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SWOT

STRENGHTS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS


Educational Center
 Central  Degradation  Capacity  Enrollment
location of the competent saturation
 Constant educational registration  The location
enrollment center  Support from of the center
growth  The classroom parents, is relatively
does not students and dangerous to
comply with teachers to be near to the
the keep the market
requirements school
pedagogical running
established
Teacher
 Dynamic and  She is no an  Her daughter  Pronunciation
vivacity English is an English
 Promotes teacher teacher
values  Work
saturation
Student
 Participation  Lack of  Receive a  Tripping over
 Discipline English quality the stands or
vocabulary education that falling from
fulfills at least the rail where
the minimum the classroom
requirements is located
SUBJECT CURRICULA
English for 3rd grade.

HANDBOOKS OR OTHER INFORMATION SOURCES


Monte Sinaí Collection “Time to learn English” Reina Isabel Chacón

LIST OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS, TRAINING UNITS, CONTENTS


Content: City places

SUMMARY OF THE DEMONSTRATIVE


She started the class with prayer to God
Reviewed the task of the previous class
She proceeded to talk about the moral value that was "Gratitude"
She asked questions about the places the children knew in the city
Later she made a vocabulary in English while asking the places of the city in Spanish
The children repeated with their teacher
They drew the places of the city in their notebook
They listened to a song related to the theme
She concludes the class by assigning a homework assignment

MANAGEMENT SITUATIONS OF TIME, SPACE OTHER ELEMENTS


EXCLUSIVE OF A CLASSROOM
The class developed it for forty minutes. The classroom space was not appropriate for the
class because there was not enough ventilation and enough lighting, which could probably
suffocate the students and the teacher in more than one occasion, so they have a small pedestal
fan. The teacher said that she did not have a own classroom for the class, and that she was
constantly being moved from the classroom, we observed that there were class spaces on the
walls such as math, Spanish, music, etc., but it did not have an English space; They do not have
books for each child so the teacher should develop teaching materials such as pictures or images
to illustrate the development of the topic. The advantage is that the classroom has the exact
number of chairs for each child, in addition the teacher will have internet, their own computer
and speakers to incorporate audiovisual material to the children during the classes.
INTERVIEW A TEACHER TO EXPLORE THEIR EXPERIENCE
IMPLEMENTING THE CURRICULUM STANDARDS OF ENGLISH AND
THE METHODOLOGIES SHE USES IN THE TEACHING PROCESS

1. How much time do you invest in writing activities during the class?
- Almost the whole class because they are in a learning process from the beginning and
it is necessary that they know more than what they have been taught.

2. What tools do you use to develop writing activities?


- Vocabularies (book) and internet.

3. Do you apply the DCNB?


- Yes, through the planification.

4. Do you use didactic materials to develop your class?


What kind of materials?
- Yes, for example for the exams I use worksheets.

5. What kind of evaluation do you use?


- Worksheets, tests, questions during the class.

6. Does the classroom count with pedagogical condition?


- Does not have pedagogical resources, for example ventilation and lighting are needed
in this classroom particularly.

7. What is the best way to improve writing skill in the student?


- I have trained them through: Album, exercises both in class and homework, reports,
drawings.

8. What kind of activities do you apply to your students to improve writing skill, does it
work?
- The majority is with open book, then we practice doing another type of activity, if it
works.

9. Trough which activities do you apply feedback at the end of your class?
- Small activities that reinforce what I taught or oral questions.

10. Have you applied writing activities such as vocabulary, or write small stories to your
students?
- Yes, often yes, but it costs a little because they are petite.
STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

This interview main objective shows the relevance of the curriculum in the educational
context in the Basic Education Center José Maria Medina and is focused in the specific area of
Writing and the second branches derived from this skill and how this affect in the writing
process.

Though theoreticians and researchers have contributed to turn writing into a critical,
constructive and significant experience, problems in the process of teaching reading remain.
Results indicate that teachers continuously teach writing aiming at strengthening social awareness
needed for an effective social change. The interview is to know the didactic strategies used by
teacher in the teaching learning process. The curriculum for Basic Education, points out that this
strategies are necessary for the expression of thought critical, reflective, liberating and the
appreciation of diversity cultural partner through writing. The interview is observational and
descriptive. The results show that teachers don not stop at the process of teaching writing that
leads to the strengthening of social awareness, for the effective transformation of society.

