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Power Monitoring and

Control Systems
Catalog

Class 3000
Table of Content s

Power Monitoring and Control Systems Introduction .................. Page 4

Power Meters .............................................................................. Page 8

Circuit Monitors ........................................................................... Page 12

System Manager™ 3000 Software ............................................. Page 18

Ethernet Gateway ....................................................................... Page 24

Digital Relay ................................................................................ Page 28

MICROLOGIC® Circuit Breaker Interface .................................... Page 34

LIFE-GARD® Model 85A Temperature Controller Interface ......... Page 36

Power Management Services ..................................................... Page 38

Year 2000 Compliance ................................................................ Page 42

Suggested System Specifications ............................................... Page 43

Glossary of Terms ....................................................................... Page 68


POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Monitoring and Control


Systems Introduction
Profitability with power monitoring
If you knew where and how to cut peak demand power usage, you could
lower your electric bills and your company’s cost of product. But how can
you, when you have no idea how your demand patterns relate to produc-
tion?
Perhaps you would like to stretch this year’s budget by deferring the
purchase of a new substation, but you are not sure you have enough
capacity to accommodate the vital new process equipment you need to
install. Take a chance and the whole line could go down–at who knows
what cost in downtime. If you only knew where and how much excess
capacity you have.
Electric utility deregulation
is changing the way you
buy electricity. But do you
know all you need to know
about your electrical
needs, including the
quality of power needed,
in addition to knowing
when and how much
power is needed?
Electricity–once consid-
ered an uncontrollable The POWERLOGIC system provides the information
cost of doing business–is you need to control utility costs and, perhaps more
brought under control important, downtime costs.
through power monitoring
and control systems. With
a power monitoring and control system, a facility engineer has the ability to
locate trouble spots and prevent outages or downtime, as well as deter-
mine energy use by department or product line.
The POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring and Control System from Square D
is an innovative total system solution to managing electricity and improving
the reliability of power distribution equipment. The POWERLOGIC system
combines microprocessor-based instrumentation and control to provide
advanced features for industrial, commercial and utility electrical systems.
The POWERLOGIC system’s exceptionally accurate instruments, high-
speed communications network, and fully integrated power monitoring
application software make these benefits possible.

Controlling costs to maximize profits


One of the keys to maximizing profit is by controlling costs. A power
monitoring system helps you do that in two ways. It allows you to better
know the impact electrical costs have on your operating costs, and gives
you the information you need to purchase electricity more cost effectively.

Reduction of downtime
Minimizing downtime is critical to the profitability every operation. Unex-
pected power outages and having key pieces of equipment shut down
suddenly is expensive due to the time required to find the source of the
problem, correct it, and get production started again. The loss of product
adds additional expense. The key is to identify potential problems and
correct them proactively. For example, the current on a critical motor may
From the personal computer on your desk, you can run have become higher than normal. A bearing may be failing. The power
the world’s most powerful monitoring and control system: monitoring system’s overload alarm alerts the operator of the situation so
the POWERLOGIC system. the problem can be identified and corrected with a minimum of downtime.

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Power Monitoring an d Contro l


Systems Introduction
Improve power quality
Power quality concerns include making sure the power delivered to critical
machines and processes is both clean and dependable. Computers and
microprocessor-based control systems are very sensitive to the quality of
power they use. The first step to solving power quality problems is to
determine the magnitude of the problem. This is one of the functions of the
power monitoring system.

Lower energy costs


The power monitoring system can help lower energy costs in several ways.
First, demand charges can often be reduced through the analysis of
maximum and minimum readings and reviewing time and trend plots of
data logs. Alarms can be triggered to warn when the system is in danger of
creating new peaks. Second, power factor penalties can be reduced by
using power factor correction capacitors (PFCs). But to use PFCs correctly,
you need to know what your power factor is and the harmonic content of
the circuit. The power monitoring system can be used to determine when
and where capacitors should be used. Finally, the POWERLOGIC system
provides you with the information about your
power requirements so you can take full advan-
tage of the electrical utitlity deregulation opportu-
nities.

Allocate energy costs


More and more companies want to know not only
how much energy they are using, but where they
are using it. Competitive pressures necessitate
knowing all the costs associated with a product,
including the cost of power to produce it. In
addition, efforts to closely manage energy costs
are easier to evaluate when the costs are broken
down by area. The POWERLOGIC system can
create the trend plots and reports allocating the
energy costs the way you need them.

Better utilization of power distribution


equipment
A common question asked is “Does the existing
distribution equipment have enough capacity?” A
power monitoring system with the
POWERLOGIC software displays the data logs
in the form of time trend plots. Peak information
from date and time stamps of maximum readings
is also useful. This shows which distribution
equipment is under utilized, or near overload. All
this information can be used to obtain the
maximum use of existing equipment, and to
more accurately design future distribution
equipment.

Special monitoring and control systems


Power monitoring is often just part of the
solution. Monitoring other utilities such as gas,
water, and steam may be needed. Sequence of
events monitoring can be critical. Monitoring and
control of generators and transfer switches may
be required. Automatic control systems for Typical POWERLOGIC power monitoring and control system.

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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Monitoring and Control


Systems Introduction
shedding and restoring loads may be key to minimizing energy costs or
maintaining critical circuits. There are POWERLOGIC solutions for all these
systems.

How do power monitoring and control systems work?


Power monitoring systems monitor the flow of electrical power in circuits
throughout the plant. In the POWERLOGIC system, highly accurate circuit
monitors and power meters are dedicated to power monitoring, while other
compatible devices collect additional equipment information from protective
relays, circuit breakers, transformer temperature controllers, and
panelboards.
Electrical data–such as current, power, energy, waveforms, and equipment
status–is passed over a data network to one or more personal computers.
The personal computers run power monitoring application software that
retrieves, stores, organizes, and displays real-time circuit information in
simple, usable formats.
The information collected and stored in a power monitoring system helps
operate a facility more efficiently. Of course, the quality of the data depends
on the accuracy of the instrumentation and the usability of the display
formats. A POWERLOGIC system provides this accuracy in a format that is
easy to use and understand.

Accurate monitoring devices


Each POWERLOGIC monitoring device is a multi-function, digital
instrumentation, data acquisition device capable of replacing a variety of
meters, relays, transducers, and other components.
POWERLOGIC system devices can be integrated with Square D’s
electrical power distribution products or retrofit into existing equipment. The
result is a distributed network of intelligent, accurate monitoring devices
reporting to one or more centralized locations.

Flexible connectivity and network topologies


All POWERLOGIC-compatible devices are equipped with an RS-485
network communication port for integration into a POWERLOGIC power
monitoring and control system. Up to 32 devices can be daisy-chained and
directly connected to a personal computer, system display, Ethernet
gateway (TCP/IP and OSI), or POWERLOGIC network
interface module (PNIM). Square D can provide
industrially hardened local area networks, or connect to
existing networks, either local or wide area. Other
communication options such as fiber optics and
modems, including telephone and radio, are also
available. The POWERLOGIC system makes it easy to
allow localized, distributed, remote, and any mixed
network combination.

Powerful software solutions


The POWERLOGIC application software series offers a
variety of power monitoring solutions, allowing you to
monitor, display, and store vast amounts of information
No other monitor gives you more standard communications capabilities
than the POWERLOGIC circuit monitor. And once the data gets to your from all of the POWERLOGIC compatible devices.
computer, there’s no better way to make sure of all the information than
System Manager™ 3000 software. Organized and usable information
The POWERLOGIC application software series
automatically integrates real-time circuit information into
organized and usable formats. Without any custom

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Power Monitoring an d Contro l


Systems Introduction
programming and very minimal setup, the user can readily access real-time
and historical data, time trend plots, alarms, waveform plots, power quality
information, data logging, output control, and more.

Evaluation, engineering, and support


Square D’s Power Management Organization is more than power
monitoring devices and software. It includes highly trained and capable
engineers evaluating and providing solutions to power quality issues. To
ensure smooth installation and system commissioning, our application
engineering services are available to oversee the project from design to
completion. The POWERLOGIC University provides users with the training
needed to get the most out of their system. And finally, the Technical
Support Group provides the answers to the questions to ensure smooth
operation of your power monitoring system.

Information is power
If you can’t measure it, you can’t control it. And controlling costs is critical.
POWERLOGIC power monitoring systems provide you with the information
you need to make the sound business decisions needed in today’s
marketplace.

See all those meters? A single POWERLOGIC power meter or circuit monitor can do their work and that of many others.
Yet it costs less than what you’d pay for just a few of them.

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Power Meters

Features
Economical Metering Ease of Installation 2-Line LCD Display
Solution • Display mounts in • Mounts back-to-back
• A single, economical panel cutout of or up to 50 feet from
device that replaces a standard 1% analog power meter module
full complement of meters
analog meters • Use as a portable
• Separate meter and power meter program-
• Accurate true RMS display modules allows mer
metering of distorted flexible mounting
currents and voltages options • Provides setup and
up to the 31st display of metering
• Easy retrofit into information
harmonic
existing power
• THD readings for each equipment • Provides optical
metered phase of isolation from 600 V
metering connection
The POWERLOGIC current and voltage to Direct Connect Up to
assist in measurement 600 V
Power Meter is of power quality data Designed for Reliability
• No PTs required up to
• Tested for compliance
capable of replacing a • Neutral current 600 V
with UL and CSA
monitoring to detect
• No separate control requirements
full complement of overload neutrals
power required on up
to 600 V circuits • FCC compliant
basic analog meters. • Individual machine
(Class A)
load monitoring
This cost effective, • Available feeder Communications • CE marking
capacity monitoring Options
high performance • Vibration and
(peak demand current) • POWERLOGIC temperature tested
meter can operate as communications for
• Load monitoring for
integration with a
predictive mainte-
a stand-alone device POWERLOGIC power
nance/troubleshooting
monitoring system
or as part of a • Remote meter reading
• Modbus RTU
and data logging from
POWERLOGIC Power communication for
a personal computer
integration with other
using POWERLOGIC
Monitoring System to systems
System Manager
software and RS-485 • KYZ pulse initiator for
help reduce energy communications communication to
and maintenance energy management
systems
costs by providing

valuable power

information.

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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Meter s

Basic Metering Solution and More Meter Feature Values Model Model
PM-600 PM-620
The POWERLOGIC Power Meter is designed for use in basic power Current, per phase A, B, C ● ●
Current, neutral N ●
metering applications. It can replace conventional metering devices such Volts, L-L A-B, C-B, C-A ● ●
as ammeters, voltmeters, and watt-hour meters while providing powerful Volts, L-N A-N, B-N, C-N ● ●
capabilities not offered by analog metering. The power meter’s true rms Real power (kW) A, B, C, total ● ●
Reactive power (kVAR) A, B, C, total ● ●
readings (31st harmonic response) accurately reflect non-linear circuit
Apparent power (kVA) A, B, C, total ● ●
loading more than conventional analog metering devices. The power meter Power factor (true) A, B, C, total ● ●
calculates the neutral current, which can assist in identifying overloaded Frequency ● ●

neutrals due to either unbalanced single phase loads or triplen harmonics. Current demand A, B, C, N, present & peak ●
Real power demand (kWd) 3 phase total, present & peak ●
Circuits can be closely monitored for available capacity by keeping track of Reactive power demand (kVARd) 3 phase total, present & peak ●
the peak average demand current. Accurate circuit loading information is Apparent power demand (kVAd) 3 phase total, present & peak ●
essential to get the most out of existing power equipment while maintaining Real energy (kWh) 3 phase total ● ●
● ●
power system reliability. Reactive energy (kVARh) 3 phase total
Apparent energy (kVAh) 3 phase total ● ●

The power meter provides a full complement of accurate true rms metering Energy accumulation modes Signed, absolute, energy in,
energy out ● ●
values through the optional display, or via the standard RS-485 communi- KYZ output ● ●
cation port to a POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring and Control System. A RS-485 POWERLOGIC and
Modbus RTU communications ● ●
model PM-600 power meter module replaces a full complement of basic Date/time stamping Peak demands, power up/restart,

analog meters including a watt-hour meter. The model PM-620 power resets
THD, voltage & current A, B, C ●
meter module extends the metering capabilities to report power and current
POWERLOGIC Power Meter Feature Comparison
readings including the date and time of occurrence. The model PM-620
also provides neutral current and per phase THD for each metered current
and voltage. Refer to the tables for information about the metering values
reported by each model. A KYZ output is included to communicate energy
and demand information to third party energy management systems.

Mounting Flexibility
The power meter’s small size and variety of mounting configurations allow
it to be readily installed in new equipment or retrofit into existing equipment.
The power meter module can be mounted onto a
35mm DIN rail, or it can be mounted on any flat
surface using its four mounting feet. For added
simplicity in retrofit installations, the panel
mounting hole patterns for both the power meter
module and the optional power meter display
match the conventional 4-inch ammeter/voltme-
ter spacing so the meter and the display can be
mounted back-to-back on opposite sides of a
panel surface. In metering installations of 600 V
Power Meter Module
and below, the power meter provides additional
savings in both cost and mounting space by eliminating the need for PTs
and control power transformers.

Versatile Display
The optional power meter display mounts in the same space as a conven-
tional 4-inch ammeter and is connected to the power
meter module with a communication cable. With the
2-line by 16-character LCD display, the user can
view metering data, and access the password
protected meter setup and resets menus. Since the
power meter display can be mounted up to 50 feet
Power Meter Display away from the power meter module, power metering
can now be installed in tight equipment spaces
without sacrificing convenient and affordable local display. The communi-
cations port on the power meter display is optically isolated from the 600 V
metering connections.

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Power Meters

Power Meter Power Meter


Display Module
(PMD-32) (PM-600 or PM-620)
4

2 3

Power Meter Module and Display Features


1 2-line x 16 character LCD display
2 Tactile function keys
3 Multi-conductor communication cable (up to 50 feet)
4 Control power, metering KYZ and communications connections
5 Panel or DIN rail mounting
6 Removable terminal shield

Powerful Functionality
The power meter accepts inputs from standard 5 A CTs and has full scale
input of 10 A. The voltage inputs can be directly connected to 3 phase
circuits of 600 V and below without the need for PTs or CTs. For higher
voltage circuits, the power meter accepts a full range of PT primary values
with control power derived from the PTs or from a separate source of ac or
dc control power. Setup and resets are password protected and are easily
done through the power meter display or via the network using System
Manager™ software, releases SMS-3000, SMS-1500, and PMX-1500.
From the optional display, POWERLOGIC or Modbus RTU protocols can
be selected. No DIP switches or other hardware adjustments are required
for setup. All readings are scaled to their actual values without the need for
a multipler.

POWERLOGIC System Compatibility


The power meter supports standard POWERLOGIC RS-485 communica-
tions up to 19,200 Baud with communications links up to 10,000 feet. A
meter can quickly be installed into any existing POWERLOGIC system.
The power meter has been fully integrated into the latest POWERLOGIC
application software, System Manager software, releases SMS-3000,
SMS-1500, and PMX-1500. This software enables users to manage their
electrical distribution systems by providing tabular and graphical data
displays, alarms, real time and historical time trend tables and graphs, and
reports. Power meter setup and reset operations and wiring diagnostics
can also be performed from a remote personal computer using the soft-
ware.
POWERLOGIC power monitoring devices and systems assist in equipment
monitoring for cost allocation, troubleshooting, predictive maintenance,
planning, and more. The lower installed cost of the power meter makes it
possible for facilities to monitor many smaller, less critical feeder circuits
enabling whole facility power monitoring.

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Typical Wiring Diagram* Technical Specifications


Metering Specifications
Current Inputs
Current Range ................ 0–10A ac
Nominal Current .............. 5 A ac
Overcurrent Withstand .... 500 A, 1 second
Burden ............................ 0.15 VA
Voltage Inputs
Voltage Range ................ 20–600 V ac
Nominal Voltage .............. 208/120, 480/
277, 600/347 V
rms
Input Impedance ............. >2 Megohms
Frequency Range
(50/60 Hz) ....................... 45–65 Hz
Accuracy
Current ............................ 0.25%
Voltage ............................ 0.25%
Power .............................. 0.50%
Energy ............................ 0.50%
Demand .......................... 0.50%
Power Factor ................... 1.00%
Frequency 50/60 Hz........ 0.1 Hz
Control Power Input Specifications
Input Range, ac ................. 90–600 V ac
Frequency Range .............. 45–65 Hz
Input Range, dc ................. 100–300 V dc
* 3-Phase, 4-Wire WYE. (3-Wire Delta Burden ............................... 5 VA Nominal
and other system types supported.) Temperature Specifications
Meter Module (operating) .. 0 to 60°C
Meter Display (operating) .. 0 to 55°C

Dimensions
3.81
6.03 96.7
153

4.50
114

4.62
117

Ordering Information
Class Type Description
3.63 INCHES
92.1 MILLIMETERS 3020 PM600 Power Meter Module, Basic
Instrumentation
3020 PM620 Power Meter Module, Basic
Instrumentation, plus Demand,
4.50 THD, D/T Stamping, Neutral
114
Current
3020 PMD32 Power Meter Display with 1 Foot
Cable
1.26
4.50 32.0 3020 SC104 Optional 4 Foot Cable
114
3020 SC112 Optional 12 Foot Cable
3020 SC130 Optional 30 Foot Cable

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Circuit Monitors

Features

• True rms metering • I/O modules support System Highlights


(31st harmonic) configurable KYZ
pulse output • Supports multiple PCs
• Accepts standard CT
• Setpoint controlled • Powerful software
and PT inputs
alarm/relay functions solutions
• High accuracy—0.2%
• On-board event and • Easily retrofit
current and voltage
data logging • 500K Baud, high
• Over 50 displayed
• Waveform and event speed network
meter values
captures, user- • Programmable
• Min/max displays for selectable for 4, 12, controller support
metered data 24, 36, 48 or 60 cycles
• Fiber-optic, radio, and
• Power quality readings • High-speed, triggered modem communica-
—THD, k-factor, crest event capture tions
factor
• Programming • Ethernet interfaces
• Harmonic magnitudes language for applica-
and angles through the tion specific solutions • Building automation
31st harmonic system compatible
• Downloadable
• Current and voltage firmware • MV-90™ billing
sag/swell detection compatible
and recording • System connections
– 3-phase, 3-wire delta
The POWERLOGIC • On-board clock/ – 3-phase, 4-wire wye
calendar – Metered or calcu-
Circuit Monitor is a
• Easy front panel setup lated neutral
multi-function, digital (password protected) – Other metering
connections
instrumentation, data • RS-485 communica-
tions standard • Optional voltage/power
module for direct
acquisition and control • Front panel, RS-232 connection to 480 Y/
optical communica- 277 V
device capable of tions port standard
• Optional 18–60 Vdc
replacing a variety of • Modular, field control power
installable analog and
meters, relays, digital I/O • Wide operating
temperature range
transducers and other • 1 ms time stamping of (–25 to 70° C)
status inputs for
components. sequence-of-events • UL Listed and CSA
recording Certified, CE marking

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Comprehensive Metering Instrumentation Summary


The POWERLOGIC Circuit Monitor installs on a 3-phase circuit like a Real-Time Readings
conventional watthour meter, but it delivers far more information. In fact, • Current (per phase, N, G, 3Ø)
the circuit monitor can replace more than 100 conventional indicating • Voltage (L-L, L-N)
meters. All circuit monitors perform highly accurate, true rms metering. The • Real Power (per phase, 3Ø)
CM-2050 offers comprehensive metering with 1% accuracy on current and • Reactive Power (per phase, 3Ø)
voltage. Models CM-2150 and higher provide 0.2% accuracy on current • Apparent Power (per phase, 3Ø)
• Power Factor (per phase, 3Ø)
and voltage, and 0.4% accuracy on power and energy.
• Frequency
• Temperature (internal ambient)*
Protective Functions • THD (current and voltage)
A circuit monitor equipped with an I/O module can perform certain motor • K-Factor (per phase)
protective functions. These include phase loss, phase reversal, under Demand Readings
voltage, and more. Once the circuit monitor detects the abnormal condition, • Demand Current (per-phase, present, peak)
the output relay switches within 1–3 seconds. Each protective function can • Average Power Factor (3Ø total)
operate one or more form-C, 10 ampere relays. Each relay can be acti- • Demand Real Power (3Ø total)
vated by multiple protective functions. These functions are password • Demand Reactive Power (3Ø total)*
• Demand Apparent Power (3Ø total)
protected.
• Coincident Readings*
• Predicted Demands*
Power Quality Readings
Energy Readings
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) for current, voltage, and k-factor readings • Accumulated Energy, Real
indicate potential power quality problems which, unchecked, could disrupt • Accumulated Energy, Reactive
critical processes or damage equipment. • Accumulated Energy, Apparent*
• Bi-directional Readings*
Programming Capabilities Power Analysis Values*
The CM-2450 Circuit Monitor is programmed using simple math functions, • Crest Factor (per phase)
timers, and compare statements to customize data logging, control • K-Factor Demand (per phase)
functions, and more. For example, you could write a program that logs data • Displacement Power Factor (per phase, 3Ø)
by exception rather than at regular intervals, thus maximizing the circuit • Fundamental Voltages (per phase)
• Fundamental Currents (per phase)
monitor’s memory. Meter values can be analyzed in the circuit monitor and • Fundamental Real Power (per phase)
summarized in daily, weekly, and monthly reports. • Fundamental Reactive Power (per phase)
• Harmonic Power
Easy Setup • Unbalance (current and voltage)
Basic circuit monitor setup can be performed from either the front of the • Phase Rotation
circuit monitor, or a personal computer running POWERLOGIC application * Available via communications only.
software. The PC connects to the circuit monitor using either the system
network or an optical communications interface. No thumbwheel or DIP
switches are involved; therefore, after installation, setup parameters such
as the unit address, CT ratio, PT ratio, and baud rate can be configured
without exposing personnel to live conductors. For security, all setup
information is password protected.

