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Artists &

I L L U S T R A T O R S
Wi n
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All you need to know to make great paintings
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Ehsan Maleki was born and raised in the old city of Esfahan, Iran, where he spent 4 years studying classical drawing
and painting under the tutelage of top artists in the city. Upon graduation, he engaged in illustration for a few years and
in the early 2000’s he dedicated himself fully to painting and drawing. He has had major solo shows in different cities
within the country and also overseas. He was greatly influenced by the Russian Itinerants and Impressionist artists such
as Repin, Zorn, Casas, Sargent, Fechin, and Arkipov to name a few. Currently he runs a studio in Tehran where he
works and teaches drawing and painting in the tradition of his classical training. www.instagram.com/maleki_fineart

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Kim Scouller, Tod Ramos

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Artists & Illustrators 3


Contents 67
PIC K T H E BE S T
P E N C IL S

HARRY HAMBLING/PRIVATE COLLECTION


JOHN PIPER

82 You know you


have found a
good pencil if

22
you enjoy the
way it feels
CATHERINE RAYNER/LITTLE TIGER PRESS

when you
are drawing
XXXXX

KIM SCOULLER
– PAGE 67
regulars
7 The Diar y
Nine exciting ways to get
creative this month
10 Exhibitions featureS 56 Challenging
Explore the best art shows 18 Painting In St Ives Oil Painting My ths
12 Fresh Paint Be inspired by the artists who H ow to Sophie Ploeg explores brushes
Three inspiring new artworks paint in this creative town 58 Masterclass
us e bl ac k
26 The Working Artist 30 V& A Illustration Terence Clarke on painting light
Laura Boswell on turning Awards 2018
in yo ur ar t 62 Your Questions
– pa ge 64
negative feedback into a positive We catch up with this year’s Master wildlife art in ink
28 In The Studio wonderful prizewinners 64 Essential Colour
Leading British artist Kurt Jackson 40 Second Nature Al Gury on using black paint
welcomes us to his workspace Andrew Lambirth explores how 67 Sketching Pencils
36 10 Minutes With... Harry Hambling’s creativity Kim Scouller rounds up the best
Figurative artist Mary Jane Ansell blossomed in later life 68 Create Harmony
shares her portrait painting tips Peter Keegan explains how best to
38 Prize Draw practical use tertiary and analogous colours
Win one of 20 watercolour sets 45 Sketchbook 70 Paint A Horse
worth a total of £1,000 Top tips and techniques Tod Ramos shows us how he
82 What I’ve Learned 50 An A-Z Of paints lifesize from observation
We chat to children’s book Landscape Painting 73 Coloured Pencils
illustrator Catherine Rayner Your essential guide to the genre Jake Spicer draws summer foliage

4 Artists & Illustrators


Letters
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LET TER OF THE MONTH

What do you do Send your letter or email to

with your old the addresses below:

copies of A&I? POST:


If, like me, you have been receiving Your Letters
Artists & Illustrators for some time Artists & Illustrators
and are loathe to throw copies away, The Chelsea Magazine
you will have accumulated quite a pile. Company Ltd.
I have limited storage space, so I cut Jubilee House
mine up and put the pages I want to 2 Jubilee Place
keep in sleeves in a ring binder. You London SW3 3TQ
could compile a range of binders by
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acrylic and so on), or projects or tips. By doing this you will have an excellent and andillustrators.co.uk
compact reference library making it easy to find what you are looking for to get you
inspired or solve a problem. The writer of our ‘letter
Russell Simpkins, Portfolio Plus member, Caversham, Berkshire, via email of the month’ will receive a
£50 gift voucher from our
partner GreatArt, who
Art. It was a unique design by offers the UK’s largest
an exceptional artist, and a range of art materials with
great loss to Glasgow. I more than 50,000 art
attended classes there many supplies and regular
years ago and have happy discounts and promotions.
memories of it. www.greatart.co.uk
It is heartbreaking to think
that the repairs after the first fire
were almost complete when the
second outbreak occurred. A
tangible part of our art history is
lost forever. Thank you for your
timely article about Charles
Rennie Mackintosh (Summer
issue 393), it was appreciated.
Marion Hiddleston, Lisburn,
Northern Ireland

A NEW ANGLE ON ART


In the Summer edition of Artists &
Illustrators (issue 393), it was
OUT OF THE BLOCKS interesting reading the article about
I attempted a demonstration in your producing a portrait from an
July edition (Masterclass, issue unusual angle by Emma Colbert.
392), which I thought I would share. Using a camera as suggested, I
It helped me get out of my artist’s attempted a couple of self-portraits.
block. I had a lovely day painting I also took photos of textured
this vibrant still life outdoors in the painted walls, windows and traffic
sun. I loved this bold technique, lights. These were incorporated in
which is different to how I usually the self-portrait to add interest.
paint using oils. I have attached the two images.
Maisie Miller, Lincoln, via email The media in both are watercolour,
acrylic and ink.
LOST TO HISTORY David Douglas, Portfolio Plus
I was so sad to hear of the second member, Northamptonshire,
dreadful fire at Glasgow School of via email

Artists & Illustrators 5


visit1066country.com/art

a quaint artist’s bolthole

Battle • Bexhill • Hastings • Herstmonceux • Pevensey • Rye


the diary

August
9 ARTISTIC THINGS TO DO IN

SOUTH WEST ACADEMY


OPEN EXHIBITION
Are you working on an artwork that you’re proud of?
Then put the finishing touches to it this month and
submit your work to the South West Academy of Fine
ELIZABETH HOOD

and Applied Arts’ open exhibition in Exeter. The open


call closes on 14 September.
www.southwestacademy.org.uk
the diary

FELICITY HOUSE

read
SUBMIT
d o n’ t 4 Letters of
2 Pastel Society Vincent

mis s!
Open Exhibition Van Gogh
Enter your pastel works now for the This Folio Society edition
chance to be exhibited alongside the (£49.95), edited by art
society’s members next year. You historian Mark Roskill with
might even win the Artists & an introduction from art
Illustrators prize and be featured in critic Martin Gayford,
the magazine. Enter online between explores the Dutch artist’s
30 July and 2 November. correspondence with his

3
www.mallgalleries.org.uk LEARN brother and confidante

DENNIS MINCHIN
Paint a Striking Still Life Theo, alongside sketches,
Brush up on canvas design, drawings and paintings.
composition and colour theory www.foliosociety.com
with the help of Royal
Birmingham Society of Artists’ member
Dennis Minchin at its city base. The course,
from 8 to 9 August, will also explore the DISCOVER
fascinating genre’s rich history.
www.rbsa.org.uk
9
Worcestershire
Open Studios
Make the most of the August Bank
Holiday weekend and head to
Worcestershire to see art across 81
PRINT locations. Choose from 170 artists’
5 Monoprinting Landscape
Be inspired by wild West
spaces between 25 and 27 August,
and get advice on printmaking,
Cornwall, from 24 to 26 August, as painting, mixed media and more.
artist Kate Walters shows you how www.worcestershireopenstudios.org
NEWLYN SCHOOL OF ART

to transform outdoor studies into


monotypes back at the Newlyn
School of Art studio.
www.newlynartschool.co.uk

6 EXPLORE
Figurative Landscapes
Discover how to paint
7 Travel
Paint in Cornwall
Head to a beautiful valley
8 Draw
Sketching London’s
Landmarks
sunlight on the sea, inspired nine miles from Fowey for a This weekend course aims to
by ground-breaking painter hands-on holiday. There’s a build confidence in sketching
Dame Laura Knight. Artist choice of accommodation on in public, while mastering
Sue Halloway leads this site, as well as a purpose- perspective, tone and
afternoon workshop at built studio and bespoke, mark-making. Tackle the
the Chichester-based gallery one-to-one tuition based on city’s iconic views with City Lit
on 26 August. your experience and media. from 4 to 5 August.
www.pallant.org.uk www.friedaandthemoon.co.uk www.citylit.ac.uk

8 Artists & Illustrators


One destination
-Two extraordinary Venues -

Superb Bespoke Interiors, Bathrooms, Kitchens & Bedrooms The most atmospheric sculpture park in Britain.
A unique one-stop shopping experience for all your interior & exterior More than 300 internationally renowned sculptors exhibiting over 1000
design & decoration requirements. sculptures for sale within ten acres of arboretum & wildlife inhabited
water gardens.

