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THE BATTLE OF

GETTYSBURG

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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012

http://archive.org/details/battleofgettysbuOOdana
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1
THE BATTLE OF

GETTYSBURG
Spilled Blood on Sacred Ground

By Dan Abnett Illustrated by Dheera Verma


j

rosen
central

New York
Published in 2007 by The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc.
29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010

Copyright B 2007 Rosen Book Works, LLC, New York, NY, and Osprey Publishing Ltd, Oxford, England

First edition, 2007

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission in writing

from the publisher, except by a reviewer.

Photo Credits: p. 4 (top) Courtesy of Military Images Magazine, (bottom) Harper's Weekly; p. 5 Harper's
Weekly; p. 7 (top) Harper's Weekly, (bottom) Courtesy of Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection, Brown
University Library; p. 44 Hulton Getty, p. 45 (top) Courtesy of Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection,

Brown University Library, (bottom) Library of Congress

Simone Drinkwater, Series Editor/Osprey Publishing

Nel Yomtov, Series Editor/Rosen Book Works


Geeta Sobha, Editor/Rosen Book Works

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Abnett, Dan.
The Battle of Gettysburg : spilled blood on sacred ground / by Dan Abnett. -
1st ed.

p. cm. - (Graphic battles of the Civil War)


Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN- 13 978-1-4042-0777-6 (lib.) 978-1-4042-6477-9 (pbk.)

ISBN- 10 1-4042-0777-5 (lib.) 1-4042-6477-9 (pbk.)

6-pack ISBN-13 978-1-4042-6272-0 6-pack ISBN-10 1-4042-6272-5


1. Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa.. 1863-Juvenile literature. I. Title. II.

Series.

E475.53.A23 200
973.7'349-dc22
2006014272
The American Civil War, 1861-1865 3
Key Commanders 3
Invading the North 4
The Officers 6
The Battle of Gettysburg: Spilled Blood on Sacred Ground ...8
Aftermath 44
Glossary 46
For More Information 47
Index and Web Sites 48

THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR, 1861 - 1865


The first shots of the Civil War were fired on April 12, 1861, when Southern
forces bombed Fort Sumter, in South Carolina. The nation had been heading
toward conflict for many years because of the economic and political differences
between Northern and Southern states. The biggest difference was over slavery.
In the South, slavery was legal. Slavery was illegal in the North.
Both North and South had advantages in the war. The North had more
manufacturing and a better railroad system. The South, especially at the
beginning of the war, had better military leaders. They also knew they only had
to fight long enough for the North to give up hope of bringing the states that
had seceded, or left the Union, back in.
Many famous battles were fought during the four-year struggle, but none
is more famous than the Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 to July 3,

1863. On those days, the course of American history was forever changed.

KEY COMMANDERS
MAJ. GEN. GEORGE COL. JOSHUA
G. MEADE CHAMBERLAIN
Meade took charge of the The hero of Little Round
Army of the Potomac Top, holding the high
days before Gettysburg. Earlier, he ground and the Union line at
had led a successful offensive at Gettysburg, he was awarded the
Fredricksburg in December 1862. Medal of Honor.

JAMES
LT. GEN. MAJ. GEN. GEORGE
LONGSTREET E. PICKETT
Nicknamed "Old Perhaps the most fear-
Warhorse," he was less—yet tragic-figure at
dependable, but sometimes slow to Gettysburg. The disastrous charge he
act on orders because he tended to led was later named after him.

be cautious.
Invading the Nort
the summer of 1863,
In Confederate States of America
(CSA) president, Jefferson Davis,
and Confederate general Robert E. Lee
developed a plan to solve several
problems that Southern forces were
facing in the fighting of the Civil War.
Although the Confederates had
enough men in their armies at this time,
uniforms, equipment, and medical
supplies were often hard to come by.
The lack of industry in the South was
a major cause of this problem.
Food was also often in low supply.
To make the situation worse, the
South was trying to avoid fighting on Gen. George Gordon Meade
its own land in order to protect the
Union general George Gordon Meade replaced
crops it grew for its armies. General Hooker as commander of the Army of
General Lee proposed a plan for the the Potomac in June 1863. He led the army
Confederates to fight a major battle until the end of the war.

on Northern soil, so that crops in


Southern states could be harvested and
food supplies for the army increased.
Meanwhile, the Confederates could
live off the lands in the North, so that
their immediate needs were met.
General Lee also wanted to take
the war closer to the nation's capital
in Washington, D.C. He hoped that
this would throw the Union and
President Abraham Lincoln's adminis-
tration into a state of confusion. This
would not only give the Confederates
a political victory, but fighting on
Northern soil could also be a military
victory. Washington, D.C, was
If

threatened, Lincoln would have to


Jefferson Davis
pull Union troops from other parts of
the country to protect the capital. This
Jefferson Davis was elected the first and only
president of the Confederate States of America. could improve Confederate chances of
winning the war.
CSA president Davis believed that
if his armies could win an important
victory on Northern soil, then France
and Great Britain would recognize the
Confederacy as a nation and possibly
come to their aid, forcing the North to
end the war.
.

The Officers
eneral Hooker was
Joseph also incorrectly believed that Southern
commander of the Union forcesoutnumbered his own by 2 to 1
^fl army. Hooker's army had the Hooker was also indecisive about
supplies that the South did not, but he whether he should attack Richmond,
was uncertain over where and how to Virginia, the capital of the Confederate
do battle with the Confederates. He government, or take his battle directly

«• j*

The Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863, was made up of several smaller fights between Union
and Confederate forces. The most important of these were (1) the initial fight between Generals
Heth and Buford on July 1 {which resulted in the death of Union general Reynolds at McPherson's
Ridge (2), the July 2 battle between Generals Longstreet and Sickles in the fight to break the Union
line (3), and Pickett's charge on July 3, which led to the death of 6,500 Confederates (4).