Flexible Communications
Optically isolated RS-485 communications connect a network of circuit
monitors into a power monitoring and control system. The industrially
hardened network communicates at speeds up to 500K Baud. It allows a
virtually unlimited number of devices to communicate, including circuit
monitors, multiple personal computers, POWERLOGIC trip units for low
voltage power circuit breakers, MICROLOGIC® solid state circuit breakers,
and other compatible devices.

Extended Memory Options


Circuit monitors provide different amounts of non-volatile memory. For
example, the CM-2452 can store more than 180,000 values, including
dates and times. The memory can be allocated among an event log, a
waveform capture log, an event capture log, and up to 14 data logs. The
table on the bottom of page 14 shows a typical example of how the user

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might configure the available memory for various models.

Alarm/Relay Functions
1 2 Circuit monitors can detect over 100 alarm situations, including over/under
conditions, status input changes, and phase unbalance conditions. Each
6 alarm condition can be set to automatically operate one or more circuit
3
5 monitor relays. Multiple alarms can be assigned to each relay. Up to three
7 form-C, 10 A mechanical relays and one solid-state output are available.
4
8 On-Board Alarm/Event Logging
9 When an alarm occurs, the circuit monitor can log the event type, date and
time, and the most extreme reading during the pick-up delay. When the
10 alarm condition drops out, the dropout date/time and the most extreme
reading during the entire event will be logged. The size of the event log can
be user configured.

Data Logging
Circuit monitors are available with non-volatile memory for storing meter
read-ings at regular intervals. A user can configure the size and structure of
up to 14 independent data logs to record metered data at intervals from 1
Front Panel Features minute to 24 hours. Each data log entry can contain up to 100 values
1 Six-digit LED display (including date/time). Models CM-2150 and -2250 store up to 5,632 values.
2 Kilo/mega units LEDs Models CM-2350 and -2450 store up to 51,200 values. Model CM-2452
stores over 180,000 values.
3 Meter indication LEDs

4 Setup/reset parameters Downloadable Firmware


5 Phase indication LEDs The circuit monitor is designed to take advantage of technological ad-
vances. As Square D introduces more powerful versions of each circuit
6 Phase select button
monitor, upgrade kits allow the user to install the new capabilities without
7 Select meter buttons changing wiring or hardware. This is possible because the circuit monitor
8 Mode indication LEDs
has downloadable firmware. The new firmware is transmitted from a PC
into the circuit monitor, using the front optical communications port or the
9 Mode select button rear RS-485 port. The equipment containing the monitor does not have to
10 Optical communications port be de-energized. This allows you to keep your circuit monitors up to date
with the latest enhancements, minimizing the fear of obsolescence.
More than 50 metered values plus extensive
minimum and maximum data can be viewed from Field Installable I/O Modules
the large 6-digit LED display.
Field installable input/output modules provide maximum flexibility, while
keeping the costs for an application at a minimum. An I/O module can be
easily installed on the back of the circuit monitor. Seven different I/O
modules are available. The modules provide various combinations of digital
and analog I/O, ranging from 1 digital input and 1 digital output to 4 digital

Typical Memory Configuration➀


CM-2050 CM-2150 CM-2250 CM-2350/2450 CM-2452
Event Log N/A 200 Events 200 Events 500 Events 1500 Events
1 Data Log N/A 8 Days 8 Days 40 Days 120 Days
Waveform Captures➁ N/A N/A 1 3➂ 9
Event Captures➁ N/A N/A 1 3➂ 13√
➀ The relative size of log files is user-defined. This table illustrates a typical memory configuration with one data log
that stores the following data hourly: 3Ø avg. amps, volts (L-L, L-N), PF, kW, kVAR, freq., 3Ø demand for amps, kW,
kVA, and kWH and kVARH.
➁ Waveform & event captures are stored in non-volatile memory in the CM-2350 and CM-2450. The exact number of
waveforms and event captures that can be stored depends on how much memory is allocated to event & data logs.
➂ Up to 20 waveform captures or 8 12-cycle event captures can be stored in the CM-2350 and -2450, depending on
memory allocation.
√ The CM-2452 can store up to 60 waveform captures, or 28 12-cycle event captures can be stored in the CM-2350
and -2450, depending on memory allocation.

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Ci rc u i t M o n i tor s

inputs, 4 digital outputs, 4 analog inputs, and 4 analog outputs.


Two inputs and one output perform special functions. Status input S1 can
be configured to accept a demand synch pulse from a utility demand meter.
Status input S2 is a high-speed input; it can be connected to an external
relay to trigger the circuit monitor’s event capture. The KYZ solid-state
output is ideal for pulse initiator applications. The form C, 10 amp me-
chanical relay outputs are extremely flexible—each can be configured for
remote (external) or circuit monitor (internal) control. In addition, each
output can be configured for normal, latched, timed, or one of six different
pulse initiator modes. The analog inputs are field convertible from 0–5 Vdc
to 4–20 mA.

Waveform Capture
Square D pioneered the concept of “waveform capture.” Circuit monitors
use a patented, high-speed sampling technique to sample 64 times per
cycle on all current and
voltage signals simulta-
neously. The captured
waveforms are stored in
the circuit monitor
memory for retrieval
and display by POW-
ERLOGIC application
software. Waveform
captures are triggered
internally or externally.
A personal computer
can send a signal over
the communications
POWERLOGIC software can show all phase voltage network or through the
and current waveforms simultaneously, or a single optical communications
waveform with a data block containing harmonics port. An external signal,
through the 31st. for example, from an
overcurrent relay, can
be received through a high-speed input. The waveform capture can also be
triggered internally by any of over 100 user-defined alarm conditions,
including high or low power factor, %THD, or phase loss.

Sag/Swell Detection
The circuit monitor can continuously monitor for sags and swells on any
metered voltage or current. This feature can help detect and analyze
troublesome voltage disturbances that can cause costly equipment down
time. The circuit monitor detects sags and swells based on user-defined
setpoints and delays (in cycles). When the circuit monitor detects a voltage
or current disturbance, it performs an event capture to record the distur-
bance. This capture is configurable for 12, 24, 36, 48, or 60 cycles. It is
performed using the same patented, 64 samples-per-cycle sampling rate
as the waveform capture. The user selects the number of pre-event cycles,
ranging from 2 to 10 cycles. Thus, the event capture shows the circuit both
before and after the disturbance. The event can be date and time stamped
to the millisecond, and recorded in the event log.

Mounting Options
POWERLOGIC software can display sag/swell data
In addition to the standard flush mounting, several other mounting options captured by the circuit monitor. This screen shows
are available. For applications requiring an indoor general purpose surface a voltage sag experienced from a single-phase
mounted (NEMA 1) enclosure, a 3090 SMA-220 is used. The circuit operation of a recloser.

SQUARE D 15
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Circuit Moni tors

monitor mounts through the door of the enclosure, providing easy access
to the rear of the monitor. The enclosure is deep enough to accommodate
options, including I/O
modules and voltage
power modules.
For applications where
depth in the equipment
enclosure is critical,
POWERLOGIC provides
the 3090 CMA-100 and
3090 CMA-110 adapters.
The CMA-100 reduces
The 3090 SMA-220 (left) and the 3090 CMA-100 provide the depth requirements by
convenient alternatives to flush panel mounting. extending the circuit
monitor beyond the front of the equipment. The CMA110 allows the
voltage/power module and some I/O modules to be mounted off of the back
of the circuit monitor.

Control Power Options


In addition to CT and PT inputs, the circuit monitor requires control power.
The circuit monitor accepts a wide range of voltages including 120/240 Vac
nominal or 125/250 Vdc nominal. When the system voltage is 480 Y/277 V,
an optional 3090 VPM-277-C1 Voltage/Power Module can be used. This
add-on module eliminates the need for PTs and provides control power.
The optional 3090 CPM-48 Control Power Module is used when 18–60 Vdc
is available. A 3090 RTM-317 Ride Through Module is also available which
provides backup control power for up to 8 seconds depending on the
presence of I/O modules. These modules can be conveniently mounted on
the back of a circuit monitor or on a nearby flat surface. To complete the
offering, Square D manufactures a complete line of control power trans-
formers.

Optical Communications Interface


The circuit monitor has an optical communications port built into the front
panel as a standard feature. Using this port, a portable computer with an
optical communications interface (OCI-2000) can retrieve data from the
circuit monitor. The OCI-2000 mounts magnetically to the circuit monitor
and provides a
standard RS-232
interface. This
interface can be used
An I/O module
by engineers and and either a
maintenance person- voltage/power
nel to retrieve module, a control
captured waveforms, power module, or a
event and data logs, ride through module
and other information can mount on the
back of the circuit
without connecting to
monitor.
the network.

It’s easy to tap into a circuit


monitor using a PC and an
optical communications
interface.

16 SQUARE D
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Ci rc u i t M o n i tor s

Dimensions Typical Wiring Diagram*


CTs (5 Amp Secondaries)
9.14 5.09 AØ
222 129 4.58
.56 BØ
116 14 Line Load
.83 CØ
21 3.15 N
80
VDS
Kilo
Mega

o AMMETER (A) [CT Primary] 3-PHASE Fuse


o VOLTMETER, L-L (V) [PT Primary] A (A-B) WYE PT
PHASE Fuses CONNECTION
o VOLTMETER, L-N (V) [Sys. Type] B (B-C)
o WATTMETER (W) [Dmd. Int.] C (C-A)
(120 V L-N CPT
o VARMETER (VAr) [WH/Pulse]
N
Secondaries) (120 or 240 Vac
o VA METER (VA) [Address] Secondary, 14 VA)
o POWER FACTOR METER [Baud Rate]
o FREQUENCY METER (Hz) [Nom. Freq.] SELECT
METER
o DEMAND AMMETER (A) [Reset] [Value]
o DEMAND POWER (W) [Reset]
o DEMAND POWER (VA) [Reset] Fuses
o WATTHOUR METER
o VARHOUR METER
[Reset]
[Reset]
METERS
MIN
12.04
o THD, CURRENT (%) [Rst. Min/Max] MAX 305
o THD, VOLTAGE (%) [Set Password] ALARM MODE 20 21 22 23 24 Disconnect
o K-FACTOR [Accept] [Setup] 10.35 TYPE 1 ENCLOSURE
INDOOR USE ONLY
Switch

263 IN+ IN- OUT+ OUT- SHLD

RS-485
DATA COMMUNICATIONS
Optical
Comm Port

Fuse

Vn Vc Vb Va
10 11 12
3 PHASE
VOLTAGE
INPUTS
120 VOLTS
NOMINAL
CIRCUIT MONITOR

9
CT Shorting
Block

In- In+ Ic- Ic+ Ib- Ib+ Ia- Ia+


8
7
3 PHASE

6
CURRENT
INPUTS
5 AMPS

(+)L G N(-)
NOMINAL

25 26 27
Front View
CONTROL

4
POWER
14 VA

3
AUXILIARY

2
CURRENT
INPUTS

1
5 AMPS

Side View with Modules


NOMINAL
True Earth
Ground

Top View Inches * 3-Phase, 4-Wire WYE with optional metered neutral.
7.35 .89 (3-Wire Delta and other system types supported.)
187 23 Millimeters

Feature Comparison
Feature CM-2050 CM-2150 CM-2250 CM-2350 CM-2450/2452

Full Instrumentation ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ Technical Specifications


RS-485 Comm Port ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ Metering Specifications
Front Panel Optical Comm Port ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘
1% Accuracy Class ✘ Current Inputs (each channel)
0.2% Accuracy Class ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ Current Range ..................... 0–7.0 A ac
Alarm/Relay Functions ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ Nominal Current ................... 5 A ac
On-board Data Logging ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘
Downloadable Firmware ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘
Voltage Inputs (each channel)
Date/Time for Each Min/Max ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ Voltage Range ..................... 0–180 Vac
Waveform Capture ✘ ✘ ✘ Nominal Voltage (typical) ..... 120 Vac
12-Cycle Event Capture ✘ ✘ ✘
Freq. Range (50/60 Hz) ........... 45–65 Hz
Extended Memory 100k 100k/356k
Sag/Swell Detection ✘ ✘ Freq. Range (400 Hz) .............. 350–440 Hz
Programmable for Custom Applications ✘ Harmonic Response—Voltage, Current
Freq. 45 Hz–65 Hz ............... 31st Harmonic
Ordering Information
Freq. 350 Hz–440 Hz ........... 3rd Harmonic
Class Type Description Accuracy
3020 CM-2050 Instrumentation, 1% accuracy Current ................................. +/- 0.20%
3020 CM-2150 Instrumentation, 0.2% accuracy, data logging, alarm/relay functions
Voltage ................................. +/- 0.20%
3020 CM-2250 Waveform capture, plus CM-2150 features
3020 CM-2350 Disturbance monitoring, 100k extended memory, plus CM-2250 features Power ................................... +/- 0.40%
3020 CM-2450 Programmable for custom applications, plus CM-2350 features Energy .................................. +/- 0.40%
3020 CM-2452 356k extended memory, plus CM-2450 features Demand ............................... +/- 0.40%
3020 CM-2000U Circuit Monitor firmware upgrade kit Power Factor ........................ +/- 0.005
3020 IOM-11 I/O Module: 1 status IN, 1 pulse OUT
Frequency 50/60 Hz ............. +/- 0.01 Hz
3020 IOM-18 I/O Module: 8 status IN, 1 pulse OUT
3020 IOM-44 I/O Module: 4 status IN, 1 pulse OUT, 3 relay OUT Frequency 400 Hz ................ +/- 0.5 Hz
3020 IOM-4411-20 I/O Module: 4 status IN, 1 pulse OUT, 3 relay OUT, 1 analog IN, 1 analog OUT (4-20 mA) Control Power Input Specifications
3020 IOM-4411-01 I/O Module: 4 status IN, 1 pulse OUT, 3 relay OUT, 1 analog IN, 1 analog OUT (0-1 mA) Input Range, ac .................... 100–264 Vac
3020 IOM-4444-20 I/O Module: 4 status IN, 1 pulse OUT, 3 relay OUT, 4 analog IN, 4 analog OUT (4-20 mA)
Frequency Range ................ 47– 440 Hz
3020 IOM-4444-01 I/O Module: 4 status IN, 1 pulse OUT, 3 relay OUT, 4 analog IN, 4 analog OUT (0-1 mA)
3020 RIO-110 2 foot I/O shielded ribbon cable extension Input Range, dc .................... 100–350 Vdc
3090 OCI-2000 Optical communications interface Burden ................................. 14 VA
3090 VPM-277-C1 Voltage/power module for direct connect to 480Y/277V circuits Temp. Range (operating) ....... -25 to 70° C
3090 CPM-48 Control power module to connect circuit monitors to 18-60 Vac control power † Accuracies apply to CM-2150, CM-2250, CM-2350,
3090 CMA-110 CM2 mounting adapter with accessory compartment CM-2450 and CM-2452 only. Model CM-2050 meets
3090 SMA-220 Circuit Monitor surface mounting enclosure with hinged cover a 1% accuracy class for current and voltage, and 2%
3090 CMA-100 Circuit Monitor mounting adapter to reduce rear clearance requirements for energy and demand.
3090 RTM-317 Ride through module for 17 Watt devices (i.e. circuit monitors)

SQUARE D 17
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager™ 3000


Software
Features
Flexible Electrical Real-time Power Integrated Device
Historical Database Management Support
• Data sharing from • Multilevel network • More than 1000
centralized open alarming devices supported per
ODBC database POWERLOGIC
• Task execution (e-mail, network server
• Predefined typical paging, resets, file
billing and power uploads, etc.) on • Advanced open
quality logging schedule or upon support for intelligent,
templates alarm detection compatible monitoring
devices from other
• Tabular viewing and • Pre-engineered real manufacturers—
trending of standard time-data displays— displaying data,
and user selectable tables, bar charts, alarming, logging, and
quantities meter panels manual control
• Multiple device • Event recording and • Complete online
quantity comparison sorting assist device setup for all
on same trend plot troubleshooting event Square D supported
sequence devices
• Historical data
management archival • Manual and automatic
and restoring device resets eliminate
redundant steps
Power information • Manual control and
setup of automatic
anytime, anywhere onboard circuit monitor
control aid to avoid
• Microsoft® setting peaks
Windows NT® and

Windows® 95

supported. Context-
sensitive
• Flexible architecture, online help
system.
from stand-alone PC
Dockable
to client/server. toolbar allows
quick access to
• Real-time viewing
functions used
with customization frequently.

using object Device list


allows easy
embedding. switching
between
• Data sharing with devices
displayed.
ODBC database and
Meter panel
DDE over the network. scales with
window for
easy viewing
includes alarm
setpoint
markings.

Bar chart type list allows easy System time.


switching between bar chart Name of system open for
types displayed. Name of online system
editing is displayed. Can
is displayed for quick
be the online system.
reference.

18 SQUARE D
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager 3000


Software
The System Manager 3000 software (SMS) family and POWERLOGIC®
Power Monitoring and Control Systems provide a total, integrated system
approach to power management. As a result, accessing power information
and distributing it wherever it’s needed is more easily achieved.
Designed primarily for power system engineers, SMS-3000 software brings
information from your power system directly to your desktop. The third
generation of POWERLOGIC power monitoring software, the SMS-3000
program runs on Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 95 operating
systems. The inherent open system and network capabilities of SMS-3000
software help users minimize energy costs, reduce peak demand charges
and power factor penalties, and reduce downtime.
Whether your power monitoring application requires a single workstation or
a full-featured system of networked computers, the new POWERLOGIC
SMS-3000 software family offers a variety of functions to make managing
and analyzing your power system easier.

Scaleable Solution: Client/Server to Stand-alone


Client/server applications today are not limited to the computing power of
one computer. Instead, they share the workload between multiple comput-
ers. With SMS-3000 software, the POWERLOGIC network server handles
all device communications, data logging and storage, and alarm manage-
ment tasks. The SMS-3000 client converts the data it receives from the
server into usable formats such as tables, bar charts, and trend plots.
It is not necessary for client PCs to be connected to the POWERLOGIC
device network; only the POWERLOGIC network server is connected to
the device network. SMS-3000 software frees you to position client PCs
anywhere on the PC local area network.

Client/Server Products
System Manager 3000 (SMS-3000) software is the client/server product
consisting of one POWERLOGIC network server and one SMS client. The
SMS-1000 software product is an additional client application that can be
placed wherever it is needed. The client is used with SMS-3000 software
via a local area network or wide area network.

