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Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide

Series 400 Terminal

This document provides information on maintaining the Series


400 terminal and resolving any user problems.

Document Part Number: 4701182-001


Document Revision: B
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment
by Kronos Incorporated. Kronos Incorporated assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this
manual. This document or any part thereof may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of
Kronos Incorporated. All rights reserved. Copyright 1995, 1999.

CardSaver, Datakeeper, Datakeeper Central, Gatekeeper, Gatekeeper Central, Imagekeeper, Jobkeeper,


Jobkeeper Central, KeepTrac, Kronos, the Kronos logo, ShopTrac, the ShopTrac logo, Solution In A Box,
Start.Time, TeleTime, Timekeeper, Timekeeper Central, TimeMaker, and VisionWare are registered trademarks of
Kronos Incorporated. CommLink, Comm.Mgr, DKC/Datalink, HyperFind, Labor Activity Manager, Labor Plus, Smart
Scheduler, Starter Series, Start.Labor, Start.Quality, Start.WIP, Tempo, the Tempo logo, and Timekeeper Web are
trademarks of Kronos Incorporated.

AS and AS400 are trademarks, and IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
INFORMIX-OnLine is a registered trademark of Informix Software, Inc. INTERSOLV is a registered trademark of
MERANT Solutions Inc. Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of
Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. ORACLE is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. Sybase
SQLServer is a trademark of Sybase, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other
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B.V. VMS is a registered trademark of Compaq.

When using and applying the information generated by Kronos products, customers should ensure that they comply
with the applicable requirements of federal and state law, such as the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Published by Kronos Incorporated


400 Fifth Avenue, Waltham, Massachusetts 02451-8746
Phone: 781-890-3232, Fax: 781-890-8768
Kronos Incorporated Global Support: 1-800-394-HELP (1-800-394-4357)

For a complete list of the international subsidiaries, see the following Kronos Incorporated Web page:
http://www.kronos.com/info/locations.htm

Document Revision History

Document Revision Product Version Release Date

A 400.3 November 1995


B 400.6 May 1999
Contents

About This Guide


Guide Organization ....................................................................................viii
Conventions .................................................................................................. ix
Abbreviations and Terms .............................................................................. x
Related Documents ...................................................................................... xii

Chapter 1: Introduction
The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts ........................................................1-2
Mainboard ............................................................................................1-2
Available Options ................................................................................1-3
The Field Replaceable Unit and Options ...........................................1-11
Maintenance Basics ..................................................................................1-12
Tools Required for Maintenance .......................................................1-12
Safety Considerations ........................................................................1-12
Cleaning the Terminal ........................................................................1-13
Before You Call Global Support ..............................................................1-14

Chapter 2: Preventive Maintenance


The Lithium Battery ...................................................................................2-2
Determining the Lithium Battery’s Life ..............................................2-2
Replacing the Lithium Battery .............................................................2-3
The Lead-Acid Battery ...............................................................................2-6
Testing the Lead-Acid Battery .............................................................2-6
Replacing the Lead-Acid Battery .........................................................2-7
Verifying the Integrity of the Network .....................................................2-10
Contents

Chapter 3: Servicing the Series 400 Terminal


Handling Static-Sensitive Components ..................................................... 3-2
Saving and Restoring Data ......................................................................... 3-3
Terminal Service Utility ...................................................................... 3-3
SL400 for DOS .................................................................................... 3-9
Programming the Series 400 Terminal .............................................. 3-16
Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal ..................................... 3-19
Removing the Battery Backup Board ................................................ 3-22
Replacing the Battery Backup Board ................................................ 3-23
Removing the I/O Board ................................................................... 3-24
Replacing the I/O Board .................................................................... 3-26
Removing the Mainboard .................................................................. 3-27
Replacing the Mainboard .................................................................. 3-28
Removing the Keypad ....................................................................... 3-30
Replacing the Keypad ........................................................................ 3-31
Removing the Keypad Membrane ..................................................... 3-32
Replacing the Keypad Membrane .................................................... 3-33
Removing the LCD ............................................................................ 3-33
Replacing the LCD ........................................................................... 3-34
Removing the Reader Cover ............................................................. 3-35
Replacing the Reader Cover .............................................................. 3-36
Upgrading Memory .................................................................................. 3-38
RAM Upgrade ................................................................................... 3-38
Boot-EPROM Upgrade ..................................................................... 3-41

Chapter 4: Troubleshooting
Terminal Hardware Failures ...................................................................... 4-2
Power-Up Failures ..................................................................................... 4-7
Badge-Reading Problems ........................................................................... 4-9
Keypad Problems ..................................................................................... 4-11
Lead-Acid Battery Backup Failures ......................................................... 4-12
Communications Problems ...................................................................... 4-14
Serial Troubleshooting ...................................................................... 4-14
Ethernet Troubleshooting .................................................................. 4-16

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Contents

Token Ring Troubleshooting .............................................................4-19

Chapter 5: Changing Terminal Firmware


Using the Correct Versions ........................................................................5-2
About the Flash Utility .........................................................................5-2
About the Boot-EPROM ......................................................................5-2
About the Flash Application Program .................................................5-3
Softloading an Application with SL400 .....................................................5-4
SL400 for Windows .............................................................................5-4
SL400 for DOS ....................................................................................5-7

Chapter 6: Using Maintenance Mode


Command Modes Overview .......................................................................6-2
Operating in Maintenance Mode ................................................................6-3
Maintenance Mode Password .....................................................................6-4
Commands List ...........................................................................................6-5
Executing Commands .................................................................................6-8

Appendix A: Error and Status Messages


Interpreting Error Messages ...................................................................... A-2
Error Messages ......................................................................................... A-3
Status Messages ....................................................................................... A-18

Appendix B: Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers


Part Numbers ............................................................................................. B-2

Index

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide v


Contents

vi Kronos Incorporated
About This Guide

This guide is specifically written for Kronos Customer Service Representatives


and all others who install, maintain, and service the Series 400 terminal.

The supported features for the Series 400 terminals vary among the applications.
You should check your application documentation or with your sales
representative to ensure that the application supports the features you need.

This preface contains the following sections:


w Guide Organization
w Conventions
w Abbreviations and Terms
w Related Documents
About This Guide

Guide Organization
This guide contains the following information:
w Chapter 1, “Introduction,” provides information on the Series 400 terminal
and its parts and optional boards. Some basic maintenance information is
provided as well as a section for customers that explains what to do before
calling Kronos Global Support.
w Chapter 2, “Preventive Maintenance,” provides information on performing
preventive maintenance on the Series 400 terminal such as replacing the
lithium and lead-acid batteries and verifying the integrity of the network.
w Chapter 3, “Servicing the Series 400 Terminal,” describes the procedures
used to save and restore Series 400 terminal data and remove and replace
parts of the terminal. It also provides information on handling static-sensitive
components, and upgrading memory.
w Chapter 4, “Troubleshooting,” includes information on troubleshooting Series
400 terminal hardware and power-up failures, resolving badge-reading,
keypad, and internal modem module problems, lead-acid battery failures, and
communication problems.
w Chapter 5, “Changing Terminal Firmware,” describes how to use the SL400
utility to change Series 400 terminal firmware.
w Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance Mode,” describes how to use maintenance
mode and provides a listing of the maintenance mode commands and
procedures.
w Appendix A, “Error and Status Messages,” contains a listing of error and
status messages, what they mean, and how to resolve the situations that cause
them to appear on the Series 400 terminal.
w Appendix B, “Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers,” lists part numbers relative
to the Series 400 terminal and its options.

viii Kronos Incorporated


Conventions

Conventions
This guide uses the following text conventions:

Convention Use
Note Emphasizes a key point.
Caution Notifies you of potential damage to your data.
Warning Notifies you of potential danger to you or damage to the
hardware you are using. Heed all warnings.
bold Indicates an important term or phrase.
File > Save Indicates a menu path. Select each item in sequence. In this
example, File > Save means “Select the File menu; then select
the Save option on that menu.”
italic Indicates a variable or placeholder for information that you
must specify. For example, filename.sql or password means
that you must supply a specific file name or password. Italic
also indicates a reference to another document.
user input Indicates information that you must type exactly as shown. For
example: Enter SuperUser for the user name.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide ix


About This Guide

Abbreviations and Terms


The guide uses the following abbreviations and terms:

Abbreviation Meaning
AC alternating current
AFT Arbiter File Transfer
APS Kronos Auxiliary Power Source
AWG American Wire Gauge
BABT British Approvals Board for Telecommunications
CCTV closed circuit television
CE Conformité Européene
CRC cyclical redundancy check
CRT cathode-ray tube
CSA Canadian Standards Association
DC direct current
DOS disk operating system (for example, IBM PC-DOS)
EEPROM electrically erasable programmable read-only memory
EPROM erasable programmable read-only memory
FCC Federal Communications Commission
FIFO first in, first out RAM Buffer
FRU field replaceable unit
I/O input/output
IKDE Imagekeeper® Data Exchange software
K kilobyte of memory
KOP Kronos Options Package
LCD liquid crystal display
LED light-emitting diode
MB megabyte of memory
OS operating system

x Kronos Incorporated
Abbreviations and Terms

Abbreviation Meaning
PC personal computer (for example, IBM PC/XT/AT or PS/2)
PIN personal identification number
PROM programmable read-only memory
RAM random access memory
TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
TKC Kronos Timekeeper Central® software
UDP User Datagram Protocol
UL Underwriter’s Laboratory
UPC Universal Product Code
VAC volts alternating current
VDC volts direct current

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide xi


About This Guide

Related Documents
Additional information relating to the Series 400 terminal can be found in these
other Kronos documents:
w Timekeeper Terminal Installation Guide (part number 4701180-001) provides
step-by-step instructions for installing the Series 400 terminal.
w Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide (part number 4701181-001)
provides information on configuring operating parameters on the Series 400
terminal. The guide also includes a list and explanation of the procedures and
steps that comprise these parameters, as well as configuration worksheets.
w Series 400 Terminal Host Sofware Interface Guide (part number
4700692-001) provides information on configuring Series 400 terminals that
interact with Kronos data collection and access control host applications. The
guide also provides instructions configuring and communicating with Series
400 terminals that interact with host software other than Kronos applications.
w Timekeeper Terminal Supervisor’s Reference (part number 4701183-001)
explains the Series 400 terminal supervisor’s procedures and provides
information on supervisor and guard modes.
w Timekeeper Terminal Quick Reference Card (part number 4701184-001)
details operating mode functions, including how they appear on the Series 400
terminal, and the appropriate responses to terminal prompts. The card also
contains a list of error messages with their meanings and resolutions.
w Series 400 Terminal Hardware Options (various part numbers) explains
available Series 400 terminal options in individual, stand-alone documents
that contain product information as well as troubleshooting procedures and
installation instructions.

xii Kronos Incorporated


Chapter 1
Introduction

The Series 400 terminal and the options associated with it are introduced in this
chapter. Also provided is some basic maintenance information you should
understand before you begin to service the terminal.

A section specifically for customers is included on the things to do before calling


Kronos Global Support and requesting a service call by a Customer Service
Representative (CSR).

This chapter contains the following sections:


w The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts
w Maintenance Basics
w Before You Call Global Support
Chapter 1 Introduction

The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts


Before you do any maintenance or troubleshooting of the Series 400 terminal, you
should become familiar with its parts. You also should be familiar with the option
boards that are available with the terminal.

Mainboard
Kronos provides two types of mainboards for the Series 400 terminal: the 186
board and the 177 board. Some of the connections on the 177 board differ from
the connections on the 186 board. The following figure shows in detail the 186
mainboard and its connector locations:

1-2 Kronos Incorporated


The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts

Legend
1 LCD cable connector (P2)
2 Keypad cable connector (P1)
3 Ethernet option connector (P3)
4 LEDs (mounted on back side of board)
5 Modem, Token Ring, or twinaxial option connector (J2)
6 RS-485 termination/biasing switch (SW1)
7 Not used and not on all mainboards (P4)
8 Optics assembly (OP1) (mounted on back side of board beneath metal optics shield)
9 RS-232/RS-485 configuration switch (SW2)
10 I/O board cable connector (P5)
11 Fuse (F1)
12 Internal Beeper (BPR1)
13 I/O port (TB1)
14 Communications port (TB2)
15 Battery backup cable connector (TB3)
16 Lithium battery (BATT1)
17 DC wall supply connector (J1 or J3)

The mainboard comes in different RAM sizes: 128K, 256K, 512K, and 1MB. For
the part numbers for the mainboards, see Appendix B, “Series 400 Terminal Part
Numbers.”

Available Options
You can add several options that plug into the mainboard, such as an I/O board, a
battery backup board, the Ethernet option board, the Token Ring interface board,
a modem option board, the auxiliary power source, and the twinaxial interface
option.

The following sections describe these options.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-3


Chapter 1 Introduction

I/O Option Boards

You can add optional I/O boards (with connecting cable and mounting screw) to
the Series 400 terminal. These boards support the connection of optional devices.
The following figure shows the standard I/O board and the connector locations. A
proximity reader and magnetic reader I/O board and a dual reader I/O board are
also available.

Legend
1 Mainboard cable connector (P1)
2 RS-232 serial printer port (TB2)
3 Remote indicator lights/Megabeep External beeper/Remote swipe bar code reader/
Wand bar code reader port (TB1)
4 Kronos RS-485 remote swipe bar code reader RS-485/Termination jumper (SB1)
5 Kronos RS-485 remote swipe bar code reader port (TB3)
6 I/O port (TB4) for master synch and other less used hardware options

1-4 Kronos Incorporated


The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts

Battery Backup Board

You can install an optional 12 VDC lead-acid battery and battery backup board in
the Series 400 terminal to provide it with up to 12 hours of full functionality.
There is another battery backup board that provides auxiliary power for the
proximity reader. The following figure shows the battery backup board and the
cable locations:

Legend
1 Mainboard cable (INPUT)
2 Fuse (F1)
3 Battery cable (BATT)

Note
Battery backup board cables are soldered in.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-5


Chapter 1 Introduction

Ethernet Option Board

You can install an optional Ethernet board in the Series 400 terminal. This option
board provides a way for Series 400 terminals and a host to connect to a standard
Ethernet network. TCP/IP UDP is the network protocol used for sending and
receiving messages. The following figure illustrates the Ethernet option board and
its connectors:

Legend
1 Mainboard connector (J1)
2 Flash
3 Output jack (P1)
4 ST-NIC chip

1-6 Kronos Incorporated


The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts

Token Ring Board

You can install an optional Token Ring board in the Series 400 terminal. This
board provides direct connection from Series 400 terminals to the AS/400 Token
Ring network. The following figure illustrates the Token Ring board:

Legend
1 18-36 Volt supply cable (P6)
2 DB9 output (P1)
3 Twisted pair adapter output (P2)
4 Mainboard connector (P3)
5 Status LEDs

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-7


Chapter 1 Introduction

Modem Option Board

You can install an optional modem board in the Series 400 terminal. Two modem
boards are available: the 2400 option board and the high-speed (14.4Kbps) option
board. Each of these option boards makes it possible to establish communications
over telephone lines between the host and the Series 400 terminal.

The following figure illustrates the high-speed modem option board and its
connectors:

Legend
1 RJ-11 jack for the telco cable
2 Mainboard connector (P1)

1-8 Kronos Incorporated


The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts

Auxiliary Power Source Board

An optional auxiliary power source board (part number 8600603-001) is available


for use with the Series 400 terminal. This board is a stand-alone power supply that
provides DC power to the Series 400 terminal. It is shipped with two 12 volt, 2.2
ampere hour lead-acid batteries. This board comes in a separate metal box and
does not plug into the mainboard as the other option boards do. The following
figure illustrates the auxiliary power source board and connectors:

Legend
1 Negative (-) battery terminals (P3)
2 Positive (+) battery terminals (P1)
3 AC line adapter filter
4 Output jack (P2)

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-9


Chapter 1 Introduction

Twinaxial Interface Board

You can install an optional twinaxial interface board in the Series 400 terminal.
The twinaxial interface allows the Series 400 terminal to be directly connected to,
and communicate with, an AS/400 host computer running an AS/400-based
Kronos application. The following figure illustrates the twinaxial interface board
and its connectors:

Legend
1 Twinaxial interface connector (4 pins)
2 Green LED
3 Yellow LED
4 7-pin connector
5 Operational selection jumper (3 pins)
6 8-position DIP switches

1-10 Kronos Incorporated


The Series 400 Terminal and Its Parts

The Field Replaceable Unit and Options


You can send the field replaceable unit (FRU) that is mounted on the wall back to
Kronos Incorporated for servicing. The FRU consists of the front cover and the
associated mainboard. However, a Kronos CSR can remove and replace some of
the components of the FRU at the customer site. In addition, the CSR can add
options as needed to the mainboard. Following are elements of the FRU and some
of the available options:
w Auxiliary power source
w Battery backup board
w Chassis assembly
w Cover assembly
w DC wall supply
w Ethernet option board
w Front covers
w I/O board
w Keypad
w Keypad membrane
w Liquid crystal display (LCD)
w Lead-acid battery
w Lithium battery
w Mainboards (128K, 256K, 512K, and 1MB RAM)
w Reader cover
w Token Ring interface board
w Twinaxial interface board
w 2400 baud or 14.4Kbps modem option board

For part numbers for the above, see Appendix B, “Series 400 Terminal Part
Numbers.”

For instructions on removing and replacing the batteries, see Chapter 2,


“Preventive Maintenance.”

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-11


Chapter 1 Introduction

Maintenance Basics
This section describes the tools you will need to service the terminal, safety
considerations, and instructions for cleaning the terminal.

Tools Required for Maintenance


You need the following tools to service and maintain the Series 400 terminal:
w Screwdrivers: Phillips #0, #1, #2; and straight blade 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch
w 5-32 security-head Allen wrench
w A nonmetallic pointed tool
w Battery Backup Kit
w Soft, clean, lint-free cleaning cloths
w Spray bottle of general-purpose glass cleaner
w Isopropyl alcohol
w Kronos Field Service Anti-Static Kit
w Wire cutters/strippers

Safety Considerations
The Series 400 terminal is approved by Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL), the
Canadian Standards Association (CSA), and the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC), and ships from the factory in a safe condition. The 14.4Kbps
modem option and other option boards have also been approved by the British
Approvals Board for Telecommunications (BABT) and have been granted the
Conformité Européene (CE) mark. For more information, see the documentation
for the specific options.

This guide contains information that must be followed to ensure safe operation
and maintenance of the terminal. Failure to follow a warning statement can result
in personal injury.

1-12 Kronos Incorporated


Maintenance Basics

Cleaning the Terminal


It is important to keep the Series 400 terminal case clean in order to prevent dirt
and grease from obscuring the terminal’s LCD display or from possibly getting
inside the badge reader.

Follow these steps to clean the Series 400 terminal’s case and keyboard:
1. Using a soft, lint-free cloth, and a spray bottle of glass cleaner, clean the
outside of the Series 400 terminal’s cover and case. Do not spray the cleaner
inside the terminal’s case. (When cleaning the terminal’s case, spray the
cleaner on the cloth—do not spray the cleaner directly on the terminal.)
2. Clean the polycarbonate lens that covers the terminal’s display.

Caution
Do not use steel wool, or any other abrasives, or solvents such as alcohol,
benzene, or acetone, as they can damage the terminal.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 1-13


Chapter 1 Introduction

Before You Call Global Support


Customers sometimes incur unnecessary costs when they call Kronos Global
Support and request that a CSR come out to their site before checking some basic
things at the Series 400 terminal.

If you are having a problem, do the following:


w Check the physical connections; for example, check the LED lights and the
link lines. Check the connections of any plug-ins.
w Verify the terminal configuration; for example, is the terminal’s password and
IP address correct? Also, verify the procedures you used to configure the
terminal.
w Check the network connection; that is, check the link on the port that the
terminal is connected to at the hub or switch and verify the circuit and wiring.
w Ping the terminal from the host PC if your terminal has a Token Ring or
Ethernet board. If you can ping the terminal, but it still won’t collect or update
data, check to see if it is a duplicate IP address problem. To do this for a
terminal with an Ethernet board, unplug the Ethernet cable from the back of
the terminal. If you can still ping the terminal, another device shares the IP
address. For information on how to ping the terminal, see the section “Ping
Utility” in Chapter 4.
If you cannot ping the terminal, the PC host may be communicating to the
terminal through a switch or some other device.

Caution
If you change anything, and the problem still exists, go back to the original
situation. Do not try to change something else at that point, because you may
introduce another problem.

If you are still having problems after trying all of the above, contact Kronos
Global Support by calling 1-800-394-HELP (1-800-394-4357), or visit http://
www.kronos.com.

1-14 Kronos Incorporated


Chapter 2
Preventive Maintenance

The Series 400 terminal requires periodic preventive maintenance to ensure


trouble-free operation. Kronos recommends that the terminal receive preventive
maintenance once a year.

This chapter contains the following sections:


w The Lithium Battery
w The Lead-Acid Battery
w Verifying the Integrity of the Network
Chapter 2 Preventive Maintenance

The Lithium Battery


Each Series 400 terminal is equipped with a 3 VDC lithium battery that protects
data stored in the terminal’s RAM. The battery also powers the terminal’s internal
real-time clock if external power is lost. You cannot read badges or make keypad
entries while the terminal is operating on lithium battery backup.

Each time you restore external power to the Series 400 terminal after it has been
operating on lithium battery backup, the terminal updates the amount of time the
terminal has been operating on battery backup and sizes the installed RAM. The
terminal displays the message LOW LITHIUM BATTERY if the battery is within
14 days of its limit.

Determining the Lithium Battery’s Life


You should replace the Series 400 terminal’s lithium battery if one of the
following conditions exist:
w The battery is more than 3 years old.
w The battery is at or near its maximum usage limit.
w The terminal displays the message LOW LITHIUM BATTERY.

The length of time the 3 VDC lithium battery can supply backup power depends
on the Series 400 terminal’s RAM size. The following table presents the lithium
battery life for each of the Series 400 terminals:

RAM Size Lithium Battery Life


128 90 days
256K 60 days
512K 30 days
1024K 15 days

When performing preventive maintenance on the Series 400 terminal, you should
determine the remaining life of the lithium battery. Replace the 3 VDC lithium
battery if it has a backup capability of 14 days or less.