6
to General Lee. Because of General
Hooker's lack of strong action,
President Lincoln replacedhim as
commander of the Union army with
General George Meade.
Unlike Hooker, General Lee was
brimming with confidence. In early
May he had defeated Hooker's army at
the Battle of Chancellorsville in
Virginia. Lee believed his army was
capable of anything, and he was deter-
mined to defeat the Union army on
their home ground— even though he
Gen. JEB Stuart
had no fixed plan as to where the
battle would take place. Confederate general JEB Stuart was only
Confederate General JEB Stuart was twenty-eight at the start of the war. He went
also eager for battle. His reputation as on to become one of the most important
cavalry commanders of the war.

commander in
the greatest cavalry the
world had been severely hurt by his
defeat at the Battle of Brandy Station in
Virginia on June 9, 1863. Fighting the
Union army on its home ground, and
winning, would restore his reputation.
No one on either the Confederate
or the Union side intended to stage a
major battle at Gettysburg. The armies
met there more by accident than
anything else. However, events soon
unfolded that ensured Gettysburg
would become one of the most
famous battles in American history.

Gettysburg was a small, quiet town that suddenly became the place where
a battle would decide the fate of a nation.
THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG
Spilled Blood on Sacred Ground
3EHS
JUNB 30, 1303. UNION &BNBZAL JOHN PUfOZP TXAVBLBP TO &BTTV63UZG WITH
Hl$ 1$T PIV&ION CAVALPY CORF5.

8
JUNB 30, 1363. CONFBPBRATB QBNBRAL VERY WELL, PETTI-
THERE'S TALK OF
JAMBS J RBTTIGRBW SAW THB UNION GREW. MOST OF THE
SHOES IN THE TOWN
mOOFS BNTBRING &BTTYSBURG. SIP. THE MEN CER- UNION FORCES ARE
TAINLY NEED THEM. AT MIDDLEBURG.

GENERAL HILL, WE SAW SOME


UNION SOLDIERS ENTERING THE
TOWN, BUT I'M SURE IT WAS JUST
THE LOCAL MILITIA.

JULY1, 1363. 515 A.M. &BNBRAL HBTHS


INFANTRY TRAVBLBP BAST ALONG THB
CHAMBBRSBURG ROAP, HBAPING TOWARP
GSTTYSBURG.

&BNBRAL HBTH SRRBAP HIS MBN FROM NORTH TO SOUTH, ACROSS THB MAIN ROAP
THAT LBP INTO THB TOWN
&BNBRAL SUFORPS CAVALR Y CORRS WATCHBP THBM COMB.
\

5:30 AM

I HOPE WE FIND
THOSE SHOES
IN TOWN.

UNION UBUTBNANT MARCBLUJB JONBS


IPBNTIFIBP THB BNBMY COMING TOWAPP
HIS TROOPS.

UBUTBNANT JONBS GAMB THB COMMANP


FOP THB FIPST SHOTS TO BB FIPBP AT
&BTTYSBUPG. THB PICKBTS FIPST
TAPGBT WAS A MOUNTBP CONFBPBPATB
OFFICBP.

BMMTSBUPG, 11 MLBS FPOM &BTTVS-


GENERAL 5UFORD IS DEFENDING^
BUPG. UNION MAJOP &BNBPAL JOHN
GETTYSBURG AGAINST THE
F PBYNOLPS WAS THB FIPST TO HBAP CONFEDERATES. INTELLIGENCE
OF THB SITUATION AT &BTTYSBUPG. SUGGESTS THAT LEE'S ARMY IS

-jan INFILTRATING THE AREA.

^fk,
l L i yt
jo, jBk M *,A
ft *wft
^
r DISPATCHES
1 FROM GENERAL
I gUFORD, $\R.j

10
HE COULD ATTACK WASHINGTON, OR
PURSUE OUR ARMIES FOR A FULL-SCALE
BATTLE. YET HE MIGHT EVEN CONVERGE
HIS TROOPS ON GETTYSBURG. SEND
0UFORD'S DISPATCHES AND MY REPORT
TO GENERAL MEADE.

...&BNBZAL &BORGB MBAPB WS THB NBWLY


APPOINTBP COMMANPBP Of THB UNION
fOXCBB.
THE GROUND AT
EMMITSBURG OFFERS
US NO ADVANTAGE IF
WE FIGHT THERE ..

I, XI, AND
III
CORPS
MUST
MAKE
HASTE TO
GETTYS-
BURG.

r WE'VE ONLY GAINED UNPBZ HUGB PZB65UZB fPOM THB CONfBP-


BPATB BOPCB5, THB UNION CAVALRY CORPS
A FEW HUNDRED
WBPB SLOWLY PBTPBATING.
YARDS. HOW LONG
HAVE WE 3EEN HERE?.

11
3:00 A.M. TWO Of &BNBZAL HBTH'S LBAP &WGAPBS HAP MAPB IT TO WILLOUGH3Y
PUN, WHBPB THBY COULP CZOZS THB $TZBAM ANP ATTACK THB UNION fOZCBB ON
McPHBZ$ON'$ WPGB

eUfOZP'5 9K\RM$HBZ9 KBPT UP A


5TBAPY erPBAtA Of f\ZB ON THB
ADVANCING CONfBPBZATB INFANTRY.