Stand-alone Products
System Manager 1500 (SMS-1500) and Power Monitoring EXPlorer (PMX-
1500) software are stand-alone products with device setup, communica-
tion and data displaying capabilities contained on the same PC thus not
requiring the PC local area network. SMS-3000
software and SMS-1500 software both support Product Descriptions
the Interactive Graphics Client. See the back
POWERLOGIC
cover for feature comparison between product APPLICATION Limited
Full Operating
Description
Featured System
offerings. SOFTWARE
Client/Server network aware software for power
Client/Server SMS-3000 Windows NT monitoring and control. Includes one SMS client
Flexibility and the POWERLOGIC network server.
Self contained stand-alone power monitoring
One of the primary features of client/server Stand-alone PMX-1500 SMS-1500 Windows NT
Windows 95 application that does not support networked clients.
technology is flexibility. The System Manager Windows NT Additional SMS client to connect to SMS-3000
Client Only PMX-1000 SMS-1000
3000 family allows greater flexibility for power Windows 95 POWERLOGIC network server.
monitoring systems, whether you need a stand- Single Device SMS-121
Windows NT Self contained stand-alone power monitoring application
Windows 95 that communicates to one device at a time.
alone system, multiple POWERLOGIC network
servers, multiple clients, remote clients, remote ADD-ON Limited Full Operating
Description Compatible
MODULE Featured System With:
sites, or even a single database to store data
Only on same PC with stand-alone SMS-3000
from multiple servers. Expand by adding addi- Interactive Windows NT products. With SMS-3000, the client SMS-1500
Graphics GFX-1000
Windows 95 application can reside on the same PC PMX-1500
tional clients. or a separate PC from the SMS Client. SMS-121

SQUARE D 19
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager 3000


Software
Security
In addition to the security the Microsoft operating
system provides, SMS provides security layers
of its own, ensuring that your power system data
are thoroughly protected. SMS supports unlim-
ited user accounts, each with a unique name
and password. In addition, SMS supports
privilege access levels that determine which
functions each user can access.
Stand-alone software allows logging and displaying
of information on one PC. Networking is optional. Auto-Dial
In some cases, you may want to monitor power
Remote sites can be system information in more than one location.
automatically dialed
via model to upload
SMS-3000 software offers a auto-dial feature
data from the devices. designed to dial remote sites on a scheduled
basis and automatically upload the system data.
This feature lets users monitor sites across
Laptop connection via modem campus or selected remote locations.
to the POWERLOGIC network
server for remote alarm
acknowledgement.
Historical Logging and Trending
The POWERLOGIC system is a collection of
distributed databases. SMS automatically
collects the extremely accurate historical
onboard device data logs as well as collecting
and storing data for devices without onboard
memory into one centralized ODBC-compliant
database. The circuit data can be easily re-
POWERLOGIC MMS
Ethernet Gateway trieved, displayed and printed in standard
historical tabular or trend formats. Custom user
selectable styles are also available. For ex-
ample, this provides selectable quantities and
Plant management can monitor
Etherent different interval logging for 24 hours or during
entire plant with graphical one line
connection
diagram using SMS and GFX-100
to local
shift hours.
from a PC within the office.
area
network Open Database
Accounting can access the database System Manager 3000 software family complies
for cost allocation without having SMS with the Microsoft Open DataBase Connectivity
client running.
(ODBC) standards of data storage. This ensures
Maintenance can that data stored by the POWERLOGIC network
monitor and server can be formatted for any ODBC-compliant
acknowledge
alarms on database.
POWERLOGIC
network server
SMS-3000 software uses an embedded Mi-
from a remote PC. crosoft Access® database and is fully tested with
both Microsoft Access and Microsoft SQL®
drivers. Other ODBC-compliant drivers can be
installed and used if desired.

Tasks
Tasks can be performed when an alarm condi-
tion is detected, or on a scheduled basis.
Available tasks include launching executable
programs such as paging software packages,
soundwave files, device resets, sending elec-
tronic mail, uploading onboard device data, and
SMS-3000 software creates tend plots of logged retrieving or capturing a waveform. Scheduled
historical data. You can display historical information
for any quantity from any device in the system. tasks can be executed hourly, daily, weekly,

20 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager 3000


Software
monthly, just once, or at other defined intervals.

Control
SMS-3000 software supports manual control of relay output contacts. Only
users with the appropriate user privilege level can access this feature,
avoiding accidental or unauthorized usage. Remote-manual control of
operations, such as initiating a start-up or a load shedding shutdown
sequence, can be performed through the software.

Event Recording
SMS uses event recording to track events in your system, from power
outages to setup changes to manual control. All system-user actions are
logged to the Event Log, which may be viewed, printed, or cleared at any
time. The Event Log is sortable by field, including device, date/time, type
of event, and user name. This aids in future troubleshooting of your system
by showing all information.

Functions/Alarms
SMS supports software alarms for digital and analog inputs in addition to
devices that have onboard alarm/event capabilities. Analog and digital
alarm conditions are set up once, then applied to the desired devices and
adjusted individually as needed. Conditional logic is also possible when
custom quantities are set as a digital alarm by defining bits in a register.
Analog alarm conditions can be set in five condition states (Highest, High,
Normal, Low, and Lowest). Each alarm condition can be set to a separate
severity level. When an alarm condition is detected, it is broadcast across
the entire SMS-3000 network logged in alarm log, and can initiate auto-
matic tasks on the POWERLOGIC network server PC.

Alarm Severity Levels


Analog and digital alarm conditions can be set for one of 10 severity levels;
each can be set for audible and visible required acknowledgment. Each
severity level can also require a password to acknowledge the alarm. You
can further customize severity levels by associating a specific color or
sound with the level or both.

Resets
SMS supports various resets for all supported device types. For example, Sixty consecutive cycles of waveform display show swell and
circuit monitor minimums and maximums, peak demand currents, and two sags.

energy alarms may be reset. You can reset quantities manually or on a


scheduled basis, individually, or simultaneously. The date/time of each
reset is stored for each quantity in the Event Log.

Disturbance Monitoring
Harmonics—which can lead to increased neutral currents, excessive
capacitor currents, or transformer and motor failure—can be displayed
through the software. POWERLOGIC circuit monitors use a high-speed
digital sampling technique to monitor the circuit voltages and currents.
Circuit waveforms and harmonic content through the 31st harmonic can be
captured and stored for later use.

Waveform Analysis
Waveform information can also be displayed in a “Data Block” format,
which includes odd and even harmonic magnitudes, crest factors, and
percent total harmonic distortion (%THD) as defined in IEEE-519. Wave- Current and voltage waveforms can be viewed simultaneously
or individually, and can be printed. A data block of harmonic
forms can be further analyzed using waveform analysis software. information can also be displayed for 4-cycle waveforms.

SQUARE D 21
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager 3000


Software
Easy System Setup
Minimal user configuration is required to get a SMS system up and running.
Device addresses and a few system and device parameters are all that are
necessary. Devices can be set up individually, or by configuring global
parameters applied to similar devices.

Help System
Complete, online, context-sensitive help is available anywhere in the
program. The system is categorized, and any topic may be selected or
printed. Most setup dialog boxes contain a Help button, which is linked
directly to information on that dialog box. SMS-3000 software also supports
right mouse button and F1 key functionality.

Real-Time Displays
SMS supports a variety of real-time data displays, from tables and bar
charts to analog meters. SMS-3000 software comes preconfigured with
many standard real-time displays to view any of the thousands of device
quantities
SMS-3000 software offers a variety of predefined and
customizable real-time data displays. Printing support
Any real-time or historical data that can be displayed in a window or
multiple windows may be saved to a disk or printed, either individually or in
a report.

Groups
Selecting devices by function, area, or electrical organization is simplified
by the configuration of groups. The group feature allows devices and
quantities to be organized logically, each with a unique name.

Customization
SMS is easy to customize, including the ability to create custom tables and
add custom quantities. Custom quantities can be any value read from a
POWERLOGIC device, a metered value from another utility (gas, water,
air, etc.), or a dynamic data exchange (DDE) quantity from another
application.
System Manager software can be easily customized by adding
new devices and quantities, and creating custom tables like
the one shown. Custom Tables
New tables can be created through a wizard-type user interface. Simply
select multiple devices and the quantity to be displayed, or select a single
device with multiple quantities, and the table will be generated. There is
also an advanced custom table utility that allows complete user flexibility of
the formatting, object embedding, and mathematical manipulation for
viewing of a single- or multiple-page table or graph.

Dynamic Data Exchange


Dynamic data exchange (DDE) is a standard feature of SMS-3000 soft-
ware. With DDE, the user can serve system data to another application,
such as an Excel spreadsheet, for advanced reporting or graphing. In
addition, SMS-3000 software can read, display, log, trend, and even alarm
via DDE from other applications such as building automation systems or
process control systems.

Reports
System Manager software generates reports using any information,
including real-time displays. SMS-3000 software supports standard reports

22 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

System Manager 3000


Software
and reports that have been customized. Automatic report generation also
is quick and easy.

Interactive Graphics
The POWERLOGIC Interactive Graphics Client (GFX-1000) is a color
graphics client application. It displays system-wide information (one line
diagrams, site plans or front elevation drawings) received from the
POWERLOGIC network server on Windows Metafile drawings. GFX-1000
can be used with SMS-3000 software or POWERLOGIC stand-alone
packages. When used with SMS-3000 software, GFX-1000 can be
installed as a separate client on any PC on the local area network. When
used with stand-alone systems, GFX must be installed on the same PC.

System Requirements
The table below lists the minimum system
requirements. The specifications in brackets "[ ]"
are recommended for superior performance. The
hard disk requirements for Windows operating
system should also be considered when
choosing a computer.

SMS-3000
SMS-1000
PMX-1500
PMX-1000
SMS-1500
GFX-1000
SMS-121*
Windows NT/95
Operating System
SMS-3000 (Windows NT only)
The table below details the features available in the System Manager 3000 software VGA VGA
Display Mode
product family. [Super VGA] [Super VGA]
SM SM PM GF SM PM SM
S- S- X- X-1 S- X- S- 486 / 66
30 10 10 1 1 1 Model Pentium
00 00 00 000 500 500 21 [Pentium]
Multiple Device Types ● ● ● ● RAM 32M 16M [32M]
Communication

Communicate to Multiple Devices ● ● ● Hard Disk 500M † 500M †


Communicate to Single Devices ● Program Size 15M 8M
Supports Network Clients ● SY/LINK Card optional
Reads DDE Data from other Applications ● ● ● ● RS-232 Port required
Supports GFX ● ● ● ● ● ● required
Network Card required
Setup Devices and Routing ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Modem 14.4 or 28.8 (opt.)
Real-Time Tables ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Sound Card optional optional
Bar Charts ● ● ● ● ●
3.5" Drive required required
Meter Panels ● ● ● ● ●
CD Drive recommended recommended
Alarm ● ● ● ● ● ● ●
Logging ● † The amount of memory required on the hard disk depends on
● ● ● ● ●
User Interface

whether the logging data is stored on the same computer.


Trending ● ● ● ● ● ● * System Manager One-To-One (SMS-121 software) uses the
Waveform Capture ● serial port to communicate, so the SY/LINK® requirements listed
● ● ● ● ● in the table do not apply.
Manual Control ● ● ● ● ● ● ●
Reports ● ● ● ● Ordering Information
Automatic Tasks ● ● ●
Description Class Type

Customization ● System Manager NT Client/Server 3080 SMS-3000
● ● ● ●
Shares SMS Data through DDE on Client ● ● ● ● ● ● ●
System Manager Client 3080 SMS-1000
Create Graphical Drawings Interactive Graphics Client 3080 GFX-1000

Power Monitoring EXPlorer 3080 PMX-1000
Numbering xxx-3000 Client/Server System Manager Stand-alone 3080 SMS-1500
conventions: xxx-1500 Stand-alone
Power Monitoring EXPlorer 3080 PMX-1500
xxx-1000 Clients work with SMS-3000 except GFX-1000
works with SMS-3000 and xxx-1500 products System Manager One-to-One 3080 SMS-121

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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Ethernet Gateway

Features
• Allows communications • On-board security lock-
with POWERLOGIC out feature (user
compatible devices configurable)
over standard Ethernet- • Integral 12Vdc AUI
TCP/IP networks control power
• One or two RS-485 • Small footprint: 4.76
serial ports at 19.2K (121)H x 7.25 (184)W
Baud x 9.05 (230)D inches
• Fully TCP/IP and OSI (millimeters)
compliant • Tabletop or wall
• Standard AUI and mounting
RJ-45 Ethernet ports • UL, CSA
• Up to 10 simultaneous • 32–140°F (0–60°C)
logical connections ambient operating
from host device (e.g., temperature
SMS-3000) per RS-485
The POWERLOGIC® port • Diagnostic LEDs on
RS-485 ports and
Power Monitoring and • 120/240Vac, 125Vdc RJ-45 Ethernet port
control power
Control System offers

direct connection to

Ethernet-TCP/IP

networks to make
power monitoring and

power quality informa-

tion available over new

and existing local and

wide area networks.

From a central

location or many
Configuration example of a POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring and Control System using Ethernet
remote locations, you

can now better

manage your electrical

distribution system

using Ethernet

networking technolo-

gies–as well as the

Internet.

Configuration example of a POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring and Control System using Ethernet
and an industrial area network

24 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Ethernet Gateway

The POWERLOGIC system offers the flexibility to build entire power


monitoring and control systems using Ethernet-TCP/IP (Transmission
Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) as the high-speed network backbone.
POWERLOGIC Ethernet connectivity products consist of a gateway device
and an Ethernet driver for the SMS-3000 family of System Manager
software products. SMS-3000 power monitoring software operates on
Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT. The combination of the gateway
and driver creates a system with optimal communication performance and
accessibility to power system information.
Electrical distribution systems now often have hundreds, and even thou-
sands, of communicating devices. A high-speed, high-bandwidth network
such as Ethernet often becomes necessary to handle the increased data
throughput required. In many cases, an existing Ethernet network can be
used to avoid the cost of installing and maintaining a separate “backbone”
network.
Ethernet is the most widely supported network in the world. It offers an
open architecture, speed, wide range of connectivity products, and virtually
unlimited flexibility allowing users to build any size network. These benefits
ensure users of their investment in Ethernet as the backbone network of
choice for power monitoring and control systems.
As your POWERLOGIC system expands (number of users increase, and
additional devices are implemented), so too can your network using
standard, off-the-shelf products that meet your specific needs.
The POWERLOGIC system allows you to leverage existing Ethernet
technology for power monitoring, power quality, and other information over
virtually any existing communication infrastructure, including the Internet.
Improved System Performance
The POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateway and the SMS Ethernet Driver have
been engineered to form a tightly coupled system. Together these compo-
nents form the basis for a reliable, high-speed power monitoring solution.
The SMS Ethernet Driver allows simultaneous communication requests to
multiple gateways providing faster overall throughput in gathering data from
the entire POWERLOGIC system.
TCP/IP and OSI Protocols
Many Etherent networks are based on TCP/IP. This is the standard protocol
for delivering information and is what the Internet and many Intranets use.
Other network systems utilize the equally powerful Open Systems Intercon-
nect (OSI) protocol. The System Manager Ethernet Driver and Ethernet
Gateway support both TCP/IP and OSI protocols. Either protocol is routable
through existing IP routers, hubs, etc., allowing users to select the protocol
stack best suited for their application.
Manufacturing Message Specification (MMS)
The POWERLOGIC Ethernet connectivity solution uses MMS as the
messaging protocol over Ethernet. MMS is an international standard (ISO/
IEC 9506) for exchanging real-time data and supervisory information
between network devices. As an international standard, MMS is not
controlled by any one entity. Overall, MMS provides a very powerful, high
throughput platform for network communication.
MMS offers increased flexibility in integrating other devices and systems
into a POWERLOGIC system. The messaging services provided by MMS
are broad enough to cover a wide range of applications while the MMS
protocol itself is independent of the application being performed.

SQUARE D 25
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Ethernet Gateway

Easy Configuration
Both the System Manager Ethernet driver and gateway are easily config-
ured and secured. Standard dialog box setup screens for communicating
with the gateway reside in System Manager. The gateway has an onboard
setup utility that is easily configured via the RS-232 port using a standard
terminal emulator software program, such as Windows Terminal. The setup
utility contains all configuration parameters for the gateway as well as
diagnostic parameters. Additionally, an extensive help system is included in
the setup utility. All configuration information is stored in nonvolatile
memory and therefore, not affected on loss of control power.
Gateway and Network Integrity
Each serial port contains RS-485 biasing and surge protection circuitry to
ensure reliable operation where noise may be present from nonlinear
devices, electromagnetic induced equipment, or single capacitive coupling
of the power system voltages.
Easy Field Upgrades
As features are added to the system components–either in System
Manager, the gateway, or the end devices–the gateway can be easily
updated via the RS-232 port. This firmware upgrade is accomplished
without hardware replacement, lengthy system downtime, or system
reconfiguration.
Support for Existing POWERLOGIC Systems
The POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateway supports routing into existing
SY/NET® network based systems. The RS-485 ports on the gateway can
be connected to another RS-485 port on the network interface module
(NIM, PNIM, etc.) making information from the SY/NET network available
over Ethernet. This approach benefits existing facilities where
POWERLOGIC systems are already in use. Users of existing Square D
networks can choose to augment their systems by using Ethernet as the
high-speed backbone.
System Manager and Client/Server System
System Manager 3000 software uses client/server technology for
managing activity and information on the Ethernet network. This is ideal for
systems where multiple
users need access to power
system information. The
POWERLOGIC Network
Server, which may be a
dedicated Windows NT
workstation or any one of the
user’s personal computers,
‘serves’ requested
information to users
elsewhere on the network
running System Manager
client software. This provides
The POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateway combined
many users access to the
with System Manager software brings power
information for various system information to any personal computer on
functions such as energy the local area network or even the Internet.
cost accounting, power
quality monitoring, or maintenance activities. All users share a common
historical database through Microsoft’s Open Database Connectivity
(ODBC) standard. The ODBC standard is supported by a wide variety of
software vendors as an open solution.

26 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Ethernet Gateway

Technical Specifications
Control Power Input Specifications
Input Range, ac ................. 100-264 Vac
Frequency .......................... 50/60 Hz
Input Range, dc ................. 110-300 Vdc
Burden ............................... Up to 72 VA

Environmental Specifications
4.76 Ambient Operating
121 Temperature .................... 32° to 140°F
(0° to 60°C)
Ambient Storage
Temperature .................... -40° to 176°F
(-40° to 85°C)
INCHES 9.05 Relative Humidity Rating
MILLIMETERS 7.25
230 (noncondensing) ............. 5 to 95%
184

Regulatory/Standards Compliance
UL Listed, CSA Certified
Ethernet Gateway Dimensions
Minumum PC Requirements for System
Manager Software (SMS-3000)
• Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 95
• VGA Monitor (Super VGA recommended)
• Pentium processor
• 32MB RAM
• 500MB hard disk (if database on same PC)
• CD ROM recommended
• Standard Ethernet network interface card
• 14.4K Baud modem (28.8K recommended)
• Sound card recommended
Overhead mounting

Ordering Information
Class Type Description
Left-side mounting Right-side mounting
3050 EGW1
POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateway
Optional Ethernet Gateway Mounting Brackets with (1) RS-485 port (up to 8
devices)
3050 EGW2 POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateway
with (2) RS-485 ports (up to 128
devices)
3050 EGWMBK Mounting Brackets Kit
3050 EGWNMC Null Modem Cable
3080 TCPMMS POWERLOGIC Ethernet Driver for
SMS-3000 Software family.

SQUARE D 27
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Digital Relay

Features
• 3-phase and ground • High level of immunity
overcurrent protection to electromagnetic
disturbances
• User-selectable time
current curves • Status input for remote
indication of circuit
• Local keypad and
breaker position
display of metering and
settings • Removable terminal
blocks for ease of
• POWERLOGIC system
maintenance
compatible
• Supports 1 A or 5 A
• Remote monitoring
phase CT inputs
using System Manager
software • Zero sequence current
determined by 3-phase
• Optional latching of
internal summation
output relay contacts
(ANSI 86) • Optional support of
CSH zero sequence
• Self-diagnostics for
toroids for external
improved reliability
sensing of ground fault
• Trip and self-diagnostic currents
The POWERLOGIC indicators
• 120 Vac or 48/125 Vdc
system is a family of control power options

power monitoring and

control products that

provides comprehen-

sive solutions for

power distribution Ethernet High-Speed LAN


system management.
Legend
The POWERLOGIC
DR PowerLogic Digital Relay
system can help (50/51 and 50N/51N)
CM PowerLogic Circuit Monitor
improve system DR CM EGW EGW PowerLogic Ethernet Gateway
Main LAN Local Area Network
reliability, lower

operating costs, and

enhance equipment

utilization. System

Manager software

provides an integrated DR DR DR DR
Feeders
solution to remotely

monitor a variety of

intelligent electronic

devices, including the Typical medium voltage switchgear lineup—one line diagram.
digital relay.

