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Introduction:

The purpose of this lab is to determine the equivalence point of a reaction and then use that to find the
molar concentration of the Ba(OH)2 solution. In an aqueous solution, the ions are able to conduct
electricity and a conductivity value can be obtained to find the equivalence point of the reaction. In this
lab, barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 was reacted with sulfuric acid H2SO4 and the conductivity value of the
solution was taken. The weight of the precipitate was also measured and recorded. Both of these methods
were used to calculate the molar concentration of the barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 solution

Materials:
 LabQuest
 Conductivity Probe
 Ba(OH)2
 0.1M H2SO4 Solution
 DI water
 2- 250mL beakers
 graduated cylinder
 pipet and pipet bulb
 Drop counter
 Reagent Reservoir
 Filter paper
 Ring stand and clamps
 Filter funnel
 Balance

Methods:
1. Pipette 10mL of Ba(OH)2 solution into a 250mL beaker
2. Add 50mL of DI water to it
3. Set up drop counter and conductivity probe
4. Turn probe on to 20,000 ms/cm range
5. Once connected, turn on and calibrate the dropper
6. Set up and fill beaker with 60mL H2SO4
7. Rinse reservoir with water first
8. Make sure drop counter is calibrated
9. Set to record in mL
10. Assemble system together
11. Calibrate so there are 2 drops/sec
12. Perform titration
13. After titration, filter the solution, weighing filter paper first
14. Heat filter paper to dry it out
15. Weight and record filter paper and precipitate left behind
16. Clean up all materials
Results:
Trial 1 Trial 2 Trail 3

Equivalence Point (mL) 11.2mL 11.25mL 18.9mL

Mass of filter paper + precipitate (g) 0.92g 0.98g 0.87g

Mass of filter paper (g) 0.47g 0.42g 0.44g

Mass of precipitate (g) 0.45g 0.56g 0.43g

Molarity of H2SO4: 0.100M

Discussion:
According to the data collected, the equivalence point for the three trials were roughly around the same
points at 11.2mL, 11.25mL, and 18.9mL. We were also able to find the molar concentration of the
sulfuric acid which was 0.00112mol for trial 1, 0.001125mol for trial 2, and 0.00180mol for trial 3. We
also found the molarity used for the barium hydroxide as well based off of the sulfuric acid moles which
was found to be 0.112M for trial 1, 0.1125M for trial 2, and 0.189M for trial 3. The weight of the
precipitate was found to be 0.45g, 0.56g, and 0.43g and we can see that they were all roughly around the
same weight as well. We also measured the conductivity of the solution throughout the titration and you
can tell that at the equivalence point the conductivity is least greatest, the graph forms almost a “V”
shape. Some possible errors could have been not using the solution on the conductivity probe that helps it
conduct better, not waiting for the filter paper to dry completely because that can skew the mass, or not
looking at the meniscus while measuring out the liquids. Overall, the experiment was a success because
our graph formed the right shape and we were able to determine the equivalence point and the molarity of
the Ba(OH)2 which was 0.1696M trial 1, 0.213M trial 2, and 0.105M trial 3 using the moles of BaSO4.

Conclusion:
In this lab, we used a titration of a barium hydroxide and sulfuric acid to find the equivalence point for
three trials and they were roughly around the same point, 11.2mL, 11.25mL, and 18.9mL. We were also
able to find the molar concentration of the sulfuric acid which was 0.00112mol for trial 1, 0.001125mol
for trial 2, and 0.00180mol for trial 3. We also found the molarity used for the barium hydroxide as well
based off of the sulfuric acid moles used which was found to be 0.112M for trial 1, 0.1125M for trial 2,
and 0.189M for trial 3. After the titration, we filtered out the precipitate that was formed from the titration
and weighed it, we found the masses of the precipitate to be 0.45g, 0.56g, and 0.43g and we can see that
they were all roughly around the same weight. We also measured the conductivity of the solution
throughout the titration and you can tell that at the equivalence point the conductivity is least greatest, the
graph forms almost a “V” shape. Some possible errors could have been not using the solution on the
conductivity probe that helps it conduct better, not waiting for the filter paper to dry completely because
that can skew the mass, or not looking at the meniscus while measuring out the liquids. Another error was
that each group only did one trial and we shared the data so one group may have done something
differently than another. Overall, the experiment was a success because our graph formed the right shape
and we were able to determine the equivalence point and the molarity of the Ba(OH)2 which was
0.1696M trial 1, 0.213M trial 2, and 0.105M trial 3 using the moles of BaSO4.

Reference:
Kenneth, E. B., Raymond, N. Conductometric Titration and Gravimetric Determination of a Precipitate.
ANAL, 322, 11.