12
fOg AN HOUR, THB SOUNP Of HBAVY
GUNflRB MIXBP WITH THE CZACKLB Of
MUSKBT ANP CAZ3INB flf?B.

0OM3AZPBP BY HBAVY GUNflZB,


THB UNION fOZCBS ZBTZBATBP.
9:00 A.M.
THB SBMINAZY,
SUfOZP SAW HIS TROOPS PBTPBATING.
HB THBN SPOTTBP &BNBPAL PBYNOLPS
&BNBZAL
PUfOZPS WING TOWAPP HIM.

HBAP-
QUAZTBXS.

eUfOZP COULP SBB THAT THB


OONfBPBPATBS WBPB GAINING *&ALLOON$ COLORBP
GPOUNP ON McPHBPSON'S PIPGB. BL.UB ZBPZBSBNT
ACTUAL 5POKBN
P\ALOGUB.

I XBCKOH I CAN/
PBYNOLPS ANP HIS GROUP
MBT &PIGAPIBP &BNBPAL THE RE3S ARE
JAMBS WAPSWOPTH ANP HIS THICKER 'N BLACK-
PBINfOPCBMBNTS, BAST Of BERRIES AHEAD/
McPHBPSON'S PIPGB.

THOUSANPS Of
SOLPIBPS fPOM
BOTH SIPBS
BBGAN TO APPIMB
AT &BTTYSBUPG.

13
J
THB CONPBPBPATBS tAAPB STRONG APVANCBS\ ... HOWBVBP, MOPB THAN
\AG>AINST &BNBPAL SUfOPP'S TPOOPS. 500 CONFBPBPATB INFAN-
TPYMBN WBPB WAITING IN A
A
JL\M
\
&r&-- \ «A\1
PAILPOAP CUT SOUTH Of
McPHBPSON'S PIPGB.
i

'

§1
^-»* ^tl*^' iJl

^
r mA
ll^'li
I' ^r^sS^A-SK^
#/r ^m^v infantry huppibp into position, pb-
r i

TBPMNBP TO SUPPORT THB APTILLBPY GUNFIPB ...

THBY WBPB PBAPy TO AMBUSH UNION MAJOP


JAMBS HALL'S APTILLBPY 3BLOW THB PIPGB.

THB UNION WAS SOON IN POSITION ON THB BASTBPN\


SLOPB OF McPHBPSON'S PIPQB.

14
CAUGHT IN A BRUTAL CPOSSFIPB, HAWS GUNS WAPSWOPTHS MEN FOUNP
BEGAN TO WITHPPAW. THBMSBLVBS IN A VICIOUS
FIPBFIGHT, BBFOXB THBY
COULP HBLP HAWS GUNS.

234 OUT OF 375 OF


i

WAPSWOZTHS MBN PIBP


IN THB FIGHT

ZBYNOIPS AGAIN ZAWBP HIS MBN


FORWARD MEN, FORWARD, FOR GOD'S SAKE, AND TO PPIVB THB CONFBPBZATBS OUT
DRIVE THOSE FELLOWS OUT OP THOSE WOODS/ OF THB WOPS BBTNBBN McPHBXSONS
ZIPGB ANP SBMINAPY WGB.
£/ THB BNP OF THB PAY'S FIGHTING, CONFBPBZATB FOZCB9 HAP GAINBP GPOUNP
AT &BTTV$BURG. THBY HAP ALSO 3BNBFITBP FROM THB ARRIVAL OF FZB5H
TZOOP9. VBT UNION FOZCB6 HAP PBCIMATBP CONFBPBXATB TROOPS IN THB
ZAIUZOAP CUT ANP CONTINUBP TO HOLP BOMB OF THB HIGH GPOUNP.

16
UNION COMMANPBP MBAPB AZZIVBP JULY Z, PAWN &BNBZAL9 MBAPB ANP\
LATB ON THB NIGHT Of JULY I OLIVBP HOWAZP MAPB PLAN6 ...

THE LINE RUNS SOUTH &BNBZAL LBB MBT WITH &BNBZAL5 HOOP, HILL, ANP
FROM CEMETERY RIDGE HBTH. &BNBZAL LONQ5TZBBT HAP ALSO FINALLY
TO 3\G FOUND TOR AmVBP.

THB CONFEDERATES WILL ATTACK


FROM SEMINARY l?IDGE TO THE
WEST WE MUST CONTROL THE
EMMITS3URG ROAD.

17
11:1$ AM. fOUX HOURS AfTBZ UBB GAVB HIS OXPBZS.

WHERE ARE CAPTAIN


fJOHNSON'5 REPORTS
^|
(ANp WHy mH>7
OF THE ENEMY'S FORWARD,
POSITION?
A LONGSTREET?

BAZLY AFTBPNOON. XHB CONfBPBXATB ARMY WAS APVANCING


ON THB UNION FOPCBS ON HBPP'S PIPGB.

18
Ifflffi THAT MOWING, UNION MAJOR
¥T
YOU MUST HOLD THE LINE, SICKLES.
&BNBRAL PANIBL SICKLBSS INFANTRY
IF YOU MOVE FORWARD ONTO THE
HAP FORMBP UP AT THB SOUTH BNP OF
HIGH GROUND THE LINE WILL BE
CBMBTBRY WGB.
BROKEN AND EXPOSED TO ATTACK.
THB HIGH GROUND
WILL BE EASIER TO
DEFEND. WE SHOULD
PRESS

SlCKLBS MOVBP HIS 11,000 MBN TO THB HIGH


GROUNP. PUT HIS HASTB HAP GNBN THB BNBMY
AN OFBNING TO APVANCB ON HB HAP MAPB A
COSTLY MSTAKB.