2-2 Kronos Incorporated


The Lithium Battery

Follow these steps to determine the remaining life of the Series 400 terminal’s
lithium battery:
1. Swipe a supervisor badge or maintenance badge through the terminal’s
integral swipe reader.
2. In response to the PASSWORD prompt, enter a valid supervisor password.
The terminal now operates in supervisor mode.
3. Press the * key. In response to the ENTER COMMAND NUMBER prompt,
type 41 at the keypad and press Enter.
The terminal displays the battery life in days. If the lithium battery has a life
of 14 days or less, then replace the battery by following the instructions in the
section, “Replacing the Lithium Battery.”
4. Press any key to exit command 41.
5. Press the * key. In response to the ENTER COMMAND NUMBER prompt,
type 0 and press Enter to exit supervisor mode and return to normal mode.

Replacing the Lithium Battery

Warning
A lithium battery can explode if improperly replaced, handled, or stored. To avoid
this hazard, replace it with the same type of battery or equivalent. Discard a used
lithium battery according to local environmental and safety regulations.

Use the following precautions when handling, storing, or replacing the lithium
battery:
w Do not short the battery.
w Do not charge the battery.
w Do not disassemble the battey.
w Do not directly solder onto the battery.
w Do not use or store the battery above the temperature of 158o F (70o C).

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 2-3


Chapter 2 Preventive Maintenance

w Replace the Series 400 terminal’s lithium battery only with a battery supplied
by Kronos Incorporated. The Kronos part number for the lithium battery is
7900002-001.

Follow these steps to remove and replace the Series 400 terminal’s lithium
battery:
1. Save the terminal’s data and configuration.
See the section “Saving and Restoring Data” in Chapter 3.
2. Remove the terminal’s security screw which holds the front cover in place.
3. Unplug the terminal.
4. Carefully swing the Series 400 terminal’s front cover open so that you have
access to the mainboard.
5. Locate the lithium battery on the mainboard. Note the polarity of its
connector. The bottom of the connector is positive (+), and the top of the
connector is negative (-).
6. Using a nonmetallic pointed tool, carefully remove the old lithium battery
from the mainboard and dispose of it according to local environmental and
safety regulations.
7. Orient the new lithium battery so that its positive (+) end faces down (the flat
side—not the tip end, as shown below), and press the battery into its
connector. See the following figure:

2-4 Kronos Incorporated


The Lithium Battery

8. Since you have just installed a brand new lithium battery, you must update the
lithium battery life value, which is stored in RAM. Reset the lithium battery
life value by following these steps:
a. Swipe a maintenance badge through the Series 400 terminal’s integral
swipe reader.
The terminal operates in maintenance mode and prompts ENTER
COMMAND NUMBER.
b. Type 190 and press Enter.
The terminal prompts ARE YOU SURE?.
c. Press Enter to reset the lithium battery life value.
The lithium battery’s life value is automatically reset to its maximum
value.
d. In response to the ENTER COMMAND NUMBER prompt, type 0 and
press Enter to exit maintenance mode and return to normal mode.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 2-5


Chapter 2 Preventive Maintenance

The Lead-Acid Battery


You can install an optional 12 VDC lead-acid battery (part number 7900005-001)
and battery backup board in the Series 400 terminal to provide it with up to 12
hours of full functionality, including support of:
w Full LCD display (backlight automatically dimmed)
w Integral swipe badge reader
w Keypad entries
w Bell relay (device connected to bell relay must have its own power source)
w I/O board (remote badge reader, printer port, bell relay)

Testing the Lead-Acid Battery

Warning
The type of lead-acid battery used in the Series 400 terminal can generate
hundreds of amperes for short periods of time if its terminal posts or cable leads
are shorted together. Use extreme caution when handling the battery to ensure that
its cable leads do not come in contact with each other and that its terminal posts do
not come in contact with metal.

If the Series 400 terminal is equipped with an optional 12 VDC lead-acid battery,
the battery should be replaced if it’s age is 4 years or greater, regardless of
condition. To test a lead-acid battery that is less than 4 years of age, follow these
steps:
1. Make sure that all power to the Series 400 terminal is off.
2. Carefully swing the terminal’s front cover open so that you have access to the
12 VDC lead-acid battery installed within the terminal’s case.
3. Disconnect the battery cables from the battery.
4. Remove the battery from the terminal case by gently pushing the terminal’s
side tabs away from the battery and sliding the battery out.

2-6 Kronos Incorporated


The Lead-Acid Battery

5. Install a new battery within the terminal’s case.


For more information see the section, “Replacing the Lead-Acid Battery.”
6. Dispose of the old battery properly in accordance with all local environmental
and safety regulations.
7. To test the battery backup option, look at the yellow LED on the front of the
Series 400 terminal. When you remove AC power while the battery backup
option is installed, the yellow LED flashes on and off, indicating that the
terminal is being powered by battery. When you restore AC power, the LED
illuminates continuously.

Replacing the Lead-Acid Battery


To replace the lead-acid battery, complete the following steps:
1. Remove the old lead-acid battery by following steps 1 through 4 in the
previous section, “Testing the Lead-Acid Battery.”
2. Locate the battery’s red and black terminal tabs. Ensure the red tab is on the
right, as in the following figure:

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 2-7


Chapter 2 Preventive Maintenance

3. Insert the battery into the terminal chassis at a 45-degree angle, as shown in
the the following figure:

Red
Black

4. Rotate the battery into position.


The battery will snap into position with side tabs holding it in place, as shown
in the following figure:

Black Red

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The Lead-Acid Battery

5. Connect the red (+/positive) and black (-/negative) cables from the battery
backup board to the matching battery tabs.
6. Connect the battery backup board cable to TB3 located at the bottom center of
the terminal’s mainboard, as shown in the following figure:

To TB3

7. Close and lock the terminal’s front cover.

Caution
Failure to connect the battery cables to the proper terminals on the lead-acid
battery can cause the fuse on the battery backup board to blow.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 2-9


Chapter 2 Preventive Maintenance

Verifying the Integrity of the Network


Verify the integrity of the Series 400 terminal’s communications capabilities by
following these steps:
1. Perform a general inspection of the installation site. Ensure that all
communications cables are routed properly and are securely connected to the
terminal(s), the host PC, and any other Kronos equipment that may be
installed at the site (such as RS-232/RS-485 Smart Converters).
2. While at the installation site, check with the system administrator or other
personnel who are familiar with the terminal network to see if they are
experiencing any problems with the installation. If so, obtain a detailed
explanation of the problem.
3. Inspect the cables. Make sure they are properly attached.
4. Check wires for any breaks.
5. If you are running Timekeeper Central Version 5 or earlier, type the
ERRLOG.TKC file to the host PC and look for any communication error
messages.
If you are running Timekeeper Central Version 6 or later from the Kronos
Central Controller shell program, type the Activity History Report and look
for any communications error messages.
You can also use the Tryit utility of the Terminal Service Utility (TSU)
application if you are using a Windows time and attendance application. For
information about Tryit, see the section “Tryit Utility” in Chapter 4.
If there are any communications problems, take appropriate action to resolve
them. For more information, see the section “Communications Problems” in
Chapter 4.

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Chapter 3
Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Servicing the Series 400 terminal consists mainly of saving and restoring the
terminal’s data and removing and replacing malfunctioning components of the
field replaceable unit (FRU). Instructions are also included for upgrading
memory.

This chapter contains the following sections:


w Handling Static-Sensitive Components
w Saving and Restoring Data
w Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal
w Upgrading Memory

Note
When servicing the Series 400 terminal, collecting data from the terminal is not
always an adequate method of saving employee data, as the latest punch status (in
or out) is lost on power-up (if the lithium battery is disabled). Prior to servicing
the Series 400 terminal, you must save its data by following the steps in the
“Saving and Restoring Data” section in this chapter.
Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Handling Static-Sensitive Components


Many assemblies in the Series 400 Terminal have static-sensitive components.
Static electricity can cause hardware components to fail. Use the Kronos Field
Service Anti-Static Kit (part number 3600166-001) when handling static-sensitive
assemblies.

You can damage components if you do not take the following precautions:
w When handling a static sensitive assembly (such as a printed circuit board) for
any reason, first put on the Anti-Static Kit’s wrist strap. Wrap the conductive
wrist strap around your wrist so that it is comfortable, and secure the fastener.
Be sure the other end of the strap is grounded.
w When you finish handling the assembly, replace it in the Series 400 terminal,
or place it on a grounded conductive surface.
w When shipping or storing a printed circuit board, always place the board in a
conductive shipping bag or carton.

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Saving and Restoring Data

Saving and Restoring Data


When servicing the Series 400 terminal, you may encounter various reasons for
disconnecting the terminal from its power source. For example, you may have to
remove and replace the terminal’s lithium battery, or you may have to replace the
terminal itself. Disconnecting the terminal causes the terminal to lose its stored
data. Before disconnecting the terminal for any reason, you must save the data in
the terminal so important information is not lost. After you finish servicing the
terminal, you must then restore the terminal’s data.

Kronos provides service utilities for Windows and DOS systems that you can use
to save and restore the Series 400 terminal’s data. These utilities are delivered
with the host applications. The utilities SL400 and Softload are included with
DOS products. The Terminal Service Utility application is included with
Windows products. The Timekeeper C/S product uses Data Collection Manager
(DCM), which contains a subset of the functionality available in the Windows and
DOS utilities.

Terminal Service Utility


You can use the utilities of the Terminal Service Utility (TSU) application to save
and restore data in a Windows environment. The application includes the
following utilities:
w Check
The Check utility reports the current serial parameter settings. It reports the
ports available and the baud rate on the Communications Resource Summary
screen.
w Setcomm
The Setcomm utility shows the current system settings on the
Communications Setup screen. You use this tool to configure serial
parameters.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

w SL400
You can use the SL400 utility to save and restore data and to update the
terminal’s flash-EEPROM. For information on updating the flash-EEPROM,
see Chapter 5, “Changing Terminal Firmware.”
w SoftLoad
You can use the SoftLoad utility to update the terminal’s firmware. From the
Update Firmware window, you can search for files and browse to change
directories.
w Transfer
You use the Transfer utility to transmit commands in a text file from the PC to
the terminal. This utility provides a way to change programming and to obtain
programming in a text file. It uses the Arbiter File Transfer (AFT) software.
See the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide and the Series 400
Terminal Host Software Interface Guide for information on using AFT.
w Tryit
You can use the Tryit utility to test the communications line. For instructions
for using Tryit see the section “Tryit Utility” in Chapter 4.

You need just the Setcomm and SL400 utilites to save and restore the Series 400
terminal’s data. While using these utilities, you can edit and save text files by
accessing the Open option on the Files menu. The default for editing is Notepad,
but you can use WordPad if it is in the current directory or path.

Configuring with Setcomm

Before you use the SL400 utility, you must configure the TSU application. To
access the Terminal Service Utility application, complete the following steps:

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Saving and Restoring Data

1. Unzip the UTILS.ZIP file and run the SETUP.EXE file.


The Terminal Service Utility window appears:

2. From the Terminal Service Utility window, select Tools > Setcomm.
The Communications Setup dialog box appears:

Complete the following steps to configure the application:

1. Select the radio buttons for the primary and secondary serial ports for serial
and modem communications. Be sure to select both the communications
(COM) port and the appropriate baud rate to match your system’s
communications specifications.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Note
For modem terminals, specify a modem initialization string in the Command
field. The default should be Z.

2. Click the Advanced button to configure transmission delays if you experience


problems communicating with the terminal. Generally the defaults are
satisfactory for most communications.
3. Click the Save button and then click the OK button to save these settings.
Setcomm creates a COMMLINK.CFG file in the directory that you select.

Consult the online Help if you experience any problems.

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Saving and Restoring Data

Saving the Terminal Parameters

To save the terminal parameters, use the SL400 utility.

Caution
Before you collect the terminal parameters, be sure to collect the punch data from
the terminal using your host software.

To access the SL400 utility from the Terminal Service Utility window, select
Tools > SL400. The SL400 dialog box appears:

To save the terminal parameters, complete the following steps:

1. Check the Save Program Parameters box, and uncheck the other preferences.
2. Specify the terminal for which you want to save the parameters. Enter into the
Address field the IP address for Ethernet terminals, the telephone number for
modem terminals, or the password for direct connection terminals.
3. Click the Update button to retrieve the terminal’s programming parameters.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

The SL400 utility stores the parameters to a specified file, XXXXXX.PRM. The
X’s in the filename correspond to the six-digit password entered; for example, if
the password is 111111, the file is called 111111.PRM.

After you save the terminal’s parameters, you can now service the terminal as
required.

Restoring the Terminal Parameters

Before restoring the parameters, you must cold-start and then reprogram the
terminal. For information, see the section “Programming the Series 400
Terminal.”

To restore the terminal parameters, complete the following steps:


1. From the Terminal Service Utility window, select Tools > SL400.
The SL400 dialog box appears.
2. Select the Restore Parameters box and clear the other preferences.
3. Specify the terminal for which you want to restore the parameters. Enter into
the Address field the IP address for Ethernet terminals, the telephone number
for modem terminals, or the password for direct connection terminals.
4. Click the Update button to restore the terminal’s parameters.

Other TSU Options

You can use the DataSave and DataRestore preferences on the SL400 window to
save and restore all the data in the terminal. However, the process of saving all the
data takes more time than saving just the terminal’s parameters. However, if you
save just the terminal parameters, remember to reinitialize the terminal using your
host application.

You can also use the SL400 utility to update the terminal’s flash-EEPROM. For
more information, see the section, “Softloading an Application with SL400” in
Chapter 5.

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Saving and Restoring Data

SL400 for DOS


A DOS version of SL400 is available for Kronos DOS products. You can use this
program (SL400.EXE) to save and restore the Series 400 terminal’s data. Prior to
saving data, ensure that you installed the versions of SL400.EXE,
SETCOMM.EXE, CHECK.EXE, and TRYIT.EXE that are compatible with the
installed version of your Series 400 terminal application and its associated
COMM.FIG file.

The SL400 utility has three options:


w Application update
Use this for softloading an application into the flash EEPROM. See Chapter
5, “Changing Terminal Firmware” for instructions.
w Terminal Parameters
Use this for saving and restoring the terminal’s parameters. The process of
saving data using this option takes about 30 seconds at a 9600 baud rate; the
process of restoring it takes about 1 minute.

Caution
Prior to using this option, be sure to collect the punch information from the
Series 400 terminal.

w Datasave
Use this for saving and restoring the terminal’s RAM data. This option saves
all data in the terminal. The process of saving data using this option takes
about 10 minutes at a 9600 baud rate; the process of restoring data takes about
the same amount of time. The time will vary based on the amount of RAM
(128K, 256K, 512K or 1024K).

Saving the Terminal Parameters

Follow these steps to save the Series 400 terminal’s parameters using the DOS
SL400 utility:
1. Install the appropriate version of SL400.EXE, in the \KRONOS\APPS
directory.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

2. If this is a new software installation, you need to know your computer’s


communication setup specifications before proceeding. To configure
Setcomm:
a. Go into the DOS environment and find the directory that contains
SETCOMM.EXE.
If the SETCOMM.EXE file is not in the \KRONOS\DATA directory,
move it to that directory.
b. At the DOS prompt, enter SETCOMM and press Enter.
c. Edit the information in the opened window to match your system’s
communications specifications.
d. Exit from the DOS window. When you exit, the system creates or
modified a COMM.FIG file.
e. Check that the modified or new COMM.FIG file is in the same directory
as the SL400.EXE file.
Both files should be in the \KRONOS\DATA directory.
3. To run the SL400.EXE program from the \KRONOS\DATA directory, enter
SL400 at the DOS prompt and press Enter.
The Series 400 Service Utility window appears:

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Saving and Restoring Data

4. Select the Terminal Parameters option and press Enter.


The Terminal Parameters window appears:

5. Select the Store Parameters option and press Enter.


The Store Parameters window appears:

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

6. Enter the password and phone number of the terminal you are saving the
parameters from. If there is no phone used, enter 0 for the phone number.
Press Enter.
The SL400 utility stores the parameters to a specified file, XXXXXX.PRM.
The X’s in the filename correspond to the six-digit password entered; for
example, if the password is 111111, the file is called 111111.PRM. When the
utility finishes transferring the information, it displays the message:
***Successful Completion***
7. Press any key to return to the Store Parameters screen. You can save another
terminal’s parameters or press Esc to exit from the SL400 application.
8. After you have saved the Series 400 terminal’s parameters, you can service
the terminal as required.

Examining the Terminal’s Parameter File

After you save the terminal’s parameters, you can view, print, or modify the
information.

w To view the terminal’s parameter file, use the DOS editor. In the directory
where the file SL400.EXE is located, enter the following command at the
prompt:
C:\> edit XXXXXX.PRM
Press Enter and the file displays on the screen.
w To print the terminal’s parameters, press the ALT, F, P keys in sequence. You
can choose to print selected text only or the complete document.
w To modify the terminal’s parameters, highlight or delete the specific
information you want to change and type in the new information.
To save the file, press the ALT, F, A keys in sequence. The Save as dialog
box appears. Rename the file and save it to any directory. You should rename
the file so that the original file will not be modified. It is best to use a file
name that is not the password, because you may want to use only a few files
for many terminals . You can now use the new parameter file with the changes
you made. If you make any changes, be sure to print a copy of the terminal’s

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Saving and Restoring Data

parameters for future reference. To close the DOS editor, press the ALT, F, X
keys in sequence.
After you save the terminal’s parameters, you can now service the terminal as
required. Before restoring the parameters, you must cold-start and reprogram the
terminal.

Restoring the Terminal Parameters

To program the Series 400 terminal before using SL400 to restore the parameters,
you need the printed copy of the terminal’s parameters. For instructions on
printing the parameters, see the section “Examining the Terminal’s Parameter
File.”
You can also get the information you need from the terminal by swiping a
maintenance badge and using Command 90, Procedure 9, Step 1, Procedure 10,
Steps 1 and 2, and Procedure 30, Steps 1 and 2. Write down the value for a
modem (1 if there is a modem or 2 if there is not). Also write down the baud rate,
the password, and the IP address before cold-starting the terminal and beginning
the programming procedure. For information on programming the terminal, see
the section “Programming the Series 400 Terminal.”

To restore the parameters, go to the DOS directory where SETCOMM.EXE is


located, and complete the following steps:
1. Run the SL400.EXE program by entering SL400 and pressing Enter.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

The Series 400 Service Utility window appears:

2. Select the Terminal Parameters option.


The Terminal Parameters window appears:

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Saving and Restoring Data

3. Select the Restore Parameters option.


You are prompted for the name of the terminal parameter file.

4. Enter the name of the terminal parameter file and press Enter.
You are prompted for the password and telephone number.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

5. Enter the password and telephone number of the terminal you are restoring
parameters to and press Enter.
The SL400 application starts restoring the parameters. This takes
approximately 1 minute to complete at a 9600 baud rate. When the process is
completed, the following message displays:
***Successful completion***
6. Exit from the SL400 application by pressing the Esc key until you are at the
DOS prompt. Type Exit to close the DOS window.
7. Start the Kronos host application and initialize the Series 400 terminal.
For more information, see the Series 400 Host Software Interface Guide.

Programming the Series 400 Terminal


After you cold-start the terminal using maintenance command 93, you must
reprogram the terminal before you can restore the terminal’s parameters. Refer to
your notes or to the printed copy of the terminal’s parameter file for the values
you need to complete the following procedure for programming the terminal:

Keystrokes Terminal Displays


* ENTER COMMAND NUMBER
90 Enter PROCEDURE .9
(Some terminals may display PROCEDURE .2 at
this point.)
* Enter ENTER BATTERY LIFE XX
(The XX can be 90, 60, or 30)
* PROCEDURE .1
9 Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 01
Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 01
ENTER VALUE ...0
0 Enter (if no modem) PROCEDURE 09 STEP 02
or
1 Enter (if a modem)

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Saving and Restoring Data

Keystrokes Terminal Displays


Enter BAUD[*/-]
9600
Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 03
Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 03
ENTER VALUE ..0
Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 04
Enter PROCEDURE 09 STEP 04
ENTER VALUE ...0
Enter PROCEDURE 10
Enter PROCEDURE 10 STEP 01
Enter BAUD [+/1] XXXX
(The XXXX will be 2400 or 9600)
2400 Enter (if modem) PROCEDURE 10 STEP 02
or (If a 14.4Kps modem, PROCEDURE 10, STEP 7,
9600 Enter (if no modem) 8, & 9; if a Token Ring interface, PROCEDURE
10, STEP 10. Earlier versions of the 400 terminal
require Procedure 10, Step 2 to be set to 132 for
the modem.)
* PROCEDURE .1
30 Enter PROCEDURE 30 STEP 01
Enter PROCEDURE 30 STEP 01
PASSWORD
XXXXXX Enter PROCEDURE 30 STEP 02
(For the XXXXXX use the 6-digit
password, such as 111111. The
password is unique for each
terminal.)
Enter PROCEDURE 30 STEP 02
IP 000.000.000.000

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Keystrokes Terminal Displays


XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Enter (If the PROCEDURE 31
terminal has an Ethernet or Token
Ring board, use 12-digit IP address,
such as 158.228.055.066 (zeros must
be used).
or
Enter (if no Ethernet or Token Ring)
* Enter ENTER COMMAND NUMBER
83 Enter DATE
dd/mm/yy (enter day, then month, ENTER TIME
and then year) Press Enter after each
entry.
HH:MM (enter time in 24-hour ENTER COMMAND NUMBER
format or 12-hour format.)
Press Enter.
* Enter MO 04-JAN-99 13:00
KRONOS XXX
(Shown here is an example. The date and time you
set appears on the display.)

Some of the procedures and steps described in the above procedure may vary
depending on the optional boards that you use. For more information on a specific
board, see the installation guide for that board. For more information about the
procedures and steps, see the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal


The Kronos Customer Service Representative can remove and replace parts of the
Series 400 terminal and the terminal’s optional boards.

The following figure shows the assembled view of the Series 400 terminal:

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-19


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

The following figure shows the unassembled view of the terminal parts:

Legend

1 Keypad
2 Keypad membrane
3 Reader cover
4 Front cover
5 LCD
6 Mainboard
7 I/O board ribbon cable
8 I/O board
9 Chassis
This section contains information on removing and replacing certain components
of the field replaceable unit (FRU) and some of the optional boards. These include
the following:
w Battery backup board
w I/O board

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

w Mainboard
w Keypad
w Keypad membrane
w Liquid crystal display (LCD) assembly
w Reader cover

You can find information about other elements as follows:


w For information on removing and replacing the 3 VDC lithium battery and the
12 VDC lead-acid battery, see Chapter 2, “Preventive Maintenance.”
w For installation instructions for the Ethernet Option Board, see the Ethernet
Option Board Assembly and Installation Guide.
w For installation instructions for the Chassis Assembly, Cover Assembly, DC
Wall Supply, and Front Cover, see the Timekeeper Terminal Installation
Guide.
w For information instructions for the Auxiliary Power Source, see the Kronos
Auxiliary Power Source Installation Guide.
w For installation instructions for the modem modules, see the Kronos Terminal
14.4Kbps Modem Option Installation Guide.
w For installation instructions for the Token Ring board, see the Token Ring
Interface Installation Guide.
w For installation instructions for the Twinaxial interface board, see the
Twinaxial Interface Installation Guide.