Miscellanea www.miscellanea.co.uk The Sculpture Park


Crossways, Churt, Surrey www.thesculpturepark.com Jumps Road, Churt, Surrey
GU10 2JA Curator: 07831 500 506 GU10 2LH
01428 714 014 01428 605 453
Exhibitions
AUGUST’S BEST ART SHOWS
London The impact of The Great War culture, industry and innovation. 31 August to 27 September
BP Portrait Award 2018 on art revealed. Various locations. Celebrating animal art.
Until 23 September Tate Britain. www.tate.org.uk www.getnorth2018.com Granary Art Gallery,
See the very best Weston-under-Lizard. www.
contemporary portraits. Magic Realism: Art in Weimar Portrait of the Artist: associationofanimalartists.com
National Portrait Gallery. Germany 1919-33 Käthe Kollwitz
www.npg.org.uk 30 July 2018 to 14 July 2019 Until 30 September Drawn to Perfection
Explore the uncanny and 36 works from the British Until 23 September
Rediscover: Tiepolo’s Joseph mysterious in painting. Museum’s collection. Masterworks from the
Receiving Pharaoh’s Ring Tate Modern. www.tate.org.uk Ferens Art Gallery, Hull. Royal Collection.
Until 30 August www.hcandl.co.uk Barber Institute of Fine Arts,
With the help of X-rays, explore RA Summer Exhibition Birmingham.
the artist’s working methods. Until 19 August The Enchanted Garden www.barber.org.uk
Dulwich Picture Gallery. www. A celebration of Art Made Now. Until 7 October
dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk Royal Academy of Arts. Garden-inspired art. England – South
www.royalacademy.org.uk Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle. Artists Rooms: Agnes Martin
John Vernon Lord: www.laingartgallery.org.uk Until 7 October
Illustrating Carroll and Joyce England – North Six key paintings from the
We talk 13 July to 4 November Annie Swynnerton: Twentieth-Century Lithographs major abstract artist,
to the Magical pen-and-ink works Painting Light and Hope Until 22 September characterised by subtle pencil
n
ar tis t o from the V&A Illustrator of the Until 6 January 2019 Works from Pablo Picasso, lines and pale washes.

p a g e 30
Year 2018. Works by a pioneering artist. Henry Moore and Mary Fedden. Winchester Discovery Centre.
House of Illustration. www. Manchester Art Gallery. Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal. www.hampshireculturaltrust.
houseofillustration.org.uk www.manchesterartgallery.org www.abbothall.org.uk org.uk

Aftermath: Art in the Wake Great Exhibition of the North England – Midlands Floral Fantasies
of World War One Until 9 September Association of Animal Artists Until 9 September
Until 23 September Exhibitions of northern art, Autumn Exhibition Botanical watercolours and

Prince and Patron


21 July to 30 September
To celebrate the Prince of
Wales’ 70th birthday, the
summer opening of
Buckingham Palace will
feature a display of more than
100 of His Royal Highness’
favourite pieces from the
Royal Collection. They will be
shown in the State Rooms
alongside works by young
artists supported by three of
ROYAL COLLECTION TRUST © HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2018

The Prince of Wales’ charities:


the Royal Drawing School, the
Prince’s Foundation School of
Traditional Arts and Turquoise
Mountain. Don’t miss works
from Prince Charles’ personal
art collection, too.
Buckingham Palace,
London SW1A.
www.royalcollection.org.uk
drawings from the collection. The Paston Treasure:
The Fitzwilliam Museum, Riches and Rarities
Cambridge. of the Known World
www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk Until 23 September
Rare 17th-century art and
Florabundance: objects originally featured
Contemporary Flower Art in the mysterious painting
13 July to 7 October The Paston Treasure.
Paintings, drawings and prints Norwich Castle Art Gallery.
by 12 artists. www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk
Watts Contemporary Gallery,
Compton. Yves Klein
www.wattsgallery.org.uk 18 July to 7 October
Explore more than 50
Henry Lamb: artworks, including paintings,
Out of the Shadows sculpture and installations.
Until 30 September Blenheim Palace, Woodstock.
The first major retrospective of www.blenheimpalace.com
the 20th-century British
figurative painter since 1984. Scotland
The Salisbury Museum. Barbara Rae:

EDWIN G LUCAS, CALEY STATION, EDINBURGH, 1942, OIL ON CANVAS, 99X73.7CM. CITY ART CENTRE,
www.salisburymuseum.org.uk The Northwest Passage
4 August to 9 September

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES EDINBURGH. © THE ARTIST'S ESTATE. PHOTO: CITY ART CENTRE
In Focus: Wilhelmina A new body of paintings and
Barns-Graham: Sea, Rock, prints based on a series of
Earth and Ice journeys into the Arctic.
Until 7 October Royal Scottish Academy Edwin G Lucas: An Individual Eye
Explore four decades of oils of Art and Architecture, 4 August 2018 to 10 February 2019
and drawings responding to Edinburgh. His family discouraged him from becoming an artist. This collection of 60 colourful and
diverse landscapes. www.royalscottishacademy.org imaginative works reveal his defiance. The self-taught artist went on to be a prolific
Jerwood Gallery, Hastings. painter, showing works at the Royal Scottish Academy and the Society of Scottish
www.jerwoodgallery.org LAST CHANCE Artists. Although there are Surrealist and Modernist influences in his paintings, Lucas
Charles Rennie Mackintosh: distanced himself from trends. Trace the development from his early watercolours to his
Prized Possessions: Making the Glasgow Style bold, experimental oil paintings of the 1940s and 1950s, as well as his works of the
Dutch Masterpieces Until 14 August 1980s, produced after a 30-year break.
from National Trust Houses Celebrating 150 years since City Art Centre, Edinburgh. www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk
Until 16 September the birth of the architect,
See works by the finest artist and designer.
masters of the Golden Age Kelvingrove Art Gallery, School of Art and Museum, A showcase of artworks
including Rembrandt van Rijn. Glasgow. Aberystwyth University. with a maritime theme which
The Holburne Museum, Bath. www.glasgowlife.org.uk www.aber.ac.uk tie-in with Visit Wales’ ‘Year
www.holburne.org of the Sea’.
Maritime Perspectives: James Green: MOMA Macynlleth.
Ravilious Room Collecting Art of a Entering Donkey World moma.machynlleth.org.uk
Until 16 September Seafaring Nation Until 30 September
Watercolours, prints and Until 21 October Linocuts and screenprints. Ireland
ceramics from the 20th- More than 100 works capturing Mostyn, Llandudno. Elizabeth Magill: Headland
century artist and designer. life on Scotland’s coastline. www.mostyn.org Until 23 September
Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne. Scottish Maritime Museum, A major exhibition of new work
www.townereastbourne.org.uk Irvine. www.scottish Oriel Davies Open 2018 by the landscape painter.
maritimemuseum.org Until 5 September Ulster Museum. www.nmni.com
Rose Wylie: History Painting Contemporary works
Until 15 September Wales from established and Drawing Dublin
The Royal Academician Discourse: Reynolds to Rego emerging artists. Until 26 August
presents paintings and works Until 28 September Oriel Davies Gallery, Newtown. Works on paper including
on paper across two venues. Follow the evolution of www.orieldavies.org landscapes, figure studies
Newlyn Art Gallery and printmaking practice from and portraits.
the Exchange, Penzance. Royal Academicians across The Sea National Gallery of Ireland,
www.newlynartgallery.co.uk its 250-year history. 11 August to 9 September Dublin. www.nationalgallery.ie