MBAPB WAS FURIOUS. SBBING


SICKLBS BXFOSING THB UNION
UNB, HB ROPB OUT, SHOUTING
AT HIS GBNBRAL TO STOP. 0UT
IT WAS TOO LATB.

19
TWO OF CONFBPBPATB &BNBPAL LONGSTPBBT'S HOOP ASKBP lONGSTPBBT
INFANTS PMSIONS HBAPBP UP THB BMMITS&UPGM IB HB COULP TAKB
HIS MBN
POAP, UNPBP THB COMMANP OB &BNBPALS JOH\ |f|
SOUTH ANP ATTACK THB
iJOP ASP kVANPkP t/UV.^fcj M M iiiHlM SI 1 VI
UNION UNB FPOM THB PBAP
AT SlG POUNP TOP.

nl^^^ij^ll \Qim?^^M9l^S" jtv ill


mkm I

Mn mm A wrfwmsMnJt'^^
i

f
w
¥
ML IS

^
c. *

WE'RE

Ito get
j

here, law/
off
J'

TOO EXPOSED 1
we need
this
*
'

road-L^t'

\THB CONfBPBPATBS KBPT PUSHING FOPWAPP, BUT WBPB NO MATCH FOP


\THB UNION FIPBPOWBP. BMBNTUALU/, THBY WBPB FOPCBP TO PBTPBAT

THBV FOUGHT WITHOUT SUPPOPT FOP AN HOUP ANP A HALF

20
&PIGAPIBP &BNBPAL GOUVBPNBUP SOUTH Of LITTLB POUNP TOP, THB
WAPPBN WAS CHlBf BNGlNBBP TO THB CONfBPBPATBS WBPB ATTACKING &IG
APMY Of THB POTOMAC. fPOM HIS POUNP TOP
POSITION, HIGH ON LITTLB POUNP
TOP, HB COULP SBB THB UNION
m
PBfBNSBS.

WITH SUPPOPT COMING fPOM ALL


SIPBS, THBCONfBPBPATBS WBPB
MASSING APOUNP SlG POUNP TOP

fPOM HIS POSITION ON SIG POUNP THB CONfBPBPATB INfANTPY ON 0IG


TOP, CONfBPBPATB COLONBL WILLIAM POUNP TOP PBSPONPBP TO THB
OATBS ALSO PBALIZBP THB IMPOPTANCB PUNISHING fiPB fPOM WAPPBN'S
Of LITTLB POUNP TOP UNION APTILLBPt

f THB CONFEDERATES ARE MASSING TO


THE SOUTH. WE MUST HOLD LITTLE POUND
TOP BEFORE THEY TAKE THE ADVANTAGE.

WHOEVER COMMANDS LITTLE FOUND


TOP COMMANDS THE FIELD Of BATTLE/J

21
GENERAL SYKES, I HAVE RE-
/W/£W COLONBi 6TZONG VINCENT WA$
QUESTED REINFORCEMENTS CALLBP UPON fOg &g\GAP\£Z &BNBXAL
FROM GENERAL MEADE, BUT ... WAZREN'$ f?£INFOf?CEMENT$.
COLONEL VINCENT
...WE NEED TO yj GENERAL SYKES WANTS
TAKE LITTLE POUND 'S\ A BRIGADE AT THE TOP
//
O^ LITTLE (?OUND TOR
"3£

ZOTH MAINE TO THE


.SOUTHERN FACE/ ,

22
A5 CONfBPBZATB MFANTM ATTACKBP THB
90UTHBZN 9L OPB6 Of UTTLB POUNP
^7

MOMBNT5 LATBZ, CONfBPBZATB 50LP\BZ5 ZBGZOUFBP...


13

23
\TWO TBXA& PBGMBNT9 POUNPBP THB WB&TBPN 9LOPB9 OF UTTIB POUNP XOP

AAARGH/
DON'T GIVE AN
INCH, MEN/

\BVBN A9 COLONBL $TPONG MMCBNT WA0 PYING, HB CONTINUBP TO PALLY H\S MBNA

24

THB CONFBPBZATB INFANTRY ATTACKBP THB UNION INFANTRY FOZCB5 ACROSS
THB WHBAT FIBLP BBTWBBN &BMNAZY PIPGB TO THB WB5T ANP CBMBTBZY ZIPGB
TOTHBBASTA
fcHA(?GE')

—^
[hold youi? GieouND/1

UNION ZBINFOZCBMBNT9 ZBFBLLBP THB


BNBM, mo ZBTXBATBP BACK THROUGH
THB WHBAT FIBLP.

TN THB WHBAT FIBLP, BOTH FOZCB5 ATTACKBP ANP COUNTBZATTACKBP. \

FINALLY, MOPB UNION ZBINFOZCBtABNTB FOZCBP THB


CONFBPBZATB9 BACK AGAIN INTO THB WOOPS.
11
25
6\N£\TZ£Z'6 CORPS SOON FOUNP ITS %F'FIGHTING ON 71 MC

*
r
J$ I?ET1?£AT/

I^P^ Z£r . %^*m*f?^

r^ PFNNSYLMANIAN P£GM£NT, L£P BY 0PIGAPI£P 9£N£PAL SAMU£L CPAWFOPP,


FINALLYPUNCHFP OUT TH£ LAST OF TH£ CONF£P£XAT£ TROOPS THAT TH£Y HAP
3££N SKIRMISHING WITH ALL PAY.

26
IBB'SOPPBP5 HAP ALBO INCLUPBP ATTACKING CBMBTBPY PIPGB. THBPB, THB CON-
FBPBPATB9 WBZB BOM3APPBP BY UNION FIPB, PUT THBY STILL MAPB PPOGPB99.