Removing the Battery Backup Board


The Series 400 terminal’s optional battery backup board is shipped from the
factory with its battery cable and mainboard cable soldered to their respective
connectors on the board.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the terminal’s optional battery backup board:
1. Carefully open the Series 400 terminal’s front cover so that you have access
to the battery backup board installed within the terminal’s case.
Do not swing the cover open more than 90 degrees from its chassis, as the
hinge assembly may break.
2. Disconnect the battery cable’s red and black leads from the 12 VDC lead-acid
battery.
3. Disconnect the cable that connects the battery backup board to the mainboard
from connector TB3 on the mainboard.
4. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, remove the single screw that
secures the battery backup board to the Series 400 terminal’s chassis.
5. Remove the battery backup board from the terminal’s chassis.
The following figure demonstrates how to remove the battery backup board:

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

Replacing the Battery Backup Board


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the optional battery backup board (from slot number 1 only):
1. Remove the old battery backup board following the steps in the previous
section, “Removing the Battery Backup Board.”
2. Place a replacement battery backup board within the Series 400 terminal’s
chassis. The board is shipped from the factory with the battery cable and
mainboard cable soldered to their respective connectors on the board. Using a
number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, secure the battery backup board to the
terminal’s chassis by driving a single 6-32 x .187 screw through the board and
into the chassis. The board MUST be located in slot number 1. See the
following figure for orientation, and see the section “The Lead-Acid Battery”
in Chapter 2.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-23


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Caution
Failure to connect the battery cable to the proper terminals on the 12 VDC battery
can cause fuse F1 on the battery backup board to burn out.

3. Connect the battery backup board’s battery cable to the 12 VDC lead-acid
battery:
a. Connect the battery cable’s red lead to the positive (+) terminal on the
battery.
b. Connect the battery cable’s black lead to the negative (-) terminal on the
battery.
4. Plug the cable that connects the battery backup board to the mainboard into
connector TB3 on the mainboard.
5. Connect the Series 400 terminal to its external power source.

Removing the I/O Board


The Series 400 terminal’s optional I/O board is connected to the mainboard’s
connector P4 (177 board) or P5 (186 board) by way of a cable.

Caution
If you are removing the I/O board and you do not plan to replace it, be sure to
collect the punches in the terminal and save the terminal’s data. For instructions
see the section “Saving and Restoring Data.”

With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the terminal’s optional I/O board:
1. Carefully open the Series 400 terminal’s front cover so that you have access
to the I/O board installed within the terminal’s case.
2. Disconnect the battery cables from the lead-acid battery.
3. Disconnect the cable that connects P1 on the I/O board to the mainboard.
4. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, remove the single screw that
secures the I/O board to the Series 400 terminal’s case.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

5. Remove the I/O board from the terminal’s case.


If you are planning to replace the I/O board, proceed to the section “Replacing
the I/O Board.” If you are not planning to replace the I/O board, connect the
Series 400 terminal to its external power source and proceed to step 6.
The following figure demonstrates how to remove the I/O board:

6. Warm-start the terminal using Procedure 79 or maintenance command 92 to


ensure that program mode values are consistent with the fact that there is no
longer an I/O board.
For information about procedures, see the Series 400 Terminal Configuration
Guide. For information about maintenance commands, see Chapter 6, “Using
Maintenance Mode.”

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Replacing the I/O Board


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the terminal’s optional I/O board:
1. Seat a replacement I/O board within the Series 400 terminal’s case.
2. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, secure the I/O board to the
terminal’s case by driving a single screw through the board and into the case.
3. Plug the cable that connects the I/O board to the mainboard into connector P1
on the I/O board.
4. Connect the Series 400 terminal to its external power source.
The following figure demonstrates how to replace the I/O board:

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

Removing the Mainboard


The mainboard is connected to the front cover by three screws. With external
power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to remove the
terminal’s mainboard:
1. Disconnect the Series 400 terminal from its external power source.
2. Unlock and swing open the terminal’s front cover. Do not swing the cover
open to an angle of more than 90 degrees from its chassis, as the terminal’s
hinge assembly may break. The mainboard is mounted inside the front cover.
3. Disconnect the DC wall supply’s cord from connector J1 or J3 on the
mainboard.
4. Disconnect all cables connected to the mainboard, such as the keyboard and
display cables and other cables to optional boards.
5. Carefully separate the Series 400 terminal’s front cover from the terminal’s
chassis. Press the hinge pin assembly tabs with one hand while
simultaneously pulling the front cover off of the chassis with the other hand.
The front cover separates from the chassis with the hinge knuckles and hinge
pin assembly connected to it, as the following figure shows:

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

6. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, remove the three screws that


secure the front cover to the mainboard.
7. Lift the mainboard up and out of the front cover. Note that you must guide the
board out of the two supporting posts at the bottom of the front cover.
The following figure shows how to remove the mainboard from the front
cover:

Replacing the Mainboard


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the terminal’s mainboard:
1. Seat the mainboard inside of the front cover with its components facing up.
Move the keyboard and display cables out of the way before seating the
mainboard. The mainboard should rest on the two supporting posts located at
the bottom of the front cover, and the holes in the mainboard must line up
with the accepting post on the front cover.
2. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, drive a 6-32 x .312 screw
through each of the screw holes in the mainboard and into the front cover.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

3. Connect the Series 400 terminal’s front cover to its chassis by carefully
guiding the two hinge pin assembly tabs through the two brackets provided on
the inside of the chassis.
4. Reconnect all cables to the mainboard.
5. Install a lithium battery on the mainboard following the instructions in
Chapter 2, “Preventive Maintenance,” or remove the battery tab if a new or
replacement mainboard is used.
6. Plug the DC wall supply’s cable into the mainboard’s power connector.
7. Plug the DC wall supply into an AC outlet. The terminal should power up
normally.
8. Close the terminal’s front cover.
The following figure shows how to replace the mainboard:

9. Ensure that the mainboard is functioning properly by operating the terminal in


maintenance mode and executing the following maintenance mode
commands:
w Command 83: Set Date and Time

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

w Command 110: Display Firmware and Memory Size


w Command 111: RAM Test
w Command 152: Read Badge and Display Value
w Command 153: Display Test
w Command 154: Keypad Test
w Command 156: Test Gate/Bell Port (optional)
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance Mode.”
10. If a time and attendance application has not been loaded into the mainboard’s
flash-EEPROM, do so by following the instructions in Chapter 5, “Changing
Terminal Firmware.”
11. Configure the terminal’s operating parameters.

Removing the Keypad


The Series 400 terminal’s rubber keypad should be replaced only if it is cut or
otherwise physically damaged. If there are problems with the terminal accepting
data from the keypad, it is generally the result of a problem with the keypad
membrane (located beneath the rubber keypad; see the sections “Removing the
Keypad Membrane” and “Replacing the Keypad Membrane” for more
information) or the mainboard.

With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the terminal’s keypad:
1. Remove the Series 400 terminal’s mainboard following the instructions in the
section “Removing the Mainboard” earlier in this chapter.
2. With the mainboard removed, the keypad’s four posts, spring washers, and
retaining rings are exposed. Remove the washers and retaining rings.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

3. Lift the rubber keypad off of the keypad membrane.


The following figure shows how to remove the keypad:

Replacing the Keypad


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the terminal’s keypad:
1. Seat the rubber keypad on top of the keypad membrane. Ensure that its four
posts pass through the keypad membrane and out through the back of the front
cover.
2. Secure the keypad to the back of the front cover by installing a spring washer
and a retaining ring over each of its posts.
3. Reinstall the mainboard by following the instructions in the section
“Replacing the Mainboard” earlier in this chapter.
4. Test operation of the keypad by executing maintenance mode command 154.
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance Mode.”

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

The following figure shows how to replace the keypad:

Removing the Keypad Membrane


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the terminal’s keypad membrane:
1. Remove the Series 400 terminal’s mainboard following the instructions in the
section “Removing the Mainboard.”
2. With the mainboard removed, the keypad’s four posts, spring washers, and
retaining rings are exposed. Remove the washers and retaining rings.
3. Turn the front cover over.
4. Lift the rubber keypad off the keypad membrane.
5. Feed the keypad membrane cable through the provided slot in the front cover
and lift the keypad membrane up off the front cover.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

Replacing the Keypad Membrane


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the terminal’s keypad membrane:
1. While holding the front cover face up, feed the keypad membrane cable
through the provided slot in the front cover.
2. Seat the keypad membrane in place on the front cover.
3. Seat the rubber keypad on top of the keypad membrane. Ensure that its four
posts pass through the keypad membrane and out through the back of the front
cover.
4. Secure the keypad to the back of the front cover by installing a spring washer
and an e-ring over each of its posts.
5. Reinstall the mainboard by following the instructions in the section
“Replacing the Mainboard.”
6. Test operation of the keypad by executing maintenance mode command 154.
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance Mode.”

Removing the LCD


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the terminal’s liquid crystal display (LCD):
1. Remove the Series 400 terminal’s mainboard following the instructions in the
section “Removing the Mainboard.”
2. With the mainboard removed, the LCD’s mounting position on the back of the
front cover is exposed. Four mounting posts hold the LCD in display. To
remove the LCD, carefully spread the mounting posts apart and lift the LCD
up and out.

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Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

The following figure shows how to remove the LCD:

Replacing the LCD


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the terminal’s LCD:
1. Spread the four mounting posts apart and seat the LCD in place.
2. Reinstall the mainboard by following the instructions in the section
“Replacing the Mainboard.”
3. Test operation of the LCD by executing maintenance mode command 153.
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance Mode.”

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

The following figure shows how to replace the LCD:

Removing the Reader Cover


Kronos provides two types of reader cover; one has a wider slot than the other.
With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
remove the reader cover:
1. Remove the Series 400 terminal’s mainboard following the instructions in the
section “Removing the Mainboard.”
2. With the mainboard removed, the reader cover’s locking screw and two
plastic mounting clips are exposed. Remove the Phillip’s screw located on the
cover’s lower left inside area.
3. In the same area, locate the two plastic mounting clips, holding the reader
cover in.
4. Carefully press one side in and pull on the reader cover to remove it.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-35


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Note
The metal wear bar may dislodge from the front cover.

The following figure shows how to remove the reader cover:

Replacing the Reader Cover


With external power removed from the Series 400 terminal, follow these steps to
replace the reader cover:
1. Place the metal wear bar over the plastic rail, located to the left of the optics
window. The long metal wear bar is to be placed to the right.
2. Line up the reader cover over the top of the main cover, aligning the bottom
and right side edges and the two plastic mounting clips to pass into the main
cover.

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Removing and Replacing Parts of the Terminal

3. Press down on the reader cover snapping it into place.


The sound made when you snap the reader cover into place is rather loud, so
do not be alarmed.
4. Using a number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver, replace the reader cover’s
locking screw.
5. Reinstall the mainboard by following the instructions in the section
“Replacing the Mainboard” earlier in this chapter.

The following figure demonstrates how to replace the reader cover:

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-37


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

Upgrading Memory
This section describes how to upgrade the memory in the Series 400 terminal.
You will need an 5-32 security-head Allen wrench and a nonmetallic pointed tool
for removing the lithium battery. For information about static protection when
upgrading the terminal’s memory, see the section “Handling Static-Sensitive
Components.” If you are not familiar with the mainboard location codes used in
this section, see the mainboard figure in the section “The Series 400 Terminal and
Its Parts” in Chapter 1.

Caution
Upgrading the terminal’s memory will erase all terminal configuration
information and punch data. Before changing the memory configuration, be sure
to save the terminal’s data. See the section “Saving and Restoring Data” earlier in
this chapter.

RAM Upgrade
This section contains information you need to upgrade the Series 400 terminal’s
random access memory (RAM). The two types of mainboard support different
RAM configurations.
w Mainboard 6600177-XXX
This mainboard supports memory configurations of 128K and 256K. You
achieve the memory configurations by installing either one or two 128K
memory chips.
w Mainboard 6600186-XXX
This mainboard supports memory configurations of 128K, 256K, 512K, and
1024K (1MB). You achieve the memory configurations by installing one or
two 128 memory chips, or one or two 512K memory chips. Use the shorting
jumpers located at J1 to configure the hardware for either 128K or 512K
memory chips.

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Upgrading Memory

Inserting the Memory Chip

During the procedure for installing the memory chip, which is described in
“Changing the Memory Configuration,” you need to insert a memory chip into the
socket on the mainboard. If you do not insert the memory chip into the socket
properly, the chip will not function.

You must first locate Pin 1 of the socket and the memory chip to properly orient
the memory chip in the socket on the mainboard. The markings on the mainboard
have a rectangular outline for the socket.
w PIN1 on the mainboard is located in the upper left corner, on the edge of the
outline that has a notch.
w PIN 1 of the memory chip is noted by a small dot in the upper left corner of
the chip.

When you place the memory chip into the socket, align both PIN1 on the chip and
the socket. Be sure that the pins go straight into the socket and that the chip sits
flat. You must push firmly to seat the chip properly. Be careful not to push
excessively or you may bend or break the pins.

Changing the Memory Configuration

To install the new memory chip and change and verify the memory configuration,
complete the following steps:
1. Disconnect the wall transformer from its AC power source.
2. Using the Allen wrench, remove the screw on the left side of the terminal and
open the unit.
3. If a battery backup board is installed, unplug the battery backup connection at
TB3 on the mainboard.
4. Using the nonmetallic tool, remove the lithium battery at BATT1, by wedging
it through the slots on the side of the holder. Take care not to damage the
battery holder when removing the battery. For more details, see the section
“Replacing the Lithium Battery” in Chapter 2.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-39


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

5. Before inserting new memory chips into the appropriate sockets, locate the
existing memory chips on the mainboard.
On the 6600177-XXX mainboard, the primary memory chip is at location U4;
the secondary is at U5. Note that the primary memory chip is soldered to the
mainboard; there is a socket for the secondary memory chip.
On the 6600186-XXX mainboard, the primary memory chip is at location U5;
the secondary is at U6. Note that both the primary and secondary memory
chips have sockets.
– If upgrading a 6600177-XXX or 6600186-XXX mainboard from 128K to
256K, insert the memory chip into the secondary socket.
– If upgrading a 6600186-XXX mainboard from 128K or 256K to 512K,
remove any 128K memory chips and insert the 512K memory chip into
the primary socket. Place jumpers on shorting jumper pairs 1-2 and 3-4 at
J1 (the jumper pairs closest to the secondary socket).
– If upgrading a 6600186-XXX mainboard from 128K or 256K to 1024K,
remove any 128K memory chips and insert the two 512K memory chips
into the sockets. Place jumpers on shorting jumper pairs 1-2 and 3-4 at J1
(the jumper pairs closest to the secondary socket).
– If upgrading a 6600186-XXX mainboard from 512K to 1024K, insert the
512K memory chip into the secondary socket.
6. Plug in the battery backup connection at TB3 on the mainboard (if a battery
backup board is installed).
7. Install the lithium battery into BATT1, ensuring that the positive (+) side of
the battery is positioned on the same side of the holder as the board markings.
8. Close the Series 400 terminal, and using the Allen wrench, replace the screw
on the left side of the terminal.
9. Connect the wall transformer to its AC power source. The terminal should
turn on normally and display:
1/01/85 12:00A OR 1/01/85 12:00A
KOS.2XXX KOS.3XXX
The XXX show the boot-EPROM version. The date and time are incorrect
until initialized.

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Upgrading Memory

10. Check the terminal for memory size. At the terminal keyboard, press the *
key.
The terminal displays the ENTER COMMAND NUMBER message.
11. Type 110 and press Enter.
The terminal displays the boot-EPROM version and the amount of memory:
128K, 256K, 512K, or 1MEG.
12. Restore the terminal’s data. For instructions, see the section “Saving and
Restoring Data” earlier in this chapter.

Boot-EPROM Upgrade
This section contains information you need to upgrade the Series 400 terminal’s
boot erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM).

Caution
Upgrading the boot-EPROM will erase all terminal configuration information and
punch data. Before upgrading the boot-EPROM, be sure to save the terminal’s
data. See the section “Saving and Restoring Data” earlier in this chapter.

Be sure to cold-start the Series 400 terminal before you upgrade the
boot-EPROM. Use maintenance command 93 or Procedure 78 to cold-start the
terminal.

Complete the following steps to upgrade the boot-EPROM:


1. Locate the boot-EPROM memory chip on the mainboard.
The memory chip is at the U2 location on the 6600177-XXX mainboard and at
the U3 location on the 6600186-XXX mainaboard.
2. Disconnect the DC power source from the terminal.
3. Disconnect the lead-acid battery from the terminal’s mainboard.
You do not have to remove the lithium battery.
4. Unplug the memory chip from its socket, using a smooth upward tug.
To avoid bending the legs of the chip, the best way to remove the chip is with
a chip remover. The better chip removers have a piece that settles onto the top

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 3-41


Chapter 3 Servicing the Series 400 Terminal

of the chip while its fingers insert under the body of the chip. The chip
remover’s fingers secure the chip against the rest of the remover to ensure that
pressure is distributed between the two ends of the chip.
5. Align the notch on the new boot-EPROM with the notch on socket U3 or U2
on the terminal’s mainboard.
6. Plug in the new memory chip being sure to orient it properly so that all the
chip’s legs are plugged in.
For more information, see the section “Inserting the Memory Chip.”
7. Reconnect the lead-acid battery to the terminal’s mainboard.
8. Reconnect the DC power source.
9. Enter maintenance mode and use command 117 to confirm that the
boot-EPROM upgrade is successful.
10. Restore the terminal’s data.
For instructions, see the section “Saving and Restoring Data” earlier in this
chapter.

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Chapter 4
Troubleshooting

This chapter provides troubleshooting procedures to help isolate the source of


hardware malfunctions that can occur while operating the Series 400 terminal.

Troubleshooting procedures are provided for the following types of problems:


w Terminal Hardware Failures
w Power-Up Failures
w Badge-Reading Problems
w Keypad Problems
w Lead-Acid Battery Backup Failures
w Communications Problems

For troubleshooting information related to specific options, see the following


documentation:
w Ethernet Option Installation and Overview Guide
w Kronos Terminal 14.4Kbps Modem Option Installation Guide
w Token Ring Interface Installation Guide
w Battery Backup Option Installation Guide
w Dual Reader I/O Board Installation Guide
w Optional I/O Board Installation Guide
w Twinaxial Interface Installation Guide
w Kronos Auxiliary Power Source Installation Guide
w Universal Relay Installation Guide
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

Terminal Hardware Failures


Since error messages do not display for most hardware failures, you must perform
some hands-on troubleshooting to determine their causes. You need the following
tools to troubleshoot the Series 400 terminal’s hardware:
w #0, #1, and #2 Phillips-head screwdrivers
w 1/8-inch and 1/4-inch flat blade screwdrivers
w A nonmetallic pointed tool
w 5-32 security-head Allen wrench
w AC/DC voltmeter
w Ohmmeter

You also need the following functioning elements of the Field Replaceable Unit
(FRU) and option boards. For part numbers, see Appendix B, “Series 400
Terminal Part Numbers.”
w Mainboard
w LCD display assembly
w DC wall transformer
w Keypad
w Auxiliary power source (APS)
w Remote swipe bar code badge reader
w 2400 Baud or 14.4Kbps modem module
w Ethernet option board
w Token Ring option board
w Twinaxial interface board

The following table summarizes the steps that you should follow when
troubleshooting the Series 400 terminal’s hardware. This table covers the majority

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Terminal Hardware Failures

of troubleshooting contingencies. For additional information, see the sections


following the table.

Symptom Probable Cause Corrective Action


Series 400 terminal DC wall transformer is not Plug in DC wall transformer.
fails to power up plugged in properly to
terminal or outlet.
No LCD backlight AC line is not live or is Measure voltage at AC outlet
supplying improper voltage. and, if necessary, locate another
power source.
APS is not installed properly. Reinstall APS properly.
Power LED is off LED indicator light is burned Replace mainboard.
out.
For more information, see “Power-Up Failures.”
Display fails to work AC line is not live or is Measure voltage at AC outlet
supplying improper voltage. and, if necessary, locate another
power source.
DC wall supply is not plugged Plug in DC wall transformer.
in properly to terminal or
outlet.
APS is not installed properly. Reinstall APS properly.
Display’s cable is not Make sure cable is connected to
connected to mainboard. connector P2 on mainboard.
Display board is Replace with a functioning
malfunctioning. mainboard.
Mainboard is malfunctioning. Replace with a functioning
mainboard.
For more information, see “Power-Up Failures.”

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-3


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

Symptom Probable Cause Corrective Action


Series 400 terminal Badge is unreadable. Inspect badge. Clean badge and/
fails to read badges or reader.
(integral reader) Terminal is improperly Check bar code symbology,
configured. badge reader type, and company
ID code.
Mainboard is malfunctioning. Connect a functioning
mainboard.
For more information, see “Badge-Reading Problems.”
Series 400 terminal Badge is unreadable. Inspect badge. Clean badge and/
fails to read badges or reader.
(remote reader) Badge reader is improperly Check connections.
connected.
Terminal is improperly Check bar code symbology,
configured. badge reader type, and company
ID code.
For more information, see “Badge-Reading Problems.”
Keypad fails to work Keypad’s ribbon cable is Make sure ribbon cable is
improperly connected to connected to connector P1.
mainboard. Make sure the cable is not
twisted or cut.
Keypad is malfunctioning. Replace keypad.
Mainboard is malfunctioning. Replace mainboard.
For more information, see “Keypad Problems.”

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Terminal Hardware Failures

Symptom Probable Cause Corrective Action


Internal modem does Incorrect baud rate. Make sure internal modem and
not communicate host modem are configured with
the same baud rate (600, 1200,
2400, or 9600 bps, or 14.4Kbps)
Procedure 10, Step 1.
Ring count must be set to an
amount between 1 and 4.
Procedure 9, Step 1.
Terminals must be configured
for RS-485 communications.
Make sure terminals are
terminated and biased properly.
For more information, see the Kronos Terminal 14.4Kbps
Modem Option Installation Guide.
Lead-acid battery The battery backup option is Reinstall according to
failure improperly installed. specifications.
Ensure that fuse F1 is not blown.
Battery backup board Replace with functioning battery
battery-charging circuit is not backup board.
functioning properly.
Battery is defective. Replace with a functioning
battery.
For more information, see “Lead-Acid Battery Backup
Failures.”