Artists & Illustrators 11


Fresh
Paint
Inspiring new artworks, straight off the easel

Rachel Ross stability, roughing in the areas of colour with large brushes.
Mundane items are rich with memories of people, places “It is then a process of gradual refinement,” she adds.
and moments in this artist’s work. Around 10 years ago, “I use heavy body acrylic in thin layers. The final layers
following a 20-year career in illustration, Rachel was drawn become a series of glazes with fine brushes used at the
back to painting for her own pleasure. And she started by end to sharpen up details.”
recreating familiar objects. “My first paintings were of my In Kitchamajig, the slotted spoon and spatula were a
children’s outgrown shoes,” she says. “My youngest son particular challenge. “I wanted to recreate the highly shiny
had just started school. I realise in hindsight that this was a surface of the metal,” she says. “The light is forever
pivotal time in my life. My children were growing up and changing in my studio affecting the reflections in the
didn’t need me as they once had. There was a strong implements. Added to this, the slots in the spoons made
emotional pull to these personal items.” this very complicated to see and difficult to recreate. The
The worn kitchen tools in her recent acrylic work, use of masking fluid helped.”
Kitchamajig, elicit a similar tug. “I look for items I am drawn Having worked with acrylic as an illustrator, it felt natural
to on an emotional level,” says Rachel. “It might be worn to Rachel to continue to use the medium when she began
sparkly dancing shoes, a rusty old key, a diary full of her personal artworks. “I had become very comfortable
long-forgotten appointments or a tarnished well-used with them,” she says. “I don’t really think of my paintings as
spoon reminiscent of one I remember from the back of my having a style as such. I paint as I would naturally. My
mother’s kitchen drawer.” She has accumulated quite a painting is like my handwriting.”
treasure trove of subject matter, including personal To capture her relationship with the
R ac h
belongings, things given to her by family and friends, and subjects, Rachel prefers to work from e l’
objects of curiosity she has happened upon. “I love flea direct observation, saying: “I believe to p t s
markets and antique fairs,” she adds. you can only really see something ip
U s e lo
The artist has painted versions of the three implements and therefore understand it t s of p
c olour aint
in Kitchamajig over a number of years. “I thought they properly by working from life.” c arefu s and mix
lly t
complemented each other aesthetically and would make a See more of Rachel’s work at a sub t o ac hieve
le, nat
strong graphic image,” Rachel says. “I loved the dull metal www.rachelross.co.uk palet t ur al
e
coil of the whisk and the way it contrasts with the slots and
holes in the shiny metal of the other two items.”
Working in a light-flooded conservatory studio in her
home, she began the painting by outlining on a panel with LEFT Kitchamajig, acrylic on
gesso, working on birch for its smoothness and chemical birch panel, 65x55cm >

Artists & Illustrators 13


®National Trust Images / Chris Titmus

®National Trust Images / Chris Titmus

Great PulteneyGreat
StreetPulteney Street
Bath BA2 4DB Bath BA2 4DB
www.holburne.org
www.holburne.org

PRIZED
PRIZED
POSSESSIONS
POSSESSIONS
Dutch Dutch
Masterpieces
Masterpieces
from from
National
National
Trust Houses
Trust Houses

25 May to
25 May to
In partnership with:
In partnership with:
16 September
16 September

Supported by: Supported by:


Fresh Paint

Neale Worley
“Painting a child does
require a subtle
response, to the skin in
particular. It’s not like
painting an old man,”
says the Royal Society
of Portrait Painters and
New English Art Club
member. “Painting
younger skin is always
more difficult, I feel.”
For this side-on view,
the experienced portrait
artist, who has painted
many high-profile
subjects and twice toured
with the Prince of Wales,
was trying to achieve a
sensitive, tender image of
a child in thought. And he
succeeded. Ilea was
selected for the Royal
Society of Portrait
Painters exhibition, while
a second full-length view
of the same child, is on
show at the BP Portrait
Neal
Awards display. The two e’
artworks share a to p t s
contemplative and intimate mood, possibly bred of School of Arts and Crafts iP
A dear
familiarity – and love. “Ilea is my daughter,” says the before going on to train as an fr
M ac k in iend, Ian
artist, “so that is inspiration enough.” artist at the Royal Academy s adly to s h , n
pas ow
Portraits are only a part of the figurative paintings the Schools. “I don’t think the RA s aid : “ s e d away,
I f in do
artist creates. “The human form has always been of Schools gave me a different rub it ubt
interest,” says Neale. “In this painting, the blue out .”
perspective on painting,” he adds.
background was chosen to complement the blue dress “It’s looking at other painters that
she was wearing, and the flower pattern softens the inspires. You have to go where your
image echoing the curves of her profile. Blue also has a sensibilities lead you.”
melancholy significance.” For commissions contact nealeworley@hotmail.com. ABOVE Ilea, oil on linen,
The realist painter studied graphics at Camberwell See more of Neale’s work at www.nealeworley.com 30.5x25.5cm >

Artists & Illustrators 15


Fresh Paint

Carol Ann Hopper


At the end of a country garden sits a log
cabin. Inside, you’ll find Carol Ann Hopper
surrounded by art books and a dresser full of
paper and paints, listening to music. “It gives
me the peace and quiet I need to
concentrate on my painting,” she says.
The Essex-based artist uploads her
botanical art on to Artists & Illustrators’
online gallery, where art-lovers can browse
and buy her work. “Through Portfolio Plus I
have an additional way to show my paintings
to more people,” says Carol. “I have sold a
painting directly via my personal page and
enjoy looking at paintings listed by others.”
The stunning composition, realism and
delicate detail of her watercolour Bearded
Iris Chieftan caught our eye, too. But it was a
long time coming. “We bought the plant for
our garden. After a three-year wait, it
flowered. It was so beautiful I had to paint it,”
says Carol. “The sun shining through the
petals makes the flower glow and I wanted to
see if I could capture this in watercolour.”
She applied pinks and yellows around the
edges of the lower petals before building
dark colour in as few layers as possible. The
top petals’ papery texture was created by
layering transparent paints. To capture detail,
she’s indebted to her Billy Showell brushes.
“The best piece of equipment a botanical
artist can have is a brush with a good body to
hold the paint and a beautiful long point to
create fine lines,” she says.
The Society of Botanical Artists’ open
exhibitions first inspired her to take up the
genre. While teaching art at an adult
community college, Carol enrolled for the
society’s diploma. “I am now branching out
into watercolour landscapes, oil and acrylic
painting,” she adds. “Watch this space.”
www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/
carolannhopper

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sign up for your own personalised
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You can also:
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THIS IMAGE Bearded Iris Join our art community today at www.
Chieftain, watercolour artistsandillustrators.co.uk/register
on paper, 38x24cm

16 Artists & Illustrators


Be
inspired
by Cornwall
Walk in the footsteps of The Greats and let
Cornwall inspire your art. Picture starting
your day with a morning dip in the sea then
breakfast on the balcony and a coastline stroll
to find that perfect spot to paint.