THB UNION HAP FOPMBP A 9ALIBNT APOUNP CONFBPBPATB9 UNPBP PPIGAPIBP


THB PBACH OPCHAPP, WHICH WAS UNPBP &BNBPAL CAPMU$ WILCOX. OVBPPAN
ATTACK FROM CONFBPBPATB INFANTRY THB UNION APTILLBPY POSITION IN
THB PBACH OPCHAPP.
WE HAD THE
YANKEES RUNNING
SCARED/

THB 3ATTLB PAGBP 3BTWBBN THB BMMITSBUPG POAP ANP CBMBTBPY PIPGB. THB
UNION FOPCB9 WBPB 5PLINTBPBP 3Y THB MIGHT OF THB &OUTHBPN FOPCB5.

27
&BNBPAL WINflBLP SCOTT HANCOCK WAS PUT IN CHAPQB\
Of THB UNION tt COPPS WHEN MAJOP &BNBPAL JOHN
PBYNOLP9 PIBP IN 3ATTLB THB PPBMIOUS PAY.

Of 2&2 UNION SOLPIBPS Of THB MINNBSOTA PBGIMBNT


THB
WHO CHAPGBP POWN CBMBTBPY PIPGB, ONLY 33 PBTUPNBP.

THBY GAVB HANCOCK TIMB TO PALLY HIS TPOOPS.

UNPBP ^BNBPAL HANCOCK'S COMMANP, THB UNION fOPCBS


PALUBP ANP STALLBP THB CONfBPBPATBS /V THBIP ATTACK. ' Tl"c3h~ +^M l\

">^^tf&I^^^E^^^^

'w^
- .

/V^3^S
.' V* XHBH^Ml l^^2~^£JHEB*fT

f
-
7:30 KM. tfTBP THBIP VICTOPY,
THB UNION fOPCBS WITHPPBW
TO CBMBTBPY PIPGB.

mCONfBPBPATB SOLPIBPS WBPB HOPPIflBP THB CONfBPBPATBS PBTPBATBP


BY THB PBATH Of THBIP COMMANPBP, TO SBMINAPY PIPGB^

28
AT *00 P.M. ON SBNNBPS HILL. A
BAPLIBP, WHBN THB SHBLLING STOPPBP, &BNBPAL
CONPBPBPATB APTILLBPY COPPS POPMBP BMLL MOVBP HIS MBN, PBSPITB IT BBING
UP TO THB NOPTHBAST OP THB 3ATTLBPIBLP. CONTPAPY TO &BNBPAL LBBS OPPBPS.
B

XHB CONPBPBPATB APTILLBPY SHBLLBP


\CULP'S HILL ANP CBMBTBPY HILL POP
TWO HOUPS.

Jhow far is it? this M


JOHNSON'S MBN ATTACKBP UNPBP PIPB. UNION
<-CC ,

DOESNT FEEL LIKE IV


GBNBPALS &PBBNB ANP POBINSON HAP PUG
JY^ J IN THBIP TPOOPS IN
PBPBNSB OP THB CON-
Ian attack, more ukeB M. (ppm
A ROUTE MARCH/
PBPBPATB APMYS SUPBPIOP NUMBBPS.
[[ [\ Q J '\Jj \

1:

i
'A

AT THIS RATE
THERE WONT BE
MUCH LIGHT
LEFT BY THE
TIME WE GET TO
ATTACKING.

TO THB PIGHT OP THB UNION POSITION, CONPBP- \LATBP . . X?


BPATB &BNBPAL &BOPGB H. STBUAPT STUMBLBP
UPON BMPTY TPBNCHBS. rHBPB WAS A CHANCB OP
POUTING THB UNION POPCBS ON CULPS HILL.
I

NO ONE SEEMS TO BE
COMING TO HELP US. NOW
IT'S TOO DARK TO ATTACK/

29
THAT NIGHT, MBAPB MBT WITH HIS GBNBXALS.

WE TAKEN
HAVE [THE TERRAIN HAS BEEN KIND TO
HEAVY LOSSES. |
US, GENERAL WILLIAMS. WE HELD
GENERAL ZOOK THE HIGH GROUND FROM THE
AND COMMANDERS BEGINNING, AND WE TOOK UP A

VINCENT WEED, STRONG DEFENSIVE LINE.

AND WILLARD ARE


BUT WE HAVE
ALL DEAD.
NOT WON THIS
BATTLE YET/

BUT OUR LINE


HAS HELD WELL
IAGAINST THE CONFED-
ERATE ARMY THEIR
*Jfi
NUMBERS ARE VAST/
IWP!
VERY WELL, WILLIAMS.
SEND FRESH TROOPS IN
BEFORE FIRST LIGHT. WE
SHALL BE THE WINNERS/
&BNBXAL LONGSWBBT WORKBP \juiy g, setose pawn.
MO&T OF THB NIGHT ON A PLAN
OF ATTACK FOR THB NBXT PAY. ^generall??^^
r-tr^m WE SHOULD SWING 1

WmM\ 1
AROUND THE UNION 1
LINES, AND ATTACK 1
IN A CIRCLE AROUND 1

/*$h *- L 3\G FOUND MTOR


gppP2(£»a* ^F^\

b.
flfiQ£-

I -^"""-i
Mj!
8/
f^
:
{
W WE
1 LINE
jT|_

WILL
IN

hit
ATTACK THE
A FULL FRONTAL
longstreet.J
1

MAJOR GENERAL PICKETT'S


DIVISION IS FRESH. IF ANYONE CAN
CRACK THE UNION LINE, THEY CAN/1
9:00 A.M. GENERAL WALKERS CONEBPERATB 10:10 A.M. GENERAL STEUART HAP
fORCBS WERE STORREP IN THEIR TRACKS, BEEN GIMEN ORPBRS TO ATTACK
ANP UNABLE TO HBLR STEUARTS MEN. BUT WALKERS REINFORCEMENTS
HAP NOT REACHEP HIM.