28 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Digital Relay

Protection and Flexibility


The POWERLOGIC digital relay accepts current inputs from standard 1- 2
ampere or 5-ampere current transformers, and is suitable for a wide range 1 3
of applications on medium voltage circuits. Time-current characteristics are
independently adjustable for phase and ground from a variety of curve
shapes—inverse, very inverse, extremely inverse, and so on. Close 4
tolerances on programmable relay pickup settings and flexible time delay
adjustments permit better coordination with upstream and downstream
devices. 5

Curve shapes, current transformer (CT) ratios, and relay settings are set
using the simple front-panel keypad and display. The digital relay provides a
variety of metering and status information, and supports various capabili-
ties from a remote PC.

3-phase Overcurrent (ANSI 50/51)


The digital relay senses overloads and short circuits between phases, and
initiates a breaker trip. The relay has both time overcurrent and instanta-
neous pickup settings. When a current exceeds one of these settings, the
digital relay displays a “PHASE FAULT” message. After the relay operates, 1 On indicator light–Lights when the digital relay
is energized.
its red trip LED flashes, indicating that a trip has occurred.
2 Self-diagnostic indicator–Lights if an internal
Ground Fault (ANSI 50N/51N or 50G/51G) failure occurs.

The digital relay senses phase-to-ground faults in resistive grounded, 3 Trip indicator– Lights when the digital relay
reactive grounded, and solidly grounded networks, and initiates a breaker operates a circuit breaker after detecting an
trip. The relay has both time overcurrent and instantaneous pickup settings. overcurrent. A trip message on the display
indicates the type of overcurrent.
When a current exceeds one of these settings, the relay displays a “GND
FAULT” message. After the relay operates, its red trip LED flashes, indicat- 4 16--character LCD display– Displays the
ing that a trip has occurred. following:
• Phase ammeter readings
• Phase demand ammeter readings
UIT Curve
• Phase/ground amperes at time of last trip
The digital relay features a new type of inverse-time-overcurrent curve • All setup values
known as the ultra inverse time curve (UIT). This unique curve provides • Messages
better coordination with fuses and devices that require extreme coordina-
5 Keyboard–Use these buttons to advance
tion. through the digital relay display menus.

Time Overcurrent Settings


The digital relay has three settings for time overcurrent: time current curve,
current setting, and time delay. Time current curves are divided into two
categories: definite time and inverse-time-overcurrent. For the definite time
curve and the RI curve, the current setting is the tripping pickup.
Instantaneous Pickup Settings
The digital relay has two settings for instantaneous protection: instanta-
neous pickup and instantaneous time delay.

Ammeter
The digital relay displays instantaneous phase ammeter readings and
phase block demand ammeter readings on the LCD display. By equipping
the digital relay with optional communications, the following values can be
viewed on a remote PC:
• Minimum, maximum, and instantaneous currents
• Thermal and block demands (present and peak) with date and time stamp
All values, on both the relay display and over communications, are actual
primary values in A, kA, and seconds.

SQUARE D 29
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Digital Relay

Event History Information


The digital relay provides two types of historical information: trip history and
pickup history. The current values at the time of the last trip can be viewed
on the LCD display. A more detailed trip history for the last three trips can
be accessed over communications. The trip history includes:
• Cause of trip
• Pickup status at time of trip
• Date and time of trip
• Currents (phase, ground, and 3-phase average)
• Thermal demand (3-phase average and per-phase)
Also, using communications the user can access a date/time history of the
last pickup for time overcurrent and instantaneous overcurrent, for both
phase and ground.

Continuous Self Diagnostics


The digital relay continually monitors the analog-to-digital conversion
channel, the microprocessor, the memory components, the internal voltage
supply, the integrity of its values, and the internal software program. If the
digital relay detects an internal failure, it inhibits the output relay contacts
and operates a watchdog output relay. The watchdog output relay contacts
can be connected to an alarm, such as a light or bell, to indicate that an
internal failure has occurred.
For digital relays with communications, the diagnostic status can be viewed
on a remote PC. This self-diagnostic feature makes the digital relay more
reliable than an electromechanical relay; in electromechanical relays,
internal failures can only be detected by periodic manual tests.

POWERLOGIC Compatible
The digital relay is compatible with POWERLOGIC systems; therefore, it is
supported by POWERLOGIC software. The relay can share an RS-485
communications link with circuit monitors operating at a baud rate from
1200 to 19,200 bps. Digital relays can be daisy-chained with up to 32
POWERLOGIC devices over a 10,000 foot (3050 meter) span.

Communications Capabilities
Communicating versions of the
digital relay have remote capabilities
such as status monitoring, metering,
relay reset, and circuit breaker
operations. The digital relay has one
status input that can be used for
remote status monitoring; for
example, indicating circuit breaker
position. In addition, remote phase
and ground current metering, trip
event history, and data logging can
be performed using POWERLOGIC
software. Remote relay resets and
remote circuit breaker operations
can also be performed over the
communications network.
POWERLOGIC application software configured to display real-
time phase and ground currents, circuit breaker status, and trip
history in an easy-to-read, graphic format.

30 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Digital Relay

Time Characteristic Curves

Ultra Inverse Time Extremely Inverse Time Very Inverse Time


1000 1000 1000

UIT EIT VIT

100 100 100

T T T
i i i
10 m 10 m 10 m
e e e
12.5
i i i
n 12.5 n n
12.5 s 5.0
s s
e e e
c 5.0
1.00 o c 2.5 c
5.0 1.00 o 1.00 o
n
d
2.5 n n
1.2
2.5 s d d
s 0.8 s
1.2
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.8
.100 0.4
.100 .100 0.2
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.2

0.1 0.1
.02
1

.02
10

100

.02

1
1

10

100
10

100

Current in multiples of pickup


(I/PHCS or I/GFCS) Current in multiples of pickup Current in multiples of pickup
(I/PHCS or I/GFCS) (I/PHCS or I/GFCS)

Standard Inverse Time Rapid Inverse Definite Time


1000 100 90s
1000
DT
SIT RI

100 10
100

T T
T Adjustable i
i 12.5 i
10 m 1.00 m
10 12.5
m e
e e
5.0 i i
i n
5.0 n n
2.5 s
s s
2.5 e e
e 1.2 c
c c .100
1.00 1.00 o o
1.2 o 0.8 n
n n
0.8 d d
d s
s 0.4 s
0.4
0.2

0.2
.100 0.1 .010
.100
0.1

.02 .001
.02
1

10

100
1

10

100
1

10

100

Current in multiples of pickup Current in multiples of pickup


Current in multiples of pickup (I/PHCS or I/GFCS)
(I/PHCS or I/GFCS) (I/PHCS or I/GFCS)

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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Digital Relay

3-Phase Overcurrent Parameter Settings


Parameter Settings

CT Primary Rated Current (PH CT) A: 10 - 15 - 20 - 25 - 30 - 35 - 36 - 40 - 45 - 50 - 60 - 70 - 75 - 80 - 90 - 100 - 120 - 125 - 150 - 160 -
175 - 180 - 192 - 200 - 225 - 240 - 250 - 300 - 320 - 350 - 400 - 450 - 480 - 500 - 600 - 625 - 640 - 700 -
750 - 800 - 900 - 960
kA: 1 - 1.2 - 1.25 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 2 - 2.5 - 3 - 3.5 - 3.75 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 6.25
Curve (PH TCC) DT - SIT - VIT - EIT - UIT - RI
Current Setting (PH CS in multiples .3 - .35 - .4 - .45 - .5 - .55 - .6 - .65 - .7 - .75 - .8 - .85 - .9 - .95 - 1 - 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 - 1.5 -
of PH CT) 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2 - 2.2 - 2.4 - 2.6 - 2.8 - 3 - 3.5 - 4 - 4.5 - 5 - 5.5 - 6 - 6.5 - 7 - 7.5 - 8 - off
For all inverse-time-overcurrent curves, the PH CS setting range is limited to 2.4 x PH CT.➀
Time Delay (PH TD) ms: 100 - 200 - 300 - 400 - 500 - 600 - 700 - 800 - 900
s: 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.0 - 2.1 - 2.2 - 2.3 - 2.4 - 2.5 - 2.6 - 2.7 - 2.8 -
2.9 - 3.0 - 3.1 - 3.2 - 3.3 - 3.4 - 3.5 - 3.6 - 3.7 - 3.8 - 3.9 - 4.0 - 4.5 - 5 - 5.5 - 6 - 6.5 - 7 - 7.5 - 8 -
8.5 - 9 - 9.5 - 10 - 10.5 - 11 - 11.5 - 12 - 12.5 - 13 - 13.5 - 14 - 14.5 - 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 -
21 - 22 - 23 - 24 - 25 - 30 - 35 - 40 - 45 - 50 - 55 - 60 - 65 - 70 - 75 - 80 - 85 - 90
For all inverse-time-overcurrent curves, the PH TD maximum setting is 12.5 s.
Instantaneous Pickup (PH IP in 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 -
multiples of PH CT) 24 - off
Instantaneous Time Delay (PH ITD) “inst.”: instantaneous, typical tripping time 25 ms.
ms: 50 - 100 - 150 - 200 - 250 - 300 - 400 - 500 - 600 - 700 - 800 - 900
s: 1 - 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.0
➀ Equivalent to 12 A tap on an induction disc relay.

Ground Fault Overcurrent Parameter Settings


Parameters Settings
CT primary rated current Residual (50 N/51 N) “GF CT=PH CT”: sum of the three phase currents.
(GF CT) CSH 120 or CSH 200 “Tor 2A”: 2 A input rating, CSH core balance CTs: equivalent to GF CT=2 A.
“Tor30A”: 30 A input rating, CSH core balance CTs: equivalent to GF CT= 30 A.
Standard zero sequence CT A: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 10 - 15 - 20 - 25 - 30 - 35 - 36 - 40 - 45 - 50 - 60 - 70 - 75 - 80 - 90 -
with interposing CSH 30 100 - 120 - 125 - 150 - 160 - 175 - 180 - 192 - 200 - 225 - 240 - 250 - 300 - 320 - 350 - 400 -
450 - 480 - 500 - 600 - 625 - 640 - 00 - 750 - 800 - 900 - 960.
kA: 1 - 1.2 - 1.25 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 2 - 2.5 - 3 - 3.5 - 3.75 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 6.25
Curve (GF TCC) DT - SIT - VIT - EIT - UIT - RI
Current Setting (GF CS 05 - .1 - .15 - .2 - .25 - .3 - .35 - .4 - .45 - .5 - .55 - .6 - .65 - .7 - .75 - .8 - .9 - .95 - 1 - 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 -
in multiples of GF CT) 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2 - off
For all inverse time overcurrent curves, the GF CS setting range is limited to 1.0 x GF CT.

Time Delay (GF TD) ms: 100 - 200 - 300 - 400 - 500 - 600 - 700 - 800 - 900
s: 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2 - 2.1 - 2.2 - 2.3 - 2.4 - 2.5 - 2.6 - 2.7 - 2.8 - 2.9 - 3 - 3.1 - 3.2 -
3.3 - 3.4 - 3.5 - 3.6 - 3.7 - 3.8 - 3.9 - 4 - 4.5 - 5 - 5.5 - 6 - 6.5 - 7 - 7.5 - 8 - 8.5 - 9 - 9.5 - 10 - 10.5 - 11 - 11.5 -
12 - 12.5 - 13 - 13.5 - 14 - 14.5 - 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 - 24 - 25 - 30 - 35 - 40 - 45 - 50 - 55 -
60 - 65 - 70 - 75 - 80 - 85 - 90
For all inverse-time-overcurrent curves, the GF TD maximum setting is 12.5 s.
Instantaneous Pickup 0.5 - .1 - .15 - .2 -.25 - .3 - .35 - .4 - .45 - .5 - .55 - .6 - .65 - .7 - .75 - .8 - .85 - .9 - .95 - 1 - 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 -
(GF IP in multiples of 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2 - 2.5 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - off
GF CT)
GF ITD “inst.”: instantaneous, typical tripping time 25 ms.
ms: 50 - 100 - 150 - 200 - 250 - 300 - 400 - 500 - 600 - 700 - 800 - 900
s: 1 - 1.1 - 1.2 - 1.3 - 1.4 - 1.5 - 1.6 - 1.7 - 1.8 - 1.9 - 2

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Digital Relay

Electrical Specifications Dimensions


Phase Current Inputs Side View Panel Cutout Top View
Burden
1 A CT configuration ........... <0.001 VA
5 A CT configuration ........... <0.025 VA
CT primary ratings10 .......... A–6250 A
Status Input 8.74 7.91 7.95 6.93 6.14
222 201 202 176 156
Voltage range ..................... 20-138 Vac/Vdc
Input current draw
(max.) .............................. 3 mA @ 20 V;
6 mA @ 138 V 6.38 Inches
Must turn off voltage 0.79 7.80 Millimeters
162
20 198
(max.) .............................. 8.0 Vac/Vdc
Must turn on voltage
(min.) ............................... 20 Vac/Vdc
Relay Output Contacts (01)
Rated current ..................... 8 A @ 48 Vdc;
8 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac
Breaking capacity
dc resistive load ............... 4 A @ 48 Vdc; Typical Wiring Diagram
0.7 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac
ac resistive load ............... 8 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac
Relay Output Contacts (02, 03, 04, 05) AS′ Standard Phase Current
Rated current ..................... 8 A @ 48 Vdc; Sensing Connections
8
1
8 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac 7
Breaking capacity 2
6
5
Trip Relay 4

dc resistive load ............. 2 A @ 48 Vdc; 3


4
3
Contacts 1

0.3 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac 2 N


120 Vac
5
1 L
ac resistive load ............. 4 A @ 127 Vdc/Vac A 2
Control Power Inputs 6
Voltage ............................... 100–127 Vac 3
Voltage range ..................... –10, +20%
P
Burden ............................... 16 VA
Inrush current ..................... <18 A for 10 ms CCA 650
Operating frequency .......... 47.5–63 Hz 4
Watchdog Output
Voltage 48–125 Vdc
4 3 Phase
2
Voltage range ..................... ±20%
5 1 Relay Contacts Current
B
Burden ............................... 12 W 1 Sensor
Inrush current ..................... <12 A for 10 ms Module
Regulatory/Standards Compliance
Safety ................................. UL 508
Environmental
Operating temp➀. ................ IEC 68-2 (–5 to +55° C)
Storage temp. .................... –25 to +70° C
Humidity ............................. 95%, 40° C
Electromagnetic Ordering Information
Radiated emissions ............ FCC Part 15 (Class A)
Conducted emissions ......... FCC Part 15 (Class A) Model Number Description
RF immunity ....................... IEC 255-22-3 (Class III) DR-LX S01 X0A TEN Digital overcurrent protective relay (3-phase and ground),
Electrostatic discharge ....... IEC 255-22-2 (Class III) 120 Vac control power*
Electrical
1.2/50 µs impulse DR-LX S01 X0A TBN Digital overcurrent protective relay (3-phase and ground),
withstand ........................ IEC 255-4 (2 kV for 48/125 Vdc control power
1 min.)
DR-LX S01 S0A TEN Digital overcurrent protective relay (3-phase and ground)
Damped 1 MHz
with data communications, 120 Vac control power*
sine wave ....................... IEC 255-22-1 (Class III)
5 ns fast transients ............. IEC 255-22-4 (Class IV) DR-LX S01 S0A TBN Digital overcurrent protective relay (3-phase and ground)
Immunity to surge .............. IEC 801-5 with data communications, 48/125 Vdc control power
Dielectric withstand ............ IEC255-4 (2 kV for
CSH 30 CSH 30 core balance CT ground fault sensor
1 min.); UL 508
CSH 120 CSH 120 core balance CT ground fault sensor
➀ Ambient cubicle temperature. Relay components maximum
operating temperature is 70° C. CSH 200 CSH 200 core balance CT ground fault sensor

*Reliable 120Vac control power is required for proper operation.

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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

MICROLOGIC® Circuit Breaker


Interface
Features
Real-time current Circuit breaker data
• A, B, C phase true • Breaker type
RMS currents
• Sensor rating
• Ground fault current
• Plug rating
(optional)
• Long time settings:
Historical data pickup and delay
• Date and time of last • Short time settings:
trip pickup and delay
• Cause of trip • Instantaneous settings
• Phase currents at trip • Ground fault settings:
pickup and delay
• Ground fault current at
trip
• Number of overload
trips
• Number of short circuit
trips
• Number of ground fault
trips

PIF-3 interface and other POWERLOGIC devices in a typical POWERLOGIC system

34 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

MICROLOGIC Circuit Breaker


Interface

The POWELOGIC product interface (PIF-3) for MICROLOGIC circuit Technical Specifications
breakers, together with MICROLOGIC full function circuit breakers, Communications ...................... (1) RS-485, (8)
provides an economical means to perform remote current monitoring, MICROLOGIC
without the need for additional current transformers or metering equipment. connectors
In addition, the product interface reports a wealth of valuable historical trip Clock/calendar accuracy .......... +/-4 seconds in 24
data and breaker and breaker data from MICROLOGIC full function circuit hours (@25°C)
breakers. Electrical
Control power input
The product interface can be mounted in QED switchboards to enable local
Nominal voltage ................... 120 Vac
and remote monitoring of circuit breaker data. The data from up to 32
Operating range ................... 85-132 Vac
circuit breakers can be displayed using a POWERLOGIC system display
for circuit breakers, or an IBM PC compatible personal computer equipped Burden ................................. 1.1 A @ 120 Vac
(132 VA)
with System Manager software.
Frequency range .................. 47.0 to 65.0 Hz
Isolation ................................ 2000 V, 1 minute
Product Interface Mounts Easily in Switchboards
Ride through on power loss ..... 20 ms @ 120 Vac
The product interface mounts easily in Square D I-Line panelboards and Fusing ...................................... 2 A 250 V slow blow
QED switchboards. In new equipment, any MICROLOGIC full function +12 V LED ................................ Indicates +12 V power
circuit breaker can communicate to the product interface. supply OK
+5 V LED .................................. Indicates +5 V power
The Right Connections supply OK
The product interface provides eight removable terminal plugs for connec- Battery low LED ....................... When ON, indicates
tion of up to eight MICROLOGIC circuit breakers. Each MICROLOGIC low battery voltage
circuit breaker is wired to a communications adapter (CIM3F). Each Environmental
communications adapter is then connected to the terminal strip on the side Operating temperature ......... 0° to 70°C
of the product interface. Storage temperature ............ -40° to +85°C
Humidity rating ..................... 95% RH maximum
A removable RS-485 terminal plug is used to daisy-chain the product non-condensing
interface to other POWERLOGIC compatible devices.
.250
R 0.250 2.999 6.4
RS485 Communications 6.4
76.2
to other devices

Product Interface Side View


12V
OK
BATTERY 5V

IN+
1

8.375
LOW

IN- 212.7
2

COMMS

Communications
OK
RS485

OUT+
3

Terminal Strip 7.869


4

OUT-
199.9
Micrologic® Circuit Breakers
Product Interface for
66

8.875
5

SHLD
GND
225.4
6

ADD + 0

+12V
7

Ground Terminal D-
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

D+
GND
®
ADD + 1

+12V
MADE
USA
IN

D-
D+
GND
ADD + 2

+12V
D- 8.000 .378
203.2 4.375
MICROLOGIC CIRCUIT BREAKERS

D+
250V, 2 AMP

S
FU E
GND 111.1
FUSE

Control Power Fuse


ADD + 3
FUS
SE

+12V
U

E F
D-
D+
GND
ADD + 4

+12V
AC

DC

D-
D+
40
L

GND
ADD + 5

Control Power +12V


Terminal Strip D-
39
G

D+
GND
ADD + 6
38

-
N

+12V
D-
DC
AC

D+
GND
ADD + 7

+12V
D-
D+

Ordering Information
Communications Adapters (CIM3F)
1 required for each Circuit Breaker Class Type Description
3050 PIF-3 Product Interface for
To Micrologic Circuit Breakers
(Up to eight per PIF-3) MICROLOGIC Circuit Breakers*

The product interface can communicate to up to eight * One Multipoint Communciations Adapter (3090 MCA-485)
MICROLOGIC circuit breakers. and one Multipoint Communications Terminator (3090
MCT-485) required per RS-485 communications link.

