Anda di halaman 1dari 9

BATTLE FLAGS WILL BE FLOWN!

Spanish-American War (1898) 


Fleet Lists and Actions 
 
Rob Pracy 
4/1/2013 
 

 Details of all ships involved in the Spanish‐American war for use with ‘Battle Flags will be Flown’ along with a list of actions fought  
 

Spanish American War (1898) 

United States (Manila Bay)

Guns Armour
Name Tonnage Speed FV DV GPts Cost Anti TT
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret Battery Side

Olympia 5685t 9 9 7 10 15 4-8" E 10-5" F 2 18" 6 A D D -


Baltimore 4413t 8 8 3 6 10 4-8" E 6-6" F 1 - - D - - -
Petrel 867t 5 3 0 2 2 4-6" F - - - - - -
Raleigh 3183t 8 7 2 7 9 1-6" E 10-5" F 1 18" 4 E - - -
Concord 1710t 7 4 0 3 4 6-6" F 1 - - - - - -
Boston 3189t 5 7 0 5 5 2-8" E 6-6" F 1 - - - - - -
0 - - - - - - -
 
 

Spanish - Manila Bay

Guns Armour
Tonnag Spee GPt
Name FV DV Cost Anti TT Batter
e d s
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret y Side

Reina Cristina 3042t 8 7 0 4 7 6-6.4" F 2 14 5BBS - - - -


"
4 4 14 - - - -
Castilla 3289t 5 5 0 4-5.9" F 2-4.7" F 3 " 2
4 3 14 - - - -
Isla De Cuba 1030t 6 3 0 6-4.7" F 1 " 3
4 3 14 - - - -
Isla De Luzon 1030t 6 3 0 6-4.7" F 1 " 3
Don Antonio De 3 3 14 - - - -
Ulloa 1152t 5 3 0 4-4.7" F 1 " 2
Don Juan De 3 3 14 - - - -
Austria 1152t 5 3 0 4-4.7" F 1 " 2
Marques de Duero 492t 4 2 0 1 1 1-6.4" F - - - -
1 14 - - - -
General Lezo 515t 5 2 0 1 2-4.7" F " 1
Velasco 1152t 5 3 0 2 2 14 2 - - - -
2-6" F 2 "
0 - - - - - - - - - - -
 
Shore Batteries: Guns

Manila 4-9.4" C*
2-5.9" F
4-5.5" F
2-4.7" F
Cavite: 2-5.9" F
 

Spanish American War - Puerto Rico

2nd Battle of San Juan

Guns Armour
Name Tonnage Speed FV DV GPts Cost Anti TT
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret Battery Side
Spanish
Isabel II 1152t 5 3 0 3 3 4-4.7" F 1 14" 2 - - - -
Terror 370t 11 3 0 1 3 - - - - - 14" 2 - - - -
 

United States
St Paul 14910tg 9 10 0 2 8 4-5" F 2 - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - -
 

Spanish American War

United States (Battle of Santiago)

Guns Armour
Name Tonnage Speed FV DV GPts Cost Anti TT
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret Battery Side

Indiana 10288t 6 14 17 16 24 4-13" 3A* 8-8" E 2 18" 2 4A A C D


4-6" E
Oregon 10288t 6 14 17 16 24 4-13" 3A* 8-8" E 2 18" 3B 4A A C D
4-6" E
Massachusetts 10288t 6 14 17 16 24 4-13" 3A* 8-8" E 2 18" 3B 4A A C D
# 4-6" E
Iowa 11410t 7 15 11 21 25 4-12" 2A 8-8" E 2 14" 3S 2A 2A C D
4-4" F
Texas 6135t 7 10 12 12 18 2-12" 2A 6-6" E 1 14" 4 A A - A
Brooklyn 9215t 9 13 9 14 21 8-8" E 12-5" F 1 18" 5B 2A B E -
New York # 8200t 9 12 7 12 18 6-8" E 12-4" F 1 14" 5B A B D -
Vixen 816tg 7 2 0 0 1 1 - - - - -
Gloucester 775tg 7 2 0 0 1 - - 1 - - - - -
 