32
&4$ AM. AT THB SMB TMB AB THB UNION POPCBB \NBPB ATTACKBP WHILB
BTBUAPT'9 OPPBP9 WBPB GIVBN, CP055ING AN OPBN MBAPOW. THB INFANTPY
UNION FOPCB5 UNPBP COLONBL WA$TOPNAPAPT.\
CHAPLB9 MUPGB WBPB OPPBPBP
TO ATTACK THB BPBA£TWOPK$
NBAP $PANGLBP'5 $PPING.

BOMB Of THB UNION $OLPIBP$ MAPB IT AS PAP A9 THB BPBA£TWOPK$.

KA5 A.M. THB UNION FOPCB9 WBPB POWN


TO HALF 6TPBNGTH. THB BATTLB WA$
LOST, ANP THB 9UPVNOP5 FBLl BACK.

33
ON SBMINAPY PIPGB, CONFBPBPATB\
&BNBPAL PBTTlGPBWS FOPCB9
FOPMBP UP IN THB TPBB LINB.

THB CONFBPBPATB9 PPBPAPBP FOP A MAS5BP A69AULTA


ridki

dhW'j

jfeMi'tfrt^W^

\XT INCLUPBP50 pbgimbnts of solpibps that


PBPPB9BNTBP SIX PIFFBPBNT CONFBPBPATB
eBVBNTY'FWIBGUNS WBPB PANGBP ALONG THB STPBTCH
3BTWBBN THB PBACH OPCHAPP ANP SPANGLBP'S WOOP.

*.

THBSB SUPPORT WBAPONS COVBPBP THPBB


QUAPTBP9 OF A MLB OF GPOUNP.

LONGSTPBBT SBNT WOPP TO HIS MBN HB BOON GOT


BACK AN ANSWBP

THE ARTILLERY WAGONS ARE


RUNNING OUT OF MUNITIONS.
WHAT CAN I DO, 3UT FOLLOW
GENERAL LEE'S ORDERS AND
SEND PICKETT'S MEN TO
THEIR DEATHS?

34
WO ZM. &BNBZAL LONGSTZBBT CALLS THB OPPBZJ

THB AIM OF THB CONFBPBZATB GUNS THBPB WBPB GPBATBP LOSSBS AMONGST
WAS POOP. TNSTBAP OF HITTING THB THB UNION APTILLBPY TO THB PBAP OF
UNION LINB ON SBMINAPY PIPGB, THB THB LINB
GUNS FIPBP ON &BNBPAL MBAPBS
HBAPQUAPTBPSA

CONFBPBPATB COLONBL B. POPTBP ALBX-


THB NOTB FPOM COLONBL ALBX-
ANPBP, WHO COMMANPBP THB CANNON FIPB,
ANPBP PBAP, *FOP &OPS SAKB
WATCHBP THB UNION APTILLBPY WITHPPAWAL.
COMB QUICK. THB 13 GUNS HAVB
GONB. COMB QUICK OF MY AMMU-
NITION WILL NOT LBT MB
SUPPORT YOU PPOPBPLY."

THE ARTILLERY \S
RETREATING. THE UNION
LINE IS BROKEN

35
T GENERAL 1/ I SHALL LEAD MY IONGSTPBBT COULP PO NOTHING
LONGSTREETpi DIVISION FORWARD SIR? TO STOP WHAT WOULP HAPPBN. PUT
SHALL I THBPB WAS NOTHING BLSB HB COULP
ADVANCE? PO WITHOUT APTILLBPY SUPPORT

I V*

\lONGSTPBBT SAIP NOTHING. THB NOP OF HIS HBAP\


\TO &BNBPAI PICKBTT WAS 3APBLY NOTICBA3LB.

3:10 PM. MAJOP &BNBPAI &BOPGB BPWAPP PICKBTT LBP THPBB


3PIGAPBS Of THB 3TH VIRGINIA TOWAPP THB UNION fOPCBS.

&BNBPAL PBTTIGPBW'S MBN, WHO WBPB BXHAUSTBP PPOM THBIP PAPT IN THB PPB-
VIOUS PAYS' 3ATTLBS, WBPB THB PIP5T TO 3B FIPBP UPON.

36
PICKETT'S MEN FOLLOWBP &BNBPAL PBTTIGPBW ANP
TUPNEP AT AN ANGLE TOWAPP EMMIT5&UPG POAP.

WHEN THEY PEACHEP THEIR POSITION, UNION GUNS ON


\CEMETEPY PIPGE ANP LITTLE POUNP TOP OPENEP FIPE\

PICKETT STOPPEP AT PUSS 0APN, ANP PPESSEP


PANKS 3EFOPE CONTINUING HIS ATTACK.
-o ^

THE 3TH VIRGINIA COLORS, OR


FLAG, FELL FOUR TIMES IN JUST A
THEY WEPE MET WITH MOPE HEAVY APTILLEPY FIPE. I FEW MINUTES, BUT WAS CARRIED ON

they left vepy many peap behinp them. othep confepepates


Wining the fight suppenpepep immepiately

37
MY BRIGADE HAS
WITHDRAWN. THE CHARGE
WAS A MISTAKE. THE MEN
DIDN'T STAND A CHANCE.

GENERAL, ALL THIS HAS BEEN


|f
I MY FAULT IT IS I WHO HAVE
LOST THIS FIGHT AND yOU
I
MUST HELP ME OUT OF IT AS

3=BEST yOU CAN.