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-5


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

Symptom Probable Cause Corrective Action


Communications Improper cabling. Ensure that all communications
failure cables are routed correctly and
connected properly.
Improper termination and Make sure the network is
biasing (RS-485). properly terminated and biased.
Improper communication Check baud rate,
parameter configuration. communications port
configuration, and
communications parameters on
host PC. Correct where
necessary.
Hardware defect. Use printer port for
communications.
Replace mainboard with
functioning mainboard.
For more information, see “Communications Problems.”

4-6 Kronos Incorporated


Power-Up Failures

Power-Up Failures
If the Series 400 terminal does not power up, then one of the following assemblies
may be faulty:
w DC wall supply
w APS (if using distributed power over communications lines)
w LCD display
w Mainboard

Use the following steps when troubleshooting problems that occur when powering
up the terminal:
1. Check the Power Status LED, the bottom indicator light on the Series 400
terminal. This light illuminates if the terminal is receiving adequate power. If
it does not illuminate, proceed to step 3. If the LED illuminates, but the
terminal does not power up, go to step 2.
2. Check the LCD display:
a. Remove the AC power from the terminal.
b. Disconnect the LCD display’s cable from connector P2 on the mainboard.
c. Connect a functioning display board to connector P2 on the mainboard.
d. Supply AC power to the Series 400 terminal.
If the terminal powers up properly, install the functioning display board in
the terminal. If the terminal does not power up, proceed to step 3.
3. Using an AC voltmeter set to 150 VAC (or set to 250 VAC for a 220 VAC
line), measure the AC voltage. Measured voltages must be in these tolerance
ranges:
AC hot to ground measures 108 to 132 VAC
AC hot to AC neutral measures 108 to 132 VAC
AC neutral to ground measures 0 to .5 VAC
If the measured AC voltages are not within range, locate another AC power
source.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-7


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4. Verify that the DC wall supply is good:


a. Check to see that the DC wall supply is plugged into the Series 400
terminal’s power connector and to an AC wall outlet. If the wall supply is
not plugged in properly, plug it in securely.
b. Unplug the DC wall supply from the terminal, but not from the wall
outlet.
c. Using a voltmeter, measure the DC voltage across CR6. The voltage
should measure approximately 24–28 VDC. If the voltage is present, and
within tolerance, then proceed to step 5.
If DC power is not present, then replace the DC wall supply with a
functioning one.
5. If using distributed power over the communications lines, verify that the APS
is installed properly. If the APS is not installed properly, reinstall it properly.
If using distributed power over the communications lines, verify that the APS
is supplying the proper DC voltage. With the APS connected to an AC power
source, measure the voltage output at pin 3 of its network connector. This
voltage should measure +36 VDC (+/- 5%).
If the APS is outputting the proper voltage level, then proceed to step 6.
If the APS is not outputting the proper voltage level, then replace it with a
functioning one.
6. If, after performing all of the above steps, the terminal still does not power up
properly, replace the mainboard with a functioning mainboard.

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Badge-Reading Problems

Badge-Reading Problems
If the Series 400 terminal is experiencing badge-reading problems, the source of
the problems can usually be traced to one of the following:
w Bar code badges are unreadable or the badge is out of specification.
w Remote badge reader is improperly connected to the terminal.
w Integral or connected badge reader is malfunctioning.
w The Series 400 terminal is improperly configured for the connected badge
reader(s), company ID code of the badges being read, or the bar code
symbologies being read.
w Mainboard is malfunctioning.

Use the following procedure to troubleshoot badge-reading problems:


1. Using maintenance mode command 152, verify that the Series 400 terminal
can read badges in maintenance mode.
Configuration settings are sometimes the cause of badge reader problems.
Using maintenance command 152 can cause confusion in diagnosing these
problems. Command 152 bypasses configuration settings, and problems that
exist while in normal mode can be missed while in maintenance mode. For
example, all bar code symbologies are temporarily enabled when command
152 is used, and any configuration setting using Procedure 11 to disable a
symbology is ignored.
Try using command 10 while operating in guard or supervisor mode. If the
badges read properly using command 152 and not command 10, then the
problem is in how the Series 400 terminal is configured. Check the settings in
Procedures 12, 13, and 14. For more information, see the Series 400 Terminal
Configuration Guide.
2. Clean the integral swipe badge reader.
3. Inspect the bar code badges that are being read. If badges are being scraped
off, you may need a wider-slot reader. Contact Kronos Global Support.
If the badges are damaged in any way, replace them with functioning
badges.
If the badges are good, then proceed to step 4.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-9


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4. If the connected wand, CCD, handheld laser bar code reader, or remote reader
is malfunctioning, follow these steps:
a. Disconnect the bar code reader from the Series 400 terminal and connect
a functioning reader in its place.
b. Attempt to read some badges using the functioning reader.
If the terminal fails to read the badges, proceed to step 5.
5. Verify that the Series 400 terminal is configured properly for the attached
badge reader(s), the bar code symbologies being read, and the company ID
code of the badges being read.
w Ensure that the bar code symbology that you are attempting to read has
been enabled in Procedure 11.
The remote reader converts any badge into the Code 128 bar code
symbology. Be sure this symbology is not disabled when using a remote
reader.
w Ensure that the correct badge reader type has been enabled in Procedure
1, Step 2.
The badge reader only reads the bar code default (3) or generic (4) unless
it is a PIN only unit.
w Ensure that the correct company ID code has been enabled in Procedure
29.
For information on these procedures and steps, see the Series 400
Terminal Configuration Guide.
Change these program mode values if necessary and then reconfigure the
Series 400 terminal. Attempt to read some badges or bar codes after
reconfiguring the terminal. If the bar code reader still fails to work
properly, proceed to step 3.
6. Check the I/O board if external devices are being used. Replace if defective.
7. If, after performing all of the above steps, the Series 400 terminal still does
not read badges, replace the mainboard with a functioning mainboard.

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Keypad Problems

Keypad Problems
Constant or intermittent keypad problems can usually be attributed to one of the
following:
w Keypad is malfunctioning
w Mainboard is malfunctioning

Use the following procedure to troubleshoot keypad problems:


1. Execute maintenance mode command 154 to test the keypad.
2. Press a key on the keypad. Its corresponding character(s) should appear on the
terminal’s LCD. If not, proceed to step 4.
3. Press Clear twice to abort.
4. Determine if the keypad’s ribbon cable is properly connected to the
mainboard:
a. Open the Series 400 terminal’s front cover.
b. Ensure that the keypad’s ribbon cable is connected to connector P1 on the
mainboard and that it is not twisted or cut.
If the cable is improperly connected, reconnect it properly and secure the
front cover.
5. Try replacing the keypad membrane. For instructions, see the section
“Replacing the Keypad Membrane” in Chapter 3.
If none of the above steps solve the problem, replace the mainboard with a
functioning board.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-11


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

Lead-Acid Battery Backup Failures


Failure of the Series 400 terminal’s 12 VDC lead-acid battery backup option can
be traced to one of the following problems:
w The battery backup option is installed improperly.
w The battery backup board’s battery-charging circuit is not functioning
properly.
w The lead-acid battery is not holding a charge properly.
w The battery backup board’s sensing circuitry is not functioning properly and
is failing to switch the terminal’s power source to the lead-acid battery when
external power is lost or interrupted.

If at any time the 12 VDC lead-acid battery backup option fails to provide backup
DC power to the Series 400 terminal when its external power source is lost or
interrupted, you should isolate the source of this failure by following these steps:
1. Inspect the Series 400 terminal and ensure that its lead-acid battery option is
installed properly:
a. Ensure that the battery backup board’s black cable is connected to the
battery’s negative (-) terminal and that its red cable is connected to the
battery’s positive (+) terminal.
b. Ensure that the battery backup board’s mainboard cable is connected to
connector TB3 on the mainboard.
c. Ensure that fuse F1 on the battery backup board is not burned out. If it is,
replace it with a 5.0A/125V glass fuse (part number 4400111-001).
d. Ensure that the battery backup board’s three cables are soldered to the
board properly.
2. With the Series 400 terminal connected to its external power source, ensure
that the battery backup board’s battery-charging circuitry is functioning
properly:

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Lead-Acid Battery Backup Failures

a. Using a Kronos field service battery tester (part number 9700005-001), or


a standard multimeter, measure the charge voltage supplied to the
lead-acid battery while it is connected to the battery backup board. Place
the battery tester/multimeter’s probes across the lead-acid battery’s
positive and negative terminals.
b. If this voltage measures less than 12 VDC, then either the lead-acid
battery is failing to hold its charge or the battery backup board’s
battery-charging circuitry is failing.
If the voltage measures 12 VDC or greater, go to step 3.
c. Replace the lead-acid battery with a functioning battery, and re-measure
the voltage. For more information, see the “Testing and Replacing the
Lead-Acid Battery” section in Chapter 2.
If the voltage again measures less than 12 VDC, the battery backup
board’s battery-charging circuitry is not functioning properly. Leave the
functioning battery in place as the original battery cannot hold a charge
properly.
3. With the Series 400 terminal’s battery backup option installed and connected,
remove external power from the terminal by unplugging its communications
cable connector.

Note
This step applies only to power over communications set ups; otherwise, you
should remove the wall supply.

Observe the terminal’s power status LED (the bottom yellow LED). If the
LED is flashing, the battery backup board’s sensing circuitry is functioning
properly.
If the power status LED is not lit, the battery backup board’s sense circuitry is
not functioning properly, and the terminal is not being switched over to
battery backup when external power is lost or interrupted. Replace the battery
backup board with a functioning board.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-13


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

Communications Problems
A single Series 400 terminal or a network of terminals can experience the
following communications problems:
w Serial problems
w Ethernet problems
w Token Ring problems
w Modem problems

Serial, Ethernet, and Token Ring troubleshooting information is described in this


section. For information on troubleshooting modem problems, see the Kronos
Terminal 14.4Kbps Modem Option Installation Guide.

Serial Troubleshooting
The source of serial communications problems can usually be traced to one of the
following:
w Improper communications cabling
w Improper RS-485 network termination and biasing
w Improper configuration of the Series 400 terminal’s communications
parameters (baud rate, start/stop bits, etc.)
w Faulty communications hardware

Use the following procedure to troubleshoot communications problems:


1. Speak with the system administrator or someone who is familiar with the
installation and obtain a specific explanation of the problem.
If the customer is running Timekeeper Central Version 5 or earlier, type the
ERRLOG.TKC file to the host PC and look for any communication error
messages.
If the customer is running Timekeeper Central Version 6 or later from the
Kronos Central Controller shell program, type the Activity History Report
and look for any communications error messages.

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Communications Problems

2. Examine all communications cables and ensure that they are connected
correctly to all devices on the network and are routed properly.
3. When troubleshooting a network of daisy-chained Series 400 terminals using
RS-485 communications, ensure that the network is properly terminated and
biased.
4. Run the SETCOMM.EXE and CHECK.EXE utility programs on the host PC
and establish its baud rate and COMM port configuration.
5. Use the TRYIT.EXE, ATRYIT.EXE, and COMMSTAT.EXE utility
programs to test communications between the host PC and each terminal on
the network. Attempt to isolate the communications problems to a single
Series 400 terminal by using TRYIT.EXE.
6. Ensure that the communications parameters of each terminal on the network
match those of the host PC. The Series 400 terminal’s configuration
parameters are set using Procedures 9, 10, and 30 of the terminal program.
7. Check the password to ensure that there are no duplicates in the network.
8. If the communications problems can be isolated to a single terminal, use the
following maintenance mode commands to test the terminal’s
communications hardware:
w Command 136: Reinitialize Communications Hardware
w Command 175: Channel A Transmit Test
w Command 176: Channel A Echo Test
w Command 177: Channel A External Loopback Test
w Command 178: Channel A Local Loopback Test
w Command 179: Channel A Remote Loopback Test
w Command 138: Test Internal Modem Module (with modem option only)
w Command 180: Channel B Transmit Test (with I/O board option only)
w Command 181: Channel B Echo Test (with I/O board option only)
w Command 182: Channel B External Loopback Test (with I/O board
option only)
w Command 183: Channel B Local Loopback Test (with I/O board option
only)

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-15


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

w Command 184: Channel B Remote Loopback Test (with I/O board option
only)
For information on the commands themselves, see Chapter 6, “Using
Maintenance Mode.”
9. If the Series 400 terminal fails any of the maintenance commands listed in
step 5, replace its mainboard.

Note
The RS-232 communications port on the optional I/O board may be configured to
perform host communications. This feature is useful in the event of host
communications port failure. See the I/O board documentation for more
information.

Ethernet Troubleshooting
You can use the Ping utilty and the Tryit utility to test Ethernet communications.

Ping Utility

You can test the communications to an Ethernet terminal using the PING.EXE
utility program, which is supplied with your installation diskette. The PING.EXE
utility can send a signal from the host computer to a Series 400 terminal that has
an Ethernet option attached.

You can run this program from the installed directory to check the
communications to terminals. The command line for PING follows:

ping password [-frequency] [-s] [-b] [-?]


where password is the 6-digit terminal password and frequency represents the
frequency number of a continuous test. Ping assumes that the first two octets of
the IP address are the same; therefore, you can only ping terminals which share
these first two octets. The optional parameters are:
w -f invokes a continuous test. You must specify a frequency rate for this

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Communications Problems

option.
w -s displays statistics of the tests such as number of successful tests.
w -b removes the audio
w -? displays help on the command line usage
For example, if you want to ping a terminal with the password 111111, type:

ping 111111

If you are unable to successfully ping a terminal, consider the following:


w Is this a new terminal? An upgraded terminal? Has it ever worked before?
w Have you verified that the IP address has been entered correctly in the
application?
w Have you checked the terminal’s configuration for the proper IP address
(Procedure 30, Step 2)?
w Can you ping other devices on that same segment? If not, contact the the
customer Network Administrator or IS personnel.
w Have you tried to ping the terminal from a host PC on the same segment as the
Terminal?
If you are experiencing either of the following situations:
w You have just put in a new Ethernet daughtercard and it will not work and you
cannot Ping it.
w You have just replaced a Series 400 terminal with a new one using the same
IP address and it will not work and you cannot ping it.

there is a good chance that the host PC is communicating to the terminal through a
switch or some other device that builds an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
table. In this case, it is possible for the switch or other device to still have the IP
address of this terminal mapped to the physical address of the original Ethernet
daughtercard.

You can ask the Network Administrator for a number of things for a workaround:
w New IP address (they can use the old IP address immediately for another
device).
w To remove the entry from the Switch database (ARP table)

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-17


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

w To put a static entry in the switch database (ARP table)

If you are able to ping an Ethernet terminal, but software communication fails, run
the Tryit utility to further test the communications.

Tryit Utility

The Tryit utility tests the communication line between the host computer and
Timekeeper terminal by establishing a communication link. This utility is part of
the Terminal Service Utility application. For more information about this
application, see the section “Terminal Service Utility” in Chapter 3.

From the Terminal Service Utility window, select Tools > Tryit.

The Tryit dialog box appears:

When running Tryit, you must specify the Ethernet IP address. When you click
the Test button, the results of the test appear in a message box. Communication is
successful when Tryit identifies terminal and version number; otherwise a failure
message displays.

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Communications Problems

If communication fails, check all cables from the host computer to the Series 400
terminal; also check the passwords and IP addresses.

For more information on Ethernet communication, as well as RS-485, RS-232,


modem, and twinaxial communication, see the Terminal Communication Network
Reference Guide.

Token Ring Troubleshooting


If you are having difficulty with Token Ring communications, perform a visual
inspection of the printed circuit board assembly for damaged components.
1. Ensure that the Series 400 terminal is set for RS-485 communications and
biasing and termination.
2. Verify that the following communication parameters are set:
w Baud rate = 9600 bps (Procedure 10, Step 1).
w Turnaround delay, data bits, and parity settings add up to 132 (Procedure
10, Step 2).
w IP address is set up correctly (Procedure 30, Step 2).
w Network speed is 4 or 16 Mbits (Procedure 10, Step 10).
w Use Procedure 91 to reset the terminal so that the setting takes effect.
3. Verify that the password (Procedure 30, Step 1) is set to default (all spaces).
4. Check the LEDs on the Token Ring board. There are three LEDs you can use
for troubleshooting:
w LED 3 = power
w LED 2 = 4 MB
w LED 1 = 16 MB
When the terminal powers up, LEDs 1 and 2 pulse once. All LEDs are off
while the field programmable gate array (FPGA) loads. LED 3 comes on

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-19


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

when the software starts to initialize and load the T1 chip. LED 2 or 3 comes
on when you attach the board to the ring.
Under normal conditions with a 16 MB network connection, LEDs 1 and 3 are
on and LED 2 is off. Under normal conditions with a 4 MB network
connection, LEDs 2 and 3 are on and LED 1 is off.
Under the following fault conditions, here is the status of the LEDs:
w No network connection: LEDs 1 and 2 are off and LED 3 pulses.
w No terminal RS-485 communication: LEDs 1 and 2 pulse.
w Incorrect network speed: LEDs 2 and 3 pulse and LED 1 can be either on
or off.
5. Ping the terminal’s IP address, not its password; for example:
ping 158.228.64.1
For more information about how to ping the terminal, see the section “Ping
Utility” earlier in this chapter. If you can ping the terminal, but it still will not
update or collect data, go to step 6.
6. Check for a duplicate IP address by unplugging the NIC cable from the back
of the terminal and pinging the IP address of the terminal again.
If the ping is successful, you know that another device shares that IP address.

If you are experiencing either of the following situations:


w You have just put in a new Token Ring interface board and it will not work
and you cannot ping it.
w You have just replaced a Series 400 terminal with a new one using the same
IP address and it will not work and you cannot ping it.

There is a good chance that the host PC is communicating to the terminal through
a switch or some other device that builds an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
table. In this case, it is possible for the switch or other device to still have the IP
address of this terminal mapped to the physical address of the original Token Ring
interface board.

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Communications Problems

You can ask the Network Administrator for a number of things for a workaround:
w New IP address (they can use the old IP address immediately for another
device).
w To remove the entry from the Switch database (ARP table)
w To put a static entry in the switch database (ARP table)

If you are still having a problem, contact Kronos Global Support.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 4-21


Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-22 Kronos Incorporated


Chapter 5
Changing Terminal Firmware

This chapter provides instructions for using the SL400 utility to modify the time
and attendance application stored in the Series 400 terminal’s flash-EEPROM.

This chapter describes the following information:


w Using the Correct Versions
w Softloading an Application with SL400
Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

Using the Correct Versions


Before attempting to use a utility to update the flash application in your Series 400
terminal, check the versions of the items described in this section.

About the Flash Utility


If you are using DOS, use either version 8D.00.03G (or higher) of the SL400.EXE
utility or version 8D00.03G (or higher) of the SOFTLOAD.EXE utility to update
the Series 400 flash application files. Earlier versions of these utilities cannot
properly load .KRE files or .KRA files.

If you are using a Windows system, use the SL400 utility of the Kronos Terminal
Service Utility (TSU) application, Version 2A.01.03 or higher. Note that you can
also use the TSU Softload utility to update the flash.

About the Boot-EPROM


The boot-EPROM of your Series 400 terminal is identified by a version stamp of
KOS.XXXX, where the XXXX indicates the release version; for example,
KOS.2A00 or KOS.2A01. Maintenance command 110 gives you the
boot-EPROM version.

If the boot-EPROM version of the Series 400 terminal is KOS.2XXXX, your


terminal’s mainboard’s number is 6600177-XXX, and you can only softload flash
application programs with the file name 400XXXX.KRN.

If the boot PROM version of your terminal is KOS.3XXX, your mainboard’s


number is 6600186-XXX, and you can only softload flash application programs
with the file name 400XXXX.KRE.

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Using the Correct Versions

About the Flash Application Program


The flash application program is identified by a version stamp of 400.XXXX,
where the XXXX indicates the release version; for example, 400.3B02 or
400.3B03. Maintenance command 110 gives you the version.

The Ethernet option board has its own flash application program device that
controls the higher level Ethernet communications functions, and this flash is also
intended to be field upgradeable using the softload process. Ethernet flash
programs are identified by the alphanumeric version followed by a .KRA
extension; for example, ETH1A01.KRA or ETH1A02.KRA.

If you softload the wrong flash file type or use an earlier version of SL400.EXE,
or you use SOFTLOAD.EXE to softload a 400XXXX.KRE or ETHXXXX.KRA
file, the softload fails somewhere in the middle of Block 1. If you allow the
softload process to complete after a failure occurs (this may take a few minutes of
seeming inactivity), SOFTLOAD and SL400 terminate the softload process
appropriately, and the terminal returns to boot mode; that is, the terminal displays
KOS.XXXX. You can then softload the proper flash file using the correct version
of SOFTLOAD or SL400 and activate the file without incident.

Warning
If you break the communications link and you cold-start the terminal before the
Series 400 terminal is restored to boot mode; that is, while the terminal displays
the SOFT LOAD MODE... message, a serious problem can occur. The terminal
returns to boot mode but can be in a state where you must return it to the Repair
Depot before the correct flash application can be softloaded and activated.
Symptoms of a problem include seeing the ERROR 50 message, or the terminal
reporting that it is a 460 when in fact it is a 480 or a 420. If this happens, you must
return the terminal to the Repair Depot. It cannot be fixed in the field.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 5-3


Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

Softloading an Application with SL400


Kronos periodically releases new versions of its time and attendance applications.
It is possible to upgrade a Series 400 terminal’s flash-EEPROM with a new time
and attendance application by softloading the application over the
communications lines connected to the terminal. If a Series 400 terminal is
connected to a modem, it is even possible to upgrade the terminal from a remote
site.

Kronos provides a SL400 service utility for Windows and DOS systems that you
can use to softload an application or to save and restore data. For more
information on saving and restoring data, see the section, “Saving and Restoring
Data,” in Chapter 3.

SL400 for Windows


Use the Windows SL400 utility, which is part of the Terminal Service Utility
(TSU) application, to softload an application into the Series 400 terminal’s
flash-EEPROM. For more information about the TSU application, see the section
“Terminal Service Utility” in Chapter 3.

Follow these steps to softload the Series 400 terminal with a time and attendance
application flash:
1. Save the data in the Series 400 terminal by following the steps in the section
“Saving and Restoring Data” in Chapter 3.

Note
The Setcomm utility in the TSU application creates a configuration file called
COMMLINK.CFG in the TSU directory.