• Guns marked * are slow firing:  i.e. fire only every other turn 

# Although part of the blockading force these ships were not present at the battle of Santiago 
 

Spanish
Fleet

Spanish - Santiago de Cuba

Guns Armour
Tonnag Spee GPt
Name FV DV Cost Anti TT Batter
e d s
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret y Side

Inf. Maria 10 16 10-


Teresa 6500t 9 10 7 2-11" B* 5.5" F 2 14" 8BS A C - -
10 16 10-
Vizcaya 6500t 9 10 7 2-11" B* 5.5" F 2 14" 8BS A C - -
10 16 10-
Alm. Oquendo 6500t 9 10 7 2-11" B* 5.5" F 2 14" 8BS A C - -
19 24 2- 17.7
Cristobal Colon 7234t 9 11 12 10"# 3A 14-6" E 2 " 4 A B B A
Reina 4 6 -
Mercedes$ 3042t 7 7 0 6-6.4" F 1 14" 5BBS - - -
Destroyers:
Pluton 400t 12 3 0 1 3 - - - - - 14" 2 - - - -
Furor 370t 11 3 0 1 3 - - - - - 14" 2 - - - -
 

• Guns marked * are slow firing:  i.e. fire only every other turn 

# These guns were not fitted when the ship was delivered, due to a contractual dispute with the manufacturers. 
$ This ship did not take part in the battle due to engine trouble and was sunk as a blockship. 
 
Pelayo$ 9754t 7 13 12 13 20 2-12.5" 2A* 9-5.5" F 2 14" 7S 3A B E -
2-11" B*
 
Pelayo, the only relatively modern Spanish Battleship, was on its way to the Pacific when war broke out. It was recalled whilst passing through the Suez 
canal.
 
Other US ships serving in the Caribbean

Guns Armour
Name Tonnage Speed FV DV GPts Cost Anti TT
Main Secondary tpd Vitals Turret Battery Side

Puritan 6060t 5 8 9 11 13 4-12" 2A* 6-4" F 1 - 2A B - -


Amphitrite 3990t 5 6 3 4 6 4-10" D* 2-4" F 1 - D D - -
Terror 3990t 5 6 2 5 6 4-10" B* - - 1 - E B - -
Montgomery 2094t 7 5 1 6 6 9-5" F 1 18" 3B F - - -
Detroit 2094t 7 5 1 6 6 9-5" F 1 18" 3B F - - -
Marblehead 2094t 7 5 1 6 6 9-5" F 1 18" 3B F - - -
Wilmington 1397t 6 3 0 4 4 8-4" F 1 - - - - -
Machias 1177t 6 3 0 4 4 8-4" F 1 - - - - -
Porter 165t 11 2 0 1 2 18" 3 - - - -
Foote 142t 10 2 0 1 2 18" 3 - - - -
Winslow 142t 10 2 0 1 2 18" 3 - - - -
 
Battles of the Spanish American War 
 
1895  Rebellion starts against Spanish rule in Cuba 
 
15th February 1898  US 2nd Class battleship Maine blows up in Havana harbour whilst on a courtesy visit. US press accuses Spanish of planting 
a mine, although it is now generally believed that the likely cause was a fire or an accidental ammunition explosion. 
 
25th February 1898  Commodore George Dewey commanding the Asiatic Squadron ordered to prepare an attack on the Spanish Phillipines. 
 
25th April 1898   US declares war on the Spanish 
 
29th April 1898  Admiral Pascual Cervera leaves Cape Verde Islands with 4 armoured cruisers plus 3 destroyers bound for San Juan, 
Puerto Rico, causing concern at the risk to cities and US merchant shipping. Evading the blockade Admiral Cervera 
slipped into Santiago de Cuba. 
 