BLBVBN THOU6ANP MBN


WALKBP fOg 5IXTBBN-
ANP-A-HALF MINUTBS
'

ACZOB9 A fIBLP. &XTY-


fl\IB HUNPZBP WBZB LO$T.

ALTHOUGH THB UNION LINB


LOST i500 MBN IN PlCKBTT'i
CHAPGB, GBNBXAL HANCOCK
KNBW THB CONfBPBZATBS
WBZB BBATBN HB WOTB A
NOTB TO TBLL MB,

GENERAL HANCOCK
SUGGESTS THAT V AND VI
CORPS COUNTERATTACK.

38
WH AT ABOUT SUPPLIES?]

\THBY WATCHBP THB CONFBPBPATB TZOOFS


\$LOWLY WITHPZAWING ANP ZBPOZTBP BACK.

39
THB BATTLE WAS ALL BUT OVBR, BUT IN THB LAST
FBW HOURS, TWO CAVAL RY ACTIONS TOOK RLACB .

X
AT LOWS FARM, JBSSTUART '9 CONFBPBRATB CAVALRY PIVISION CHARGBP
&RIGAPIBR &BNBRAL &BORGB ARMSTRONG CUSTBR'S UNION HORSBMBN

MBANWHlLB, AT ABOUT $:00 RM AT THB SOUTHBRN BNP OF THB


BATTLBFIBLP, MAJOR &BNBRAL ALFRBP A. RLBASONTON'S UNION
CAVALRY CHARGBP THB LINBS Of CONFBPBRATB INFANTRY.

40
OONfBPBRATB
LOSBB9 WBRB
4,637 KILLBP,
12,391 WOUNPBP,
MP 5,346
missing OR
CARTURBP.

THB MATBRIAL ANP MBN LOST 3Y LBB'9


ARMY Of NORTHBRN VIRGINIA COULP
NOT 3B RBRLACBP.

IBB HAP TO RRB9BRVB HIS Amy AT ALL


COSTS TO HAVB ANY CHANCB Of WINNING
THB WAR

THB 3ATTLB WAS ALRBAPY LOST.

THB UNION ARMY HAP 3BGUN TO PRAfT SOLPIBR9


INTO THB ARMY IN 1363. THBY U9BP A PRAfT TO RB-
RLACB THB BOLPIBRS THBY LOST AT &BTTYS3URG.

UNION LOSSBS
WBRB 3,149 KILLBP,
14,503 WOUNPBP,
ANP 5,101 MISSING
OR CARTURBP.

41
XHB RAIN FBLL ON A &BTTY$BUZG THAT WA$ NOW QUIl
I FBACBFUL, AFTBR THB PA&T THZBB PAY$ Of FIBRCB 3ATT<

&BNBZAL MBAPB ZBCBNBP A XBQUBST


FROM &BNBXAL 1>BB FOR AN BXCHAN&B
of meoNBze.

42
AM THB CAVALRY ATTACK WAS SUCCBSSfUL. THB UNION fORCBS
JULY 0, 3:00
CAPTUZBP WAGONS, TOOK PRISONERS, ANP KILLBP BMBN MORE CONPBPBRATE

JULY 13&3. THB CONFBPBRATB


7, AMY WAS UNA3LB TO CROSS THB POTOMAC AT
WILLIAMSPORT BECAUSE THB RIVER WAS TOO HIGH ANP THB UNION ARMY HAP PB-
STROYBP THB BRIPGB.

THB CONPBPBRATBS PORTIPIBP THB


\ARBA ANP AWAITBP A UNION ATTACK.
Aftermat

The on Northern soil in


fighting
Gettysburg was the second
won an important
new commander,
victory under
General
its

Meade.
time that the Confederate Meade proved to be a great leader,
army had tried to bring the conflict who listened to his officers and often
into theNorth. The Maryland took their suggestions. At Gettysburg,
Campaign, which ended in September he wisely recognized the strength of
1862 with the Union victory at the the fresh Confederate cavalry and
Battle of Antietam, was the first. chose not to counterattack after
As they did after Antietam, the Pickett's charge.
Confederate army retreated home, fol- General Lee had asked too much
lowing the defeat at Gettysburg. of his army, while knowing too little

Gettysburg proved to be a critical about what was going on around him.


turning point in the War Between the Yet he was extremely fortunate to
States. The Army of the Potomac had have escaped with his army across the

The Union capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi, cut the Confederacy in half and opened the entire
Mississippi River to Union gunboats and supplies.

44
(Above) President Lincoln gave his
famous Gettysburg Address on November
19, 1863.
(Left) Gettysburg was one of the bloodi-
est battles in American history.

m.A
Potomac. If the Union forces had Gettysburg and Vicksburg boosted the
attacked the retreating Confederate Union army's morale, and they now
army in force, the war might have fought with renewed energy.
been over. The support that the Confederacy
Meade preferred to preserve his had hoped to win from Great Britain
tired troops,rather than drive them and France never came. The South
on. He had met his objectives at now realized that they were fighting
Gettysburg: He had turned back Lee's this war alone.
army and driven them out of the On November 19, 1863, President
North. However, President Lincoln Lincoln gave a speech in Gettysburg,
was very disappointed that his army known as the Gettysburg Address. In
had won the battle, but failed to end it, Lincoln honored those who fought
the war at the Battle of Gettysburg. at Gettysburg and carefully explained
While the fighting at Gettysburg the values for which the war was
was going on, the Union army took being fought. It is remembered as one

control of Vicksburg, Mississippi. This of the most important speeches in


allowed the North to control the American history.
main transport
Mississippi River, the
route for each army's supplies and
troops. The double victories at
45
Glossar
artillery Large, heavy guns that are mounted on wheels or tracks.