SQUARE D 35
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

LIFE-GARD® Model 85A


Temperature Controller Interface
Features
Instantaneous Setpoints
readings • Fans on
• Temperature, Coil A • Fans off
• Temperature, Coil B • Alarm on
• Temperature, Coil C • Alarm off
• Temperature, hottest • Shutdown
coil

Status
• Fan mode (auto/
manual)
• Fan relay (on/off)
• High temperature alarm
relay (normal/setpoint
exceeded)
• Emergency shutdown
relay (normal/setpoint
exceeded)
• Transformer type

PIF3 PIF85 PIF85


CM
CB
M85A M85A
CB

CB

PIF-85 interface and other POWERLOGIC devices in a typical


POWERLOGIC system

36 SQUARE D
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

LIFE-GARD Model 85A


Temperature Controller Interface
The POWELOGIC product interface for LIFE-GARD Model 85A tempera- Technical Specifications
ture controllers brings remote transformer temperature monitoring to the Communications ...................... (1) RS-485
POWERLOGIC system. Any Square D PowerCast or conventional dry type (POWERLOGIC), (1)
transformer, equipped with a LIFE-GARD Model 85A temperature controller RS-422 (Model 85A)
can be monitored for temperature and status. The collected data can be Clock/calendar accuracy .......... +/-1.5 seconds in 24
displayed and alarmed upon at a remote personal computer using System hours (@25°C)
Manager software. Electrical
Control power input
The product interface connects to the Model 85A temperature controller
Nominal voltage ................... 120 Vac
using standard RS-422 communications. The product interface can be
Operating range ................... 90-132 Vac
located up to 4,000 feet from the Model 85A temperature controller.
Burden ................................. 1 A @ 120 Vac
The product interface provides standard RS-485 communications for (132 VA)
connection to the POWERLOGIC communications link. Multiple product Frequency range .................. 50/60 Hz
interfaces and other POWERLOGIC devices can be daisy-chained to a Isolation ................................ 1500 V, 1 minute
remote personal computer. Ride through on power loss ..... 20 ms
Surge suppression ................... 35 Joules
The product interface is housed in a steel case designed to be mounted in
DC OK LED .............................. When lit, indicates DC
power equipment. The compact product interface mounts in low-voltage
power OK
switchboards and other small faces. The wiring connections for communica-
RS-422 COMMS LED .............. Flashes when RS-422
tions cables and control power are made to removable terminal plugs on comms active
the front of the product interface. RS-485 COMMS LED .............. Flashes when RS-485
comms active
Environmental
Operating temperature ......... 0° to 70°C
Storage temperature ............ -40° to +85°C
Humidity rating ..................... 95% RH maximum
non-condensing
Physical
Weight (approx.) .................. 3 lbs
5.66
143.8

ADDRESS

0
8 2

10 6 4
RS-422 + 0 11
TO M85
- 9 8 2
12
5.66 8
8
6
0
4

2
13
7
143.8 6
6
0
4
BAUD 14
15
4.63 IN+ 5
8 2 XFMR
TYPE 16 L
117.6 IN- 4
6 4
17
120 VAC
CONTROL
RS-485 POWER
DATA OUT+ RESET 18 N
3
ADDRESS COMMS
OUT- 2 19
Address Switches
SHIELD 1 DC OK 20 GND

0 RS-422 COMMS
8 2 RS-485 COMMS
RS-422 Terminals 10 6 4
for Connection RS-422 + 0 11 ®
TO M85
To Model 85 - 9 8 2
12 Baud Rate Switch
6 4
8 0 13 Transformer Type Switch
Control Power
8 2
7 BAUD 14 Disconnect
6 4
4.25
6 0
15 Reset Switch 108.0
4.63 8 2 XFMR Inches
IN+ 5 TYPE 16 L L
117.6 IN- 4
6 4
17
120 VAC
CONTROL Control Power Connections
RS-485 Terminals for RS-485 POWER Millimeters
Connection to PowerLogic DATA
COMMS
OUT+ 3
RESET 18 N N 120 VAC
Communications Link OUT- 19
2
SHIELD 1 DC OK 20 GND G
RS-422 COMMS
RS-485 COMMS
Indicating LEDs

Product interface front view

Ordering Information
Class Type Description
3050 PIF-85 Product Interface for
LIFE-GARD Model 85A
Temperature Controllers

SQUARE D 37
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Management Services

Features
• System design and bill • Custom hardware/ • On-site and headquar-
of material recommen- software solutions ters-based customer
dations • Third party communica- training
• Remote power tions interfaces • Troubleshooting
switching system • Configured worksta- assistance, support for
design tions, user software hardware and software
• Develop specifications, interfaces products
drawings, documenta- • On-site installation • Product upgrades
tion assistance, component • Project coordination
• Automatic control configuration and
systems/PLC ladder startup
programming, including • Metering connection
load shed/peak shaving vertification/testing
schemes

Power Management Services provides a complete range of design and


operational services including specifying, developing, installing, commis-
sioning, supporting and training users of power monitoring and control
systems and remote power switching systems. Engineers maintain
expertise in many areas such as communications, personal computers,
protective relaying, automatic control systems, and programmable control-
lers.

POWERLOGIC Workstations
Square D offers a complete systems approach to power monitoring.
POWERLOGIC Application and Engineering provides POWERLOGIC
workstations–tested and approved personal computers completely config-
ured based on the individual system requirements. POWERLOGIC
workstations are designed to handle large amounts of system information,
and provide it to those who need it,
when they need it. Workstations
placed in key locations allow plant
engineers, operators, maintenance
personnel, and others to make
informed decisions using real-time
and historical information.

PM&CS Technical Support


There are several ways to receive top
quality support on POWERLOGIC
and POWERLINK products;
• Phone: 615-287-3400
• Fax: 615-287-3404
• BBS: 615-287-3414
• Email: pmosuprt@squared.com
• D-Fax: 800-557-4556 (PM&CS
Index is Document #104)

38 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Management Services


POWERLOGIC University
POWERLOGIC University is a series of training courses designed to
improve your power management skills. The university focuses on how to
install, use, and maintain your POWERLOGIC systems, and how to get the
maximum value from them. The university also gives you an understanding
of power, associated terminology, and value of the data the POWERLOGIC
system and products provide. The university provides you with the tools
you will need to get the most out of your POWERLOGIC system. Courses
are taught at the POWERLOGIC headquarters in LaVergne, TN and
regionally.
The university offers courses to certify individuals in installing and maintain-
ing POWERLOGIC systems. These courses are geared toward the
installer, and provide all the necessary knowledge to mount and set up the
hardware, install the software, set up and configure communications, and
download firmware. Certification also provides you with the required
software tools to fully maintain and test the system.
The university also offers a series of customer training courses designed to
improve your skills with the POWERLOGIC system and associated devices.
Customers may attend one or all courses. After each course, a certificate of
completion is given, and credits toward a “POWERLOGIC Expert” degree
are recorded. After successfully completing nine credits, you will receive a
“POWERLOGIC Expert” diploma and POWERLOGIC shirt.
While attendance at the POWERLOGIC headquarters is ideal, we realize
that time is valuable. Therefore, correspondence courses are also avail-
able. Receive the course materials and a test which you complete at your
convenience and mail back to receive your certificate and credits for the
course.
An additional option is customer-site training. Any of the POWERLOGIC
courses can be conducted at your facility. Courses are also be tailored to
meet your specific training needs.
Engineers, maintenance technicians, electricians, operators, facilities
managers, and others involved in managing a facility’s electrical power
consumption will benefit from POWERLOGIC university. The curriculum is
specifically designed for the end user and installer.
For contractors and consultants, the curriculum gives you an expert
understanding of the POWERLOGIC system, allowing you to better serve
your customers. After attending the university, you will be able to specify
and install power equipment correctly. If you obtain product line certifica-
tion, you will be added to our published list of certified servicing companies.
After becoming a POWERLOGIC system expert, contractors and consult-
ants can train their end users.
For course descriptions and schedules contact your local sales office or
call (615) 287-3304 and ask for the POWERLOGIC University Training
Administrator.

SQUARE D 39
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Management Services


PQ/EM Consulting
Features
Engineering studies Monitoring services Technical seminars
• Power system • On site measurement • Power quality
checkups
• Remote measurement • Power management
• Service reliability
improvements • Power system • Power system
disturbance reports monitoring and data
• Harmonic studies interpretation
• Power management
• Power quality and reports • Energy auditing
energy management
• Energy use baselines • Your site or ours
• Power system data
analysis

Engineering solutions for your power management problems


Square D offers engineering services to solve power management prob-
lems in industrial, commercial, utility and institutional facilities. Power
Management Services includes solving electric power problems, monitoring
power system parameters, training power system users, and cost justifica-
tion for managers. Registered professional engineers with utility and facility
experience identify cost-effective solutions, whether or not the facility is
equipped with POWERLOGIC power monitoring and control systems or
other Square D systems. Square D provides fully-engineered system
Benefits of solutions to your power management problems.

Power Management

Services include Sample Power Management Issues


• Solving power quality Harmonic Distortion - Power systems can absorb a surprising amount of
harmonic currents without adverse effects. However, when harmonics
problems become excessive they can lead to production shutdowns, equipment
failure, and component overloading. Power factor correction capacitors are
• Recommending
particularly
power system susceptible
POWERLOGIC circuit
to har- monitor waveform
improvements monic capture shows high
distortion levels of current and
• Optimizing voltage harmonic
problems.
distortion.
equipment efficiency

• Reducing energy

costs

• Improving service

reliability

• Eliminating

production shutdowns Harmonic distortion decreases the transformer


capacity to the point that its true capacity is
exceeded for several hours each day.

40 SQUARE D
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Power Management Services


PQ/EM Consulting
Energy Costs - Like power quality, successful
electricity cost reduction requires more than just
power system data. Here, an industrial plant
collected data from their chiller system, but
neglected to analyze its implications. Using this
data, chiller operating problems and excessive
costs were traced to fouled tubes.
Remote Monitoring - Collecting information
from remote locations can be difficult. Square D
can collect power system data via telephone
lines, analyze problems, and produce power
quality and power management reports. These
reports can be faxed to your desk, or transferred
to your computer for cutting and pasting into
your weekly production report.
Voltage Sags - Sags usually occur due to
problems on the utility system feeding your
facility. Often it is difficult to distinguish between
sags and interruptions based on equipment
effects alone. Sag solutions may be far less
expensive, however, than solutions to interrup-
tions, so it is important to capture each event.
This data can also be used to pinpoint problems
inside the facility or on the utility system.
Energy Management - Electricity costs are
difficult to reduce when you do not know where
the energy is being used. Power Management
Services engineers can help you produce a
facility energy profile which identifies energy
consumers, measures their contribution to peak
demand, and recommends no-cost/low-cost
methods to reduce costs.
Wiring and Grounding - Many power-related
problems occur because basic wiring and
grounding practices are overlooked or allowed to
deteriorate. In other instances, recommended
power schemes are defeated, allowing vacuum
cleaners to be plugged into isolated ground
circuits and frequently-started induction motors
to be served from the same transformer as
sensitive computer supplies.

SQUARE D 41
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Year 2000 Compliance

HARDWARE
Square D Power Management Operation has evaluated and tested all
Comments
necessary POWERLOGIC products for proper handling of the “Year 2000”
Power Meters
PM-600, PM-620
Yes transition from December 31, 1999 to January 1, 2000. Test criteria also
included a leap year test for February 29, 2000. The following tables
Circuit Monitors
Series 2000:
indicate test results for those devices and, where necessary, solutions to
CM-2050, CM-2150, Yes
help ensure a successful Year 2000 transition. This information is subject to
CM-2250, CM-2350, change as additional development and testing occurs.
CM-2450, CM-2452
Series 200: POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring and Control System
CM-200, CM-208, Yes Hardware Evaluation
CM-244, CM-250
The internal clock incorporated in hardware devices has been designed to
Series 100:
CM-100, CM-108,
account for the Year 2000 transition. The table at the left shows the test
Yes
CM-144, CM-150 results for POWERLOGIC hardware utilizing an internal clock.
Digital Relay
DR-LX S01 X0A TBN Software Evaluation
DR-LX S01 X0A TEN Yes System Manager 3000 software products have been designed to operate
DR-LX S01 S0A TBN
DR-LX S01 S0A TEN as intended for their anticipated useful life, with special design consider-
ation given to proper handling of the Year 2000 transition. The SMS-3000
Transformer Temp Interface
PIF-85
Yes products in the table at the right have been tested to verify that the in-
tended performance of these software products continues through the Year
MICROLOGIC Breaker Interface Yes, when used with
PIF-3 SMS-3000 v3.02 or
2000 transition and for a period of time exceeding the anticipated useful life
later only. of these products.
DS Breaker Trip Unit
Yes Portions of EXPlorer, System Manager and communications software
810D
(EXP-500, EXP-550, SMS-700, SMS-770, SMS-121 for Windows 3.1 and
PSW-101) will work past the Year 2000 date. However, since the software
was developed for operating systems such as Windows 3.1 and earlier
versions of DOS, some of the time stamping portions will not work. The
known problem areas are history logging,
waveform capture and exporting files. Upgrading
SYSTEM Windows Platform to the SMS-3000 software family will be neces-
SOFTWARE (Windows NT 3.51 Comments
and above) sary if these functions are being implemented in
your application. Contact your local Square D
SMS-3000 Windows NT sales representative for upgrade pricing. Refer to
System Manager 3000 v3.02

SMS-1500 Windows 95 or Windows NT the table at the left for software selection.
PMX-1500 Windows 95 or Windows NT
POWERLOGIC Product Upgrades
SMS-1000 Windows 95 or Windows NT Yes Square D periodically offers upgrades of device
PMX-1000 Windows 95 or Windows NT and system software. In order to maximize the
benefits of the POWERLOGIC Power Monitoring
GFX-1000 Windows 95 or Windows NT and Control System, and to take full advantage of
SMS-121 Windows 95 or Windows NT design improvements, Square D recommends
History logging, waveform capture
that users upgrade and maintain their systems by
SMS-700 Windows 3.1 and exporting files affected. Upgrade taking full advantage of its upgrade offers for the
to SMS-1500 or SMS-3000. latest version of firmware and software.
System Manager

History logging, waveform capture


SMS-770 Windows 3.1 and exporting files affected. Upgrade
to SMS-1500 or SMS-3000.
SMS-121 History logging, waveform capture
(v2.23 or Windows 3.1 and exporting files affected. Upgrade
earlier) to SMS-121 v3.02 or SMS-1500.
History logging and exporting files
EXP-500 Windows 3.1 affected. Upgrade to PMX-1500 or
EXPlorer

SMS-1500.
History logging, waveform capture
EXP-550 Windows 3.1 and exporting files affected. Upgrade
to PMX-1500 or SMS-1500.
Com

DOS History logging affected. Upgrade


PSW-101
to SMS-1500 or PMX-1500.

42 SQUARE D
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Suggested System
Specifications
SECTION 16920-1

POWER MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

PART 1 GENERAL
1.01 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
A. Furnish and install a complete Power Monitoring and Control System
(PMCS) as detailed on the drawings and as described in this specifica-
tion. The system is defined to include, but not be limited to, remote
devices for monitoring, control and protection, device communication
interface hardware, inter-communication wiring, personal computer
workstations, software, printer where specified, and ancillary equipment.
B. The manufacturer shall demonstrate the system is not a prototype and
that similar systems have been field installed and successfully operated
for at least five years. The PMCS vendor shall have full responsibility
for insuring that the PMCS system performs as specified.
C. The PMCS shall utilize Ethernet as the high-speed backbone network
that supports direct connection of an unlimited number of personal
computer workstations anywhere on the network.
D. Each Personal Computer Workstation (PCW) connected to the network
shall have equal access to information provided by the power monitoring
devices for centralizing data display, data logging, alarming, event
recording, and other power monitoring operations. Each PCW shall be
independent of the other PCWs with its own software to allow the user to
retrieve and configure the information based on the user’s needs.
E. The high-speed network shall allow direct access to data provided by the
power monitoring devices for implementing automatic control.
F. Application software for personal computer workstations shall be
provided as described in Article 2.11 of this specification.
G. The PMCS shall be POWERLOGIC as manufactured by Square D
Company [or approved equal].
H. All products shall not violate any U. S. patents.

1.02 REFERENCES
A. All Power Meters and Circuit Monitors shall be UL 508 Listed, CSA
approved, and have CE marking.
B. The system shall comply with the applicable portions of NEMA
standards. In addition, the control unit shall comply with FCC Emission
Standards specified in Part 15, Sub-part J for Class A application.

1.03 SUBMITTALS
A. Indicate electrical characteristics and connection requirements. When
PMCS components are installed by the power equipment manufacturer,
the power equipment shop drawings shall clearly identify the compo-
nents, the internal connections, and all contractor connections. The
PMCS drawings shall show all PMCS components including necessary
component dimensions; type, size, and weight; location of conduit entry
and exit; single line diagram indicating external wiring requirements.
Drawings shall identify terminal blocks used for interconnections and
wire type to be used.
B. Product Data: Provide catalog sheets and technical data sheets to
indicate physical data and electrical performance, electrical characteris-
tics, and connection requirements.

SQUARE D 43
12/97
POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Suggested System
Specifications
1.04 QUALITY
A. The PMCS vendor shall be ISO 9000 registered to demonstrate quality
compliance.
B. PMCS components included within the power equipment lineups shall
be factory installed, wired and tested prior to shipment to the job site.

1.05 SYSTEM START-UP AND TRAINING


A. On-site start-up and training of the PMCS shall be included in the project
bid.
B. Start-up shall include a complete working demonstration of the PMCS
with simulation of possible operating conditions which may be encoun-
tered.
C. Training shall include any documentation and hands-on exercises
necessary to enable electrical operations personnel to assume full
operating responsibility for the PMCS after completion of the training
period.
D. The project bid shall include [ ] days start-up assistance and [ ]
days training to include [ ] trip(s).
E. The power monitoring vendor shall offer regularly scheduled factory
training for customers on all aspects of power monitoring and control,
including:
1. Comprehensive software and hardware setup, configuration, and
operation
2. Advanced monitoring and data reporting
3. Advanced power quality and disturbance monitoring
F. The power monitoring manufacturer shall provide a full time telephone
technical help center for customers.

PART 2 PRODUCT
2.01 POWER METERS
A. The information provided by the Power Meter shall include the follow-
ing quantities:
1. Current, per-phase & neutral
2. Volts, phase-to-phase & phase-neutral
3. Real Power (kW), per phase & three-phase total
4. Reactive Power (kVAR), per phase & three phase total
5. Apparent Power (kVA), per phase & three phase total
6. Power Factor (true), per-phase & three-phase total
7. Frequency
8. Demand Current, per-phase & neutral, present & peak
9. Real Power Demand (kWd), three phase total, present & peak
10. Reactive Power Demand (kVARd), three phase total, present & peak
11. Apparent Power Demand (kVAd), three phase total, present & peak
12. Real Energy (kWh), three phase total
13. Reactive Energy (kVARh), three phase total
14. Apparent Energy (kVAh), three phase total
15. Energy Accumulation modes, signed, absolute, energy in, energy out
16. Total Harmonic Distortion (THD), voltage & current, per phase
17. Date and Time Stamping, peak demands, power up/restart and resets
B. The Power Meter shall be accurate to 0.25% of reading plus 0.05% of
full scale for voltage and current sensing, and 0.5% of reading plus
0.05% of full scale for power and energy, accurate through the 31st
harmonic.