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Softloading an Application with SL400

2. Run the TERMUTILS.EXE file.


The Terminal Service Utility window appears:

3. From the Terminal Service Utility window, select Tools > SL400.
The SL400 dialog box appears:

4. Check the Load Firmware box, and clear the other preferences.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 5-5


Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

5. Specify the file to be loaded by typing the location and file name in the
Firmware Selection field.
The file extension .KRN or .KRE indicates that the file is an update file. The
file name should reflect the location of the file, in this case the directory
“4002A00”.
6. Specify the terminal to be upgraded. Enter into the Address field the IP
address for Ethernet terminals, the telephone number for modem terminals, or
the password for direct connection terminals.
7. Click the Update button to load the firmware.
The SL400 utility program places the target Series 400 terminal in softload
mode, erases the application currently loaded in the terminal’s
flash-EEPROM, and loads the new application (?.KRN) into the terminal’s
flash-EEPROM. While the Series 400 terminal is operating in softload mode,
it displays a series of messages that reflect the progress of the operation:
SOFT LOAD MODE...
ERASING FLASH...
PROGRAMMING FLASH...
BLOCK 1 OF 2, BLOCK 2 OF 2...
When the softload is complete, the SL400 utility displays the total number of
bytes programmed, (the size of the application sent to the terminal).
8. After the Series 400 terminal has been softloaded, it may display:
PROCEDURE .1
This indicates that the Series 400 terminal is operating in program mode.

Note
The terminal can possibly return to normal mode after a softload if you are not
upgrading to the next major version number of the flash application. If the
terminal goes to normal mode, the previous configuration and all data stored
in the terminal is preserved and there is no need to restore the data. This
means you do not have to perform steps 9 through 12.

You should now configure all of the terminal’s operating parameters as


desired (see the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide).

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Softloading an Application with SL400

9. After you configure the terminal’s operating parameters, press * * Enter to


exit program mode and return to maintenance mode.
The Series 400 terminal’s display shows the prompt ENTER COMMAND
NUMBER.
10. Restore the saved data to the Series 400 terminal.
The ENTER COMMAND NUMBER prompt reappears. For information on
restoring the data, see the section “Saving and Restoring Data” in Chapter 3.
11. Press Enter to exit maintenance mode and return to normal mode.
The Series 400 terminal displays the date and time:
WE 01-JAN-92 12:00
KRONOS 460
12. Use the Timekeeper Central program to run the “Broadcast Time to
Terminals” function, which will synchronize the Series 400 terminals’ date
and time. You can also use Core Central, Data Collection Manager (DCM),
Timekeeper Central for Windows Commlink, or Terminal Service Utility
(TSU) to synchronize the date and time.

Note
To test communications between the terminal and the host, use the TSU Tryit
utility.

SL400 for DOS


You can use the DOS SL400.EXE utility to softload an application into the Series
400 terminal’s flash-EEPROM.

Caution
Prior to performing a softload, ensure that you install the versions of SL400.EXE,
SETCOMM.EXE, CHECK.EXE, and TRYIT.EXE that are compatible with the
installed version of your Series 400 terminal application and its associated
COMM.FIG file.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 5-7


Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

Follow these steps to softload the Series 400 terminal with a time and attendance
application flash:
1. Save the data in the Series 400 terminal by following the steps in the “Saving
and Restoring Data” section in Chapter 3.
2. Install the appropriate version of SL400.EXE, SETCOMM.EXE,
CHECK.EXE, and TRYIT.EXE in the \KRONOS\DATA directory.
3. If this is a new software installation, run SETCOMM, CHECK, and TRYIT to
create a COMM.FIG file; otherwise, use the existing COMM.FIG file.
4. Run the SL400.EXE program from the \KRONOS\DATA directory.
The Series 400 Service Utility window appears:

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Softloading an Application with SL400

5. Select the Application Update option.


The Application Update window appears:

6. Enter the path and file name of the application you want to send to the Series
400 terminal.
The file extension .KRN or .KRE indicates that the file is an update file. The
file name should reflect the location of the file, in this case the directory
C:\KRONOS\4002A00.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 5-9


Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

7. Press Enter.
A window appears that prompts you for a password and telephone number:

8. Enter the password and phone number of the Series 400 terminal to which you
want to send the application. If the terminal is a direct connection terminal,
leave the phone number blank or type 0.
9. Press Enter.
The SL400 utility program places the target Series 400 terminal in softload
mode, erases the application currently loaded in the terminal’s
flash-EEPROM, and loads the new application (.KRN or .KRE) into the
terminal’s flash-EEPROM. While the Series 400 terminal is operating in
softload mode, it displays a series of messages that reflect the progress of the
operation:
SOFT LOAD MODE...
ERASING FLASH...
PROGRAMMING FLASH...
BLOCK 1 OF 2
When the softload is complete, SL400.EXE displays the total number of bytes
programmed (the size of the application sent to the terminal).

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Softloading an Application with SL400

10. Press any key to return to the password and phone number entry window.
You can now specify another Series 400 terminal to softload, or you may
press Esc repeatedly to exit from the SL400 program.
11. After the Series 400 terminal has been softloaded, it may display:
PROCEDURE .1
This indicates that the Series 400 terminal is operating in program mode.

Note
The terminal can possibly return to normal mode after a softload if you are not
upgrading to the next major version number of the flash application.If the
terminal goes to normal mode, the previous configuration and all data stored
in the terminal is preserved and there is no need to restore the data. This
means you do not need to perform steps 12 through 15.

You should now configure all of the terminal’s operating parameters (see the
Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide).
12. After you configure the terminal’s operating parameters, press * * Enter to
exit program mode and return to maintenance mode.
The Series 400 terminal’s display shows the prompt ENTER COMMAND
NUMBER.
13. Restore the saved data to the Series 400 terminal.
The ENTER COMMAND NUMBER prompt reappears.
For information on restoring the data, see the section “Saving and Restoring
Data” in Chapter 3.
14. Press Enter to exit maintenance mode and return to normal mode.
The Series 400 terminal displays the date and time.
15. Use the Timekeeper Central program to run the “Broadcast Time to
Terminals” function, which will synchronize the Series 400 terminals’ date
and time. You can also use Core Central, Data Collection Manager (DCM), or
Terminal Service Utility (TSU) to synchronize the date and time.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 5-11


Chapter 5 Changing Terminal Firmware

5-12 Kronos Incorporated


Chapter 6
Using Maintenance Mode

Maintenance mode is available only to those who have maintenance badge access
to the Series 400 terminal.
This chapter contains the following maintenance mode-related information:
w Command Modes Overview
w Operating in Maintenance Mode
w Maintenance Mode Password
w Commands List
w Executing Commands
Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Command Modes Overview


The Series 400 terminal has five operating modes for its various functions. These
modes are guard, maintenance, normal, program, and supervisor. Some Series 400
terminal commands require that the terminal be operating in maintenance mode
prior to their execution; others are available in different operating modes.

Three types of operating modes require a specially coded badge:


w Maintenance mode
w Supervisor mode
w Guard mode

You configure the terminal in program mode. You enter program mode by
swiping a maintenance badge and using maintenance command 90, which is
described later in this chapter. You can execute all commands in maintenance
mode, and a password is optional. For instructions on setting a password, see the
section “Maintenance Mode Password.”

You can also execute commands 2 through 10 and 21 through 79 in supervisor


mode and commands 12 through 20 in guard mode. A password restricts guard
mode and supervisor mode. The commands that you can access in supervisor and
guard modes are described in detail in the Timekeeper Terminal Supervisor’s
Reference.

This chapter also references procedures and steps; for example, Procedure 1, Step
9, which are described in detail in the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide.
Host commands are described in detail in the Series 400 Terminal Host Software
Interface Guide.

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Operating in Maintenance Mode

Operating in Maintenance Mode


The Series 400 terminal’s maintenance mode of operation allows you to display
technical information about the terminal, execute the terminal’s self-diagnostic
tests, and perform operational functions. The self-diagnostic tests are extremely
useful when troubleshooting hardware malfunctions.
To enter maintenance mode, simply swipe your maintenance badge, which is
labeled with a large “M,” through the terminal’s badge reader.

Note
If the terminal sits idle for 45 seconds without any input from the keypad, it
automatically exits maintenance mode and returns to normal mode.

After the maintenance badge is read, the prompt ENTER COMMAND NUMBER
appears on the terminal’s display. To execute a command, use the terminal keypad
to enter a command number and press Enter. For detailed descriptions of the
commands and how to execute them, see the section “Executing Commands.”

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 6-3


Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Maintenance Mode Password


You can configure the terminal to require a password to enter maintenance mode.
To enable this feature, enter a six-digit password in Procedure 22, Step 3. If you
enter 0, the default value, you do not need a password to enter maintenance mode.

If you lose the password, you cannot access maintenance mode at the terminal.
You must reset the password using the following host command sequence:

90#22#3#password#

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Commands List

Commands List
The following is a list of the commands described in detail in this chapter in the
section “Executing Commands.”

Warning
Terminal commands marked with an asterisk (*) can destroy the contents of
random access memory (RAM). Be sure that no important data will be lost before
executing these commands.

w Command 0: Exit Maintenance Mode


w Command 6: Ring Bell
w Command 7: Silence Bell
w Command 10: Read Badge and Display Badge Number
w Command 41: Determine Lithium Battery Life
w Command 62: Adjust Time
w Command 83: Set Date and Time*
w Command 85: Display IEEE Address
w Command 89: Display Integral Reader Statistics
w Command 90: Enter Program Mode
w Command 91: Restart (no data lost)
w Command 92: Warm-Start (application data lost)*
w Command 93: Cold-Start (all data lost)*
w Command 110: Display OS Version and RAM Size
w Command 111: Test RAM
w Command 112: Scan and Write RAM*
w Command 114: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Flash-EEPROM
Program
w Command 115: Display KOP Value
w Command 116: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Boot-EPROM Program

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 6-5


Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

w Command 117: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Ethernet Option Board
w Command 118: Modem Status
w Command 119: Advanced Modem Configuration
w Command 126: Verify Motion Detector or Doormat
w Command 127: Monitor I/O Daughterboard Input Bit
w Command 130: Employee Data Reset (for sales demonstration purposes
only)*
w Command 135: Clear the FIFO Buffer*
w Command 136: Reinitialize Communications Hardware
w Command 137: Reinitialize Printer Communications
w Command 138: Test Internal Modem Module
w Command 139: Reinitialize Ethernet Option Board
w Command 150: Monitor Main and I/O Input Bits
w Command 152: Display Badge Information
w Command 153: Test Display
w Command 154: Test Keypad
w Command 155: Test Input Bit 1
w Command 156: Test Output Ports
w Command 157: Adjust Contrast of Display
w Command 158: Display Data in I/O Port
w Command 159: Write Data to I/O Port*
w Command 166: Printer Test
w Command 174: Use Printer Port for Communications
w Command 175: Communications Channel A Transmit Test
w Command 176: RS-485 Communications Channel A Echo Test
w Command 177: RS-232 Communications Channel A External Loopback Test
w Command 178: Communications Channel A Local Loopback Test
w Command 179: Communications Channel A Remote Loopback Test
w Command 180: RS-232 Communications Channel B Transmit Test

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Commands List

w Command 181: RS-232 Communications Channel B Echo Test


w Command 182: Communications Channel B External Loopback Test
w Command 183: Communications Channel B Local Loopback Test
w Command 184: Communications Channel B Remote Loopback Test
w Command 185: Test Ethernet Option Board Communications
w Command 190: Reset Lithium Battery Life Value
w Command 252: Test Ethernet Board Flash

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 6-7


Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Executing Commands
The commands described in this section are available in maintenance mode. A
listing of the keystrokes required to execute a command follows a brief
description of each command.

Command 0: Exit Maintenance Mode

Command 0 returns the Series 400 terminal to normal mode. If you do not touch
the keypad for 45 seconds, the terminal automatically exits maintenance mode
and returns to normal mode.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 0, press Enter.
MO 19-APR-99 00:01 Current date and time, or default setting
(01-JAN-92 00:01) displays.

Command 6: Ring Bell

Command 6 activates the optional external bell/alarm that is connected to the bell
relay, which is wired to the Series 400 terminal’s Input/Output port (TB1). You
can use Procedure 20, Step 2, to set the duration that the bell/alarm sounds. To use
this command, you must enable the terminal to control a bell (Procedure 5, Step
3).

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 6, press Enter.
SPECIFY INTERVAL 2 Press Enter, or press a digit (1 through 9) key
followed by Enter to specify the duration in
minutes that the bell sounds.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Executing Commands

Command 7: Silence Bell

Command 7 tests the optional external bell/alarm that is connected to the bell
relay wired to the Series 400 terminal’s Input/Output port (TB1). Command 7
silences a ringing bell/alarm. To use this command, you must enable the terminal
to control a bell (Procedure 5, Step 3).

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 7, press Enter.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 10: Read Badge and Display Badge Number

Command 10 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s integral swipe badge
reader or optional remote swipe badge reader. Use this command to read a badge
and display its contents. When a standard Kronos badge is read, nine digits
display. Leading zeros precede the badge number if necessary. When a generic
badge is read, all characters encoded on the badge display.

If an S (Supervisor) badge is read, only the last two digits of the badge number
display for security reasons. Reading a maintenance badge terminates execution
of this command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 10, press Enter.
ENTER BADGE Read badge using connected badge reader.
(Badge #) The badge number displays (right-justified)
momentarily.
ENTER BADGE The terminal continues to prompt you to read more
badges. Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Command 41: Determine Lithium Battery Life

Command 41 displays the 3 VDC lithium battery’s life (the number of days the
battery is capable of supplying backup power). For a list of lithium battery lives,
see Chapter 2, “Preventive Maintenance.”

Each time external power is restored to the Series 400 terminal after it has been
operating on lithium battery backup, the terminal checks the amount of time the
terminal has been operating on lithium battery backup and the amount of RAM
installed. The terminal displays the message LOW LITHIUM BATTERY if the
battery is within 14 days of its limit.

Note
When you cold-start the Series 400 terminal (when you remove both its DC wall
supply and lithium battery), it prompts for entry of the lithium battery’s life. Thus,
prior to cold-starting the terminal, you must always determine the lithium
battery’s life by executing this maintenance command and recording the displayed
value.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 41, press Enter.
BATTERY LIFE NN Number of days remaining in battery’s life.
<CLEAR>TO CONTINUE Press any key to exit the command.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 62: Adjust Time

Command 62 adjusts the Series 400 terminal’s time (after it has been set using
Command 83) by a specified number of minutes.

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 62, press Enter.
ENTER VALUE Enter + or - followed by a two-digit number
representing the number of minutes the
terminal’s time is to be incremented (+) or set
back (-).
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 83: Set Date and Time

Caution
This command can potentially destroy to the contents of RAM. Save the Series
400 terminal’s data prior to executing this command. If the time change is
significantly large, you lose all of the punch records in the FIFO. If you wish to
abort the command, allow the unit to “time out” of maintenance mode by making
no keypad entries for 45 seconds. You cannot abort the command after you enter
the date and time. Use the Clear key to erase entries.

In the following example, the date is set to April 19, 1999, and the time is set to
11:30 A.M. Command 83 sets the date and time in the Series 400 terminal. The
revised date and time are enabled immediately upon execution of the command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 83, press Enter.
DATE (DD/MM/YY) The date prompt appears using the dd/mm/yy order
..-..-.. and format specified in the terminal program (Pr. 2).
Type 19 to specify the day as the 19th.
DATE (DD/MM/YY) Type 04 to specify the month as April.
19-..-..
DATE (DD/MM/YY) Type 99 to specify the year as 1999.
19-04-..

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


DATE (DD/MM/YY) Press Enter to accept the entered date, or press Clear
19-04-99 to clear the entered date.
ENTER TIME Type 1130 and press Enter to specify the time as
..:.. AM 11:30 A.M.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Note
Use the Kronos Timekeeper Central program selections “Initialize” and
“Broadcast Date/Time” to send the host PC’s date and time to all individual or
connected Series 400 terminals. When the terminal uses 24-hour time, midnight is
represented as 00:00—not 24:00. 00:00 is an invalid time when the terminal uses
12-hour time.

Command 85: Display IEEE Address

Command 85 displays the Series 400 terminal’s IEEE address. This command
applies to Ethernet option installations only.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 85, press Enter.
(Address displays and then clears The address will look something like this:
after about 5 seconds.) 00-40-58-XX-X-XX (the X’s are the last six
characters from the Ethernet board’s IEEE address
bar code label.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 89: Display Integral Reader Statistics

Command 89 displays swipe statistics of the Series 400 terminal’s three readers:
two remote readers and one integral reader. Command 89 provides a way to count
the swipes on each reader to determine if they are good or bad swipes. The count

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Executing Commands

of all the swipes displays followed by the count for the local reader, the first
remote reader, and the second remote reader. You can abort the command at
anytime by pressing the Clear key.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 89, press Enter. (If you use the # key instead
of pressing Enter, the terminal resets the counters
after displaying them.)
ALL READERS The good and bad counts for all readers display
GOOD - xxx BAD - yyy first.
LOCAL READER The good and bad counts for the integral reader
GOOD - xxx BAD - yyy display.
1ST REMOTE READER The good and bad counts for the first remote
GOOD - xxx BAD - yyy reader display.
2ND REMOTE READER The good and bad counts for the second remote
GOOD - xxx BAD - yyy reader display.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 90: Enter Program Mode

Command 90 causes the Series 400 terminal to exit maintenance mode and
operate in program mode. This mode of operation allows you to enter or change
values for the terminal's operating parameters. For more information, see the
Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide.

Prompt/Message Keystrokes/Description
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 90, press Enter.
PROCEDURE 1... The terminal is now operating in Program mode.
Enter values for the terminal’s operating
parameters until the desired configuration is
achieved.
Press * * Enter to exit program mode.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Command 91: Restart

Command 91 provides a simple restart of the Series 400 terminal. When using this
command, you do not lose any data. This is the least severe of the set of terminal
restart commands.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 91, press Enter.
PASSWORD Enter your communication password.
MO 19-APR-99 00:01 Ready for next command.

Command 92: Warm-Start

Command 92 performs a warm-start of the application running in the terminal.


This erases all of the application data, and the terminal restarts as if power was
lost and restored.

Warning
After using command 92, the only data retained in the terminal is that dealing with
boot mode operation, including host communication settings.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 92, press Enter.
PASSWORD Enter your communication password.
87 ERROR This message appears if there is any uncollected
punch information. Press Clear to abort and use
your host software to collect the data.
TERMINAL BUSY This message appears while data is being erased.
PROCEDURE .1 Default operation for restart.

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Executing Commands

Command 93: Cold-Start

Command 93 performs a cold-start of the terminal. The restart is equivalent to


removing power at the terminal, removing the lithium battery, allowing RAM to
lose its contents, and then restoring power.

Warning
Command 93 erases all data from the terminal. This is the most severe of the
terminal restart commands.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 93, press Enter.
PASSWORD Enter your communication password.
87 ERROR This message appears if there is any uncollected
punch information. Press Clear to abort and use
your host software to collect the data.
TERMINAL BUSY This message appears while data is being erased.
1/01/92 The top line of the display shows an incorrect date
KOS.XXXX and time. The bottom line shows a number that
represents the mainboard of the terminal. This
means the terminal is no longer programmed and
cannot be used until reprogrammed. See the
section “Cold-Start Procedure” in Chapter 3.

Command 110: Display OS Version and RAM Size

Command 110 displays the version number of the Series 400 terminal’s operating
system (OS) software loaded in the terminal’s boot-PROM followed by the
amount of random access memory (RAM) installed in the terminal.

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 110, press Enter.
KRONOS KOS.NXxNN Press Clear to exit the command.
128K 400.5E00
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 111: Test RAM

Command 111 tests the ability of the Series 400 terminal’s RAM to be written to
and read from. This test is nondestructive to the contents of the terminal’s RAM.

The test repeats itself indefinitely until you exit from it. The display flashes each
time 4K of RAM is checked and shows an updated count of the number of
completed test cycles. A test cycle completes each time the entire RAM has been
checked. The maximum number test cycles that displays is 99,999.

Press Clear to exit the test. Upon exit, the green LED lights and the message
TEST OK displays if the test succeeds, or the yellow LED lights and the message
RAM FAULT displays if the test fails. If the RAM test fails, you can then display
the address of the failed memory location.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 111, press Enter.
RAM TEST The test repeats indefinitely.
0 Press Clear to exit the test.
RAM TEST
1
(etc.)
65 RAM FAULT This error message appears only if the test detects a
RAM failure. Then the RAM FAULT 2 message
displays.

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


RAM FAULT 2 Press Clear to clear this message and display the
RAM address at which the test failed.
RAM FAULT F2DD In this example, F2DD is the address of the bad
memory location.
Press Clear to exit the test.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 112: Scan and Write RAM

Use this command to read the data stored at a RAM location and optionally, write
data to a location in RAM.

Caution
This command can destroy the contents of RAM. Save the Series 400 terminal’s
data prior to executing this command.

To execute the command, enter a valid address in RAM for reading from or
writing to. Enter this address as a hexadecimal number ranging from 0 to FFFFF.
Addresses 0000 to 1023 are flash-EEPROM resident and you cannot alter them.
The address range depends on how much memory is installed in the terminal.
Following are the ranges for the memory sizes:
w 128K is 0–1FFFF
w 256K is 0–3FFFF
w 512K is 0–7FFFF
w 1024K is 0–FFFFF

Use the keys in the following table in combination with the number keys (0-9) to
represent a hexadecimal address or value:

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Hex Number Key


A F1
B F2
C F3
D F4
E F5
F F6

After typing the address, press Enter. The display shows the address and the value
in that address (1CCC B7, for example).

You can change the displayed value by pressing Clear to erase the displayed value
and typing a new value (in hex). Use the keys listed in the previous table for
entering the hex numbers A through F. Press Clear after you enter the value. The
display advances to the next memory location and shows the value stored there.
You can also change this value.

You can press the + or - keys to scan the entire range of RAM addresses without
altering the stored data. Press the + key to increment the address or the - key to
decrement the address.

Command 114: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Flash-EEPROM Program

The cyclical redundancy check (CRC) reads and verifies the program that is
stored in the flash-EEPROM on the mainboard. Each revision of the application
software in the flash-EEPROM has its own unique CRC value.

If the correct CRC value does not display, the application software loaded in the
flash-EEPROM is corrupt. Correct this problem by softloading the
flash-EEPROM.

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 114, press Enter.
TERMINAL BUSY This message displays momentarily as the CRC
value is calculated.
CRC = 455F (This value is an example only.)
<CLEAR> TO CONTINUE Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

For the CRC value for each revision, contact Kronos Global Support.