1st May 1898   Dewey arrives in Manila Bay. Sweeping past the guns of Manila at about 5000 yards range, his force consisting of 4 
cruisers and 2 gunboats attacked the Spanish fleet whilst still at anchor. Admiral Patricio Montojo, whose weak force of 1 
modern cruiser plus 1 obsolete wooden hulled cruiser and 7 gunboats, was anchored in a line off Cavite naval station. At 
0540 Admiral Dewey ordered his squadron to open fire, closing the range to 2000 yards in a series of passes, before 
withdrawing when advised that they were running shot of ammunition. After eating breakfast at 1116 the Americans 
closed again and finished off the Spanish Squadron, The firing ceasing at 1230. The US squadron then anchored in Manila 
Bay, but it was not until August that US troops captured Manila after a it had been agreed to arrange a show of 
resistance. 
 
11th May 1898  A US squadron consisting of the gunboats WILMINGTON, MACHIAS, and torpedo boats FOOTE and WINSLOW entered 
Cardenas Bay to attack 3 small Spanish gunboats moored there but were driven off. 
 
12th May 1898  Rear Admiral William Sampson led a squadron consisting of the battleships IOWA and INDIANA, armoured cruiser NEW 
YORK, the cruisers MONTGOMERY and DETROIT, monitors AMPHITRITE and TERROR and the torpedo boat PORTER in a 
bombardment of San Juan, Puerto Rico damaging the Moro Castle, Fort San Cristobal and the Ballaja Barracks.  
1st June 1898   Rear Admiral William Sampson commanding the main US force in the Caribbean establishes a blockade of Santiago. An 
attempt to block the channel on the 2nd June fails.  
 
6th June 1898  US cruiser MARBLEHEAD arrives in Guantanamo Bay and cuts the telegraph cables isolating Guantanamo city. Marines 
are landed on the 10th June. 
 
22nd June 1898  Old slow Spanish cruiser ISABEL II attempted to break out of San Juan, Puerto Rico assisted by the destroyer TERROR 
which had been detached from Admiral Cervera’s squadron with engine trouble. THE US auxiliary cruiser ST. PAUL 
disabled TERROR which was beached and forced ISABEL II to turn back. 
 
  US army under General Shafter land at Daiquiri and advance towards Santiago. 
    
1st July 1898   The army makes an unsuccessful frontal assault on the defences of Santiago.  
 
3rd July 1898  Battle of Santiago de Cuba  
The Spanish authorities in Havana ordered Admiral Cervera to break out. The Spanish, although suffering from defective 
boilers and poor quality coal which affected their speed, steamed out of the harbour at 0935. Admiral Sampson had left 
in NEW YORK to liaise with the army commander whilst the battleship MASSACHUSETTS was at Guantanamo Bay, coaling 
ship, leaving Commodore Winfield Scott Schley in command. The US Squadron was scattered in a semi‐circle round the 
mouth of the harbour  
 
  Admiral Cervera in the INFANTA MARIA TERESA followed by VIZCAYA, steamed directly towards the Commodore Schley’s 
flagship the BROOKLYN, whilst CRISTOBAL COLON, OQUENDO and 2 the destroyers remained closer to the shore. The 
MARIA TERESA was soon on fire running itself aground at 1015 west of Santiago, the OQUENDO, VIZCAYA and two 
destroyers following suite by 1115. The fastest ship, COLON managed some 70 miles down the coast before it slowed, 
having exhausted its supply of good steam coal, and she too was run aground at 1330. Of some 8000 shells aimed at the 
Spanish a mere 120 had hit. 
  
21st July 1898  US gunboats ANNAPOLIS, TOPEKA and yacht WASP sank the Spanish sloop JORGE JUAN and forced the gunboat 
BARACOA to scuttle itself at Nipe Bay, Cuba.