Browse our beautiful collection of Cornish


holiday cottages and summer special offers at:

www.cornishhorizons.co.uk 01841 533 331

Book online for 15%


off your sumer
getaway to Cornwall
with promo code

15OFF
PAINTING
IN ST IVES
The Cornish town enjoys a double life as an
internationally famous artists’ colony. We explore
why it has attracted painters for decades

PHOTO: MARK TROMPETELER.COURTESY THE ESTATE OF PATRICK HERON 2018

PATRICK HERON
SALLY HALES visits Tate St Ives’ major new retrospective of
an artist who helped to create the town’s artistic pedigree
PRIVATE COLLECTION © ESTATE OF PATRICK HERON. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2018

t
he light streaming through Tate St Ives’ glass front
hints at the gallery’s symbiotic relationship with
place where it stands. Towering over the bay, Tate’s
regional outpost is a testament to the town’s painterly past
and present. From the 1940s to the 1960s, it attracted
and inspired the most important artists of the day. Painter
Ben Nicholson and sculptor Barbara Hepworth led the way,
moving there shortly before the outbreak of the Second ABOVE Patrick Heron
World War. When the war ended, their presence drew a in his studio at
younger generation of artists to the area. Eagles Nest c.1969
During its artistic heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, St RIGHT Interior with
Ives welcomed, or was home to, Wilhelmina Barns-Graham, Garden Window,
Sir Terry Frost, Patrick Heron and Peter Lanyon, among 1955, oil on canvas,
others. And, despite the abstract nature of much of these > 121.92x152.4cm

18 Artists & Illustrators


Artists & Illustrators 19
LEFT xxxxxx, 1xxx, xxxxx, xxxxxxxx ABOVE
xxxxxx, 1xxx, xxxxx, xxxxxxxx

artists’ work, the shapes, forms and colours of Cornwall’s Window. By the late 1950s, he was an abstract painter with ABOVE Big Complex
famously beautiful landscape and light informed their art. colour as the subject, as well as the material, of his art; it Diagonal with
The town’s artist pedigree was given a new lease of life in was his way of communicating his response to the world Emerald and Reds,
1993 when Tate St Ives opened, and a recent £20 million through an “abstract rhythm” of lines and blocks of colour 1974, oil on canvas,
extension has doubled the space available to show art. The to create pictures “saturated with the quality of things”. 208.3x335.3cm
first exhibition in its new gallery is a major retrospective of These seas of bold, flat colour in pictures such as Big
Patrick Heron. Also a prolific writer, he was a key in creating Complex Diagonal with Emerald and Reds also reveal the
the town’s reputation. He is integral to the gallery, too. At importance of mark-making. Heron would take hours to
the entrance, sunlight pours through the three-metre Heron create these expanses, working gesturally cross the canvas
window, a stained-glass work he gifted during construction. with tiny brushes in single direction. “My 15ft canvases,
Born in Leeds in 1920, Patrick Heron moved to St Ives involving 60 or more square feet of single colour, were
when he was five. In 1929, the family moved again to painted (in oil paint) from end to end with small Japanese
Welwyn Garden City. By 1945, he was in London making a watercolour brushes,” said Heron. “But one doesn’t
name for himself, moving to Cornwall in 1955 and living at hand-paint for the sake of the ‘hand-done’; one merely
Eagles Nest, Zennor, just along the coast, until his death in knows that the surfaces worked in this way can – in fact
1999. “This is a landscape that has altered my life,” he they must – register a different nuance of special evocation
© ESTATE OF PATRICK HERON. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2018

wrote. “The house in its setting is the source of all my and movement in every single square millimetre.”
painting.” The light, colour, shape and textures he found His obsession resulted in a body of work as vibrant as
there would remain his inspiration, if not his subject. the open skies and seas around St Ives. In these images
Patrick Heron ensues chronology to explore the artist’s it’s hard not to see rugged coastlines and ragged outcrops
visual language which, despite his work going through in the swirling shapes and meandering lines. While this
several distinct creative phases, remained constant. The might be a flight of fancy inspired by a sun-drenched town,
cavernous gallery means large-scale paintings – vast colour it’s certainly true that viewing these paintings in the place
studies driven by formal, compositional concerns – can sit they were created only illuminates their brilliance.
next to his earlier work. During the 1940s and 1950s, he Patrick Heron is at Tate St Ives until 30 September, before
worked figuratively – not from life but from memory – as touring to Turner Contemporary, Margate, from 19 October to
seen in 1943’s The Piano, and 1955’s Interior with Garden 6 January 2019. www.tate.org.uk; www.turnercontemporary.org

His obsession resulted in a body of work as


vibrant as the seas and skies around St Ives
20 Artists & Illustrators
M A S T ER C L A S S

PORTHMEOR
STUDIOS
The studios in St Ives
have an artistic history
that is second to none.
SALLY HALES finds out
more from manager
CHRIS HIBBERT

Can you tell me about the history


of the studios?
Porthmeor Studios was built in the
early 1800s for the pilchard-fishing
industry. The arrival of artists in the
early 1880s coincided with a decline
in the industry, so they were able to
convert the fishing lofts into studios.
The first record of this was in Studio 8
by the American artist Howard Butler
in 1886. We think this makes it the
oldest continuously occupied studio
complex in the country. The last piece
of the jigsaw was the founding of the
St Ives School of Painting in 1938.
Decades of exposure to Atlantic gales
had taken their toll on the building.
The Borlase Smart John Wells Trust
started fundraising for the renovations New Zealand-born Frances Hodgkins, Jonathan
in 2002, but it took until 2010 to raise who spent several years at Porthmeor Baldock
the £4m needed. during the First World War. and
Lubaina
What artists have worked here? What does the future hold for Himid.
Porthmeor is best known for its Porthmeor Studios?
association with the St Ives One of our key ambitions has been to Who can
Modernists. During the 1950s and develop a residency programme for get a
1960s, it hosted some of Britain’s emerging and established artists. We studio?
most influential painters, including are keen to support the next We operate an open application ABOVE The historic
Ben Nicholson, Patrick Heron, Terry generation of artists, but recognise process. We don’t have a waiting list, complex is nestled
Frost, Francis Bacon, Roger Hilton, the impact a high-profile established and encourage anyone to apply for against the beach
Peter Lanyon and Wilhelmina artist can bring. Our opportunity came each round. We advertise the short-let TOP Porthmeor
Barns-Graham. But largely forgotten is with the Arts Council Catalyst studios twice a year and the long-lets studios are
the first wave of artists who came, programme and the backing of donors when they become available. drenched with light
including several internationally including The Wilhelmina Barns- Selection is based on quality of work,
significant painters, with Julius Graham Trust, the Porthmeor Fund evidence of a serious approach, a
Olsson’s School of Landscape and and the John S Cohen Foundation. proven commitment to development
Marine Painting in Studio 5 attracting This three-year programme has and a commitment to live in Cornwall
PAUL MASSEY