Command 115: Display KOP Value

Command 115 reads and verifies the Kronos Options Package (KOP) value
associated with the time and attendance application stored in the flash-EEPROM
on the mainboard. Each model of the Kronos Series 400 terminal has its own
unique KOP value.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 115, press Enter.
KOP VALUE = FFFFFFFF The KOP value associated with the terminal model
(430, 460, etc.) displays.
<CLEAR> TO CONTINUE Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 116: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Boot-EPROM Program

The cyclical redundancy check (CRC) reads and verifies the program that is
stored in the boot-EPROM on the mainboard. Each revision of the boot-EPROM

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

has its own unique CRC value. If the correct CRC value does not display, the
boot-EPROM is corrupt. Correct this problem by replacing the EPROM.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 116, press Enter.
TERMINAL BUSY This message displays momentarily as the CRC
value is calculated.
CRC = 455F (This value is an example only.)
<CLEAR> TO CONTINUE Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

For the CRC value for each revision, contact Kronos Global Support.

Command 117: Calculate and Display CRC Value for Ethernet Option Board

Command 117 calculates and displays the CRC value for the accessory board
(Ethernet option board). If the correct CRC value does not display, the accessory
board is corrupt. To correct the problem, softload the flash-EEPROM on the
Ethernet board. If you did not install an Ethernet board, the terminal ignores the
command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 117, press Enter.
TERMINAL BUSY This message displays momentarily as CRC
value is calculated.
CRC = 455F (This value is used as an example only.)
<CLEAR> TO CONTINUE Press Clear to exit. (If no board is present, you are
returned to the ENTER COMMAND NUMBER
prompt immediately.)
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

For the CRC value for each revision, contact Kronos Global Support.

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Command 118: Modem Status

Command 118 displays information about the modem that is plugged into the
terminal on the modem daughterboard. You must configure the terminal for a
modem (Procedure 9, Step 1). If you do not configure the terminal for a modem, it
displays the message NO MODEM ALLOCATED. If the terminal is configured
but cannot communicate with the modem, it displays the message NO MODEM
ACTIVE. If the modem is available, the terminal displays four pieces of
information about the modem. If the modem is the older 1200 baud modem, the
terminal displays the message UNKNOWN for the three pieces of information
that have to do with modem configuration. After you enter the command number
and press Enter, the terminal displays information about the modem without any
intervention by the user.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 118, press Enter.
INTERNAL 2400B MODEM (or) The internal modem type. This is based on
HIGH SPEED MODEM information received from the modem.
(One of the following values:) Modem protocol value appears. This value is
AUTO DETECT based on the terminal program setting in Procedure
V.22 1200B 10, Step 7.
V.22BIS 2400B
V.32 9600B,
V.32BIS 14400B
UNKNOWN
NORTH AMERICA (or) Country code. This code is based on the terminal
UNITED KINGDOM program setting on Procedure 10, Step 8. The
internal modem supports either North America or
United Kingdom. It is not possible to change the
country code.
EC/DC ENABLED (or) Error correction and data compression. This data
EC/DC DISABLED should match the other modem you are trying to
connect to. You enable or disable this feature
based on the terminal program setting in Procedure
10, Step 9.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Command 119: Advanced Modem Configuration

Command 119 provides a way to configure the modem with many more
configurations using S-Register AT commands. The AT prefix (also known as the
attention code), signals the modem that one or more commands follow. These
commands are industry standard language used to communicate with the modem.
You will need an AT commands reference manual, which explains the S-register
settings. After selecting an S-register, you can specify a value to be written into
the register. Different modems support different S-registers.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 119, press Enter.
REG Register. Enter an S-register number. The current
contents of the S-register appears.
VALUE Enter a three-digit number. This changes the
S-register value. The system double checks and
displays the register value.
REG Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Caution
This command is for advanced users only. An error in performing this command
could cause you to lose communication with the host software.

Command 126: Verify Motion Detector or Doormat

Command 126 sounds a beep verifying the presence of either a motion detector or
doormat used with the Series 400 terminal.

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 126, press Enter.
(BEEPER SOUNDS) When the motion detector or doormat is “tripped;”
that is, when the terminal detects a change in the
open/close active/inactive state of the device
attached to the I/O board.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 127: Monitor I/O Daughterboard Input Bit

Command 127 is a console command that sits in a loop and watches the state of
the input bit (a hardware signal) on the I/O daughterboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 127, press Enter.
IO BD DATA IN N The last character on the line shows the current
state of the hardware signal (0 or 1).
You can terminate the command by pressing the
Clear key. It automatically terminates when the
no-progress time limit is reached.
Set the no-progress time limit in Procedure 40, Step
1. The default is 45 seconds.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 130: Employee Data Reset

Command 130 is for sales demonstration purposes only. Command 130 erases
some schedule enforcement data, concerning shifts, for all home employees for a
specific terminal. When command 130 executes, it appears that the employee
never punched before at that terminal. The command also erases all the FIFO data
(see command 135).

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Caution
This command erases all FIFO data. Neither customers nor Kronos Customer
Service Representatives should use this command. Only Sales representatives use
this command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 130, press Enter.
ARE YOU SURE? Press Enter to clear the FIFO buffer and the
employee information. Press Clear to exit without
clearing the data.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 135: Clear the FIFO Buffer

Command 135 clears the entire contents of the Series 400 terminal’s first in, first
out (FIFO) buffer in RAM, including all punch data.

Caution
This command can destroy the contents of RAM. Save the Series 400 terminal’s
data before executing this command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 135, press Enter.
ARE YOU SURE? Press Enter to clear the FIFO.
Press Clear to exit without clearing the FIFO.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 136: Reinitialize Communications Hardware

Command 136 reinitializes the communications hardware in the Series 400


terminal as if from a restart. Use this command when communications problems

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Executing Commands

occur that you cannot solve. Do not execute command 136 while the terminal is
transmitting or receiving data.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 136, press Enter.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER The terminal reinitialized the communications
hardware and automatically exits the command.

Command 137: Reinitialize Printer Communications

Command 137 reinitializes the printer communications hardware in the Series 400
terminal as if from a restart. Use this command when communications problems
occur that you cannot solve. Do not execute command 137 while the terminal is
transmitting or receiving data or while the printer is operational.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 137, press Enter.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER The terminal reinitializes the printer hardware and
automatically exits the command.

Command 138: Test Internal Modem Module

Command 138 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s internal modem.
During this test, an initialization string is sent to the modem. This initialization
string includes a register inquiry seeking the number of rings configured in
Procedure 9 of program mode.

If you configure the register with a valid number of rings (1 to 4), the terminal
sends a command string to the modem to execute a local analog loopback test. If
the modem passes the loopback test, the green LED lights and the message TEST
OK displays. If the modem fails the loopback test, the yellow LED lights and the
message TEST FAILED displays.

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If you do not configure the register with a valid number of rings, the terminal
aborts execution of the command and displays the message ERROR 64.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 138, press Enter.
MODEM LOOPBACK This message appears as the modem loopback test
executes.
TEST OK Upon completion of the local analog loopback test,
the green LED lights and the terminal displays the
message TEST OK if the test succeeds. If the test
fails, the yellow LED lights and terminal displays the
message TEST FAILED.
If you did not configure Procedure 9 of the Terminal
Program with a valid number of rings (1 to 4), the
terminal aborts the execution of the command and
displays the message ERROR 64.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 139: Reinitialize Ethernet Option Board

Command 139 reinitializes the Ethernet option board in the Series 400 terminal as
if from a restart. Use this command when communications problems occur that
cannot be solved. Do not execute command 139 while the terminal is transmitting
or receiving data.

Prompt/Message Keystrokes/Description
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 139, press Enter.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER The accessory board is reinitialized and the
command is automatically exited.

Command 150: Monitor Main and I/O Input Bits

Command 150 allows you to display mainboard and I/O daughterboard input bits
in binary format. This command displays the current state of eight hardware

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Executing Commands

signals, but only six have been defined. The first two signals display as x (no
value). The rest of the values represent the following hardware signals:
w State of the input bit on the mainboard
w Presence of an I/O board (0=yes, 1=no)
w Lead-acid battery operation (0=yes, 1=no)
w State of the input bit on the I/O board
w State of the CTS signal for the serial port on the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 150, press Enter.
DATA IN (This value is an example only.)
xx111110 Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 152: Display Badge Information

Command 152 displays the contents of a swiped badge. For more information, see
command 10.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 152, press Enter.
ENTER BADGE Swipe the badge at the badge reader.
(Badge contents displays.)
ENTER BADGE Press Clear to exit.

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Command 153: Test Display

Command 153 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s display. After
executing the command, the terminal displays columns of pixels from right to left
in a sweeping fashion and then turns off the display pixels from left to right.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 153, press Enter.
(The terminal turns on and off Yellow or green LED lights upon completion of
columns of display pixels.) test.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 154: Test Keypad

Command 154 checks the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s keypad. After
entering the command number, press any key on the keypad and its corresponding
value appears on the display. Press Clear twice to exit the test.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 154, press Enter.
KEYPAD TEST Press any key, and its corresponding value appears
on the display.
<CLEAR> TWICE ABORTS Press Clear twice to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 155: Test Input Bit 1

Command 155 displays the status of the input line (hardware signal) at the Series
400 terminal’s mainboard I/O port (TB1).

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Executing Commands

You need a test connector with switch to execute this command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 155, press Enter.
DATA IN .1 The data line is either set high (1) or low (0).
Press Clear to exit the test.
If you do not press Clear, the test times out after 45
seconds have passed.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 156: Test Output Ports

Command 156 tests the operation of the output line at the Series 400 terminal’s
I/O port (TB1) and I/O daughterboard port (if present). When you execute this
command, the output bit is toggled on and off each second. The command turns
on an output bit, turns it off, then turns on the other output bit, turns it off, and
repeats that process indefinitely. You need an ohmmeter, oscilloscope, or test
connector (with LED and limiting resistor) to complete this test.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 156, press Enter.
TERMINAL BUSY This message appears while the ports toggle on and
off at 1/2 cycle per second. Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 157: Adjust Contrast of Display

Command 157 allows you to adjust the contrast of the Series 400 terminal’s
display. The different contrast settings (1 through 16) may be viewed by pressing
the + and - keys (or Prev and Next) keys.

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 157, press Enter.
SET CONTRAST <+/-> Press Enter to accept the present contrast setting, or
5 press the + or - key to select a new contrast setting,
and then press Enter.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 158: Display Data in I/O Port

Command 158 reads the data in the Series 400 terminal’s hardware ports and
displays it. To use this command, you must enter a valid address associated with a
device (see the following table).

The range of valid addresses for this command is 00–7F hex. Use the function
keys F1– F6 to enter the hex digits A–F, respectively.

The addresses that may be used with this command are listed below.

Address Data Device/Bit Selected


00–0F DUART Chip
10 1-second counter (RTC Chip)
11 10-second counter (RTC Chip)
12 1-minute counter (RTC Chip)
13 10-minute counter (RTC Chip)
14 1-hour counter (RTC Chip)
15 10-hour counter (RTC Chip)
16 Week counter (RTC Chip)
17 1-day counter (RTC Chip)
18 10-day counter (RTC Chip)
19 1 month counter (RTC Chip)
1A 10-month counter (RTC Chip)

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Executing Commands

Address Data Device/Bit Selected


1B 1-year counter (RTC Chip)
1C 10-year counter (RTC Chip)
1D Mode register (RTC Chip)
1E Test register (RTC Chip)
1F Reset register (RTC Chip)
20 Write LCD display instruction rRegister
21 Write LCD display data register
22 Read LCD data instruction register
23 Read LCD data register
30–3F Output latch
01 Q1=1 power LED ON
02 Q2=1 beeper ON
04 Q3=1 open gate or turnstile
08 Q4=1 ring bell
10 Q5=1 local reader good read LED ON
20 Q6=1 local reader bad read LED ON
40 Q7=1 remote reader bad read LED ON
80 Q8=1 remote reader bad read LED ON
40–4F Keypad write
50–5F Keypad read
60–6F Bar code counter LSB
70–7F Bar code counter MSB

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The procedure below shows how command 158 is executed:

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 158, press Enter.
ADDRESS Enter the desired address as a two-digit hexadecimal
.. number in the range 00 to 7F.
For example, enter 12.
ADDRESS DATA IN Press Clear to exit.
90012 77
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 159: Write Data to I/O Port

You use command 159 in conjunction with command 158 to modify the data
stored in a specified address of the EPROM’s I/O driving software. This data is
relevant to a particular I/O device. To use this command, you must enter a valid
address associated with a device (see the table in the description of command
158).

Caution
This command can potentially destroy the internal operation of the terminal. Save
the Series 400 terminal’s data prior to executing this command.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 159, press Enter.
ADDRESS Enter the desired address as a two-digit hexadecimal
number in the range 00 to 7F.
For example, enter 1C.
ADDRESS DATA OUT Type the desired two-digit hexadecimal number and
9001C .. press Enter, and then press Clear twice to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Executing Commands

Command 166: Printer Test

Command 166 performs an automatic printer test.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 166, press Enter.
PRINTER TEST The command executes automatically. (Streaming
ASCII text is printed.) Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 174: Use Printer Port for Communications

Command 174 enables you to use the Series 400 terminal’s printer port (on the
optional I/O board) for communications. It is helpful to have this feature if the
host communications port fails.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 174, press Enter.
TOGGLE HOST PORT Displays the new active port using a COMM PORT
ARE YOU SURE? A or a COMM PORT B message.
Press Enter for Yes; press Clear for No.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Note
You need the optional I/O board to execute this command. See the I/O board
documentation for more information.

Command 175: Communications Channel A Transmit Test

Command 175 tests channel A of the Series 400 terminal’s dual universal
asynchronous receiver transmitter (DUART). When you execute this test, the
Series 400 terminal transmits the ASCII character “U” through its

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 6-33


Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

communications port (TB2) to the serial port on the host PC. To perform this test
you must connect the Series 400 terminal’s serial port to the host PC’s serial port.
To monitor the data, you will need a software application such as Kermit or
Compro.

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 175, press Enter.
TRANSMIT CHAR U When the Series 400 terminal displays this message,
a continuous stream of “U” characters should appear
on the monitor of the host PC.
Press Clear at the terminal’s keypad to terminate the
test.
TRANSMIT CHAR U Upon exiting from the test, the message TEST OK
TEST OK displays and the green LED flashes once if the test
was successful.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 176: RS-485 Communications Channel A Echo Test

Command 176 tests channel A of the Series 400 terminal’s DUART. The test
verifies the ability of the terminal to echo characters back to a host. To perform
this test you must connect the Series 400 terminal’s serial port to the host PC’s
serial port. To monitor the data, you will need a software application such as
Kermit or Compro. If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 176, press Enter.
ECHO TEST COMM PORT Type a character at the host PC, for example “5”, and
ECHO '5' its ASCII equivalent appears on the Series 400
terminal’s display. The character then echoes back to
the host PC’s display. To terminate the test, press
Clear.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Executing Commands

Command 177: RS-232 Communications Channel A External Loopback Test

Command 177 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s communications
port while it is configured for RS-232 communications. To perform the test,
configure the communications port (TB2) for RS-232 serial communications and
loop the TXD signal (pin 1) back to the RXD signal (pin 2).

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Note
You must configure the Series 400 terminal for RS-232 communications.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 177, press Enter.
EXTERNAL LOOPBACK Displays momentarily.
TEST OK When the test succeeds, the terminal displays this
message and the green LED turns on.
64 ERROR If this message displays and the yellow LED lights, a
failure was detected or the required loopback of
TXD to RXD was not done. At this point, the
terminal automatically exits the test.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 178: Communications Channel A Local Loopback Test

Command 178 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s communications
port while it is configured for RS-232 communications. When you execute the
test, the DUART loops the TXD signal back to the RXD signal internally.

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 178, press Enter.
LOCAL LOOPBACK Displays momentarily.

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


TEST OK If the terminal displays this message and the green
LED lights, the test succeeded.
64 ERROR If the terminal displays this message and the yellow
LED lights, the test failed.
At this point, the terminal automatically exits the
test.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 179: Communications Channel A Remote Loopback Test

Command 179 tests the ability of a host device to transmit data to and receive data
from the Series 400 terminal. When you execute the test, the terminal’s DUART
is isolated. Any character received by the terminal’s communications port (TB2)
automatically echoes back to the sending device.

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 179, press Enter.
REMOTE LOOPBACK The terminal displays this message until you exit
from the test. Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 180: RS-232 Communications Channel B Transmit Test

Command 180 tests channel B of the Series 400 terminal’s DUART. Execution of
the test causes the terminal to transmit the ASCII character “U” through its printer
port. To perform this test you must connect the Series 400 terminal’s printer port
to the host PC’s serial port. To monitor the data, you will need a software
application such as Kermit or Compro.

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Executing Commands

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 180, press Enter.
TRANSMIT CHAR U When the Series 400 terminal displays this message
a continuous stream of “U” characters should appear
on the host PC’s display.
Press Clear to terminate the test.
TRANSMIT CHAR U Upon exiting from the test, the terminal displays the
TEST OK message TEST OK and the green LED flashes once
if the test succeeds.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 181: RS-232 Communications Channel B Echo Test

Command 181 tests channel B of the Series 400 terminal’s DUART. The test
verifies the ability of the terminal to echo characters back to a host through its
printer port. To perform this test you must connect the Series 400 terminal’s
printer port to the host PC’s serial port. To monitor the data, you will need a
software application such as Kermit or Compro. If this test fails, replace the
mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 181, press Enter.
ECHO TEST PRTR PORT Type a character at the CRT, for example “5”, and its
ECHO '5' ASCII equivalent appears on the Series 400
terminal’s display. The character then echoes back to
the host PC’s display. To terminate the test, press
Clear at the terminal.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

Command 182: Communications Channel B External Loopback Test

Command 182 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s printer port while it
is configured for RS-232 communications. To perform the test, configure the
terminal for RS-232 serial communications and loop the TXD signal (pin 1) back
to the RXD signal (pin 2). Note that the I/O board requires that the CTS and RTS
signals (pins 3 and 4) loop back together so this command can pass. If not, the
error message 64 ERROR appears. If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 182, press Enter.
EXTERNAL LOOPBACK Displays momentarily.
TEST OK If the terminal displays this message and the green
LED flashes, the test succeeded.
64 ERROR If the terminal displays this message, the test failed
or the required loopback of TXD to RXD was not
done.
At this point, the terminal exits from the test
automatically.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 183: Communications Channel B Local Loopback Test

Command 183 tests the operation of the Series 400 terminal’s printer port while
the terminal is configured for RS-232 communications. When the test executes,
the DUART loops the TXD signal back to the RXD signal internally.

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 183, press Enter.
LOCAL LOOPBACK Displays momentarily.
TEST OK If the terminal displays this message and the green
LED lights, the test succeeded.

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


64 ERROR If the terminal displays this message, the test failed.
At this point, the terminal exits from the test
automatically.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 184: Communications Channel B Remote Loopback Test

Command 184 tests the ability of a host device to transmit data to and receive data
from the Series 400 terminal. When the test executes, the terminal’s DUART is
isolated. Any character received by the terminal’s printer port automatically
echoes back to the sending device.

If this test fails, replace the mainboard.

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 184, press Enter.
REMOTE LOOPBACK Displays until test is exited. Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 185: Test Ethernet Option Board Communications

Command 185 tests the ability of the Series 400 terminal to transmit to and
receive data from the terminal’s internal Ethernet controller. This command is
applicable only when you install the Ethernet option board and functions only if
the option board has a valid Ethernet address.

Three tests are available:


w Loopback test 1 performs internal transmit/receive tests (looped through the
NIC module) to verify hardware operation of the Ethernet controller. If this
test fails, the Ethernet option board has a hardware fault and should be
replaced.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide 6-39


Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

w Loopback test 2 also performs internal transmit/receive tests (looped through


the ENDEC module) to verify hardware operation of the Ethernet controller.
If this test fails, the Ethernet option board has a hardware fault and should be
replaced.
w The broadcast test performs external transmit tests to verify the integrity of
the terminal’s connection to the network. If this test fails (and tests 1 and 2
pass), the terminal is not properly connected to the network. This test
transmits a test message 20,000 times or until a time-out occurs (due to key
press inactivity) or you press the Clear key.

You execute command 185 as follows:

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 185, press Enter.
ENTER TEST CODE Press 1 for loopback test 1.
Press 2 for loopback test 2.
Press 3 for the broadcast test.
Press the # key for all tests.
Press Clear to exit.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 190: Reset Lithium Battery Life Value

Executing command 190 resets the lithium battery life value to its default value
(for a list of default values, see Chapter 2, “Preventive Maintenance”). You
should reset the life value when you replace the lithium battery while the terminal
is connected to an external power source (anytime the battery is replaced without
cold-starting the terminal).

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Executing Commands

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 190, press Enter.
ARE YOU SURE? Press Clear to exit without resetting the lithium
battery usage value.
Press Enter to reset the value to the “full life” value
(15/60/90).
You execute maintenance command 41 to verify that
the battery time is reset.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

Command 252: Test Ethernet Board Flash

Command 252 looks up the device name of the accessary daughterboard (also
referred to as the Ethernet daughterboard) and displays a string that represents the
device. The letters in the text string indicate the name of the manufacturer and the
number if kilobytes. For example, the Ethernet flash is a 512K device. Some older
flash devices are only 256K.

Possible text strings for an Ethernet flash are:


w AMD 28F256
w AMD 28F512
w INTEL 28F256
w INTEL 28F512
w CAT 28F512
w SGS 28F512

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Chapter 6 Using Maintenance Mode

The following procedure shows how to implement command 252:

Terminal Displays Keystrokes/Description


ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Type 252, press Enter.
(ACCESSORY FLASH/DEVICE The TEST OK message indicates that the terminal
NAME)/TEST OK found the device name and that it matches a device
name string in the code. If the TEST OK message
does not appear, check the accessory device to be
sure it is viable.
ENTER COMMAND NUMBER Ready for next command.

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Appendix A
Error and Status Messages

This appendix provides error and status messages to help isolate the source of any
malfunction that occurs while the Series 400 terminal is operating.

This appendix contains:


w Interpreting Error Messages
w Error Messages
w Status Messages
Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Interpreting Error Messages


The Series 400 terminal displays two types of messages that can provide helpful
information when troubleshooting malfunctions:
w Error Messages
w Status Messages

This chapter contains all of the error and status messages that the Series 400
terminal can display. It also describes the possible causes of the error message.

If you encounter an error message while operating the Series 400 terminal, look
up the message and try to correct the problem.

