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Observation Task 4: Development of Early Writing Skills

Table 4: Development of Early Writing Skills

Developmental Writing Stage

Supporting

Links to the ADEC

Comments

Activities

Curriculum

Link sound with hands on and develop fine motor Include more
 

Link sound with hands on and develop fine motor

Include more

Using play

dough to

formate the

skills.

creativity in

this activity

letters

Using iPad to write the letters Link sound with iPad games in helping to write the

Using iPad to write the letters

Link sound with iPad games in helping to write the right format.

Include more useful games that assess the child and help to explore his prior knowledge.

Using small Link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the The teacher

Using small

Link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the

The teacher

whiteboards

letters of the alphabet.

should draw a

and

line in the

whiteboard

Use a pencil (whiteboard

white board

markers to

marker) and hold it

so the child

practice letter

effectively to form

formation

recognizable letters, most of which are correctly formed.

can follow and know the direction

 

Suggestions for the further development of early writing skills

 

Say the letters in their name aloud as you point to them.

Get them to ‘read’ their early writing to you.

Write the story they tell you under their drawing.

Write a letter together to someone you love.

Let them see you writing talk about what you are writing about (a grocery list or writing a check).

Look together for writing everywhere street names, shop names, writing on cars and trucks.

Reflection Keep in mind children do not learn to walk or talk at the exact same age; it is a developmental process, just as it is with writing stages. As your child moves through these stages your encouragement is very important to your child. Scribbling looks like random assortment of marks on a child's paper. Sometimes the marks are large, circular, and random, and resemble drawing. Although the marks do not resemble print, they are significant because the young writer uses them to show ideas. Letter-like Symbols Letter-like forms emerge, sometimes randomly placed, and are interspersed with numbers. The children can tell about their own drawings or writings. In this stage, spacing is rarely present. Strings of Letters In the strings-of-letters phase, students write some legible letters that tell us they know more about writing. Students are developing awareness of the sound-to-symbol relationship, although they are not matching most sounds. Students usually write in capital letters and have not yet begun spacing. Beginning Sounds Emerge At this stage, students begin to see the differences between a letter and a word, but they may not use spacing between words. Their message makes sense and matches the picture, especially when they choose the topic. Consonants Represent Words Students begin to leave spaces between their words and may often mix upper- and lowercase letters in their writing. They begin using punctuation and usually write sentences that tell ideas. Initial, Middle, and Final Sounds Students in this phase may spell correctly some sight words, siblings' names, and environmental print, but other words are spelled the way they sound.

Children easily hear sounds in words, and their writing is very readable. Transitional Phases. This writing is readable and approaches conventional spelling. The students' writing is interspersed with words that are in standard form and have standard letter patterns. Standard Spelling Students in this phase can spell most words correctly and are developing an understanding of root words, compound words, and contractions. This understanding helps students spell similar words. Help students stay on the right track by providing opportunities for frequent self-checks and plenty of other formative assessments to that they can monitor their own progress. Make it easy for students to be aware of how well they are doing, and you will make it easy for them to stay engaged in a learning activity. Create activities and assignments that are challenging but attainable. Students should have to work and think to succeed, but the potential for success should always be clearly evident.