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CFA Analysis Protocol & Instructional Plan Template

Common Formative Assessment – Any assessment given by multiple teachers with the intention of collaboratively examining
the results for: shared learning; instructional planning for individual students; curriculum, instruction and/or assessment modifications
Teacher’s Name: Blake Eden Grade Level: Content: English
11

Use the questions below to guide your content group’s discussion of the Common Formative Assessment data.
Group-level questions and individual-specific questions have been identified for you.

Step One: (Group) What does “proficiency” look like for this assessment? Below proficient? Above proficient?
Above Proficiency: Converted score of 90% or more. Student writing demonstrates insightful reading of the text, critical
thinking and effectively uses multiple pieces of evidence from the text.

Proficiency: Converted score of 70%-89%. Student writing demonstrates understanding of the text and
effectively uses evidence from the text.
Below Proficiency: Converted score of below 70%. Student writing fails to demonstrate understanding,
response does not include evidence from the text.
Step Two: (Individual – per class) How many students were below proficiency, at proficiency, and above
proficiency? Use this information to decide how to group students for a response (intervention or enrichment).

Step Three: (Group) Use the guiding questions below to examine the patterns that emerge:
 What concepts seem to have been well established? Why? What concepts seems to have not been
well established? Why?
Students seem to excel in selecting strong evidence and most are making solid simple claims. Some are making
strong, complex claims. We think they understand these concepts because these were two elements of writing
that we emphasized heavily in the English 11 writing curriculum. Each of us emphasized well-constructed writing
last semester. The students responded well to these concrete elements of writing. Students struggled with
the analysis portion of their writing pieces. We think this is because it is the more abstract element
within writing. They struggle to express their thinking in academic writing and to make connections
between different literary and rhetorical concepts.

 Are we seeing some common errors? Misunderstandings?


Students struggle to make the connection between characters and how that connection sheds light on
theme. They often don’t connect their paragraphs into a unified whole. Each one stands alone -- and is
strong as a part -- but the parts are not connected to make a meaningful argumentative analysis.

Step Four: (Group) Use the guiding questions below to discuss implications for adjusted instruction:
 Did we actually teach what we intended?
In terms of individual paragraph writing, students are developing mastery nicely, but their ideas do not
connect well enough yet for a longer work, like 2-3 paragraph response or essay, to feel connected,
clear, and concise.
 What strategies worked? Didn’t work? Why?
Providing students templates and structures helped them to format stronger paragraphs and
introductions. Practicing writing coherent paragraphs throughout the unit made students more
confident in their ability to write claims and pull evidence to support those claims. We tried providing
claims and quotes and then asking students to analyze, but this did not result in stronger analysis. We
think this is because it is not their own thinking. They struggled to make meaningful connections.
Students often resorted to summary instead of analysis.

 What strategies will we use in the next cycle?


We are using a chapter specific analysis guide with a summary of the plot on the left side, a list of
themes that it can potentially connect to in the middle, and an empty space for them to analyze on the
left. This will force them to connect moments of the text to significant themes using their own ideas. If
they, at any point, fall into simply summarizing during analysis, this will be made obvious by its similar
to what is already there on the left.

Step Five: (Can be collaborative BUT must be tailored to individual classes.) Fill in the whole group Action
Planning template. (next page)