Additional information about the procedures, steps, and commands referenced in


the following messages is available as follows:
w Procedures and steps are described in detail in the Series 400 Terminal
Configuration Guide.
w Host commands are included in the Series 400 Terminal Host Software
Interface Guide.
w Supervisor and guard commands are included in the Timekeeper Terminal
Supervisor’s Reference.
w Maintenance commands are covered in Chapter 6, “Using Maintenance
Mode” in this guide.

Note
You can disable error messages 01, 02, and 10 using Procedure 1, Step 1 of the
Series 400 terminal program. If you are experiencing any badge reading problems,
ensure that these error messages are enabled.

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Error Messages

Error Messages

Error 01: BADGE READ ERROR

The Series 400 terminal could not read the badge correctly, or the bar code
symbology is not enabled in the terminal program.

Clean the reader and test the other badges. If the badge is properly encoded, make
sure that the bar code symbology has not been disabled (Procedure 11).

Error 03: USE FUNCTION KEY

The Series 400 terminal is set so that “simple” time and attendance punches are
disabled. The terminal only accepts punches that have a function key associated
with it. This is usually a requirement of the host software.

If this behavior is not desirable, change the associated parameter in the Series 400
terminal program using Procedure 5, Step 3, Value 8.

Error 04: REPUNCH RESTRICTION

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because the elapsed time since the
employee last punched is less than the repunch interval. There are separate
repunch intervals for home and non-home employees.
w The home employee repunch interval comes from either a restriction profile
or a parameter in the terminal program (Procedure 7, Step 1).
w Non-home employees always have the terminal program parameter applied to
their punch (Procedure 7, Step 2).

A possible cause of Error 04 is that the terminal time was set to some time in the
future, some punches occurred, and then the time was corrected.

All punch data stored by the Series 400 terminal can be erased to prevent this
error. Erasing data should be done with extreme caution, as all collected and
uncollected first in, first out (FIFO) data is included. Maintenance mode
command 130 will erase all FIFO data and all current schedule data for all

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-3


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

employees; however, this data does not include individual schedules for
employees, just data reflecting that an employee is currently working a shift.

Error 05: PUNCH RESTRICTED

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because, according to the schedule
enforcement information stored in the terminal, the employee is not authorized to
punch at this time. The restriction profile includes generic and individual
schedules to which the employee is assigned.

Error 06: UNKNOWN EMPLOYEE

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because the employee assigned to this
badge or PIN number is not a home employee. The badge inserted has the correct
company code, but is not valid at this terminal. You also get this error on the 400
model (not on the 420 or 405 models) when you swipe a badge that is not for a
home employee, and cross-punching and access control features are not enabled.

Use the employee list to verify employee terminal assignments. To enable the
punching of non-home employees, change the setting for Procedure 22 in the
terminal program to enable non-home employees to punch, according to their
restriction level.

Error 07: OFF TIME

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because it is configured with an off-time
that includes the current time of day.

If this behavior is not desirable, do the following:


w Ensure that the off-times are correct, and that the day-of-week exclusion(s)
are correct. Refer to Procedure 21, Steps 1 through 4 of the terminal program.
w Check to see if the punch requires gate access but the current time is during a
gate off-time. Refer to Procedure 21, Steps 5 through 12.

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Error Messages

Error 08: PUNCH RESTRICTED

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because the restriction level encoded on
the badge does not match the restriction template parameter in the terminal
program. This applies only to non-home employees. Refer to Procedure 22, Step
1, of the terminal program.

Error 09: HOME EMPLOYEE

A supervisor used a home employee’s badge while executing supervisor


command 5. This command is intended for non-home employees; supervisor
command 2 is the corresponding command for home employees.

Error 10: BADGE DATA ERROR

The badge that was swiped was decoded but contains invalid data. For a Kronos
standard badge, this could include the wrong company code, out-of-range values
for one of the three 1-of-7 code fields, and the wrong checksum for a code 3-of-9
badge.

If the badge is not a Kronos standard badge, it is a generic badge. You must use
the Series 400 terminal program to configure the terminal to accept generic
badges. The following are relevant procedures in the terminal program:
w Use Procedure 1, Step 2 to enable the use of employee generic badges.
w Use Procedure 1, Steps 4 through 6 to define characteristics of the employee
generic badge bar code.
w Use Procedure 5, Step 3, Value 64 to enable use of badges for departments
and labor accounts.
w Use Procedure 24, Steps 1 through 3 to define characteristics of the labor
accounts for generic bar code badges.
w Use Procedure 24, Steps 4 through 12 and Steps 14 through 25 to define
characteristics of the labor level generic bar code badges (seven labor levels).
Set nonzero values in Procedure 24, Steps 4 through 12 to enable the use of
expanded labor tracking fields.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-5


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

w Use Procedure 25, Steps 1 through 3 to define characteristics of a department


generic bar code badge.

Error 11: UNKNOWN EMPLOYEE

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch because it is configured for access
control, and the badge that was swiped is not on any of the gate lists. Error 11
occurs on the 420 terminal model when a simple punch badge ID does not result
in a gate opening (home employee or gate lists). The 405 terminal model returns
Error 11 when it rejects a badge ID because it is not on the deduct lists.

Error 12: PUNCH RESTRICTED

The Series 400 terminal rejected a department/labor account/labor level badge


because the restriction level encoded on the badge does not match the department
badge restriction template specified in the terminal program (Procedure 22, Step
2).

Error 13: OUT OF RANGE

Error 13 is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program and displays in any of the following situations:
w The combination of settings for a generic bar code badge size, date size, and
number of digits to ignore is invalid.
w Values for employee, department, labor level, and labor account generic bar
code badge settings is invalid.
w The badge size of a labor level badge is set to that of the labor account badge.

Error 14: DEPARTMENT BADGE

The Series 400 terminal rejected a badge swipe because the badge number is on
the department validation list or on one of the labor level validation lists. The
terminal is expecting an employee badge swipe.

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Error Messages

If this behavior is not desirable, change the setting of Procedure 5, Step 3, in the
terminal program to 128. Exclude the weighted value of 128 to turn off this
feature.

Error 16: OUT OF RANGE

Error 16 is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal.
Possible reasons for this error message are:
w The generic bar code data size is longer than the maximum possible length.
w The data size specified for the labor account badge does not match the
combined data size settings of the labor levels.

Error 18: (sent to host PC)

The Series 400 terminal rejected host command 90 (Set Terminal Program)
because the terminal is operating in program mode. Do the following:
w Use host command 99 to force the Series 400 terminal into normal mode.
w Use host command 90 to edit the terminal program’s parameters as desired.

For details on host commands, see the Series 400 Terminal Host Software
Interface Guide.

Error 19: (sent to host PC)

The Series 400 terminal rejected host command 10 or 11 (Add Home Employee)
because the maximum number of home employees the terminal can accommodate
has been reached. Do the following:
w Check the setting for Procedure 4, Step 1 or Step 7, which determines the
maximum number of home employees the terminal can accommodate. This
can be done through host command 89.
w Use host command 120#25# to verify that all home employees in the list
belong in the list. For the syntax of the host commands, see the Series 400
Terminal Host Software Interface Guide.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-7


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Error 20: LIST ITEM NOT FOUND

The Series 400 terminal could not find the list item you are trying to modify or
delete.

Note
Use of error 20 was discontinued in a later flash version. Any attempts to delete
items that are not in the list are no longer considered to be an error. If a modify
request is anticipated, and the entry is not already in the list, the attempt is treated
as an add.

Error 21: LIST NOT FOUND

The specified list could not be found or the list number you specified is not valid.

Error 22: LIST FULL

The specified list (to add to) is full. The validation list has the maximum number
of items. Check the Series 400 terminal program setting for the allowable number
of entries. See the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide to determine which
procedure in the terminal program to check.

Error 23: (sent to host PC)

No memory is allocated for this list. Change the appropriate parameter in the
Series 400 terminal program to allocate memory for the list. See the Series 400
Terminal Configuration Guide to determine which procedure in the terminal
program to check.

Error 24: ERROR

A change to a list size limit or other memory allocation parameter (translation


text) will not fit in the memory available in the terminal. Check values for the

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Error Messages

terminal program, or try using the memory sizing utility MEM400 (described in
the Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide).

Error 26: OVER CREDIT LIMIT

Error 26 is associated with the model 405 Employee Debit Terminal (EDT). The
employee attempting a debit transaction is marked by the host system as over their
credit limit. Therefore, the terminal does not allow the employee to perform the
transaction. The employee may still perform credit transactions.

Error 27: WILL NOT BE SPLIT


Error 28: EMP’S SPLIT FULL

These two error messages display together and are associated with model 405
Employee Debit Terminal (EDT). The errors indicate that an employee attempting
a debit transaction has reached the maximum number of pay period splits. Large
purchases can be split across multiple pay periods, but these messages warn the
employee that this transaction will not be split across multiple pay periods. The
transaction is accepted and is forwarded to the host.

Error 30: NEED BADGE

This message appears when an employee attempts to enter a personal


identification number (PIN) at the Series 400 terminal while PIN entry is disabled.
The employee must swipe a badge at the Series 400 terminal instead.

If you enable PIN entry using the terminal program (Procedure 5, Step 1, Value
1), you can also prevent home employees from using PINs (Procedure 16, Step 3)
based on their restriction profile. For details on the procedures, see the Series 400
Terminal Configuration Guide.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-9


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Error 36: WARNING FIFO FULL

This message is displayed when an operator tries to enter data at a terminal when
the first in, first out (FIFO) buffer is full. All punch attempts will be rejected until
the FIFO is collected and flushed. Do the following as soon as possible:
w Use host command 100 (Send Complete FIFO) to send data from the terminal
w Use host command 110 (Clear FIFO) to flush the data from the terminal.

For information on using host commands 100 and 110, refer to the host
application collection of data and to the Series 400 Terminal Host Software
Interface Guide.

Error 41: INVALID SCHEDULE

The Series 400 terminal rejected a punch attempt by a home employee because the
host software has not sent schedule enforcement information to the terminal.
Schedule information includes restriction profiles and generic schedules and
allows the terminal to determine whether to accept a punch.

Error 42: CONFIG CONFLICT

This error is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program. The current settings indicate that the shorthand notation feature is
enabled (Procedure 25, Step 4), but there is no memory allocated for the labor
account list (Procedure 26, Step 7). Use Procedure 26, Step 7 to allocate memory
for the labor account list.

Error 43: CONFIG CONFLICT

This error is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program. The current settings indicate that the shorthand notation feature is
enabled (Procedure 25, Step 4), but one of the prompt sequence settings
(Procedure 24, Step 13; Procedure 25, Step 8; Procedure 25, Steps 10 through 13;
Procedure 44, Steps 1 through 13) is not compatible with the labor levels enabled
(Procedure 25, Steps 1 through 3). Another reason for this error message could be

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Error Messages

that the value in Procedure 25, Step 4 is greater than the number of enabled labor
levels.

The Series 400 terminal now supports seven labor levels, but still supports use of
just three labor levels. The settings mentioned in the previous paragraph are valid
for configurations not using any of the new labor levels. Procedure 33 was added
to specify prompting sequences to support all seven labor levels (not just the new
labor levels). For details on the procedures, see the Series 400 Terminal
Configuration Guide.

Error 44: NOT ALLOWED

This error is associated with the break enforcement feature. A home employee
attempted an in-punch, but the time since the corresponding out-punch is shorter
than the minimum set in the Series 400 terminal program. The feature is enabled
based on the restriction profile associated with the home employee (Procedure 69,
Steps 1 through 15), the shift length, minimum break, and minimum meal are
determined when the shift first starts (Procedures 61 through 68, Steps 1 through
15).

Error 50: ERROR

The Kronos Options Package (KOP) value stored in the Series 400 terminal
indicates that the downloaded software is for the wrong product (400 versus 550).
Contact Kronos Global Support. Another reason for this error message could be
that the wrong Softload file was sent to the terminal. The flash application starts
and determines that the KOP bit settings do not agree with the flash application
version (420 versus 460).

Error 59: ERROR

The baud rates set in the Series 400 terminal program for host communication
(Procedure 10, Step 1) and printer communication (Procedure 9, Step 2) are not
compatible with the hardware (DUART). If both baud rates are greater than 9600,
ensure that they are set to the same rate.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-11


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

This error is also returned when maintenance command 138 is executed to test the
integral modem, and the terminal cannot communicate with the modem. The
modem is either inoperable or not installed.

Error 60: TABLE FULL

While executing host command 65 (Create/Edit Bell Schedule Table), the Series
400 terminal determined that the time of day for the bell does not exist in the
current bell schedule, and that the bell table contains the maximum number of
entries (fixed at 48). If necessary, use host command 65 to edit the bell schedule
as needed. For information on host command 65, see the Series 400 Terminal
Host Software Interface Guide.

Error 61: INVALID BELL TIME

The bell time specified does not exist in the bell schedule, or the time entered is
not a valid time of day.

Error 62: NOT INSTALLED

The action the user attempted involves bells or gates, but they are not enabled in
the Series 400 terminal program. Use of both bells and gates is only possible if the
optional I/O daughterboard has been installed.

This error can be seen when using host commands 65, 66, 120#58#, 121, 122,
123, 124, 129; and maintenance commands 6, 7, l1, 14, 17, 65, 66.

This error is also returned if maintenance command 118 is used to interrogate the
integral modem, but the integral modem is not enabled. See Procedure 9, Step 1 to
enable the integral modem.

Error 63: ERROR

A hardware problem was detected when the Series 400 terminal was turned on.
Contact Kronos Global Support or your Customer Service Representative.

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Error Messages

Error 64: ERROR

An error was detected during the external loopback test (maintenance command
177 or 182). The required loopback was not completed or there was a hardware
failure. If the terminal is equipped with an internal modem module, ensure that
Procedure 9 has been configured with a valid number of rings (1 to 4).

Error 65: RAM FAULT

A fatal RAM error has occurred during execution of maintenance command 111.
Try cold-starting the terminal. If this fails, return the unit for service.

Error 68: CONFIG CONFLICT

This is a catch-all error message returned when a resource or configuration


conflict prevents the Series 400 from performing a command. Here are some
situations when this error is returned:
w Maintenance command 137 is executed (Reset Printer Port), but the port is
being used for host communication.
w Host command 70 is sent (Store Host Report), but the Series 400 terminal is
not configured to store host reports (Procedure 54, Step 2, Value 2).
w A change to Procedure 4, Step 7 is nonzero, but perimeter control is enabled
(Procedure 41, Step 1, Value 1)
w A change to Procedure 5, Step 5 includes the value 4, but there is no
daughterboard installed or the daughterboard is being used for ringing a bell
(Procedure 5, Step 3, Value 1) or is being used for perimeter control
(Procedure 41, Step 1, Value 1).
w A change to Procedure 27, Step 1 is being made, but the terminal is
configured for expanded labor tracking (Procedure 25, Steps 1 through 3 and
10 through 13).
w A change to Procedure 27, Step 2 is being made, but the terminal is
configured for expanded labor tracking (Procedure 25, Steps 1 through 3 and
10 through 13).

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-13


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Error 70: ERROR

There is no software loaded in the mainboard flash to support the Datasave or


Dataload process that was initiated. Therefore, the boot-EPROM does not contain
any code to perform the requested action.

Error 73: (sent to the host PC)

During the softload process, an attempt to erase flash-EEPROM failed.

Error 74: BAD DEFAULT

This error is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program. The default department or labor level value specified is longer than the
size specified in the terminal program.

Error 75: NO SUCH ENTRY

The department, labor level, or labor account entry is not in the validation list.
Cross-check list entries in the host software, and download the corrected list to the
Series 400 terminal.

Error 76: DUART ERROR

During a Datasave operation, the Series 400 terminal failed to send all of the
RAM contents. This is most likely due to a host communications failure.

Error 77: ERROR

During programming of the I/O daughterboard flash chip, the memory to be


programmed was found not to be blank.

Error 78: (sent to host PC)

During the softload process, an attempt to program the flash-EEPROM failed.

A-14 Kronos Incorporated


Error Messages

Error 79: (sent to host PC)

During the softload process of programming the flash-EEPROM, the Series 400
terminal rejected data sent by the host software.

Error 80: NOT ALLOWED

A user is attempting to execute a command that is disabled in the Series 400


terminal program. Refer to Procedure 60 to enable use of the command.

Error 81: NO DATA AVAILABLE

A user is attempting to select a host report, but there is either no memory allocated
for the host report buffer or no reports in the buffer.

Error 82: BAD DEFAULT

A user is attempting to use a default department or labor level assignment, but the
default was not found in the validation list. The Series 400 terminal displays the
error message, disregards the default, and prompts for entry of a valid value. The
default is not validated when it is specified in the Series 400 terminal program; it
is validated when it is used.

Ensure that the default is part of the validation list sent by the host software.

Error 83: ERROR

This error is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program. A user is attempting to set an invalid function key assignment or use a
value that is out of range.

Not all models support all possible function key functions. Refer to Procedure 50
to verify a correct function number.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-15


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Error 86: PRINTER NOT READY

A user is attempting to access the printer attached to the Series 400 terminal
through the serial connection on the I/O daughterboard.

Either the printer has not been configured in the terminal program (Procedure 9,
Step 3), or the printer’s hand-shake scheme is not behaving as expected.

Error 87: ERROR

This error is associated with changing parameter values in the Series 400 terminal
program. The change affects memory allocation, and the FIFO must be empty to
reallocate memory. The host software must collect and flush the FIFO data before
the parameter can be changed, or you can use maintenance command 135 if the
saved record FIFO can be erased.

Error 92: OUT OF RANGE

A legal argument was entered with a value that is out of range, in a command
sequence. Reasons for this error message could be that non-numeric values were
used for numeric-only arguments or that required arguments are not present.

Error 94: INVALID ENTRY

A user entered an illegal argument. Reasons for this error message could be that
numeric values used are too large or too small or not in an acceptable set of
values.

Error 95: INVALID PASSWORD

A user entered an illegal password. This error is returned in the following


situations:
w When an invalid password has been entered after attempting to enter
maintenance mode, supervisor mode, or guard mode.
w When an invalid access code is entered (gate list or deduct list).

A-16 Kronos Incorporated


Error Messages

w When an invalid communications password is entered when attempting to


perform a system restart through maintenance commands 90, 91, 93 or
terminal program Procedures 78, 79, 80.
w When a nonmatching password is used with command 69 to change a
supervisor or guard password.

Error 99: INVALID ENTRY

A user entered a nonexistent command or programming procedure number.

EXCEPTION nn

An error occurred in the software application. Operation of the Series 400


terminal from this point on is unpredictable and unreliable. Note the exception
number (nn). If there are uncollected punches in the FIFO, you should use host
command 101 (Send FIFO From Last Poll) to collect them as soon as possible.
For details, see the Series 400 Terminal Host Software Interface Guide.

Depending on the cause of the error, all information stored in the Series 400
terminal may have been erased. You may have to cold-start the terminal and
perform a softload operation to load a new application to correct the situation.
Contact Kronos Global Support and report the terminal configuration.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-17


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

Status Messages
The Series 400 terminal displays status messages that provide useful information
including current mode of operation, FIFO status. Most of these messages display
for clarification. The only exceptions are the FIFO memory warnings and the
lithium battery warning.

SUPERVISOR MODE

The Series 400 terminal is currently operating in supervisor mode. Lack of


activity causes an automatic logout of the supervisor. The time-out duration is a
parameter you set in the Series 400 terminal program (Procedure 40, Step 1).

GUARD MODE

The Series 400 terminal is currently operating in guard mode. Lack of activity
causes an automatic logout of the guard. The time-out duration is a parameter you
set in the Series 400 terminal program (Procedure 40, Step 1).

MEMORY NEARLY FULL

The Series 400 terminal has reached the “FIFO NEARLY FULL” condition as
defined in the terminal program (Procedure 17, Step 1). Terminal data should be
collected as soon as possible.

WARNING: MEMORY FULL

The Series 400 terminal is critically close to memory capacity, as defined in the
terminal program (Procedure 17, Step 2). Terminal data should be collected
immediately.

WARNING: FIFO FULL

The FIFO Series 400 terminal FIFO is full. No more punch records can be
recorded. Terminal data should be collected immediately.

A-18 Kronos Incorporated


Status Messages

LOW LITHIUM BATTERY

According to calculations performed by the Series 400 terminal, the lithium


battery is at or near the end of its life and should be replaced. Battery life is
directly related to the amount of RAM installed and how long the terminal has
operated without DC power.

SOFT LOAD MODE...

The Series 400 terminal has been placed in softload mode by a utility program
running on the host computer, such as SL400.EXE. Such programs are used to
erase the application stored in the terminal’s flash-EEPROM and softload a new
application. For more information, see Chapter 5, “Changing Terminal
Firmware.”

The second line (under SOFT LOAD MODE...) on the terminal’s display
provides extra information about the softload process.
w The message ERASING FLASH appears while the memory chip is being
erased.
w The message PROGRAMMING FLASH appears while the device is being set
up or is accepting a new flash image (new version of the application).
w The message BLOCK x of 2 appears and updates as data is received from the
host system and programmed into the memory chip.

DATA SAVER MODE...

The Series 400 terminal has been placed in data saver mode by the SL400.EXE
utility program running on the host computer. SL400.EXE is used to save a
terminal’s RAM data.

+ (between date and time)

This indicates that the home employee global restriction credit is in effect at the
Series 400 terminal. You can use either host command 3 or supervisor command 3
to manage this feature.

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide A-19


Appendix A Error and Status Messages

x (between date and time)

This indicates that the non-home employee global restriction credit is in effect at
the Series 400 terminal. You can use either host command 4 or supervisor
command 4 to manage this feature.

* (between date and time)

This indicates that both the home employee and non-home employee global
restriction credit is in effect at the Series 400 terminal. You can use either host
commands 3 and 4 or supervisor commands 3 and 4 to manage this feature.

OFF TIME

The Series 400 terminal is currently operating during a configured off-time.


During off-times, only the time displays (no date). The terminal can only read
maintenance, supervisor, and guard badges.

WARNING: DOOR IS OPEN

A door or gate opened as part of security access has remained open longer than the
time allotted in Procedure 41. If it stays open, an alarm will sound if the Series
400 terminal is connected to an alarm system. Check Procedure 41, Steps 3–5.

PRINTER NOT READY

The Series 400 terminal is set up to have a printer attached to the serial connection
on the I/O daughterboard, but the printer is not responding. Check Procedure 54,
Step 4 to be sure the value is too small.