JUSTIFICATION OF THE PROBLEM

Most people agree that Children must eventually acquire English to succeed in this
society, where English is the language of government, business, media, schooling. Children must
speak English to access higher education it means to have more opportunities and take advantage
of it; Otherwise the teaching of the second language in the José Maria Medina School for the
student population is not a priority. Therefore, as a result a deficiency in this field would be
obtained, it is intended to locate the origins of the problem from an observation, from where we
notice deficiencies in the development of the class, the main reason that exists is to impart the
class of English is a requirement by the Government, that does not give the budget and neither a
trained staff, explained the teacher in charge of the class.
DELINEATION OF THE PROBLEM

By an observation of an English class to 3rd grade and an interview with the English
teacher at José María Medina school this research is based.

OBJECTIVES

GENERAL OBJECTIVES

To become familiar with curriculum development in governmental educational centers.


To conduct a field research that leads the reflection of the curriculum in the teaching-learning
process of English as foreign language.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

Identify deficiencies and needs for the development of English class in the 3rd grade.
Provide improvement ideas to develop an efficient English class.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

What are the deficiencies of the educational center and how does this affect the English class?
How can we improve the development of the English class?

METHODOLOGY OF THE INVESTIGATION

The methodology that follows is an agreement for an interview, for which we know a
little about the development process of the English class that lives in the Basic Education Center
José María Medina of this city, also through observation we can understand better the protocol of
the class, identify the needs of the students, the teaching and the educational center has.
DESCRIPTION OF THE CATEGORY OF ANALYSIS

SKILL DIMENSION ACTIVITY


Writing Curriculum 1. Create the idea

2. Organize ideas

3. Planning activities of writing

4. The student writes a vocabulary

5. Student makes a relation about pictures and words

DIMENSION, ACTIVITY, CURRICULUM CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

The classroom space was not appropriate for the class because there was not enough
ventilation and enough lighting, which could probably suffocate the students and the teacher in
more than one occasion, so they have a small pedestal fan. The teacher said that she did not have
a own classroom for the class, and that she was constantly being moved from the classroom, we
observed that there were class spaces on the walls such as math, Spanish, music, etc., but it did
not have an English space; They do not have books for each child so the teacher should develop
teaching materials such as pictures or images to illustrate the development of the topic. The
advantage is that the classroom has the exact number of chairs for each child, in addition the
teacher will have internet, their own computer and speakers to incorporate audiovisual material to
the children during the classes.

TIME MANAGEMENT

the class was planned for 40 minutes, due to activities outside the planning class was suspended
10 minutes early.
PARTICIPANTS

The class we observed in José María Medina School was 3rd grade, which has 34 students and
the teacher in charge of the class.

SOURCES INFORMATION

In this research the most relevant sources of information are the teacher and the students of 3rd
grade.

PROCESSING INFORMATION DATA ANALYSIS

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
In agreement with (Kuhl, 2004) “Young children learn their mother tongue rapidly and
effortlessly, from babbling at 6 months of age to full sentences by the age of 3 years and follow
the same developmental path regardless of culture”. We assume that if children are constantly
exposed to different languages from an early age, they will have no problem to be able to
communicate in different situations in their lives, will have a different and panoramic perspective
than a regular child would have. We agreed to observe an English class for children whose ages
range from eight to nine years old with the objectives to become familiar with the implementation
of the curriculum and identify deficiencies during the process of the class that can affect the
opportune and effective learning, transcending his conception of English as a language and as a
class.

A professional English teacher knows that achieve an objective as improve a skill in the
second language in children is an arduous work, as claimed by (Swick, 2009) “Writing in any
language is a difficult skill to acquire. Therefore, as an ESL student you should approach writing
in English carefully.” Even in Spanish the writing skill is a large process that we as teacher would
need a lot of support to achieve goals through well-structured activities. In order to write well in
English, we as learners, we should understand the basics of the language. Probably the most
difficult area to learn is how to conjugate verbs? In a constant exposition and a good environment
that absorbs the learner.

Why should the teachers be interested in a process approach to writing? Is important to


pay attention in what the students say, but what the students write deserve the same attention of
the teacher, focusing on language grammar mistakes.

Stages in the writing process

Pre-writing
The teacher needs to stimulate students' creativity, to get them thinking how to approach a
writing topic. In this stage, the most important thing is the flow of ideas, and it is not always
necessary that students actually produce much (if any) written work. If they do, then the teacher
can contribute with advice on how to improve their initial ideas.

