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Integration of Step #1 of the Big 6, teaching and learning

strategies, and Web 2.0 Tools

Big6 #1: Task Definition


Teaching and Learning Strategies Web 2.0 Tools

Brainstorming – model brainstorming Wordles - illustrating class brainstorming


example as whole group, then begin Bubbl.us - brainstorming online
individual/small group brainstorming Tagxedo - use ideas to build text images
Having visual representation of student
Scaffolding the brainstorming strategy ideas can help with the organization of
helps to ensure understanding and information.
successful implementation of the process.

.
KWL chart – model process, then have Googledocs – shared document for KWL
students tell what they Know, What they Wallwisher –group and individual
want to learn and what they Learned. (last responses online
section completed after using information Popplet – shared graphic organizers
sources) Seeing /sharing prior knowledge and
questions, gives students more options for
The KWL chart gives students a direction their writing.
for the questioning process.

Rubric - for student expectations, Rubistar - create rubric online


model completed rubric and grading Roobrix – online rubric conversion tool
information Googledocs – online templates for rubric
design
Involving the students from the beginning
A rubric given at the beginning helps in the grading process shows them how
students get a clear picture of the expected their grade will be derived and helps to
outcomes. give them ownership of their process

Karen Spangler – 28 Jan 2013


I chose the Big6 inquiry model because I felt more comfortable with it than the
Super 3 or the Stripling Model of Inquiry. I decided to use the first phase of inquiry,
which is “Task Definition” or the prewriting stage of the Big6. The first teaching
strategy I selected was brainstorming, with modeling at every step, using scaffolding
to ensure understanding by the students and successful implementation of the
process. The Web 2.0 tools that I chose to support brainstorming were Wordles for
illustrating class brainstorming, Bubbl.us for brainstorming online, and Tagxedo
similar to Wordles for using ideas to build text images. I chose these tools because
having visual representation of student ideas can help with the organization of
information and be a jumping off point for questions. The second teaching strategy I
selected was a KWL chart, first modeling the process and then having students tell
what they Know, What they want to learn, and what they Learned, which they
complete after using their information sources. The KWL chart gives students a
direction for the questioning process by building on their background knowledge.
The Web 2.0 tools that I decided to use to support the KWL chart were Googledocs
where classes could share a document for KWL and participate simultaneously,
Wallwisher, a bulletin board which can be used for group and individual responses
to the KWL chart online, and Popplet another cite for shared graphic organizers. I
selected these tools because seeing and sharing prior knowledge and questions
gives students more options for their writing and a better understanding of the
topic. The last teaching strategy I chose was the Rubric to give students the
expectations, first by modeling a completed rubric and then explaining the grading
information. A rubric given at the beginning of an assignment helps students get a
clear picture of the expected outcomes. To support this strategy I selected Rubistar
to create a rubric online, Roobrix, an online rubric conversion tool, and
Googledocs, online templates for rubric design. Involving the students from the
beginning in the grading process shows them how their grade will be derived and
helps to give them ownership of their process

References:

Berger, Pam. “Student Inquiry and Web 2.0.” School Library Monthly/Volume XXVI,
Number 5/January 2010. Print.

“Build a wall.” Wallwisher. mixpanel MOBILE ANALYTICS. n.d. Web. 29 Jan 2013.
http://wallwisher.com/

Dunn, Jeff. edudemic “The 35 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You.” 8 Jul
2010. Web. 29 Jan 2013. http://edudemic.com/2010/07/the-35-best-web-2-0-
classroom-tools-chosen-by-you/

Gurney, Karen. “Online Tools for Creating Rubrics.” SMCC Web 2.0 Series.
20 Oct 2010. Web. 29 Jan 2013.
https://sites.google.com/site/smccweb2series/session-10-online-tools-for-
creating-rubric
“Search results for “rubric.” Google Drive. Google. 2013. Web. 29 Jan 2013.
https://drive.google.com/a/connections.mcdaniel.edu/templates?q=+rubric&sort=
hottest&view=public