students from all over the world. The already supported exciting during the tenancy.
best known of these earlier painters is residencies, and we will be welcoming www.bsjwtrust.co.uk >
JOHN PIPER
JOHN PIPER Patrick Heron and came out thinking:
“Right, that’s what I want to do for the
used to be a piggery. I used to go out
with a canvas on the cliffs, in a field or
NATALIE MILNER asks the oil painter how rest of my life.” I started drawing and in the moorland, but it was too
painting. I used to visit painters who awkward because it’s windy here. Now
and why he paints the Cornish landscape
were at the Penwith Gallery. I didn’t I go out with small sketchbooks or bits
have formal art training so I learned by of paper and an ink pen, and do
What attracted you to the landscape watching artists – going to studios and drawings and sketches when I’m
of Penwith and St Ives? looking at their paintings. I was lucky. walking. Then I come back and
It’s not pretty. It’s been scoured by everything is done in the studio.
wind and rain, and also man, but I like How do you mimic the rugged
the starkness of it. It’s a basic landscape in your artworks? You were chairman of the Penwith
landscape: fields, ancient hedgerows, I don’t want the surface to be pristine. Society of Arts for two years. How did
the odd Blackthorn tree, granite I start by putting on a paint layer with it influence your practice?
boulders, granite cliffs. I like paintings a palette knife and wait for it to dry. The longer I was chairman, the less
that are unfussy. I’ve learned that we Then I scratch bits off, put on more I was painting. The organisation was
need to have space, and you don’t paint and keep building layer-upon- demanding. I think we’re all individual
need a lot going on in a painting. layer, using heavy-duty sandpaper to artists and very different in the way
rub until I’ve got a surface I’m happy we paint or sculpt. I don’t see myself
When did you decide you wanted to with. Then I start the painting. as part of a collective.
ABOVE Far Away be an artist? John Piper’s solo exhibition is showing
Farm, oil on I went to Penwith Gallery, St Ives, as What’s your studio like? at the Penwith Gallery, St Ives, until
canvas, 90x90cm a 17 year old and saw a painting by I work in a small granite barn that 21 July. www.penwithgallery.com

22 Artists & Illustrators


ALICE
MUMFORD
SALLY HALES asks the painter
and tutor what role the town
plays in her creative process

How long have you been painting


in St Ives?
It came about as a result of teaching
at St Ives School of Painting. I have
been teaching there for 20 years. All
of my painting there is done as

ALICE MUMFORD
demonstrations.

When did you start painting?


The strange thing is I was more able
to work when I had young children Gallery in Portscatho with Chris Insoll, Cadmium and Alizarin; two earths, ABOVE The Captain’s
than at art school in Camberwell. I lost and at home at Polgrean Farm, which Raw and Burnt Sienna; and two blues, Chair, Portscatho,
my nerve. Having children gave me is halfway between St Ives and Cobalt and Ultramarine. Black is the oil on canvas,
limited and structured time. Once I got Penzance. Each place has a rhythm. warmest colour in the palette. I make 61x71cm
going again, I committed myself to an violets and oranges: they add subtle
exhibition with my mother, who is also Colour and light are important to your tertiaries. My palette is chosen
a painter. This gave me a goal. work. How do you find a palette? because I’m interested in the shadows
My mother suggested an excellent you get when halfway between looking
Where do you like to paint in St Ives? rule of thumb: have two yellows, say into the sun and with it on your back.
At the school of painting, at the New Lemon and Cadmium; two reds, www.alicemumford.com

HOW I
MADE…
ST IVES, ROOFTOPS, 2017

MIKE BERNARD reveals the process


behind his mixed-media interpretation
of the town’s iconic bay to SALLY HALES

A Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colour


member, the award-winning artist was born in
Kent and now lives in Devon, but he’s drawn to
the rugged coast of Cornwall as a subject. Mike
has developed a unique mixed-media technique,
which combines collage and paint to represent
architectural elements within landscapes.
Coastal scenes, with bobbing boats and
expanses of coast, make an attractive subject.
And they don’t come better than St Ives.
He painted St Ives, Rooftops, last year, on watercolour paper and mountboard, fixing layers with ABOVE St Ives
sketching on location in the streets high above the bay. He acrylic medium. Although the image looks busy, Mike Rooftops, mixed
takes a simple approach in situ, drawing with pencil and points out his paintings develop from two colours. Detail media and acrylic,
paper to get a feel of the scene. The finished work is suggested with Liquitex acrylics and oil pastels to stop 35x57cm
“emerges out of chaos” back in the studio. “I enjoy the the work becoming over-representational and allowing the
way textures, shapes, colour and ‘happy accidents’ steer viewer to bring their own experiences to bear: a dab of
the direction of my paintings,” says Mike. The rooftops yellow and turquoise could be a surfer or sunbather.
MIKE BERNARD

that identify the town were worked on first. The artist Mike’s book Collage, Colour and Texture in Painting is
started with big, abstract elements, collaging newspaper published by Batsford, £14.99. www.mikebernardri.com >

Artists & Illustrators 23


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24 Artists & Illustrators


M A S T ER C L A S S

AN ARTIST’S
GUIDE TO ST IVES
WHERE TO LEARN exhibition, explore the new permanent
St Ives School of Painting, display Modern Art and St Ives.
Porthmeor Studios www.tate.org.uk

ST IVES SCHOOL OF PAINTING


Head to this established painting
school between 20 and 22 August Barbara Hepworth Museum and
and be faced with a choice of two Sculpture Garden, Barnoon Hill
courses: Patrick Heron’s Gardens: Run by Tate St Ives and a short walk
Form, Colour and Composition and from the main site, the garden offers
Abstract Colour in St Ives. Fans of remarkable insight into the work of
Barbara Hepworth and Wilhelmina this important 20th-century artist.
Barns-Graham should try Female www.tate.org.uk
Pioneers: Inspired by Nature, from
13 to 16 August, to explore the form Porthminster Gallery, Westcott’s Quay
and beauty of the landscape and Now in its 11th year, this gallery’s
coastline, which inspired both artists. annual exhibition, St Ives Summer
www.schoolofpainting.co.uk Show: Nine Artists, runs until

