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Name ____ Date______Pd

Blood Typing Lab


PURPOSE: To demonstrate the concepts involved in blood transfusions and to form conclusions about
blood donors and receivers.

MATERIALS:
* 4 glass slides * 4 test tubes with “blood” * red food coloring – type A
* 4 droppers * blue food coloring – type B * red and blue (mixed) – type AB

PROCEDURE AND OBSERVATIONS:


1. Grab four test tubes with “blood types” A, B, AB, and O and arrange them in front of you.
2. Grab 4 droppers and arrange them one in front of each of the tubes with “blood”.
3. As you work on this lab, DO NOT MIX YOUR DROPPERS.
4. We will assume that the test tube with red liquid is blood type A.
5. We will assume that the test tube with blue liquid is blood type B.
6. We will assume that the test tube with mixed liquid (red and blue) is blood type AB.
7. We will assume that the test tube with clear liquid is blood type 0.

8. Place 4 evenly spaced drops from the test tube with blood type A onto 1 clean glass slide as shown
in the picture below.

9. Notice the data table on the other side of this paper. The drops on the slides represent blood
receiver types. The colored water in each test tube represents the blood donor types. You
will be working by columns (up and down) – filling up column A first.

10. Using only the dropper for each color, combine one (1) drop from each donor tube with the 4 drops
on the type A receiver slide by adding it slowly to each drop on the slide.

11. If a combination produces a color change, the transfusion would not be safe. If there isn’t a color
change, that indicates a safe transfusion. Record your observations in the data table by writing
safe or unsafe in each box. You may also use a + for safe, or a – for unsafe.

12. After recording your observations for the type A receiver slide, put it in the waste cup.

13. Now grab a new slide and place 4 evenly spaced drops from test tube with blood type B onto your
new glass slide.

14. Making sure you never mix your droppers, combine one drop from each donor tube with one drop
on the type B receiver slide as you did for the type A receiver slide.

15. Record your observations as you did for the type A receiver slide. Toss your slide again.

16. Repeat the same procedure for blood types AB and O receiver slides making sure you use a new
slide every time and never mix your droppers.
DATA TABLE

RECEIVER (drops on your slides)

A B AB O

D
O B
N
O A
R B

ANALYSIS QUESTIONS AND CONDLUSIONS

1. What type(s) of blood can a type A receiver be safely given in a transfusion?

2. What type(s) of blood can a type B receiver be safely given in a transfusion?

3. What type(s) of blood can a type AB receiver be safely given in a transfusion?

4. What type(s) of blood can a type O receiver be safely given in a transfusion?

5. Type A blood has type antigens and antibodies.

6. Type B blood has type antigens and antibodies.

7. Type AB blood has type antigens and antibodies.

8. Type O blood has antigens and antibodies.

9. Which blood type might be considered a “universal donor”? This is because type
blood has no (antigens / antibodies) and it will not react with (antigens / antibodies).
Therefore moderate amounts of it can be transfused into people of all blood types.

10. Which blood type might be considered a “universal recipient”? EXPLAIN

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