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Emergency

Practitioner
Minor
Injury
Workbook
Adult and Paediatric
Modules

Mitam Barooah & Liz Bates


Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

Foreword

To optimise your learning during the two weeks of the course, we have put
together this workbook which will benefit you by preparing you for areas expected
to be covered in the course. The handbook must be handed in on the first day of
the course. All of the information required for preparation for the course and in
answering the workbook can be found in anatomy books, journals and on the
internet. A list of reading material is provided at the end of the workbook.

You will be expected to have understanding of the following and we strongly


recommend that you focus your pre-course preparation on these areas:

Your professional responsibility as an independent practitioner


Musculoskeletal – anatomy of the upper and lower limbs (including the
knowledge of muscle groups and their function, structures associated with
joint structure and movement, ligaments and their role in stability of the
joints, vascular and nerve distribution, anatomical structures in the hand)
Wound Care (including principles of wound healing and methods of wound
closure)
Issues relating to the paediatric patient (including non-accidental injury
and child protection)
Patient Group Directives used in your practice including pharmacokinetics
and pharmacodynamics of medications you use regularly.
NICE guidelines for management of Head injury
Guidelines for requesting x-rays in your Trust

(Note: Completion of this pre-course workbook will also help you to understand
and reflect on issues concerning your development as an emergency practitioner.
This will contribute to your NMC portfolio by demonstrating evidence of
progression towards a new level of competence)

Name…………………………………………………………………………

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

1 Why do you want to expand your role to become an Emergency


Practitioner?

2 What concerns do you have about expanding your practice?

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

3 Who will benefit from your role expansion and why?

4 What qualities do you think are required to achieve success as an


emergency practitioner?

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

5 As an emergency practitioner, there will be responsibilities and


competencies that will overlap with those of doctors. How do you
propose to develop, contribute and integrate within a service that
has traditionally been a “doctor’s role”?

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

6. Label the following structures within the eye.

9
10

1.

2.

3.
6
4

Give a brief description of the function of each structure:

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

7a. Give a brief definition of the following:

Pharmacokinetics

First Pass effect (can use a diagram)

Bioavailability

List factors which may modify drug response

List methods of administration for medications (e.g., oral)

Give a definition of Pharmacodynamics.

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

7b. List the PGD’s used regularly within your department.

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

8. Describe the wounds shown below.

Wound (a):

Patient is a builder;
wound on dominant
hand caused by
Stanley knife.

(a)

Wound (b):

Injury following an
assault

(b)

Wound (c):

Patient trying to
separate dogs
fighting, bitten on
lower leg

(c)

Taking into consideration the brief history given with each


pictures, answer the following:

Would you close the wound? Why?


What methods of closure can you use? Mention their
advantages and disadvantages.
What complications would you look out for?

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

Wound a:

Wound b:

Wound c:

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

9. Reviewing the anatomy of the upper and lower limbs will optimise
your learning during the course. Name the anatomical term
corresponding to each number in the following eight radiographs.

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

10. What do you see in the picture? Describe how this may heal.
Outline different methods of immobilisation. Highlight potential
complications.

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

11. How would you describe this X-Ray if you are referring it to a
specialist over the phone?

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

12 Identify the nerve supply for the following:


The palm of the hand, sensory innervation

1. ……………….
2. ………………
3. ………………

The dorsum of the hand, sensory innervation

1. ……………..
2. ……………
3. ……………

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

13 List the movements shown in the following sketches along with the
corresponding opposite movement.

Shoulder

Knee

Hip

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

14. Please complete the following table (continue on separate sheet if necessary):
Indications Mechanism of action Doses: Adults Methods of Side effects
& Contraindications & Children administration
Paracetamol
(ibuprofen/Diclofenac)
NSAIDs

Codeine derivatives)
(Morphine and
Opiates
(Lignocaine/Mercain)
Local Anaesthetics
and
Immunoglobulin)
Tetanus
(Toxoid

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

15. A driver of a car attends a walk in centre with a history of neck


stiffness following a rear-end shunt by another car while he was
stationary. Describe the possible injuries likely by this ‘whiplash’
mechanism, concentrating in particular on the anatomical structures
around the neck and back.

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Emergency Practitioner Minor Injury Workbook

Recommended Reading

Barnes, K. (2003) Paediatrics. A Clinical Guide for Nurse Practitioners.


London. Butterworth Heinemann
Epstein O, Perkin G, DeBono D & Cookson J (2003) Clinical Examination (3rd edition) London, Mosby
Dolan B & Holt L (1999) Accident and Emergency: Theory into Practice
London, Balliere Tindall
Edwards C, Stillman P (1995) Minor Illness or Major Disease?
London, The Pharmaceutical Press
Walsh M, Crumbie A & Reveley S (1999) Nurse Practitioners: Clinical Skills and Professional
Issues Oxford, Butterworth-Heinemann
Kumar, P. Clark M .(2005) Clinical Medicine. Saunders
Ewles,L & Simnett, I (2003) Promoting Health: A Practical Guide (4th ed)
London, Belier Tindall
Trounce J & Gould D. (2004) Clinical Pharmacology for Nurses (17th ed)
London, Churchill Livingstone
Guly HR (1996) History Taking, Examination and Record Keeping in
Emergency Medicine
Oxford, Oxford University Press.
Boynton R, Dunn E, & Stephens G (2000) Manual of Ambulatory Paediatrics
London, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Walsh, M. (2000) Nursing Frontiers: Accountability and the Boundaries of
Care. London. Butterworth Heinemann.
Prosser S, Worster B, MacGregor J, Dewar K, Runyard Applied Pharmacology
P & Fegan J (2000) Edinburgh, Mosby
Courtenay M & Butler M (1999) Nurse Prescribing: Principles and Practice
London, Greenwich Medical Media
Ford M & Munro J (2000) Introduction to Clinical Examination
Edinburgh, Churchill Livingstone
Department of Health & Home (2003) The Victoria Climbie Inquiry. London HMSO
Applegate, E. (2000) The Anatomy and Physiology Learning System (2 nd Ed).
London. Saunders

Drake, R., Wayne Vogly, A., Mitchell, A. (2004) Grays Anatomy for Students. Churchill Livingstone.
Khaw P., Shah P., Elkington, A. (2004) ABC of Eyes 4th edition. Willey Blackwell.
Ludman H., Bradley P., (2007) ABC of Ear, Nose & Throat ( 5th edition) BMJ Books
Buxton, P. (2003) ABC of Dermatology. 4th edition. Willey Blackwell.
Hastings A., Redsell S. (2006) The Good Consultation Guide for Nurses.
Radcliffe Publishing. Oxford.

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