COURTESY OF THE PORTHMINSTER GALLERY © JANE ASKEY 2018


1 September, and shows the best
Barnoon Workshop Arts Space, new art inspired by St Ives and
Clodgy View Cornwall, including Jane Askey (right).
Create an abstract piece inspired www.porthminstergallery.co.uk
by St Ives artists on 9 August.
www.barnoonworkshop.co.uk Belgrave St Ives, 22 Fore Street
Contemporary and Modern artists
WHAT TO DO associated with the gallery are on
St Ives September Festival 2018, show as part of its Summer
various locations Exhibition, from 16 July to 6 August.
The town comes alive for this mixed www.belgravestives.co.uk
arts festival, which includes extent of this Modern master’s sense
exhibitions, workshops, open studios Penwith Gallery, of scale, colour and composition.
and more, from 8 to 22 September. Back Road West Published by Tate, £19.99.
www.stivesseptemberfestival.co.uk See John Piper’s third solo show www.shop.tate.org.uk
at the gallery until 21 July.
WHERE TO STAY www.penwithgallery.com St Ives: The Art and the Artists,
Headland House, Headland Road by Chris Stephens
This award-winning hotel offers FIND OUT MORE This new book explores the town’s
sweeping views of St Ives Bay, Patrick Heron, edited position in the history of Modernist
which are sure to inspire. by Andrew Wilson and ABOVE Students art from the 1930s through to the
www.headlandhousehotel.co.uk Sara Matson at work TOP Jane 1960s, and on to the opening of
This lavishly illustrated publication Askey, Smeaton’s Tate St Ives in 1993. Published on
WHERE TO SEE ART shows the full evolution of Heron’s Pier from Above, 27 September by Pavilion in
Tate St Ives, Porthmeor Beach vibrant abstract language, and offers mixed media on conjunction with Tate, £26.
As well as the current Patrick Heron a unique opportunity to explore the paper, 53x53cm www.pavilionbooks.com

PAINT LIKE A LOCAL


ALISON tutors. To get a bit of wildness, harbourside. If you need shelter Tate St Ives and also an array
SHARKEY they often go to a spot locals from the elements there is the of small galleries. The Penwith
The director of call Man’s Head. It has a restored Smeaton’s Pier to Gallery, tucked away down the
St Ives School panoramic view back over huddle under, while sketching road from Porthmeor Studios,
of Painting the bay looking towards The Godrevy Lighthouse. includes three galleries and
Island over Porthmeor Beach. sculpture area. An array of
offers advice
You often see dolphins WHERE TO SEE ART progressive artists including
BEST PLACES TO PAINT breaching the water there and It makes such a difference to Barbara Hepworth and Ben
The town and coast path circling the rocks. students to get up close to an Nicholson founded the Penwith
around St Ives are a rich Our tutors also love to take original canvas compared to Society in 1949.
resource of inspiration for our students down to the iconic seeing it in a book. There is www.schoolofpainting.co.uk
Artist
LAURA BOSWELL on the art of defusing negative comments about your artwork

a
s I write this I am preparing
to meet the public at my
Open Studios show. I do
this every year and enjoy putting on
my exhibition and demonstrating
printmaking. Most people are lovely
and supportive. But I have also had
to learn about those awkward
moments every artist encounters
when strangers get to have a say
and are less than complimentary.
I approach any encounter with an
unknown audience as a kind of
theatre. Remembering that I’m
playing the part of the artist stops
things becoming personal. I find it a
great stress buster. I’m still myself,
but the professional version. In my
role, awkward or difficult moments
are easier to deal with and don’t
get under my skin. It is inevitable
there will be people who don’t like
your work, medium or just enjoy
confrontation. I find the best way to
deal with negative comments is to
take a moment to hear what is
being said before reacting. Genuine
criticism based on observation is
respectful and often sparks an
enjoyable conversation. A
throwaway tactless comment is
exactly that: throwaway. Try to
never take it to heart. I smile, say
nothing and let the speaker move
on or have another go at engaging with me.
Very rarely, I get somebody determined to get a rise. I try not to
take the bait. Instead, I become polite and a bit dim. Simply smiling
and asking to have the offending comment repeated or explained is
a powerful way of taking control and defusing the situation if you feel
Genuine unfairly provoked. Laughing your way out of a negative situation with

criticism based a gentle tease is often the best way. Recently I was demonstrating to
a man who had come in to the gallery to get out of the rain. “Hmm,”
on observation he said. “Printmaking, well that’s not really art is it?” I smiled and
asked him if he liked football. Thankfully, he replied, “No, I watch the
can spark an cricket,” thus leaving me able to say, “Hmm, cricket, well that’s not
really sport is it?” After a mutual laugh, he stayed to watch and chat,
enjoyable chat ABOVE Mountain and left with a much better view of printmaking. But I’m still not sure
Sunset, linocut, about cricket.
35x34cm www.lauraboswell.co.uk

26 Artists & Illustrators


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Artists & Illustrators 27


IN THE STUDIO

Kurt
Jackson
One of Britain’s leading painters
reveals how nature and art meet
at his coastal hideout. Interview:
NATALIE MILNER. Photos: ANYA RICE

Where is your studio?


It’s at the water’s edge on Cape
Cornwall, in the far west of Cornwall.

Why did you choose the location


and how long have you been here?
I have been using it for many years.
This studio acts as a shelter from SEA LIFE
the worst weather. It is damp and The artist has
full of rats and birds, so nothing is painted a
stored there. At high tide the waves series based
enter the studio. on local birds

Can you tell us about your


painting process?
I avoid process. I aim for freshness
and new approaches whenever
possible. I try new combinations,
additions, subtractions, from very
small to very large.

What medium do you prefer to


paint in and why?
I am definitely a polymath. I paint,
draw, print, sculpt and write. My
paintings tend to be mixed-media
works, featuring a diverse range pipits and choughs. Naturally, I all out, some are all in. But
of media and collage on canvas, started looking at them, and everything I do references
paper or board. drawing and painting as I see them the outside experience.
in the cove and out at sea. Some of
Your new series Seacrows is the paintings are then worked up You’ve travelled extensively,
inspired by the birds that live next in another studio. including to the Arctic and
to your coastal studio. Why did you Africa, painting all the time.
want to paint them? How do you balance plein-air How did these journeys influence
Often the only company I have in the painting with studio work? your practice?
winter months in the cove are the Some artworks start inside and go Travel helped me find my own voice.
seabirds – the shags, cormorants, outside and vice versa; some are I decided what I wanted to do and

28 Artists & Illustrators


CLOSE TO Often the only company I
NATURE
The small hut
have in the winter months
even floods
at high tide
are the seabirds. I started
drawing and painting them

what I wanted to avoid. It showed


me that I only wanted to paint
‘places’ I know, and/or get to know.
My work reflects my politics,
concerns, interests and ethics.

What’s coming up next for you?


I produced a body of work from a
residency with the Woodland Trust
last year, which is now on show at
Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The
touring exhibition Revisiting Turner’s
Tourism [Kurt walked in the
footsteps of JMW Turner to visit the
locations of his iconic images and
produced work], first shown at the
Royal Albert Memorial Museum in
Exeter, is now on display at the
Jackson Foundation.
See Kurt’s paintings in Common
Ground at Yorkshire Sculpture Park,
Wakefield, until 2 September.
Revisiting Turner’s Tourism
runs until 18 August at the
Jackson Foundation, St Just,
Cornwall. www.ysp.org.uk;
www.kurtjacksoneditions.
com; www.jackson
foundationgallery.com
T HE WI N N E R S
BOOK ILLUSTRATION AWARD
AND ILLUSTRATOR OF THE YEAR 2018:

