be a functional library orientation program for all new students at the start of
the semester.

The library shall have a system of announcing all new acquisitions, a system for the use
of library resources/materials and available access to INTERNET.

Sec. 16 Laboratories and Physical Facilities

Classrooms, offices, laboratories and associated equipment and facilities shall be


adequate to provide an atmosphere conducive to learning and to support the attainment
of the program outcomes. Modern tools, equipment, computing resources and
laboratories appropriate to the program shall be made available, accessible,
systematically upgraded and regularly maintained to support the program needs and to
enable the achievement of the program outcomes.

Students, faculty members and laboratory staff should be provided with adequate
training and guidance regarding the safe and proper operation of laboratory equipment
and facilities.

ARTICLE VII

COMPLIANCE OF HEIs

Using the CHED Implementation Handbook for OBE and ISA as reference, a PHEI/SUC/LUC
shall develop the following items which will be submitted to CHED when they apply for a permit for a
new program or the approval of the transformation of existing programs to outcomes-based
framework:

Sec. 17 Complete set of program educational objectives for the BSEE program.

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Sec. 18 Complete set of program outcomes, including proposed additional program
outcomes.

Sec. 19 Proposed curriculum and its articulation through a curriculum map.

Sec. 20 Proposed performance indicators for each outcome and proposed measurement
system for the level of attainment of each indicator.

Sec. 21 Proposed outcomes-based syllabus for each course.

Sec. 22 Proposed system of program assessment and evaluation

Sec. 23 Proposed system of program Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI).

ARTICLE VIII

TRANSITORY, REPEALING and EFFECTIVITY PROVISIONS

Sec. 24 Transitory Provision

All private HEIs, state universities and colleges (SUCs) and local universities and
colleges (LUCs) with existing authorization to operate the Bachelor of Science in
Electrical Engineering program are hereby given a period of three (3) years from the
effectivity thereof to fully comply with all the requirements in this CMO. However, the
prescribed minimum curricular requirements in this CMO shall be implemented starting
Academic Year 2018-2019.

Student currently enrolled in the BSEE program shall be allowed to graduate under the
old curriculum. However, students enrolling for the abovementioned program beginning
AY 2014-2015 shall be covered by this CMO.

Sec. 25 Repealing Clause


Any provision of this Order, which may hereafter be held invalid, shall not affect the
remaining provisions.

All issuances, including but not limited to CMO No. 34 s. 2008 and specifically Sections
4.1 and 7.1 of CMO 25 s. 2005 and/or any part thereof inconsistent herewith, are
deemed repealed or modified accordingly.

Sec. 26 Effectivity Clause


This CMO shall take effect starting 1st Semester of AY 2018-2019, after publication in
an official gazette or in a newspaper of general circulation.

A PHEI/SUC/LUC applying to offer the new BSEE program shall likewise comply with
all the provisions of this CMO.

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ANNEX II - Sample BSEE Curriculum Mapping

Key: I – Introductory E – Enabling D – Demonstrated

Graduates of the BSEE program shall have developed the ability to:

a) Apply knowledge of mathematics and sciences to solve engineering problems;


b) Conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering
judgment to draw conclusions;
c) Apply both analysis and synthesis in the engineering design process, resulting in designs
that meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental,
social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability, in
accordance with standards;
d) Function effectively on multidisciplinary teams that establish goals, plan tasks, meet
deadlines, and analyze risk and uncertainty;
e) Identify, formulate and solve complex problems in electrical engineering;
f) Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations;
g) Communicate effectively with a range of audiences;
h) Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and
societal context;
i) Recognize the need for additional knowledge and locate, evaluate, integrate, and apply
this knowledge appropriately;
j) Articulate and discuss the latest developments in the field of electrical engineering;
k) Apply techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice; and
l) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles
as a member and/or leader in a team to manage projects in multidisciplinary
environments;

Program Outcomes
Courses
a b c d e f g h i j k l
Mathematics
Calculus 1 I I
Calculus 2 I I
Engineering Data Analysis I I I I
Differential Equations E E

Physical Sciences
Chemistry for Engineers I I
Physics for Engineers I I

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Allied Courses
Computer-aided Drafting I E I
Engineering Mechanics I I
Engineering Economics I I I E I
Engineering Management I I E E

Allied Courses
Engineering Mathematics for EE E E E
Fundamentals of Deformable Bodies I I
Numerical Methods and Analysis E E E
Electronic Circuits: Devices and Analysis E I E
Basic Thermodynamics I I
Industrial Electronics E E E
Electromagnetics I E
Fluid Mechanics I I
Fundamentals of Electronic Communications E
Logic Circuits and Switching Theory E I E
Microprocessor Systems E I E I
Computer Programming I I I I
Basic Occupational Safety and Health I D E D I I

Professional Courses
Engineering Mathematics for EE E E E
Feedback Control Systems I E E I
EE Law, Codes, and Professional Ethics I I D E I I
Electrical Standards and Practices I I D E I I I
Electrical Circuits 1 E E I E E
Electrical Circuits 2 E E I E E
Electrical Apparatus and Devices E E I E E
Electrical Machines 1 E E I E E
Electrical Machines 2 E E I E E
Electrical Systems Design D D I D E D E E E
Power Systems Analysis D D I D E D E E E
Research Methods I D
Research Project or Capstone Design Project D D D D D D E E E E
Instrumentation and Control D I I E I I
Seminars/Colloquia E D D E E I
On-the-job Training D E D D D E E E D
ELECTIVES 1, 2, 3 E E E D E E E E
Program Outcomes
Courses
a b c d e f g h i j k L
Non-Technical Courses
Science, Technology and Society

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Contemporary World
Readings in Philippine History
Understanding the Self
Art Appreciation
Purposive Communication
Mathematics in the Modern World
Ethics
Environmental Science and Engineering
Technopreneurship
Information Technology
Life and Works of Rizal
Physical Education
NSTP

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