44 SQUARE D
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Suggested System
Specifications

1. These accuracies shall be maintained for both light and full loads.
2. No annual recalibration by users shall be required to maintain these
accuracies.
3. Voltage and current for all phases shall be sampled simultaneously
to assure high accuracy.
C. The meter shall be UL Listed per UL 508, CSA recognized under C22.2,
CE compliant, and tested for EMC in accordance with the IEC 1000-2,
1000-4, 1000-5 series of electrical tests (level 4), FCC compliant per
FCC Part 15, Class A, and vibration and temperature tested. The meter
module shall be rated for an operating temperature range of 0°C to 60°C.
D. The Power Meter metering inputs shall utilize current transformers for
the current inputs. It shall be rated 5A nominal and 10A full scale. In
addition, it shall be industrially and utility hardened to have an overload
withstand rating of 15A continuous and 500A for 1 second.
E. The device shall not require potential transformers or control power
transformers when applied at 600V or less. The power meter shall accept
control power over a range of 90-600Vac, 50 or 60 HZ, or 100-350Vdc.
F. Each Power Meter shall have built-in RS-485 data communications to
allow multipoint communication to multiple computer workstations,
programmable controllers, and other host devices, up to a data rate of
19,200 baud.
G. All information shall be available from the display or via RS-485
communications. It shall be possible to perform the setup via the
display. No dip switches or other hardware adjustments shall be required
for setup.
H. The power meter shall be installed as part of a power monitoring and
control system as indicated on the drawings. The RS-485 communica-
tions shall provide communications links up to 10,000 feet long.
I. The power meter shall communicate using:
1. The Modbus RTU protocol and connect to any host devices with a
Modbus-compatible port.
2. The Jbus protocol and connect to any host devices with a J-bus
compatible port.
3. The POWERLOGIC protocol and shall connect to any host devices
with a POWERLOGIC compatible port.
4. The three protocols mentioned above shall reside in the meter from
the factory and be field selectable as part of setup.
J. The data communications shall be optically isolated to provide reliable
operation.
K. When connected via the network to a POWERLOGIC computer, the
power meter shall provide logging, trending, and alarming information.
L. Each Power Meter shall be equipped with a two-line LCD display as
indicated on the project drawings.
M. To facilitate ease in mounting, the display shall be capable of being
mounted up to 50 feet (15 meters) from the metering module using RJ-
11 terminated communications cable. Regardless of mounting
configuration, the display shall always be optically isolated from the
power meter module.
N. The display shall scale readings automatically, without the need for
multipliers.
O. All setup information and reset commands shall be password protected.
P. A KYZ pulse initiator for communication of kWh, kVARh, or kVAh
information to third-party energy management systems shall be pro-

SQUARE D 45
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POWER MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS

Suggested System
Specifications
vided.
Q. The power meter shall provide diagnostics to trouble shoot miswired
installations.

2.02 CIRCUIT MONITORS


A. Electronic circuit monitors shall provide true rms metered values.
Information provided by each circuit monitor shall include frequency,
temperature, current, demand current, voltage, real power, reactive
power, apparent power, demand power, predicted demand power, power
factor, accumulated energy, accumulated reactive energy, total harmonic
distortion (THD) of each current and voltage, and K-factor of each
current.
B. The current and voltage signals shall be digitally sampled at a rate high
enough to provide valid data for waveform analysis and true rms
metering accurate beyond the 30th harmonic (fundamental of 60 Hz).
C. The Circuit Monitors shall be rated for an operating temperature range of
-25° C to 70° C and have an overcurrent withstand rating of 500 amps
for 1 second.
D. All setup parameters required by the Circuit Monitors shall be stored in
nonvolatile memory and retained in the event of a control power
interruption. Any battery or other device used to provide non-volatile
memory shall be serviceable from the front of the circuit monitor and
servicing shall not require removing the circuit monitor from the gear in
which it is mounted.
E. The Circuit Monitor shall maintain in nonvolatile memory maximum and
minimum values for each of the instantaneous values reported as well as
the time and date that the minimum or maximum was set.
F. The Circuit Monitors shall accept inputs from industry standard
instrument transformers (120 VAC secondary PTs and 5 A secondary
CTs). Connection to 480Y/277 VAC circuits shall be possible without
use of PTs. In the interest of safety, provision shall be made that if PTs
are not used, it shall not be necessary to bring voltages greater than 120
VAC (line to neutral) to the Circuit Monitor itself.
1. PT primaries through 1.2 kV shall be supported
2. CT primaries through 32 kA shall be supported
G. The Circuit Monitor shall be accurate to 0.15% of reading plus 0.05% of
full scale for voltage and current metering and 0.3% for all power and
energy functions.
1. These accuracies shall be maintained for both light and full loads.
2. No annual recalibration by users shall be required to maintain these
accuracies.
3. Voltage and current for all phases shall be sampled simultaneously
to assure high accuracy in conditions of low power factor or large
waveform distortions (harmonics).
H. Any Circuit Monitor may be applied in three-phase, three- or four-wire
systems. A fourth CT input shall be available to measure neutral or
ground current. If the fourth CT is not used, then a residual current shall
be calculated by vectorial addition of the phase currents. In four-wire
connections the Circuit Monitor shall utilize the circuit neutral common
reference and not earth ground, to provide metering accuracy.
I. The Circuit Monitor shall be capable of being applied without modifica-
tion at nominal frequencies of 50, 60, or 400 Hz.
J. The Circuit Monitor shall operate properly over a wide range of control
power including 100-264 VAC or 100-300 VDC. Connections to 18-60

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VDC shall also be available. Ride through capability should also be


available for backup control power for up to 8 seconds.
K. The Circuit Monitor shall surface or flush mount to an enclosure and be
provided with an attractive finish bezel ring.
1. The Circuit Monitors shall be equipped with an integral, continuous
duty, long-life display to provide local access to the following
metered quantities as well as the minimum and maximum value of
each instantaneous quantity since last reset of min/max:
2. Current, per phase rms, 3-phase average and neutral (if applicable)
3. Voltage, phase-to-phase, phase-to-neutral, and 3-phase average
(phase-to-phase and phase-to-neutral)
4. Real power, per phase and 3-phase total
5. Reactive power, per phase and 3-phase total
6. Apparent power, per phase and 3-phase total
7. Power factor, 3-phase total and per phase
8. Frequency
9. Demand current, per phase and three phase average
10. Demand real power, three phase total
11. Demand apparent power, three phase total
12. Accumulated Energy, (MWh and MVARh)
13. THD, current and voltage, per phase
14. K-factor, current, per phase
15. Reset of the following electrical parameters shall also be allowed
from the front of the Circuit Monitor:
a. Peak demand current
b. Peak demand power (kW) and peak demand apparent power
(kVA)
c. Energy (MWh) and reactive energy (MVARh)
16. Setup for system requirements shall be allowed from the front of the
Circuit Monitor. Setup provisions shall include:
a. CT rating [ ]:5)
b. PT rating [ ]:120)
c. System type [three-phase, 3-wire] [three-phase, 4-wire]
d. Demand interval (5-60 min.)
e. Watt-hours per pulse
17. All reset and setup functions shall have a means for protection
against unauthorized/accidental changes.
18. For ease in operator viewing, the display shall remain on continu-
ously, with no detrimental effect on the useful life of the Circuit
Monitor.
L. The Circuit Monitor shall be equipped with a front panel communica-
tions port as standard equipment. The port shall be completely
accessible during normal operation and shall not require exposure of the
operator to life-threatening voltage when in use. The operator shall be
able to quickly connect a small Personal Computer (PC) to this port
without use of tools or splices. This front panel port shall have all of the
communication functionality of the standard hard wired rear port. When
a connection is made to the front port, the Circuit Monitor shall disregard
communication from the rear port until the front port is disconnected.
M. It shall be possible to field upgrade the firmware in the Circuit Monitor

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to enhance functionality. These firmware upgrades shall be done
through either the front or rear communication connection. No Circuit
Monitor disassembly or changing of integrated circuit chips shall be
required. It shall not be necessary to de-energize the circuit or the
equipment to upgrade the firmware.
N. The following metered values as well as the minimum and maximum
instantaneous readings since last reset shall be communicated by the
Circuit Monitor:
1. Frequency
2. Temperature
3. Current, per phase rms and neutral (if applicable)
4. Current, 3-phase average rms
5. Current, apparent rms
6. Voltage, phase-to-phase and phase-to-neutral
7. Voltage unbalance, phase-to-phase and phase-to-neutral
8. Power factor, per phase
9. Power factor, 3-phase total
10. Real power, per phase and 3-phase total
11. Reactive power, per phase and 3-phase total
12. Apparent power, per phase and 3-phase total
13. Demand current, per phase and three-phase average
14. Demand real power, three-phase average
15. Demand reactive power, three-phase average
16. Demand apparent power, three-phase average
17. Accumulated energy, (MWh, MVAH, and MVARh)
18. Total Harmonic Distortion (THD), voltage and current, per phase
19. K-factor, per phase
O. All power demand calculations shall be done by any one of the following
calculation methods, selectable by the user:
〈 Thermal demand using a sliding window updated every 15 seconds.
The window length shall be set by the user from 5-60 minutes in
five minute increments.
〈 Block interval, with optional sub-intervals. The window length
shall be set by the user from 5-60 minutes in 5 minute intervals.
The user shall be able to set the sub-interval length from 5-30
minutes in 5 minute intervals.
〈 External Pulse Synchronization, utilizing a synch pulse provided
externally. An optional status input shall be used to sense the pulse.
〈 Sliding block interval with continuous sliding 15 second subinter-
vals.
1. The following demand readings shall be reported by the Circuit
Monitor:
a. Average demand current, per phase
b. Peak demand current, per phase
c. Average demand for real power, reactive power, and apparent
power
d. Predicted demand for real power, reactive power, and apparent
power
e. Peak demand for real power, reactive power, and apparent
power

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2. The default demand calculation method shall be a 15 minute sliding


window thermal demand.
P. Each Circuit Monitor shall be capable of receiving a broadcast message
over the communications network that can be used to synchronize
demand calculations by several Circuit Monitors. This message need not
be addressed specifically to any one Circuit Monitor.
Q. The following energy readings shall be reported by the Circuit Monitor:
〈 Accumulated energy
〈 Accumulated reactive energy
〈 Accumulated apparent energy
1. For real and reactive energy reported values, separate totals for
energy flow in each direction shall be kept, as well as an arithmetic
sum.
2. Each Circuit Monitor shall be capable of operating a solid state
KYZ output relay to provide output pulses for a user definable
increment of reported energy. Minimum relay life shall be in excess
of one billion operations.
R. All Circuit Monitors shall include current and voltage waveform capture
capability. Waveform capture shall be user selectable for 4, 12, 24, 36,
48, or 60 cycles of data.
1. Either type of waveform capture shall be initiated either from a
Personal Computer Workstation (PCW) running the appropriate
Power Monitoring and Control Systems software, or by the circuit
monitor as a user defined response to an alarm condition. In
addition, an external trigger can initiate the 12, 24, 36, 48, or 60
cycle waveform. The waveform capture sequence shall be initiated
within 1 millisecond after the trigger is sensed. (A user definable
delay shall determine how many of the cycles are shown before
and after the trigger event.)
2. The Circuit Monitor shall capture, and store in internal memory, 64
digitally sampled data points for each cycle of each phase voltage
and current.
3. The Circuit Monitor shall transmit the waveform samples over the
network to the personal computer workstation for display, archival,
and analysis.
4. Each voltage and current of all the phases shall be sampled
concurrently so that proper phase relationships are maintained, so
that harmonic flow analysis can be performed, and so that the effect
of a disturbance can be observed on all phase voltages and currents.
5. Harmonic analysis performed on the captured waveforms shall
resolve harmonics through the 31st.
6. The data used for the four cycle waveform capture display shall also
be used to derive metered quantities in order to provide meaningful
additional data.
7. All waveforms must reflect actual circuit performance. Waveforms
synthesized or composed over time shall not be acceptable.
S. Data logging may be accomplished either within the circuit monitor or at
the PCW, or both. Each circuit monitor shall be able to log data, alarms
and events, and multiple waveforms. The monitors shall offer up to 356
KB of on-board non-volatile memory. This information shall be
communicated to the PCW upon demand. Logged information to be
stored in each Circuit Monitor includes:
1. Up to 14 separate data logs shall be configurable by the user. Each
log entry shall be date and time stamped. The type of data for the

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log shall be selected from a list of 175 monitored values. Each log
entry shall be user configurable to consist of from one to over 75
values of instantaneous data, depending on the type of data. It shall
be possible to set up each log to take data at a different user defined
schedule interval. In addition, it shall be possible for a user to
define an event or new min/max condition that will trigger log file
entries.
2. Data logs can be configured by users to be Fill & Hold or Circular
(FIFO).
3. A Min/Max log file shall include the time, date, and value for the
minimum and maximum of each of the instantaneous metered
values.
4. An alarm and event log shall contain time, date, event information,
and coincident information for each user defined alarm or event.
This log shall have a capacity of up to 1,000 events selected from
over 100 alarms or events.
5. Waveform logs shall store captured waveforms, 4, 12, 24, 36, 48,
and 60 cycle as defined by the user. Waveform log entries shall be
scheduled at a user defined interval, externally triggered, or forced
in response to a user defined event. Waveform logs shall be either
Fill & Hold or Circular (FIFO) as defined by the user.
6. A simple user interface shall be available to enable the user to
allocate Circuit Monitor memory to different log functions.
T. Circuit Monitor Input/Output Options: Input/Output modules shall be
field replaceable. Circuit Monitors shall be equipped with one of the
following I/O options as shown on the project drawings:
1. Option One - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; one solid state input suitable for external end of demand
interval demand pulse detection
2. Option Two - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; eight solid state status inputs
3. Option Three - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; four solid state status inputs; three mechanical output
relays
4. Option Four - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; four solid state status inputs; three mechanical output
relays; one analog input, convertible from 0-5 VDC to 4-20 mA;
one analog output, 4-20 mA
5. Option Five - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; four solid state status inputs; three mechanical output
relays; one analog input, convertible from 0-5 VDC to 4-20 mA;
one analog output, 0-1 mA
6. Option Six - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; four solid state status inputs; three mechanical output
relays; four analog inputs, convertible from 0-5 VDC to 4-20 mA;
four analog outputs, 4-20 mA
7. Option Seven - One solid state output suitable for KYZ pulse
initiation; four solid state status inputs; three mechanical output
relays; four analog inputs, convertible from 0-5 VDC to 4-20 mA;
four analog outputs, 0-1 mA
U. Alarm events shall be user definable.
1. The following classes of events shall be available as alarm events:
a. Over/under current
b. Over/under voltage

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c. Current imbalance
d. Phase loss, current
e. Phase loss, voltage
f. Voltage imbalance
g. Over kVA
h. Over kW or kVAR into/out of load
i. Over/under frequency
j. Under power factor, true or displacement
k. Over THD
l. Over K-factor
m. Over demand, current or power
n. Reverse power
o. Phase reversal
p. Status Input change
q. End of incremental energy interval
r. End of demand interval
s. Over/under analog inputs
t. Current sag/swell
u. Voltage sag/swell
2. For each over/under metered value alarm, the user shall be able to
define a pick-up, drop-out, and delay.
3. There shall be four alarm severity levels in order make it easier for
the user to respond to the most important events first.
4. Indication of an alarm condition shall be given on the front panel.
V. Output Relay Control
1. Relay outputs shall operate either by user command sent over the
communication link, or set to operate in response to user defined
alarm event.
2. Output relays shall close in either a momentary or latched mode as
defined by the user.
3. Each output relay used in a momentary contact mode shall have an
independent timer that can be set by the user.
4. It shall be possible for individual relay outputs to be controlled by
multiple alarms in a wired “OR” configuration.
W. All Circuit Monitors noted on the project drawings shall include sag and
swell detection capability. This capability is characterized by the
following features:
1. The Circuit Monitor shall continuously monitor for disturbances in
the currents and incoming voltage. There shall be zero blind time;
each cycle shall be individually monitored.
2. Disturbance events less than one cycle in length shall be detected.
3. The user shall be able to set a threshold and delay which shall be
used by the circuit monitor to determine if an event has occurred.
The threshold shall be user defined as either a fixed setpoint or
relative setpoint. When using the relative setpoint, the Circuit
Monitor will set the nominal current or voltage equal to its present
average value. The Circuit Monitor will automatically adjust the
nominal current and voltage values to avoid nuisance alarms caused
by gradual daily variations of currents and voltages.
4. Upon detecting a disturbance, the Circuit Monitor shall be capable

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of :
a. Logging a waveform of the event, 12, 24, 36, 48, or 60 cycles
in length, of all phase currents and voltages. The sample rate
shall be of sufficient resolution to show the 31st harmonic for
each cycle.
b. Operating any output relay on an optional I/O module.
c. Recording the disturbance into an event log with a date and
time stamp to the millisecond.
d. Causing an operator alarm at the PCW workstation.
5. All data and waveform logs shall be communicated over the local
area network or through the front panel communications port so that
the user may view and analyze the data using the PMCS software
and workstation.
X. Where indicated on the drawings, the Circuit Monitors shall be designed
to run customized programs to greatly expand the Circuit Monitor’s
functionality for the particular installation.
1. These programs shall be written in a circuit monitor programming
language similar to a compiled “BASIC” language. It shall include
the following capabilities:
a. Scheduled tasks
b. Event Tasks
c. Math functions including: add, subtract, multiple, divide, sine,
cosine, square root, etc.
d. Logical functions including: AND, OR, XOR, NOT, shift, etc.
e. Loop commands
f. Compare statements
g. Counters and timers
2. The manufacturer shall offer custom programming services.
3. Changing programs shall not require any physical modifications to
the Circuit Monitor, such as changing computer chips or cards. All
changes shall be done via either of the communications ports.
4. Examples of custom programs would include:
a. Metering of specialized utility rate structures, including real
time pricing and curtailable rates
b. Data reduction using smart data logging
c. Automatic monthly logging/reset of kWH and Peak Demand
d. Statistical profile analysis of metered quantities
e. CBEMA power quality analysis
f. Calculations for IEEE-519 verification
g. Metering of combined utilities: gas, water, steam, electric
h. Non-critical control schemes, such as load control or power
factor correction, based on multiple conditions e.g. time of day
and input status
Y. Advanced harmonic information shall be available via the Circuit
Monitor. This shall include the calculation of the harmonic magnitudes
and angles through the 31st harmonic.
1. This information shall be available for all three phases, current and
voltage, plus the neutral current. (To ensure maximum accuracy for
analysis, the current and voltage information for all phases shall be
obtained simultaneously from the same cycle.)
2. The Circuit Monitor shall have a minimum of 100k of on board

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memory to log harmonic magnitudes and angles.
3. The harmonic magnitude shall be reported as a percentage of the
fundamental or as a percentage of the rms values, as selected by the
user.

2.03 MOLDED CASE CIRCUIT BREAKER ELECTRONIC TRIP


UNITS
A. Electronic Trip Units shall be provided as designated on the project
drawings. All Electronic Trip Units shall be UL Listed.
B. They shall provide the following breaker/trip unit information to the
PMCS network:
1. Breaker frame type (i.e. LE, ME, NE, PE, SE)
2. Breaker sensor rating
3. Rating plug
4. Protective settings
C. The Electronic Trip Units shall provide individual phase and ground
ammeter information to the PMCS network.
D. The Electronic Trip Units shall provide the following trip information to
the PMCS network:
1. Date/time of last trip
2. Type of last trip (overload, short circuit, ground fault)
3. Magnitude of phase and ground fault at time of last trip
E. The Electronic Trip Units shall provide the following maintenance
information to the PMCS network:
1. Number of overload trips
2. Number of short circuit trips
3. Number of ground fault trips

2.04 LOW VOLTAGE POWER CIRCUIT BREAKER TRIP UNITS


A. Low Voltage Power Circuit Breaker Trip Units shall be digital and true
rms sensing and provided as designated on the project drawings.
B. The trip units shall be integral to the circuit breaker, and include the
following:
1. Unit status indicator
2. Integral testing
3. Adjustable long delay and ampere setting
4. Local mode of trip indicators
5. Rating plug
6. Local hi-load indication
7. [Adjustable short time delay and pickup]
8. [Adjustable ground fault delay and pickup]
9. [Selectable I2t on short time and ground fault]
10. [Zone selective interlocking]
C. The trip unit shall include an integral, four digit, alphanumeric display to
indicate the following:
1. Amperes
2. Peak power (MW)
3. Present power (MW)
4. Energy (MWh)

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5. Mode of trip
6. Service trip messages
D. The trip units shall be powered from within the circuit breaker without
the need for an external power source. Optionally, control power for
display and communication may be provided by an external source as
indicated on the project drawings.
E. They shall have the ability to communicate up to 19.2 k baud on the
PMCS network without the need for additional communication inter-
faces.
F. The trip units shall provide the following breaker identification informa-
tion to the PMCS network:
1. Frame size
2. Rating plug and multiplier
G. The following trip information shall be available over the PMCS
network:
1. Breaker tripped
2. Cause of trip
3. Time of trip
4. Trip currents: per phase and three-phase average
5. Number of trips by type (i.e. instantaneous, ground, etc.)
H. Breaker status and maintenance information shall be available over the
PMCS network including:
1. Breaker open or closed
2. Number of open/close operations
3. Number of breaker trips
4. Breaker loading in percent of capacity based on long delay pickup
setting
I. It shall be possible to operate the breaker remotely via the PMCS
network. This function shall be password protected.
J. The following metered values shall be available over the PMCS
network:
1. Current, per phase rms, ground, and neutral (if applicable)
2. Current, three-phase average rms
3. Power factor, three-phase
4. Real power, three-phase
5. Accumulated real energy
6. Energy (Wh)
7. Present and peak demand current, per phase, neutral, and three-
phase average
8. Present, peak, and predicted demand power (kW).
K. The following values shall also have minimum and maximum readings
available:
1. Current, per phase rms, ground, and neutral (if applicable)
2. Current, three-phase average rms
3. Power factor, three-phase
4. Power, three-phase (kW)
L. Energy reported values available over the network, shall include separate
totals for energy flow in each direction, as well as an arithmetic sum.
M. The power demand shall be calculated using the sliding window method

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with a user selected window of 5-60 minutes, in 5 minute intervals.