Focusing ideas
During this stage, students write without much attention to the accuracy of their work or the
organisation. The most important feature is meaning. Here, the teacher (or other students) should
concentrate on the content
of the writing. Is it coherent? Is there anything missing? Anything extra?
Evaluating, structuring and editing
Now the writing is adapted to a readership. Students should focus more on form and on
producing a finished piece of work. The teacher can help with error correction and give
organisational advice.

Classroom activities
Pre-writing

 Brainstorming
Getting started can be difficult, so students divided into groups quickly produce words
and ideas about the writing.
 Planning
Students make a plan of the writing before they start. These plans can be compared and
discussed in groups before writing takes place.
 Generating ideas
Discovery tasks such as cubing (students write quickly about the subject in six different
ways - they:

o 1. describe it

o 2. compare it

o 3. associate it

o 4. analyze it

o 5. apply it

o 6. argue for or against it.

 Questioning
In groups, the idea is to generate lots of questions about the topic. This helps students focus upon
audience as they consider what the reader needs to know. The answers to these questions will
form the basis to the composition.

 Discussion and debate


The teacher helps students with topics, helping them develop ideas in a positive and encouraging
way.

Focusing ideas

 Fast writing
The students write quickly on a topic for five to ten minutes without worrying about correct
language or punctuation. Writing as quickly as possible, if they cannot think of a word they leave
a space or write it in their own language. The important thing is to keep writing. Later this text is
revised.
 Group compositions
Working together in groups, sharing ideas. This collaborative writing is especially valuable as it
involves other skills (speaking in particular.)

 Changing viewpoints
A good writing activity to follow a role-play or storytelling activity. Different students choose
different points of view and think about /discuss what this character would write in a diary,
witness statement, etc.

 Varying form
Similar to the activity above, but instead of different viewpoints, different text types are selected.
How would the text be different if it were written as a letter, or a newspaper article, etc.

Evaluating, Structuring and Editing

 Ordering
Students take the notes written in one of the pre-writing activities above and organise them. What
would come first? Why? Here it is good to tell them to start with information known to the reader
before moving onto what the reader does not know.

 Self-editing
A good writer must learn how to evaluate their own language - to improve through checking their
own text, looking for errors, structure. This way students will become better writers.

 Peer editing and proof-reading


Here, the texts are interchanged and the evaluation is done by other students. In the real world, it
is common for writers to ask friends and colleagues to check texts for spelling, etc. You could
also ask the students to reduce the texts, to edit them, concentrating on the most important
information.
The importance of feedback
It takes a lot of time and effort to write, and so it is only fair that student writing is responded to
suitably. Positive comments can help build student confidence and create good feeling for the
next writing class. It also helps if the reader is more than just the teacher. Class magazines,
swapping letters with other classes, etc. can provide an easy solution to providing a real audience.

Writing as communication
Process writing is a move away from students writing to test their language towards the
communication of ideas, feelings and experiences. It requires that more classroom time is spent
on writing, but as the previously outlined activities show, there is more than just writing
happening during a session dedicated to process writing.

Potential problems
Writing is a complex process and can lead to learner frustration. As with speaking, it is necessary
to provide a supportive environment for the students and be patient. This approach needs that
more time be spent on writing in class, but as you have seen, not all classroom time is spent
actually writing.
Students may also react negatively to reworking the same material, but as long as the activities
are varied and the objectives clear, then they will usually accept doing so. In the long term, you
and your students will start to recognise the value of a process writing approach as their written
work improves.

CONCLUSIONS
REFERENCES

Kuhl, P. K. (2004, November). EARLY LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. Seattle, Washignton, USA.

Swick, E. (2009). Writing Better English. New York: Mc Graw Hill.


Universidad Pedagógica Nacional

Francisco Morazán

NEEDS ANALYSIS PROJECT BASED ON WRITING SKILL AT


JOSÉ MARÍA MEDINA SCHOOL IN

SANTA ROSA DE COPÁN, COPÁN

RESEARCHES

Ángel Antonio Miranda Hernández

Henry Bladimir Pineda

Jorge Luis Perdomo Landaverde

Lurbin Selena Sánchez Mejía

PROFESSOR: Sandra Margarita Alvarado