Step Six: (Can be collaborative BUT must be tailored to individual classes.) Fill in the small group Action
Planning template. (last page)
SMART Goals and Whole Group Action Planning Worksheet
Current reality Desired Reality Possible Causes for Gap Action Plan & Tools for Monitoring
(Our SMART Goal) Between Goal and Reality? What is our step-by-step plan to accomplish this goal? What
……………….…………..
tools can we use (or create) to check whether students are
What is the data showing as What specifically will students Is the curriculum we teach
aligned to the standards? making progress (in other words, is our plan working)?
the greatest area of need? do?
Analysis and argumentative Students will read grade level Yes, but not usually on
Action Steps* Evidence of Success or
connectivity between claim- texts, engaging with the text grade level.
*you may not need all rows Completion
evidence, claim-analysis, and using graphic organizers and
Are we ordering and Students will write bi- Standard rubric. Progress
individual paragraphs in the answering guiding questions prioritizing our instruction? weekly SCRs focused on monitoring.
context of an essay. as support Yes with regards to writing, analysis.
Students will practice making but not in regards to results
What specific skills and claims, identifying evidence, that are measured by MC
concepts must we focus on? and explaining their thinking questions.
in both writing and speaking Pre-chapter Close Reading Improvement in analysis
Making argumentative Are we using formative
To what extent and by when? Organizers. as demonstrated in SCRs
connections between claim, assessment data…
Students will write a literary and ETs.
evidence, and whole Yes, but not always
paragraphs. analysis essay about The common formatives. Yes.
Great Gatsby by the end of Each of us adapt our
quarter 3. They will continue Process-based literary Increased complexity of
lessons according to what analysis essay: time for thinking.
to practice analysis by writing students produced during
complex SCRs and brainstorming, feedback,
the previous class period. writing, revision, more
participating in discussion Yes to format. No to
and Socratic Seminar in writing.
vocabulary.
quarter 4. Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.
Are we using effective
As measured by what? teaching strategies?
CFAs, Midterms, Essays, SCRs, See STEP 4
Final.

Are the tools and materials Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.
we use effective in delivering
our instruction?
Example SMART Goal: See STEP 4
By March 2018, 90% of our
students will write a well- Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.
Are we meeting the needs of
developed persuasive essay our struggling students by
attaining a score of 3 as providing additional time
measured by our district and support?
writing rubric. Yes.
Small Group Action Planning Worksheet – add or delete rows as needed
Proficiency Level Students Needs Strategies
Flor Campos  Opportunities to go deeper into  1-1 and small group instruction
Abel Deluna the text  Strategic grouping with other
Above
 Enrichment high performing students
Kevin Hernandez
Adilene Garcia

Ruby Martinez  Scaffolding  CM templates


Dulce Ramirez  Practice using accountable talk  CM ‘brick and mortar’
Beatriz Chavez  More opportunities to apply  Accountable talk structures
Michelle DelaCruz skills practiced in class  1-1 and small group instruction
Violeta Gomez
Luis Rodriguez
Karen Sanchez
Lillyanna Smith
Lillian Read
Christopher Martel
Nallely Villegas

Esperanza Moncada
Proficient Efrain Perez
Yobani Vera
Alfonso Villalpando
Alan Gonzalez
Vanessa King
Amia Medina
Arianna Blair
Francis Rivera
Gelcen Arizmendi
Alexus Bautista
Bryan Cordova
Jesus Morales
Rafael Trevizo
Odalys Lara  Attendance  Contact parents
David Acevedo  Alternative assignments to replace  Conference with students
Antonio Perez missing work  Create alternative assignments
Ashly Caldera  More opportunities to practice so students can demonstrate
Omar Pone skills learned in class standards proficiency
Yelitza Silva  CM templates
Victor Alpizar  CM ‘brick and mortar’
Janette Alvarez  Accountable talk structures
Lizbeth Arias
Alexandra Avalos
Angel Serratos
Sierra Muniz
Marcos Reyes
Below
Alicia Gaucin
Eduardo Soto
Jacob Turner
Everardo Valdez
Estefania Torres
Alejando Pacheco
Manuel Rosales
Reece Allee
Juan DeLaCruz
Devon Corder
Christain Contreras

Click here to enter student names. Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.

Click here & use drop-down arrow to select proficiency level.

Click here to enter student names. Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.

Click here & use drop-down arrow to select proficiency level.


Click here to enter student names. Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.

Click here & use drop-down arrow to select proficiency level.

Click here to enter student names. Click here to enter text. Click here to enter text.

Click here & use drop-down arrow to select proficiency level.