A-20 Kronos Incorporated


Appendix B
Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers

This appendix contains a complete listing of part numbers relevant to the Series
400 terminal and its options.
Appendix B Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers

Part Numbers

Part Number Description


Mainboards - 128K RAM
6600186-001 460 Mainboard
6600186-002 450 Mainboard
6600186-003 440 Mainboard
6600186-004 430 Mainboard
6600186-005 420 Mainboard
Mainboards - 256K RAM
6600186-011 480 Mainboard
6600186-012 470 Mainboard
6600186-015 420 Mainboard
Mainboards - 512K RAM
6600186-021 480 Mainboard
6600186-022 470 Mainboard
6600186-025 420 Mainboard
Mainboards - Gatekeeper (256K RAM)
6600186-015 420 Mainboard
6600186-701 550 Mainboard

B-2 Kronos Incorporated


Part Numbers

Part Number Description


Series 400 Terminal Cover Assemblies - 128K RAM
8600616-001 460 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-002 450 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-003 440 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-004 430 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-005 420 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-031 360 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-032 350 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-101 460 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-102 450 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-103 440 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-104 430 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-105 420 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-151 460 Cover Assy. (186 board, black)
8600616-153 440 Cover Assy. (186 board, black)
8600616-155 420 Cover Assy. (186 board, black)
8600616-161 460 Cover Assy. (186 board, ecru)
8600616-163 440 Cover Assy. (186 board, ecru)
8600616-171 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, blue)
8600616-173 440 Cover Assy. (186 board, blue)
Series 400 Terminal Cover Assemblies - 256K RAM
8600616-011 460 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-012 450 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-013 440 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-014 430 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-015 420 Cover Assy. (177 board)
8600616-111 480 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-112 470 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-115 420 Cover Assy. (186 board)

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide B-3


Appendix B Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers

Part Number Description


8600616-116 480 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-156 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, black)
8600616-166 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, ecru)
8600616-176 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, blue)
Series 400 Terminal Cover Assemblies - 512K RAM
8600616-121 480 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-122 470 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-125 420 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-126 480 Cover Assy. (186 board)
8600616-158 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, black)
8600616-168 480 Cover Assy. (186 board, ecru)
AC Transformer and AC-Related
7800008-001 400 Wall Transforner
8600619-001 AC Outlet Option: Simplex Outlet, Hood, Surge Suppressor
AP00535-007 Surge Suppressor (comes with 8600619-001)
Batteries and Battery-Related
7900002-001 45/400 Lithium Battery
7900005-001 Lead-Acid Battery
8600670-001 Battery Backup Kit
Cabinet
3600390-001 400 Keypad
3600391-001 400 Keypad Membrane
8600617-001 400 LCD Display Assembly
8600672-001 400 Cover (plastics only, w/o Reader Cover)
8600677-001 400 Reader Cover
8600830-001 400 Chassis Assembly
Connectors
5100004-001 5-Position Communication Connector
5100015-001 6-Position Communication Connector

B-4 Kronos Incorporated


Part Numbers

Part Number Description


5100013-001 7-Position Communication Connector
Ethernet
6600187-001 400 Ethernet Option Board (comes with 8600947-001,
Ethernet Option Kit)
Screws and Brackets
8400254-002 Hinge Pin
8400255-002 Hinge Knuckle
8400267-001 400 Conduit Support Bracket
8400269-001 Security Bracket (Metal)
8900018-001 8-32 Security Head Allen Wrench
8900022-001 E-Ring
9000108-001 KRONOS Security Screws
9000124-001 Screw 4/40
9200105-001 Spring Washer
Modem, Boards, Fuses, and Cables
3600398-001 I/O Board-to-Mainboard Connecting Cable
4400111-001 125V/5A Fuse (Battery Backup Board)
4400117-001 5x20, 250V, 1/2 A Time Delay Fuse
6600167-001 Battery Backup Board (comes with 8600670-001, Battery
Backup Kit)
6600168-001 Input/Output Board (comes with 8600671-001, I/O Kit)
6600204-001 14.4Kbps Modem Board
8600670-001 Punch-on Battery Backup Option: 12 VDC Lead-Acid
Battery, Battery Backup Board, Connecting Cables,
Mounting Screw
8600671-001 Input/Output Board Option: I/O Board, Connecting Cable,
Screw
860183-001 Modem Option Kit, 14.4Kbps
9700102-001 RS-485 Plenum Communications Cable (Belden 88761)
9700105-001 RS-232 Plenum Communications Cable

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide B-5


Appendix B Series 400 Terminal Part Numbers

Part Number Description


9700123-001 18 AWG, 4-conductor, Shielded Communications Cable
Miscellaneous
6800109-001 Maintenance Badge (Barcode)
6800110-001 Supervisor Badge (Barcode)
8600760-001 Remote Swipe Barcode Badge Reader
9900164-001 Function Key Labels
Documentation
4700692-001 Series 400 Terminal Host Software Interface Guide
4701180-001 Series 400 Terminal Installation Guide
4701181-001 Series 400 Terminal Configuration Guide
4701182-001 Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Guide
4701183-001 Timekeeper Terminal Supervisor’s Reference
4701184-001 Timekeeper Terminal Quick Reference Card

B-6 Kronos Incorporated


Index

A C
address resolution protocol 4-20 Calculate and Display CRC Value for
Adjust Contrast of Display (command Boot-EPROM Program (command
157) 6-29 116) 6-19
Adjust Time (command 62) 6-10 Calculate and Display CRC Value for Ethernet
Advanced Modem Configuration (command Option Board (command 117) 6-20
119) 6-22 Calculate and Display CRC Value for
AFT software 3-4 Flash-EEPROM Program (command
auxiliary power source 4-2, 4-3 114) 6-18
board drawing 1-9 CE mark 1-12
Check utility 3-3
B cleaning the terminal 1-13
BABT 1-12 Clear the FIFO Buffer
badge-read problems 4-4, 4-9 (command 135) 6-24
configuration settings 4-9 Cold-Start (command 93) 6-15
testing with command 152 6-27 command modes 6-2
bar code guard 6-2
badges 4-9 maintenance 6-2
damaged badges 4-9 program 6-2
battery backup board supervisor 6-2
drawing 1-5 commands. See maintenance commands
removing 3-22 communications 4-6, 4-14
replacing 3-23, 3-24 error messages 2-10
boot-EPROM modem 4-14, 4-19
displaying CRC value 6-19 performing check 2-10
upgrading memory 3-41 problems 4-14
RS-232 configuration 4-16
serial 4-14
Token Ring board 4-19
twinaxial 4-19
verifying integrity of network 2-10
Index

Communications Channel A Remote Loopback 14 DEPARTMENT BADGE A-6


Test (command 179) 6-36 16 OUT OF RANGE A-7
Communications Channel A Transmit Test 18 (sent to host PC) A-7
(command 175) 6-33 19 (sent to host PC) A-7
Communications Channel B Remote Loopback 20 LIST ITEM NOT FOUND A-8
Test (command 184) 6-39 21 LIST NOT FOUND A-8
Conformité Européene (CE) mark 1-12 22 LIST FULL A-8
CSA 1-12 23 (sent to host PC) A-8
24 ERROR A-8, A-9
D 26 OVER CREDIT LIMIT A-9
data, saving and restoring 3-3 27 WILL NOT BE SPLIT A-9
date and time, set command 6-11 28 EMP’S SPLIT FULL A-9
Determine Lithium Battery Life (command 30 NEED BADGE A-9
41) 6-10 36 WARNING FIFO FULL A-10
Display Badge Information (command 41 INVALID SCHEDULE A-10
152) 6-27 42 CONFIG CONFLICT A-10
Display Data in I/O Port (command 158) 6-30 43 CONFIG CONFLICT A-10
Display IEEE Address (command 85) 6-12 44 NOT ALLOWED A-11
Display Integral Reader Statistics (command 50 ERROR 5-3, A-11
89) 6-12 59 ERROR A-11
Display KOP Value (command 115) 6-19 60 TABLE FULL A-12
Display OS Version and RAM Size (command 61 INVALID BELL TIME A-12
110) 6-15 62 NOT INSTALLED A-12
63 ERROR A-12
E 64 ERROR A-13
65 RAM FAULT A-13
Employee Data Reset (command 130) 6-23 68 CONFIG CONFLICT A-13
Enter Program Mode (command 90) 6-13 70 ERROR A-14
error messages A-1, A-17 73 (sent to the host PC) A-14
01 BADGE READ ERROR A-3 75 NO SUCH ENTRY A-14
03 USE FUNCTION KEY A-3 76 DUART ERROR A-14
04 REPUNCH RESTRICTION A-3 77 ERROR A-14
05 PUNCH RESTRICTED A-4 78 (sent to host PC) A-14
06 UNKNOWN EMPLOYEE A-4 79 (sent to host PC) A-15
07 OFF TIME A-4 79 BAD DEFAULT A-14
08 PUNCH RESTRICTED A-5 80 NOT ALLOWED A-15
09 HOME EMPLOYEE A-5 81 NO DATA AVAILABLE A-15
10 BADGE DATA ERROR A-5 82 BAD DEFAULT A-15
11 UNKNOWN EMPLOYEE A-6 83 ERROR A-15
12 PUNCH RESTRICTED A-6 86 PRINTER NOT READY A-16
13 OUT OF RANGE A-6

Index-2 Kronos Incorporated


Index

87 ERROR A-16 removing the keypad 3-31


92 OUT OF RANGE A-16 removing the LCD 3-34
94 INVALID ENTRY A-16 removing the mainboard 3-28
95 INVALID PASSWORD A-16 removing the reader cover 3-36
99 INVALID ENTRY A-17 replacing the battery backup board 3-23
EXCEPTION nn A-17 replacing the I/O board 3-26
interpreting A-2 replacing the keypad 3-32
Ethernet option board 6-39 replacing the LCD 3-35
broadcast test 6-40 replacing the mainboard 3-29
displaying CRC value 6-20 replacing the reader cover 3-37
drawing 1-6 separating the front cover from the
loopback test 1 6-39 chassis 3-27
loopback test 2 6-40 snapping the lead-acid battery into place 2-8
pinging 4-16 Token Ring board 1-7
reinitializing 6-26 twinaxial interface board 1-10
troubleshooting 4-16 file extensions
Tryit utility 4-18 .KRA 5-2
Exit Maintenance Mode (command 0) 6-8 .KRE 5-2
.KRN 5-2
F firmware, changing 5-1
F1 fuse 2-9, 3-24 flash-EEPROM 3-4, 3-8, 5-1
FCC 1-12 CRC value 6-18
field replaceable unit (FRU) 3-1, 3-19, 3-21, loading a new application into 5-4, 5-7, 5-11
3-24, 4-2 front cover
FIFO buffer, clearing 6-24 opening 3-24
figures separating from chassis 3-27
assembled view of Series 400 terminal 3-19 FRU. See field replaceable unit
auxiliary power source board 1-9
battery backup board 1-5 G
connecting the battery backup board Global Support, things to do before you
cable 2-9 call 1-14
Ethernet option board 1-6 guard mode 6-2
I/O option board 1-4
inserting lead-acid battery into chassis 2-8 H
locating the lead-acid battery tabs 2-7 hardware problems, troubleshooting 4-2
mainboard 1-2 hex addresses 6-30
modem option board 1-8
positioning the lithium battery 2-4 I
removing the battery backup board 3-22
removing the I/O board 3-25 I/O board

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide Index-3


Index

displaying input bits 6-26 orienting with connector 2-4


drawing 1-4 removing 2-4
monitoring 6-23 replacing 2-3
removing 3-24 resetting life value 6-40
replacing 3-26
IEEE address, display command 6-12 M
integral reader mainboard 6-26
displaying statistics 6-13 displaying input bits 6-26
failure 4-4 drawing 1-2
internal modem failure 4-5 malfunctioning 4-3, 4-11
removing 3-27
K replacing 3-28
keypad maintenance basics 1-12
failure 4-4 cleaning the terminal 1-13
problems 4-11 safety considerations 1-12
removing 3-30, 3-31 tools required 1-12
replacing 3-31 maintenance commands 6-8
testing 6-28 0 (Exit Maintenance Mode) 6-8
keypad membrane 6 (Ring Bell) 6-8
removing 3-32 7 (Silence Bell) 6-9
replacing 3-33 10 (Read Badge and Display Number) 6-9
KOP. See Kronos Options Package 41(Determine Lithium Battery Life) 6-10
Kronos Options Package, displaying value 6-19 62 (Adjust Time) 6-10
83 (Set Date and Time) 6-11, 6-12
L 85 (Display IEEE Address) 6-12
LCD 4-3 89 (Display Integral Reader Statistics) 6-12
removing 3-33 90 (Enter Program Mode) 6-13
replacing 3-34 91 (Restart) 6-14
troubleshooting 4-7 92 (Warm-Start) 6-14
lead-acid battery 93 (Cold-Start) 6-15
backup option 4-12 110 (Display OS Version and RAM
connecting battery backup cable 2-9 Size) 6-15
failure 4-5, 4-12, 4-13 111 (Test RAM) 6-16
replacing 2-7, 2-9 112 (Scan and Write RAM) 6-17
testing 2-6, 4-13 114 (Calculate and Display CRC Value for
LED 4-3 Flash-EEPROM Program) 6-18
light-emitting diode. See LED 115 (Display KOP Value) 6-19
liquid crystal display. See LCD 116 (Calculate and Display CRC Value for
lithium battery 2-2, 2-3, 2-5, 6-10 Boot-EPROM Program) 6-19
determining life of 2-2

Index-4 Kronos Incorporated


Index

117 (Calculate and Display CRC Value for 181(RS-232 Communications Channel B Echo
Ethernet Option Board) 6-20 Test) 6-37
118 (Modem Status) 6-21 182 (RS-232 Communications Channel B
119 (Advanced Modem Configuration) 6-22 External Loopback Test) 6-38
126 (Verify Motion-Detector or 183 (RS-232 Communications Channel B
Doormat) 6-22 Local Loopback Test) 6-38
127 (Monitor I/O Daughterboard Input 184 (Communications Channel B Remote
Bit) 6-23 Loopback Test) 6-39
130 (Employee Data Reset) 6-23 185 (Test Ethernet Option Board
135 (Clear the FIFO Buffer) 6-24 Communications) 6-39
136 (Reinitialize Communications 190 (Reset Lithium Battery Life Value) 6-40
Hardware) 6-24, 6-25 252 (Test Ethernet Board Flash) 6-41
137 (Reinitialize Printer maintenance mode 6-2
Communications) 6-25 commands 6-2
138 (Test Internal Modem Module) 6-25 executing commands 6-3, 6-5, 6-8
139 (Reinitialize Accessory Board) 6-26 operating in 6-3
150 (Monitor Main and I/O Input Bits) 6-26 password 6-2, 6-4
152 (Display Badge Information) 6-27 memory upgrade 3-38
153 (Test Display) 6-28 boot-EPROM 3-41
154 (Test Keypad) 6-28 changing configuration 3-39
155 (Test Input Bit 1) 6-28 inserting the chip 3-39
156 (Test Output Ports) 6-29 locating existing chips 3-40
157 (Adjust Contrast of Display) 6-29 RAM 3-38
158 (Display Data in I/O Port) 6-30, 6-32 using a chip remover 3-41
159 (Write Data to I/O Port) 6-32 modem option board 4-2
166 (Printer Test) 6-33 2400 baud 6-21
174 (Use Printer Port for advanced configuration 6-22
Communications) 6-33 AT commands 6-22
175 (Communications Channel A Transmit baud rates 4-5
Test) 6-33 country code 6-21
176 (RS-485 Communications Channel A displaying status 6-21
Echo Test) 6-34 drawing 1-8
177 (RS-232 Communications Channel A high speed 6-21
External Loopback Test) 6-35 loopback test 6-25
178 (RS-232 Communications Channel A problems 4-5
Local Loopback Test) 6-35 S-Register settings 6-22
179 (Communications Channel A Remote Modem Status (command 118) 6-21
Loopback Test) 6-36 Monitor I/O Daughterboard Input Bit (command
180 (RS-232 Communications Channel B 127) 6-23
Transmit Test) 6-36

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide Index-5


Index

Monitor Main and I/O Input Bits (command R


150) 6-26
random access memory
scanning 6-17
N testing 6-16
network, verifying integrity of 2-10 upgrading 3-38
writing data to 6-17
O Read Badge and Display Number (command
option boards 1-3, 3-21 10) 6-9
auxiliary power source 1-9 reader cover
battery backup 1-5 removing 3-35
Ethernet 1-6 replacing 3-36
I/O 1-4 Reinitialize Communications Hardware
modem 1-8 (command 136) 6-24
Token Ring 1-7 Reinitialize Ethernet Option Board (command
twinaxial 1-10 139) 6-26
Reinitialize Printer Communications (command
P 137) 6-25
remote reader failure 4-4
part numbers B-2
Reset Lithium Battery Life Value (command
AC-related B-4
190) 6-40
battery-related B-4
Restart (command 91) 6-14
cabinet B-4
restoring data
cables B-5
for DOS 3-13
connectors B-4
with SL400 3-8
documentation B-6
Ring Bell (command 6) 6-8
Ethernet B-5
RS-232 Communications Channel A External
fuses B-5
Loopback Test (command 177) 6-35
mainboards B-2
RS-232 Communications Channel A Local
miscellaneous B-6
Loopback Test (command 178) 6-35
option boards B-5
RS-232 Communications Channel B Echo Test
screws and brackets B-5
(command 181) 6-37
Series 400 terminal cover assemblies B-3
RS-232 Communications Channel B External
PC boards, handling 3-2
Loopback Test (command 182) 6-38
Ping utility 4-16
RS-232 Communications Channel B Local
precautions 3-2
Loopback Test (command 183) 6-38
preventive maintenance 2-1
RS-232 Communications Channel B Transmit
Printer Test (command 166) 6-33
Test (command 180) 6-36
program mode 6-2
RS-485 Communications Channel A Echo Test
enter 6-13
(command 176) 6-34
programming the terminal 3-16

Index-6 Kronos Incorporated


Index

S Silence Bell (command 7) 6-9


SL400 for DOS 5-7
safety considerations 1-12
SL400 for Windows 5-4
saving data 3-3
SL400 utility 3-8, 5-1, 5-7, 5-11
terminal parameters 3-7, 3-9
DOS Application Update option 3-9
Scan and Write RAM (command 112) 6-17
DOS Datasave option 3-9
Series 400 Service Utility 3-10
DOS Terminal Parameters option 3-9
Series 400 terminal
for DOS 3-9
adjusting display 6-29
for Windows 3-4
assembled view 3-19
restoring parameters with 3-13
badge-read failure with 4-4, 4-10
saving data with 3-7
battery backup board connections 1-5
Softload utility 3-4
cleaning 1-13
softloading a new application 5-4, 5-7, 5-11
communications failure with 4-6, 4-14
using the correct versions 5-2
error messages A-3
with SL400 for DOS 5-7
Ethernet board connections 1-6, 1-7
with SL400 for Windows 5-4
I/O board connections 1-4
static-sensitive components 3-2
internal modem failure with 4-5
status messages A-18, A-20
keypad failure with 4-4
* (between date and time) A-20
keypad test 6-28
+ (between date and time) A-19
LCD failure with 4-3
DATA SAVER MODE... A-19
lead-acid battery failure with 4-5, 4-12, 4-13
GUARD MODE A-18
LED failure with 4-3
LOW LITHIUM BATTERY A-19
mainboard connections 1-2
MEMORY NEARLY FULL A-18
modem board connections 1-8
OFF TIME A-20
options 1-1
PRINTER NOT READY A-20
part numbers B-1, B-2
SOFT LOAD MODE... A-19
pinging 1-14
SUPERVISOR MODE A-18
power-up failures 4-3, 4-7
WARNING DOOR IS OPEN A-20
precautions with 3-2
WARNING FIFO FULL A-18
programming 3-16
WARNING MEMORY FULL A-18
safety considerations with 1-12
x (between date and time) A-20
status messages A-18, A-20
Store Parameters window 3-11
troubleshooting hardware problems 4-2
supervisor mode 6-2
unassembled view 3-20
servicing instructions 3-1
Set Date and Time (command 83) 6-11
T
Setcomm utility 5-4 terminal parameter file
configuring with 3-4 examining 3-12
for DOS 3-10 modifying 3-12
for Windows 3-3 printing 3-12

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide Index-7


Index

Terminal Parameters window 3-11, 3-14 printer 6-33


terminal parameters, restoring 3-13 RAM 6-16
Terminal Service Utility 3-3, 4-18, 5-2, 5-4 terminal display 6-28
Check utility 3-3 time, adjusting 6-10
configuring 3-5 Token Ring board 4-2, 4-19
DataRestore option 3-8 drawing 1-7
DataSave option 3-8 LED check 4-19
main window 3-4 pinging 4-20
Setcomm utility 3-3 tools
SL400 utility 3-4 for preventive maintenance 1-12
Softload utility 3-4 required for maintenance 1-12
Transfer utility 3-4 Transfer utility 3-4
Tryit utility 3-4 troubleshooting
Test Display (command 153) 6-28 badge-reading problems 4-4, 4-10
Test Ethernet Board Flash (command 252) 6-41 before calling Global Support 1-14
Test Ethernet Option Board Communications communications problems 4-6, 4-14
(command 185) 6-39 Ethernet option board 4-16
Test Input Bit 1 (command 155) 6-28 hardware problems 4-2
Test Internal Modem Module (command internal modem module 4-5
138) 6-25 keypad problems 4-4
Test Keypad (command 154) 6-28 LCD failure 4-3
Test Output Ports (command 156) 6-29 lead-acid battery 4-5, 4-12, 4-13
Test RAM (command 111) 6-16 LED failure 4-3
tests modem option board 4-5
channel A external loopback 6-35 pinging 4-18
channel A local loopback 6-35 power-up failures 4-3, 4-7, 4-8
channel A remote loopback 6-36 Token Ring board 4-19
channel B Echo 6-37 Tryit utility 4-18
channel B external loopback 6-38 Tryit utility 3-4, 4-18, 5-7
channel B local loopback 6-38 twinaxial interface board 4-2
channel B remote loopback 6-39 drawing 1-10
channel B transmit 6-36
DUART channel A echo 6-34 U
DUART channel A transmit 6-33 UL 1-12
Ethernet flash 6-41 Use Printer Port for Communications (command
Ethernet option board 6-39 174) 6-33
I/O port signal 6-28
internal modem module 6-25 V
keypad 6-28
output ports 6-29 Verify Motion-Detector or Doormat (command
126) 6-22

Index-8 Kronos Incorporated


Index

W
Warm-Start (command 92) 6-14
wrist strap 3-2
Write Data to I/O Port (command 159) 6-32

Series 400 Terminal Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide Index-9


Index

Index-10 Kronos Incorporated