JOHN VERNON LORD


NATALIE MILNER chats to the veteran illustrator to find out
how he arrived at his delicate, intricate style

t
o say this illustrator is dedicated to the texts he The book’s pen-and-ink drawings mirror Ulysses’
interprets would be an understatement. He intricacies. But the roots of John’s style lie not in the literary,
spent a year unpicking James Joyce’s notoriously but rather the deprivations of wartime Britain. On rainy days
challenging Ulysses before he began illustrating as a boy, his grandmother would set him drawing challenges.
the new Folio Society edition. But it paid off. This “If I left a sky empty she’d say ‘put in clouds or aeroplanes or
spring, the work saw him win the illustrated book category at the sun,’” he says. “She didn’t like anything blank. It was
BELOW John’s the V&A Illustration Awards, and the title of Moira Gemmill wartime and the scarcity of paper was quite profound.”
sketchbook of Illustrator of the Year 2018. He rightly made a firm fan of Now in his late 70s, the former lecturer at the University of
doodles RIGHT awards judge and comedian Frank Skinner, who championed Brighton shows no signs of slowing down. A new solo show
Nausicaa, his extraordinarily detailed illustrations, admitting in his John Vernon Lord: Illustrating Carroll and Joyce at London’s
pen and ink, prize-giving speech that he’d become “obsessed” with House of Illustration reveals an artist who is still at the top of
watercolour the work. He was joined on the judging panel by Artists his field. On display are his magical illustrations from Alice’s
and collage, & Illustrators editor Sally Hales and director of the V&A Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass and
25x16cm, from Dr Tristram Hunt, who both admired John’s commitment What Alice Found There, and Finnegans Wake, alongside a
Ulysses, 2017 to illuminating a classic that drips with literary illusions. selection of his ‘diaries’. He’s been doodling in them since the
1960s. These mini-sketchbooks, packed with tiny scribblings,
ideas and silly pictures – created in meetings during his
teaching days – form his back catalogue. With a penchant for
the ridiculous and surreal, an anagram, palindrome or riddle
can set him off. “I’m very anally retentive,” he laughs.
“Nonsense has always appealed to me, so I’ve done a lot of
Lewis Carroll. I suppose it’s the fantasy element. My picture
books are nonsensical.”
At 17 John went to study at Salford School of Art – where
he met Denie, his wife of 56 years – then moved on to
London’s Central School of Arts and Design, where influential
tutors, including illustrator John Burningham and author
Mervyn Peake, help to pave his way, introducing him to
JOHN VERNON LORD/HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION

commercial illustration and teaching at what was then


Brighton College of Art. Commissions kept him busy for the
next seven years. It wasn’t until he met American novelist and
academic Janet Burroway at a party that his first children’s
book, The Truck on the Track, was born.
It was a collaboration that set in motion a 20-year
relationship with publisher Jonathan Cape, and resulted in his
children’s classic The Giant Jam Sandwich. His father, a >

30 Artists & Illustrators


JOHN VERNON LORD/FOLIO SOCIETY

Artists & Illustrators 31


LEFT Work baker, inspired the story with his habit of placing a jam-
from Alice’s smothered crusts away from their picnics to tempt wasps.
Adventure in “You can see his old shop at the end of the book,” says John.
Wonderland Such personal memories and visual references are vital to
BELOW his process. “My version of Aesop’s Fables is set in my home
Ilustrations village,” he says. “One day a man took an aerial photograph
from The of our house. I bought it and worked from that for another
Giant Jam angle.” Starting with a loose pencil sketch, John moves to pen
Sandwich and ink, before colouring in a mixture of crayon and Ecoline
watercolours. “I love drawing in pen and ink,” he says. “I use a
mixture of thin Rotring Isographs, Profipen and Edding 1800
pens, dipping pens, mapping pens, fountain pens and biros.”
But, when it comes to a novel as complex as Ulysses, pen
doesn’t hit paper before he knows what to draw. John was
aware of the long line of illustrators who had gone before him,
in particular Matisse’s 1935 edition of the book. James Joyce
had been keen to show the great artist images of Dublin at
the turn of the 20th century. “I read that and I thought, ‘Joyce
wanted Dublin in it,’” he says. So he headed to the city to
walk in the protagonist’s footsteps, sketching and
photographing as he went.
JOHN VERNON LORD/HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION, PUBLISHED BY ARTISTS’ CHOICE EDITIONS

John then weaved a tapestry of imagery, blending Dublin


with hints of Homer’s Odyssey and Greek mythology
alongside the symbols and colours that Joyce attributed to
each ‘episode’. His art materials were equally wide-ranging,
with traditional collage and pen and ink used alongside
edited photography, rubber stamps and monoprints. “The last
illustration is a photograph. It’s a coming back to reality; a
coming home,” he says. “I printed two photographs on thin
paper and fiddled about with them in a lightbox so you could
hardly tell which was a face and which was the water.”
When asked about his next project, John doesn’t give much
away. “It’s a graphic novel, possibly, it may not be. It’s very
ridiculous,” he laughs. “I’ve not written a story and I don’t
know where it’s going.” With this he reveals an inner child that
still longs to fill pages with fantastical nonsense. This desire,
married to his technical brilliance and scholarly insight, is
JOHN VERNON LORD/JONATHAN CAPE

sure to keep the extraordinary illustrations flowing.

John weaved a tapestry of John Vernon Lord: Illustrating Carroll and Joyce is at the House
of Ilustration, London N1, until 4 November. Ulysses by James
imagery, blending Dublin Joyce, illustrated by John Vernon Lord, is published by the Folio
Society, £125. www.houseofillustration.org.uk; www.foliosociety.
with hints of mythology com; www.vam.ac.uk; www.johnvernonlord.blogspot.com

32 Artists & Illustrators


M A S T ER C L A S S

EDITORIAL ILLUSTRATION AWARD

CAT O’NEIL
SALLY HALES asks the illustrator how she made
a complex idea come alive in her winning work RSA Benefits

How did you become an illustrator? organic or has an organic element, so I have Recently I’ve been laying down flat panels
I went to art school at Edinburgh College of a library of textures that I have collected, of colour, removing lines and focusing on how
Art to do a four-year illustration degree. I which I layer in. they work together, sorting out line work at
benefited from the training, mostly because the end. I like bright colours. My palette
it challenged my preconceived notions of What techniques and tools do you use? used to be muted but it has become more
what constitutes a good image. Everything starts with pencil line and then saturated as I’ve progressed. My approach
I ink over the top. If I’m doing observational is more conceptual than narrative-orientated,
The winning work encapsulates a complex drawing, I usually draw directly in ink, which which is probably why I get so much editorial
idea. Can you explain your process? is a different mindset. I like the Pentel brush work rather than publishing.
I analyse the text to find the important ideas, pens but, if I have more time for a project, I
focus and tone of the piece. My work relies also like to use Winsor & Newton Indian ink What would be your dream project?
heavily on visual metaphor. I write things that with brushes. This is more unpredictable, but I love working with The New York Times,
come into my head, then I follow each path to you get a wider range of marks. which is regarded as one of the most
see if it leads anywhere interesting. Once I prestigious editorial illustration clients in the
have a few concepts I like, I start drawing What are the challenges for creating a world. The art direction is brilliant.
thumbnail sketches. For one illustration, I’ll strong editorial illustration? www.catoneil.com >
try six to ten thumbnails, and then pick three I think the concept is the most challenging
and draw them as roughs. thing, but I say this having trained for at least
With RSA Benefits (above), I wanted to 11 years. I can rely on my technical skills, but MORE WINNERS...
convey the struggle of the families in the coming up with a clever idea requires more STUDENT ILLUSTRATOR OF THE YEAR
article. It showed a family running across a concentration. The challenge is to take 2018 Joseph Namara Hollis,
calendar but, as they approached the fifth of something that is not necessarily visual or Anglia Ruskin University
the month, when the next benefit instalment easy to understand, and make it visually STUDENT RUNNER-UP Fay Troote,
would be paid, they start sinking. I draw the accessible. I love that aspect of the job. Arts University Bournemouth
finals in ink with Pentel brush pens, mapping HIGHLY COMMENDED Alva Skog, Central
nibs or very fine watercolour brushes. Then I How would you define your illustration style? Saint Martins (University of the Arts);
scan the drawings and colour them digitally My work relies on line work; that’s the Emily Hill, Royal Drawing School; Sinae
using Photoshop CC and a Cintiq, which is a skeleton. If it works as a black-and-white line Park, Norwich University of the Arts
graphics tablet. It’s important the work looks drawing, I know I can make it work in colour.