breastworks Temporary fortifications.

carbine A short-barreled lightweight gun originally used by the cavalry.

cavalry The branch of an army that was trained to fight on horses; cavalries
use armored vehicles today.

converge To come together.

decimate To destroy a large part of something.


deploy To place in battle formation.

dispatch A written message.


division A large military unit that is smaller than a corps.

draft The selection of people for military duty.

engage To take part or involve oneself.

flank The far left or right side of a body of soldiers.

forager Someone who hunts for food.

infantry The branch of an army trained to fight on foot.

infiltrate To pass through gaps in the enemy's line.

militia A group of citizens who receive military training but who are on call

only for emergencies.

musket A gun with a long barrel used before the invention of rifles.
picket A soldier positioned to protect his main army from surprise attack.
rampage Reckless or violent action.

regiment A unit of troops made up of two or more battalions.

salient Something that projects outward or upward.


secede To formally withdraw from a group or organization, often to form
another organization.

skirmisher A soldier who engages in a minor fight with a small force of enemy
soldiers.

46
More Information
ORGANIZATIONS

The Gettysburg National Battlefield Museum Foundation


P.O. Box 4224
Gettysburg, Pa. 17325-4224
(866) 889-1243
Web site: www.gettysburgfoundation.org/

Gettysburg National Military Park


97 Taneytown Road
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325
(717) 334-1124
Web site: http://www.nps.gov/gett/

FOR FURTHER READING

Gaines, Ann. Battle of Gettysburg in American History. Berkeley Heights, NJ:


Enslow Publishers, Inc., 2001.

January, Brendan. Gettysburg. New York: Da Capo Press, 2004.

Murphy, Jim. Long Road to Gettysburg. Boston: Houghton Mifflin


Company, 2000.

Smith, Carl. Gettysburg 1863: High Tide of the Confederacy. Oxford, England:
Osprey Publishing, 1998.

47
Inde
F
artillery, 13-14, 19, 21, 24-25, flank, 17 peach orchard, 27, 34
27, 29, 31-32, 34-37 forager, 8 picket, 10

Pickett, Major General George,


B H 3, 31, 34-38
Big Round Top, 17, 20-21, 23, 31 headquarters, 13, 35 Pickett's Charge, 3, 36-38, 44
breastworks, 33 Hooker, General Joseph Potomac, Army of the, 3, 5,

brigade, 12-13, 22, 27, 36, "Fighting Joe," 5-7 15, 21, 44
38-39
Buford, General John, 8-14, 17 I R
infantry, 9, 12, 14, 19-21, 23, rampage, 20
c 25, 27, 32-33, 40 regiment, 24, 26, 28, 34
carbine, 13 infiltrate, 10 reinforcements, 8, 13, 21-22,
cavalry, 7-9, 11, 18, 31, 40, 43 25, 27, 29, 32

Cemetery Ridge, 17, 19, 25, retreat, 11, 13, 17, 20, 23,

27-29, 37 Jones, Lieutenant Marcellus, 25-26, 28, 35, 37, 43


Chamberlain, Colonel Joshua, 10 Reynolds, Major General John,
3, 22-23 10, 13, 15, 28
Chambersburg Road, 8-9
converge, 11 Lee, General Robert, 4, 7, 10,

counteroffensive, 25-26, 38 16-18, 20, 27, 29-31, 34, salient, 22, 27


Culp's Hill, 16-17, 29-30, 32 38, 41-42, 44-45 secede, 3

Custer, General George Lincoln, President Abraham, 4, Seminary Ridge, 13, 15-17,
Armstrong, 40 7, 11, 45 25, 28, 31, 34-35
Davis, President Jefferson, 4-5 Little Round Top, 3, 17, 21-24, skirmisher, 8, 12, 26
26, 37 Spangler's Wood, 33-34
D Longstreet, Lieutenant General Stuart, General JEB, 7, 18, 40
decimate, 16, 32 James, 3, 16-18, 20, 31,
deploy, 17, 22 34-36 V
Devil's Den, 20, 24 victory, 4-5, 28, 44
dispatch, 10-11 M Virginia, 6-7, 36-38, 41, 43

division, 8, 20, 31, 36, 38, 40 McPherson's Ridge, 8, 12-15


draft, 41 Meade, Major General George, W
3-4, 7, 11, 17, 19, 22, 30, Washington, D.C., 4, 11

35, 38-39, 42, 44 wheat field, 25


Emmitsburg Road, 17, 20, 27, Medal of Honor, 3

37 militia, 9, 15

engage, 9, 16 musket, 13

» «'

WEB SITES

Due to the changing nature of Internet links, the Rosen Publishing Group, Inc.,

has developed an online list of Web sites related to the subject of this book.
This site is updated regularly. Please use this link to access the list:

http://www.rosenlinks.com/gbcw/gettys
48
WiMMs in this series

THE BATTLE OF ANTIETAM


"The Bloodiest Day of Battle"

THE BATTLE OF FIRST BULL RUN


The Civil War Begins

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG


Spilled Blood on Sacred Ground

THE BATTLE OF SHILOH


Surprise Attack!

THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS


Deadly Inferno

TimMOMTOR versus THE MERRIMAC


Ironclads at War