2.05 TRANSFORMER TEMPERATURE MONITORS


A. Transformer Temperature Monitors shall be provided for each dry-type
and cast resin transformer noted on the project drawings. All Trans-
former Temperature Monitors shall be UL Listed.
B. The Transformer Temperature Monitors shall provide the following
information to the PMCS network.
1. Coil temperatures - phases A, B, and C
2. Hottest coil temperature
3. Fan relay status
4. Alarm relay status
5. Emergency over-temperature relay status
6. Setpoints for fans, alarm and over-temperature relays

2.06 ELECTRONIC MOTOR PROTECTIVE DEVICES


A. Electronic Motor Protective Devices as noted on the project drawings
shall be able to model (learn) the thermal loading of the motor and cool
down characteristics to maximize protection during continuous and load
cycling operation.
B. Each unit shall be equipped with industry standard RS-485 data
communications and utilize the same data communication cables as the
other power monitoring devices in the system.
C. Historical operating information such as running hours since last
commissioning, number of starts/trips since last commissioning, number
of overload trips/ground fault trips and similar data shall be displayed on
the front of the device and be available via data communications to
programmable logic controllers and personal computer workstations
throughout the PMCS network for control, alarming, data logging, and
event recording.
D. The Motor Protective Devices shall provide fault diagnosis data such as
pre-trip motor and ground fault currents, unbalance ratio, and maximum
stator RTD temperature.
E. Each motor circuit noted on the drawings shall be equipped with a
Circuit Monitor to provide extensive power monitoring information.
F. The Motor Protective Devices shall accept dc control power.
G. Motor Protective Devices shall be UL Listed.

2.07 DIGITAL PROTECTIVE RELAYS


A. Digital protective relays shall be installed as noted on the project
drawings. These relays shall accept three-phase inputs from industry
standard current transformers with 1 or 5 Amp nominal secondaries.
B. The protective relay shall provide three-phase overcurrent protection
(ANSI 50/51) and ground overcurrent protection (ANSI 50/51G or 50/
51N).
C. The user shall be able to select a variety of time current curves from
several different families. Families of curves shall include definite time,
inverse, very inverse, extremely inverse and ultra inverse. All families
of curves shall be suitable for coordination in typical medium voltage
applications; the ultra inverse curves shall be provided to enhance
coordination with fuses.
D. A front panel keypad and display shall be provided. From this front
panel it shall be possible to:

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1. Select Time-Current Characteristic curves
2. Set CT ratios
3. Display phase current information
4. Observe Digital Relay trip status
5. Gather diagnostic information about the relay
6. View cause of trip
E. An optional communication port shall be factory available. Over the
communications provided by this port it shall be possible to:
1. Communicate at up to 19.2 k baud over the PMCS network
2. Operate the breaker by command
3. Communicate instantaneous rms currents per phase and ground and
demand currents per phase to the PMCS software.
4. Communicate breaker status, and type of trip including fault
magnitude to the PMCS software.
5. Communicate the Digital Relay settings to the PMCS software.
F. There shall be two options for control power for the relay:
1. Option 1: 120 VAC
2. Option 2: 48/125 VDC

2.08 SYSTEM DISPLAY UNITS


A. System Display units shall be provided that include easy to read, pre-
configured screens displaying data from the electronic trip units in an
organized manner. The system display shall be UL Listed.
B. System Display Installation
1. System Display units shall be installed by the manufacturer in the
switchgear as indicated on the drawings.
2. The System Display units shall be flush mounted on switchgear
door panels.
C. System Display for Electronic Trip Units
1. System Display units shall be provided for display the data
available from selected Electronic Trip Units connected on the
individual data transfer network.
2. The System Display unit shall utilize a 4 line by 20 character, high
contrast LCD technology display with back lighting to provide high
reliability and superior readability in all light conditions.
3. The level of back lighting as well as the contrast shall be adjustable.
4. The System Display shall be equipped with a screen saver feature to
extend the life of the display.
5. Data shall be displayed in a logically organized manner complete
with the proper scaling and units.
D. System Display Keypad
1. The System Display unit shall allow for easy operation by provid-
ing a keypad with large keys for operator selections.
2. The keys shall have a raised perimeter and tactile feedback to
provide a positive response even with gloved hand operation.
3. The keys shall be clearly marked to indicate the function and
separated into meaningful groups with display prompting to assist
the user in operation.
4. It shall be possible to sequentially view all available data from a
selected device by single keystrokes advancing through the various

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display pages.
5. It shall be possible to view the same pages of data from other
Electronic Trip Units by single keystroke advancing back and forth
from device to device.
E. System Display Configuration
1. Each System Display unit shall be configured by the manufacturer
with all necessary data.
2. It shall be possible to change the configuration for each System
Display unit using the keypad provided on each display.
3. Access to configuration functions shall be password protected to
prevent unauthorized or accidental modification.
F. Resetting Device Data Using the System Display
1. The System Display unit shall permit the reset of the stored min/
max values in the electronic trip units.
2. It shall also permit the reset of the accumulated energy values, peak
demands, and the time and date stamps stored in the Circuit
Monitors.
3. These resets shall be limited to authorized persons by means of
password protection.

2.09 PMCS NETWORK


A. Connecting and Networking of Power Monitoring Devices
1. All data stored in the Power Monitoring Devices shall be accessible
to external devices by means of RS-485 serial communications.
2. It shall be possible to connect from one communications port to
another (daisy-chain) such that up to 32 Power Monitoring Devices
may be connected to form a continuous communications link
extending up to 10,000 feet.
3. Communications links shall be compatible with the RS-485 multi-
drop communications standards.
4. Communication rates on the links shall be adjustable up to 19.2 k
baud to provide acceptable throughput of power monitoring device
data.
5. It shall be possible to connect up to an unlimited number of
communications links into a large network using ethernet hubs to
form a high-speed power monitoring and control network.
B. General Network Information
1. The PMCS shall be connected by means of Ethernet as the high-
speed backbone network.
2. The high-speed network shall consist of POWERLOGIC Ethernet
Gateways that allow display units, computers, programmable
controllers, and other higher level or sub-networks to access the
electrical data being gathered by the electronic Circuit Monitors,
Electronic Trip Units, Transformer Temperature Monitors, Elec-
tronic Motor Protective Devices, and Digital Protective Relays.
3. It shall be possible to add an unlimited number of Personal
Computer Workstations (PCWs) to the high speed network.
Addition of a new PCW shall not require any modification to any
existing PCWs. Adding PCWs shall require only a simple network
tap; extensive rewiring or wiring to each group of monitoring
devices shall not be required.
4. Each personal computer connected to the network shall be a
Windows NT or Windows 95 workstation with a standard Ethernet

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Network Interface Card (NIC).
C. POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateways
1. All of the power monitoring devices shall be connected to the
Ethernet backbone by one or more POWERLOGIC Ethernet
Gateways (EGW) as shown on project drawings.
2. The EGW shall connect to the Ethernet backbone via unshielded
twisted pair cable (UTP) or fiber optics via an attachment unit
interface (AUI) port.
3. The AUI port shall be equipped with control power (12V) such that
an external power supply is not required to power the transceiver.
4. There shall be indicating LED’s for the Ethernet connections to
assist in trouble-shooting. Indicators are required for Transmit,
Receive, Collision, Link and Polarity of the connection.
5. The Ethernet Gateway shall support Circuit Monitors, Power
Meters, and other POWERLOGIC-compatible devices through one
or more 4-wire, RS-485 communication ports via standard daisy-
chain connections using Belden 8723 or equivalent. Each RS-485
serial port shall operate up to 19.2 kbaud. Each RS-485 serial port
shall have a corresponding LED to indicate communications
activity on the daisy-chain.
6. The EGW shall be fully TCP/IP compliant thereby allowing the
power monitoring software access to power monitoring information
from anywhere on the local area network (LAN) or via the Wide
Area Network (WAN).
7. The protocol used over ethernet by the EGW shall be Manufacturers
Messaging Specification (MMS) an international standard (IEC
9506) which is an open, well-defined protocol.
8. Setup of the EGW shall be accomplished via an integral, RS-232
interface on-board the EGW. All setup parameters shall password
protected to guard against intentional and/or inadvertent access. It
shall also be possible via this RS-232 port to upgrade the firmware
of the EGW in the field to accommodate new system features.
9. All Ethernet cabling shall be installed by a qualified data communi-
cations cable installer or the electrical contractor qualified to install
data communications equipment. All communications cabling shall
be Category 5 rated for 100MB.
10. The system shall provide for secure operation via an encryption
algorithm such that unauthorized personnel cannot intentionally or
inadvertently alter the communication or setup parameters.
11. A dedicated Ethernet gateway shall be used which requires no
hardware adjustments or modifications. Standard personal
computers (PCs) or programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are not
acceptable as gateways to the power monitoring and control devices
12. The Ethernet gateway shall be equipped with an integral power
supply suitable for connection to 120VAC, 240VAC, 50/60Hz, or
125VDC input supply. The power supply input shall be fused and
readily serviceable in the field. An external power supply is not
acceptable.
13. The EGW shall be small, self-contained, and suitable for mounting
in an electrical closet, telephone room or network room. It shall
also be suitable for mounting in instrument compartments in
electrical equipment. It shall be no larger than 5"H x 8"W x 10"D
in size. It shall be possible to side or top mount the EGW using
optional mounting brackets.

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D. Interface to Existing Systems
1. The high-speed network utilized by the PMCS system shall permit
easy interface with the Building Automation System (BAS).
a. Data located in the power monitoring devices and PLC
registers and associated inputs/outputs shall be made available
to the BAS vendor via Circuit Monitor and/or programmable
controller register lists.
b. Hardware and software required by the BAS to retrieve this
data from the PMCS data highway shall be the responsibility
of the BAS vendor.
2. The network shall have POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateways
installed as noted on the project drawings that allow electrical plant
information flow with existing POWERLOGIC networks.
a. Data located in the power monitoring devices and PLC
registers and associated inputs/outputs shall be made available
to the factory automation vendor via Circuit Monitor and/or
programmable controller register lists.
b. Hardware and software required by the factory automation
system to retrieve this data from the PMCS data highway, shall
be the responsibility of the factory automation vendor.
E. Additional Network Media Options
1. Fiber optics shall be installed where shown on the project drawings.
Fiber optic modems and interface hardware shall be provided by the
PMCS vendor as required. Use of fiber optics shall be transparent
to PMCS software and monitoring devices.
2. Telephone modems shall be installed where shown on the project
drawings. Telephone modems and interface hardware shall be
provided by the PMCS vendor as required. Use of telephone
modems shall be transparent to PMCS software and monitoring
devices.
3. Wireless ethernet shall be installed where shown on the project
drawings. Wireless ethernet and interface hardware shall be
provided by the PMCS vendor as required. Use of wireless ethernet
shall be transparent to PMCS software and monitoring devices.
4. Ethernet shall be used where shown on the project drawings.
POWERLOGIC Ethernet Gateways shall be provided by the PMCS
vendor and installed as necessary. Ethernet network connections
shall be established using industry standard Ethernet protocols such
TCP/IP. All components shall work with existing Ethernet
Gateway, Router, and Hub technology. Use of Ethernet shall be
transparent to PMCS software and monitoring devices.

2.10 PERSONAL COMPUTER WORKSTATIONS (PCWs)


A. The PMCS shall include Personal Computer Workstations complete with
PMCS Application Software as specified as in Article 2.11 of this
specification, and shall be located as designated on the project drawings.
It shall be pre-configured with all software, configuration files, and one-
line drawings by the vendor and ready to connect and operate when
delivered to the job site.
B. Hardware Requirements
1. The PMCS system shall also include [ ] factory supplied
Personal Computer Workstations capable of displaying information
from all Circuit monitors.
2. Each Workstation shall consist of a Pentium or higher CPU, color

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VGA monitor, Microsoft Windows NT/Windows 95, network
interface board or Ethernet communications card, CD-ROM and/or
[3.5 in] floppy drive(s), [ ] Mbyte RAM (32 Mbyte minimum),
and [ ] Mbyte hard drive storage capability (500 Mbyte free hard
disk space minimum).
3. It shall be possible to operate networked computer workstations in a
client/server environment to allow data sharing and viewing with/on
any computer on the network. Each workstation shall have
complete access to all PMCS information. The number of worksta-
tions connected on the network shall not be restricted. It shall also
be possible to have one or more standalone computer workstations
in a monitoring system where PC networking is not required.
C. Software Requirements
1. The manufacturer shall supply PMCS application software which
provides the operator user friendly access to all Circuit monitor
data, breaker/contactor/switch status and manual control, communi-
cation alarms, captured waveforms and logged data.
2. In addition to the PMCS application software programs, each PCW
shall permit the use of other software programs as desired by the
user.

2.11 PMCS APPLICATION SOFTWARE


A. General
1. The PMCS shall be supplied with user-friendly application software
suitable for operation on personal computer workstations which
serve as central control stations by monitoring the devices in the
system, recording events, indicating alarm conditions, and display-
ing and logging device data.
2. The software shall be developed by the manufacturer of the
monitoring devices, and shall be designed specifically for power
monitoring.
3. The vendor shall provide a list of all the software needed on the
project and indicate which packages are being supplied.
4. The vendor shall describe the procedure to be used to allow the
software to support additional monitoring devices at a future date,
including graphics. The description shall be in sufficient detail to
allow the user to make the modifications without vendor support.
5. The software shall be configured, not programmed. All software
shall be configured by the vendor and delivered ready to use. This
configuration shall include preparation of all graphics, displays, and
interactive one line diagrams required as a part of this project.
6. Any development keys or programming tools needed by the user to
make modifications to the screens, interactive one-line diagrams, or
displays shall be provided by the vendor.
7. The vendor shall pre-configure the software to be ready to display
data from at least 20 additional monitoring devices that may be
added at a later date. Configuration shall be to the point that when
additional monitoring devices are added, the user shall only need to
convey to the software the communications address and type of the
new device. The software shall then be able to display all data from
that device in a format identical to that used for other devices of the
same type.
8. The software vendor shall offer regularly scheduled classes to
provide instruction on using application software and associated
monitoring devices to manage a PMCS.

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B. Software Options
〈 Application Software shall be supplied by the PMCS manufacturer
to support system configuration, monitoring of the devices, data
logging, alarming, and other operations associated with the PMCS.
Each Personal Computer Workstation (PCW) shall be equipped
with PMCS software from the options listed below, as noted on the
project drawings. Different PCWs can have different software
options installed; installation of a given software option on any
PCW shall not limit the software options on any other PCW.
〈 The software package(s) noted on the project drawings and
described below, fully configured by the vendor, shall be provided.
1. Windows NT/Windows 95 Platform
a. Microsoft Windows NT/Windows 95, 32 bit client/server
application provides both standalone monitoring and network
connectivity solutions over the PC LAN or WAN. Network
capabilities allow remote access and data sharing of real-time
power system information. Applications are designed to
monitor the entire system of power monitoring devices in the
background for alarms, events, and data logging, allowing the
operator to perform other tasks with the workstation.
b. The following core products shall be provided as noted on the
project drawings. In addition, all add-on modules described
below shall be provided as noted in the project drawings.
1) Basic Power Monitoring - Standalone (PMX-1500). This
software package shall operate on either Windows 95 or
Windows NT. It shall be used where all of the power
monitoring data shall be retrieved and displayed on
individual PCs.
(a) Shall support over 1000 PMCS devices, and poll all
as required.
(b) Shall provide security to protect system data.
(1) Shall support unlimited user accounts, each
with a unique name and password.
(2) Shall provide ten privilege access levels that
determine which functions each user can access.
(3) Set up functions shall be password protected.
(c) Device setup shall be accessible in both on-line and
off-line modes.
(d) Shall permit device setup including configuration of
circuit monitor data and waveform logs. Shall allow
the user to define circuit monitor alarms and
configure circuit monitor relay operation.
(e) Shall allow devices and quantities to be organized
into logical groups (function, location, department,
etc.). Groups shall be user defined, each group
having a unique name.
(f) Shall provide resets of all supported devices. Shall
allow resets by device or by group of devices.
(g) Shall include an on-line, context sensitive help
system.
(h) Events shall be recorded in an Event Log.
(1) Event Log shall be capable of holding at least
1000 events. The actual number of events shall

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user defined and only be limited by size of
storage drive.
(2) The Event Log shall record date/time of the
event, event description , and user name (if
applicable).
(3) The Event Log shall record occurrences that are
related to the operation of the software such as
breakers opening, or closing, loss of power, loss
of device communications, user logon, changes
to system setup, etc.
(i) Shall monitor for alarm conditions detected by each
device and indicate the alarm at the PCW.
(1) Alarms shall be user defined pick-ups and drop-
outs.
(2) Shall include pre-defined system alarms.
(3) Ten severity levels for analog and digital alarm
conditions shall be supported.
(4) Each severity level shall provide user selected
indication including audible, visible, and/or
required acknowledgment.
(5) Alarm severity levels shall allow further
customization by requiring password acknowl-
edgment of alarms and by associating a unique
color and/or sound with the level.
(6) Alarms shall be reported by exception.
(7) At any time, a summary of all active alarms
may be viewed.
(8) Alarms shall be recorded in the event log.
(9) Alarms shall be on-board or PC-based.
(j) Shall display digital status inputs.
(k) Shall provide real time, user friendly tabular displays
of electric plant information.
(l) Shall log PMCS data to the PC hard disk at user
specified intervals.
(1) Shall be capable of exporting logged data to
other file types used by other common
commercially available software products.
(2) Shall allow logging of non-electrical quantities
such as water, gas, steam, and air pressure.
(m) Shall retrieve and display tables of historical data
recorded over time.
(n) Shall provide time trend plots of historical data over
time.
(1) Shall be possible to overlay on the same plot
information from multiple circuit monitors.
(2) Shall be possible to plot only a portion of the
total data available.
(3) The user shall be able to specify the beginning
and ending date and time of the data to be
plotted.
(o) Shall retrieve and display data and alarm and event
logs created and stored in circuit monitors.

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(p) Shall capture and log waveforms and harmonic


information based on user specified criteria.
(1) Shall provide graphical waveform displays for
the voltages, phase currents, and residual
current monitored by circuit monitors.
(2) The following information shall be calculated
and displayed based on minimum of 4 cycles of
data:
(a) Total Harmonic Distortion (THD), rms
magnitudes, peak values, Crest Factors
(CF), and magnitudes of the individual
harmonics.
(b) All harmonics calculations shall be based
on samples covering multiple cycles in
order to reduce inaccuracies caused by
sampling discontinuities.
(3) Shall retrieve, display, and store 4, 12, 24, 36,
48, and 60 cycle waveforms from circuit
monitors.
(q) Shall allow Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE).
(1) Shall serve system data to other applications
supporting DDE for advanced reporting and
graphics.
(2) Shall read, display, log, trend, and alarm DDE
data from other applications.
(3) Shall allow the creation of custom quantities to
read DDE quantities from other applications
and metered values from other utilities (gas,
water, steam , and air pressure).
(r) Shall enable monitoring in more than one location by
dialing up remote sites and automatically polling
devices.
(s) Shall comply with the Open Database Connectivity
(ODBC) standards of data storage to allow other
software products easy access to the stored informa-
tion. Shall be possible to format data stored by the
server for any ODBC database.
(t) After power loss and restoration shall restart
automatically, go on-line and resume logging and
alarming.
(u) Shall be capable of password-protected control of
system operations from the PCW including the
operation of Circuit monitor outputs, PLC outputs,
electronic trip units, digital protective relays, and
other devices.
(v) Shall allow user to create custom tables for viewing
electric system information in convenient formats.
Custom tables shall be easily modified as need
arises.
2) Full System Power Monitoring - Standalone (SMS-1500)
(a) Shall have all functionality of Basic Power Monitor-
ing - Standalone (PMX-1500) described above and
the additional functionality described below.
(b) Shall include a task manager scheduling capability

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that provides automated program operations for
repetitive tasks. Such tasks shall include scheduled
resets, device log and file retrieval, generating and
printing reports, launching executables, sending
email, and activating beepers. Frequency and
execution of automated tasks shall be user defined.
(c) Shall provide real time, user friendly bar chart and
meter displays of electric plant information.
(d) Shall allow creation of custom real time trend plots,
charts, and meter panels for viewing electric system
information in convenient formats. Custom displays
shall be easily modified as the need arises.
(e) Shall allow user to develop reports for any
displayable electrical system information.
(1) Shall provide options to simplify routine
printouts of various data for standard reports.
(2) User shall be allowed to modify reports.
(f) Shall allow the user to save and retrieve computer
workspaces that include user selected graphics,
tables, meters, and bar charts.
3) Single Device Monitoring (One device at a time) - Option
(SMS-121)
(a) Shall have all functionality of Full System Power
Monitoring – Standalone (SMS-1500) described
above, with the following exception: the software
shall communicate with one device at a time.
4) Advanced System Power Monitoring - Client/Server
(SMS-3000)
(a) Shall have all functionality of Full System Power
Monitoring - Standalone (SMS-1500) described
above, and shall provide these functions on the same
PC and/or distribute information processing across
the PC LAN or WAN. The server shall operate on
Windows NT, while the client s may operate on
Windows 95 or Windows NT.
(b) Shall display system information on the local PC and
on any client PC that is accessible via the PC LAN
or WAN and has the appropriate PMCS software (see
Section c. below, Optional PMCS software add-on
modules.)
(1) Shall allow connection to network server via
modem to access system information and
acknowledge alarms from a PC or laptop at any
remote location.
(2) Shall broadcast alarms across the PC LAN or
WAN.
(3) Shall log PMCS data to any logical drive
including the local computer hard disk and any
remote drive accessible via a network PC or
server.
c. Optional PMCS client software for use with the Windows NT
and Windows 95 based, system monitoring applications
described above include:
1) Power Monitoring Client (PMX-1000) - [requires SMS-

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3000]
(a) Shall be located wherever needed on any PC in the
monitoring system connected to the server via LAN,
WAN, or modem.
(b) Shall display all system information listed above in
Basic Power Monitoring - Standalone (PMX-1500)
collected by the network server from the power
monitoring devices.
2) System Manager Client (SMS-1000) - [requires SMS-
3000]
(a) Shall be located wherever needed on any PC in the
monitoring system connected to the server via LAN,
WAN, or modem.
(b) Shall display all system information listed above in
Advanced System Power Monitoring – Client/Server
collected by the network server from the power
monitoring devices.
3) Interactive Graphics Client (GFX-1000) - [requires PMX-
1500, SMS-121,SMS-1500, or SMS-3000]. The
Interactive Graphics Client shall reside independently on
separate PCs networked to the server, or on any PC with
any other PMCS power monitoring software as indicated
on the drawings.
(a) Interactive Graphics software shall be provided that
is compatible with the PMCS software.
(b) Shall be located wherever needed on any PC in the
monitoring system connected to the server via LAN,
WAN, or modem.
(c) The software shall display real-time information
collected by the network server from the power
monitoring devices on custom drawings including
power one-line system drawings, equipment
elevation drawings, shop floor layouts, legends,
process drawings, etc.
(d) It shall be possible to display any of the quantities
available from the power monitoring devices or
programmable logic controllers in the location, size,
and color selected by the user.
(e) The software shall provide the ability to perform
executables and launch other programs.
(f) The Interactive Graphics software shall allow the
user to zoom, scale, and scroll the drawings to the
desired degree of magnification.
(g) The software shall be capable of displaying status of
circuit breakers (open/closed/tripped), status of
transformer fans (on/off), transformer coil and motor
temperatures, power factor capacitors (on/off),
POWERLINK AS circuit breaker status and control,
and other information available on the PMCS
network. The data shall be available in multiple
formats value blocks, meters, and bar charts.
(h) From within any drawing the user shall have the
ability to link and display drawings in a hierarchical
fashion to allow quick access to related drawings.

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(i) The Interactive Graphics software shall allow the
user to manually control various system operations
with proper password entry (e.g. load transfer).
(j) Analog functions blocks shall be included to display
the condition (e. g. high, low, or alarm) of any
metered quantity such as current, voltage, tempera-
ture, etc.
(k) Components shown on one-line diagrams shall be
color-coded based on the on/off status signals form
the device.
(l) Vendor shall supply custom graphic screens based on
user supplied drawings.
2. Software Service Agreement
a. The electrical equipment manufacturer shall include a [ ]
[1], [2], or [3] years Software Service Agreement which
provides customer with software upgrades for the software
specified above as they are available.

2.12 AUTOMATIC CONTROL


A. Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) shall be provided which
communicate with the Circuit Monitors Electronic Trip Units, Trans-
former Temperature Monitors, Motor Protective Devices, Digital
Protective Relays, and other compatible devices for performing control
operations.
B. Each PLC shall include ladder programs which will direct the automatic
control operations as specified.
C. Processor, input, output, and network interface cards shall be provided as
necessary to implement the sensing and automatic control operations.
D. Data pertaining to the automatic control system shall be transmitted via
the PMCS network to the remote personal computer workstations.
1. PLCs and PCWs shall operate independently of each other, and
shall not be affected by the operation of any other PCW.
E. At a minimum the application software at the personal computer
workstation shall provide the following:
1. Interactive color-graphics one-line of automatic control system
(breaker status, relays status, etc.).
2. All automatic control operations (open/close breaker, relay
operation, etc.) shall be date/time stamped and recorded in an event
log.
3. Setup and display alarm conditions for automatic control operations
shall be possible with each alarm condition entered in the event log.
4. Manual operator intervention via the keyboard or interactive one-
line graphics shall be provided such that any point in the process
may be controlled.
5. Manual intervention shall be password protected to prevent
inadvertent or unauthorized override of the control scheme.
6. Protective relaying functions, anti-paralleling interlocks, or load
limits shall not be defeatable.

PART 3 EXECUTION
3.01 INSTALLATION
A. PMCS components, including Circuit Monitors, Electronic Trip Units,

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Transformer Temperature Monitors, Motor Protection Devices, and
Digital Relays, included within the power equipment lineups shall be
factory installed, wired and tested prior to shipment to the job site.
B. All control power, CT, PT and data communications wire shall be factory
wired and harnessed within the equipment enclosure.
C. Where external circuit connections are required, terminal blocks shall be
provided and the manufacturer’s drawings must clearly identify the
interconnection requirements including wire type to be used.
D. All wiring required to externally connect equipment lineups shall be
installed by the electrical contractor.
E. Contractor interconnection wiring requirements shall be clearly
identified on the PMCS system drawings.

END OF SECTION

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Glossary of Terms

access – Allowed availability to information on a network.


accumulated energy – A running accumulation over time of the energy monitored in
a given circuit. The total energy consumed is obtained by continuously
integrating instantaneous real power with respect to time.
accumulated reactive energy – A running accumulation over time of the reactive
energy monitored in a given circuit.
address – 1) Reference number assigned to a memory location or interfaced device.
2) A step in the application program at which a specific instruction can be found
(program address). 3) A unique register location used to hold specific data
(register address).
ambient temperature – The temperature within an encompassed atmosphere.
analog – A physical quantity, such as voltage or shaft position, that normally varies
in a continuous manner.
asum – The arithmetic sum of the magnitudes of the fundamental and individual
harmonics as opposed to the vectorial sum.
ANSI – Abbreviation for American National Standards Institure.
apparent power, 3-phase total – The total volt-amps consumed in a 3-phase circuit.
average demand current, Phase A – Average demand for Phase A current
calculated using a sliding window over a given time interval. Also known as
thermal demand current.
average demand current, Phase B – Average demand for Phase B current
calculated using a sliding window over a given time interval. Also known as
thermal demand current.
average demand current, Phase C – Average demand for Phase C current
calculated using a sliding window over a given time interval. Also known as
thermal demand current.
average demand real power – Average demand for real power calculated using a
sliding window over a given time interval (ranging from 1-60 minutes in 1 minute
increments for the circuit monitor).
Baud rate – The rate of speed at which information is transmitted over
communication lines, expressed in bits per second.
bit – A contraction of binary digit, the smallest unit of information in binary notation. A
bit is a zero (0) or a one (1), i.e., the binary of number of 0110 consists of four
bits.
bit rate – The rate at which binary digits, or pulses representing them, pass a gioven
point of a communication line.
channel – A path for electrical transmission of signals between two or more points.
circuit monitor – A multifunction, digital instrumentation, data acquisition and
control device capable of replacing a variety of meters, relays, transducers and
other components.
circuit monitor label – A user-definable, alphanumeric field associated with the
circuit monitor.
circuit monitor nameplate data – A user-definable, sixteen character field used to
identify a circuit monitor and its use. For example, if the circuit monitor supplied
power tot he welder on production line 3, the nameplate may be “Welder Line 3”.
coaxial cable – A cable consisting of an outer conductor concentric to an inner
conductor, separated from each other by insulating material.
communications link – Equipment, especially transmission cables and interfaces,
which complete the communications connections and permit the transmission of
digital signal data.
communications microprocessor – The circuit monitor microprocessor which is
responsible for communication to/from the host, receiving data from metering
microprocessor, accurately maintaining clock and calendar, keeping the min/max
of calculated values, and control of digital inputs/outputs.
continuous rating – Maximum constant load that a device can carry continuously
without exceeding its temperature rise specification.
crest factor (CF) – Ratio of peak to rms values of voltage or current. Crest factor is
equal to 1.414 for a purely sinusoidal signal.

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CT rating – A user-definable parameter which represents the primary rating of the


current transformers connected to the circuit monitor.
current, percent apparent distortion – The difference in percent between the true
rms current and the rms value of a pure sinusoid with the same peak current as
the measured waveform.
current Phase-A – The measured rms current of the A Phase.
current Phase-B – The measured rms current of the B Phase.
current Phase-C – The measured rms current of the C Phase.
current, 3-phase average – The simple arithmetic mean of the rms current flowing
in the 3 phases.
current transformer – An instrument transformer intended to have its primary
winding connected in series with the conductor carrying the current to be
measured or controlled.
cycle – Unit of frequency of alternating current, equal to 1/60 second or 16.33
milliseconds.
daisy chain – The physical method of cabling devices in series.
demand interval – The time interval used in the average demand calculations for
real power.
device address door – The sliding door located on the rear of the circuit monitor
which covers the devices address switches.
device address switches – Two ten position rotary switches, accessed from the
rear of the circuit monitor, which are used to set the address of the circuit
monitor as well as the unit’s Baud rate.
digital – The representation of numerical quantities by means of discrete numbers.
download – To transfer data to a device.
duplex – Two-way data transmission. Full duplex allows simultaneous data
transmission in both directions. Half-duplex allows data transmission in either of
two directions, but only one direction at a time.
energy management alarms – A user-definable parameter which indicates when
the alarm set point has been exceeded, records the date and time of the event,
and records the maximum level of average demand power eventually reached.
Ethernet – A specification for local communication networks that employs coaxial
cable as a passive communications medium to interconnect differnet kinds of
computers, information processing products, and offie equipment at a local site.
fiber optics – A medium that uses light conducted through glass or plastic fibers for
data transmission.
flag – A signal device in a microprocessor system that alerts the operator, or the
system itself, to the occurrence of some desired or undesired event.
frequency – The number of complete cycles of sinusoidal variation per unit of time,
expressed in Hz.
full-duplex – Simultaneous two-way transmission through a communications
channel.
fundamental – Term for value of voltage or current corresponding to the portion of
the signal at the power frequency. Usually the power frequency is 60 Hz, but
may be 50 Hz (Europe) or 400 Hz (aviation).
gateway – In local area networks (LANs), a computer system and its associated
software that permit two networks using differerent protocols to communciate
with each other. A gateway translates all protocol levels from physical layer up
through applications layer, and can thus be used to interconnect networks that
differ in every detail.
graphics – Methods and techniques for converting data to or from a graphic display.
ground – Conducting path between a circuit or equipment and earth or a conducting
body serving in place of earth.
half-duplex – Two-way, but not simultaneous, transmission of data through a
communications channel.
interface – A device that allows communication between systems or ports of
systems.

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K-factor – Relates the heating effect of a distorted current in a transformer to a


sinusoidal current with the same rms magnitude.
kV – Abbreviation for kilovolts (volts x 1,000)
kVA – Abbreviation for kilovolts apparent power
kVAr – Abbreviation for kilovolts reactive power
kW – Abbreviation for kilowatts, real power
kVA – Abbreviation for kilovoltampere, a standard measure of power.
load – 1) A device placed in a circuit to which power is delivered. 2) The process of
entering data into memory.
master-slave – A mode of operation where one data station (the master) controls
the network access of one or more data stations (the slaves).
metering microprocessor – The circuit monitor microprocessor which does the real
time monitoring of the current and voltage inputs. It reads the A/D converters and
makes the required calculations on the raw data.
millisecond (ms) – One thousandth of a second: 1 x 10-6 or 0.001 second.
multipoint communications – Method of communication in which a single device
can communicate to multiple devices.
multiprocessing – Executing two or more tasks in memory at the same time.
NEMA Standards – Property characteristics adopted as standard by the National
Electrical Manufacturers Association.
network – A group of computing devices that are connected to each other by
communication lines to share information and resources.
non-volatile memory – Memory which retains its contents upon loss of power. The
circuit monitor stores many values in non-volatile memory.
OHM’s Law – Current (I) in terms of electromotive force (E) and resistance (R) given
by the equation I = E/R.
on-line – Describes equipment or devices which are involved in direct
communications.
operating system (OS) – Integrated programs that work together to manage and
improve the operating effectiveness of a computer or system.
OSI – Abbreviation for Open Systems Interconnection. Network model developed by
the International Standards Organization (ISO).
overvoltage – Occurs when the voltage exceeds a normal or predetermined value.
peak – Value of voltage or current that is the maximum, or minimum, crest value of
the waveform.
peak demand current Phase-A – The maximum value recorded for average
demand current for Phase A since last reset.
peak demand current Phase-B – The maximum value recorded for average
demand current for Phase B since last reset.
peak demand current Phase-C – The maximum value recorded for average
demand current for Phase C since last reset.
peak demand real power – The maximum value recorded for average demand real
power since last reset.
peripheral – Those devices which support but are not directly involved in the
operation.
point-to-point communications – Method of communication in which a device
communicates to only one other device at a time.
polling – A method by which all equipment sharing a communications line can be
periodically interrograted or allowed to transmit without contending for the line;
often a reference to a centrally controlled method of accessing a number of
devices.
potential transformer – An instrument transformer that is intended to have it
primary winding connected in shunt with a power supply circuit, the voltage of
which is to be measured or controlled.
power – 1) Rate of energy flow, measured in watts. 2) Torque times speed.
power factor, 3-phase total – The total power factor of a 3 phase circuit calculated
as the 3 phase total real power divided by the 3 phase total apparent power.

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power factor, Phase-A – The cosine of the angular difference between the vetor’s
phase A current and phase A-N voltage.
power factor, Phase-B – The cosine of the angular difference between the vetor’s
phase A current and phase B-N voltage.
power factor, Phase-C – The cosine of the angular difference between the vetor’s
phase A current and phaseC-N voltage.
programmable controller – A solid-state control system which has a user
programmable memory for storage instructions to implement specific functions
such as: I/O control logic, timing, counting, arithmetic, and data manipulation.
protocol – A standardized procedure for establishing a communications link
between two devices based on such elements as word structure or length.
PT rating – A user-definable parameter which represents the primary rating of the
potential transformers connected to the circuit monitor (assumes 120V
secondary PTs).
reactive power, 3-phase total – The sum of the reactive power values for each of
the 3 phases.
read – To copy, usually from one form of storage to another, particularly from
external to secondary storage to internal storage.
real power, 3-phase total – The sum of the real power values for each of the 3
phases.
real time – Pertaining to the performance of a computation during the actual time
that a related physical process transpires, in order that results of the
computation can be used in guiding the physical process.
register – A storage area consisting of two bytes or 16 bits of storage.
RMS – Root Mean Square calculation.
RMS-H (Root Mean Square-Harmonic) – The effective value of the the harmonic
portion of voltage or current. This quantity provides information about the actual
level (in volts or amps) of voltage or current harmonics.
router – A device that connects multiple networks together, providing path selection
and alternate routing based on network destination addresses and the status of
the connected networks.
routing – A technique which allows information to be sent from one device along a
specified path (or route) to another device. The path is mapped by a statement
offering the address of each device along the route.
RS-422 interface – An electrical interface which offers a standard of communication
for electronic devices. The circuit monitor’s RS-485 interface is RS-422
compatible.
RS-485 interface – An electrical interface which offers a standard of communication
for electronic devices and offers multipoint communications. The circuit monitor
utilizes the RS-485 interface.
SCADA – Abbreviation for Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition.
surge – Large, fast pulse of current, potential or power.
system – A collection of units combined to work as a larger integrated unit having
the capabilities of all the separate units.
system connection – A user-definable variable which indicates whether a specific
system is a 3-wire or 4-wire system.
terminator – A hardware load employed on the end of a transmission line or cable
used to balance the impedance.
THD (Total Harmonic Distortion) – Indicates the degree to which a voltge or current
signal is distorted.
ThickWire (10BASE5) – Standard Ethernet baseband coaxial cable that serves as
the backbone transmission medium for the local area network. Primarily used for
facility-wide installations.
ThinWire (10BASE2) – A wiring scheme which uses a type of (thin) coaxial cable for
use in Ethernet. Primarily used in office environments.
throughput – Maximum system output, measured in tasks per unit of time.
transient – Pulse, oscillation or momentary deviation.
trim ring – An optional rectangular ring which is mounted to the circuit monitor

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Glossar y of Terms

through an electrical panel.


root-mean-square (RMS) – The square root of the mean value of the square of the
parameter values during a complete cycle.
unidirectional maibox – A technique used by the circuit monitor’s microprocessors
to exchange information in which each microprocessor has a separate mail box
to transmit data a separate mail box to receive data.
upload – To transfer data from a device.
user-defined parameter – A value which is definable by the user via the
communications link. The circuit onitor has 13 user-defined parameters.
var – The unit of reactive power in the Internal System of Units.
varhour – The unit of quadrature-energy in the International System of Units.
voltage, Phase A-B – The measured RMS voltage between phases A and B.
voltage, Phase B-C – The measured RMS voltage between phases B and C.
voltage, Phase C-A – The measured RMS voltage between phases C and A.
voltage, Phase A-N – The measured RMS voltage between phases A and Neutral.
voltage, Phase B-N – The measured RMS voltage between phases B and Neutral.
voltage, Phase C-N – The measured RMS voltage between phases C and Neutral.
watt – The unit of power in the Internal System of Units.
watthour – A measure of power equal to 3600 joules.
waveform capture – A circuit monitor feature available in Models CM-2250, CM-
2350, and CM-2450/2452 which captures and reports up to 256 data points from
a given phase’s current and voltage waveforms.
write – To enter data into a storage device.

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Square D, ,POWERLOGIC, POWERLINK,
MICROLOGIC, LIFE-GARD, VISI/VAC,
POWER-ZONE, SY/NET, and SY/LINK are registered
trademarks of Square D Company. System Manager
and EXPlorer are trademarks of Square D Company.
All other product names listed in this document are
trademarks of their respective companies.

Bulletin No. 3000CT9701 December, 1997 © 1997 Square D All Rights Reserved