Artists & Illustrators 33


M A S T ER C L A S S

BOOK COVER DESIGN AWARD

SUZANNE DEAN
Her design for Maggie Nelson’s Bluets wowed the judges.
She tells SALLY HALES how the concept developed

How did you become a book designer? quotes Roland Barthes. I investigated a pigment. How do you reflect the potency of
When I graduated from Kingston University series of approaches to the design but blue on the page? How can you step closer to
I worked for a design firm that specialised in settled on something abstract and evocative. the vibrancy of the original pigment?
food packaging. It was time to move on when I experimented with abstracted shapes and
I was told my Klimt-inspired design for marks that evoked the beauty and intensity How was the book cover created?
yoghurt was too exciting and unconventional. of the book. After a series of iterations, I I made much of the image by painting ink and
I was asked out of the blue if I might be found forms that felt vivid and expressive. pigment on paper. I scanned my paintings in,
interested in applying for a job designing and manipulated and intensified them using
book covers at Penguin. I had always been a How did you set about exploring the Photoshop until the blue became almost
reader and immediately loved it. Each job is possibilities of working with just one colour? iridescent, sharp and electric. It was then
unique. I stayed at Penguin for three years, At one stage I toyed with versions that used I knew I had a book cover that felt it was
and then moved to Picador before being blue in a minimal way, but it became working. It was lovely when Maggie Nelson
offered an art director role at Random House. apparent I could only deal with its intensities approved, saying: “First cover ever that
solely using blue. I visited L. Cornelissen & I loved on the first try!”
How do you go about representing a book Son, the wonderful art shop near the British
as unique as Bluets? Museum. The shelves are What are you working
It seemed a daunting prospect because it is lined with jars of pigment on now?
such an intense and varied work. It is – wonderful blues of high I’m creating a cover based
part-essay, part-poetry; a meditation on intensity. I decided to try to on circle motifs for the
desire and suffering seen through a blue retain this vibrancy and new novel by Haruki
lens. It tells of new love and heartbreak, and luminescence. I found the Murakami, Killing
the author’s life-long obsession with the pigment and pastels dulled Commendatore. And I’m
colour blue. The ideas are presented in short when photographed, and I excited by a non-fiction
paragraphs, which wind their way through pondered whether blue paint book called The Optic
famous blue figures such as Yves Klein, would be more immediate Nerve by Maria Gainza.
Leonard Cohen and Billie Holiday. It even than a photograph of www.suzannedean.co.uk
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10 MINUTES WITH…

Mary Jane
Ansell
The figurative artist tells NATALIE MILNER why she loves to create
haunting pictorial narratives in her paintings. Photos: MARK MCNULTY

When did you know you wanted to be an artist? What personal painting projects are you working on?
I bought my first set of oils at 14. I was so desperate for I work on two or three commissions through the year and
an easel, I made a table-top contraption from some wood the rest of the time I’m working on 15 or more paintings for
I found in my dad’s shed. I’ve learned through trial and an exhibition. A small group of models carry out a number
error, picking up whatever I could from galleries, books and of sittings, ahead of which I make lots of thumbnail
magazines such as Artists & Illustrators. I’ve always been sketches to get an idea of how they will pose. When I’ve got
a people-watcher and love to try to capture that ineffable the props, costumes and lighting right, I’ll take hundreds of
thing that is the person. I did an honours degree in photographs. I’ll look at these over several weeks, making
illustration at Brighton University because I love to explore drawings and studies of the ones I’m back to, until I know
narrative and wanted the challenge of different mediums which ones I want to develop into paintings.
and projects, as well as access to world-class practising
artists and a life model. What artists inspire you and why?
Musicians, writers or artists who have stuck with it and
Tell us about found their own unique vision. Right now Aleah Chapin,
your painting Margaret Bowland, Bo Bartlett, Andrew Tift, Philip Harris,
process. Mitch Griffiths, Susannah Martin and Lee Price are all
I paint directly, doing incredible work.
almost alla
prima in parts, What are your top tips for portrait painting?
with Old Find out what it is about your work that is absolutely yours
Holland, and hold on to it no matter what. Be your own harshest
Gamblin, critic and the person you most try to impress. Strive to
M Graham learn and improve your work constantly. If something’s not
and Michael working, find someone that’s doing it the way you want to
Harding paints, and ask them. Work every day and challenge yourself with
and Rosemary deliberate practice. The 100 faces challenge on Instagram
& Co brushes. is a great place to start. Simplify your process, set goals
I prime an and benchmarks, and be utterly tenacious; the successful
aluminium painters have just been doing it longer and harder. Take
composite your work seriously but don’t forget to revel in how
panel with a wonderful the whole process is.
tinted acrylic
ground and Has your move to Snowdonia affected your practice?
ABOVE Shadow of The Seventh, oil on sand until it’s Partly, we moved to be closer to my dad after my mum
aluminium panel, 81x81cm perfectly died, but also to have total tranquility and a big, bright
smooth. studio. I’ve made a wall-mounted easel that’s great for
Starting with a simple drawing, I map out the image, then drawing out paintings or large-scale drawings. Nature is
go in with a fairly limited palette, building colour layers. seeping into my work, not least in my recent series with
birds, butterflies and bones.
How did your painting in the permanent collection of the
National Portrait Gallery come about? What’s next for you?
My work came to the attention of the directors of the I’m busy in the studio working towards a two-person show
National Portrait Gallery through the BP Portrait Awards. I at RJD Gallery in New York, and group shows at Arcadia
was invited to paint Easyjet founder Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou Contemporary in LA and Modern Eden gallery in San
in 2015 as part of their ongoing remit to include noteworthy Francisco. They all open in August.
British citizens in the national collection. www.maryjaneansell.com

36 Artists & Illustrators


I’m a people-watcher
and love to capture
that ineffable thing
that is the person
2
UP
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38 Artists & Illustrators


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40 Artists & Illustrators
H A R RY H A M B L I N G

second
nature Self-taught painter
HARRY HAMBLING
followed his famous
daughter into art.
Here, ANDREW
LAMBIRTH explores
how his creativity
blossomed later in life

i
first met Harry Hambling in 1990,
when he was 88 and had been
painting for more than 20 years.
Although he was a natural when it
came to putting on paint, Harry hadn’t
picked up a brush until he had retired from
his day job, as chief cashier in Barclays
Bank, Hadleigh, a handsome Suffolk village
not far from Gainsborough’s birthplace,
Sudbury. He retired when he was 60, which
is when his youngest daughter Maggi gave
him a set of paints, but it took him a
further five years to try them out. However,
when he did start painting in 1967, there
was no stopping him. Harry enjoyed a
30-year career as an artist and sold nearly
everything he produced.
His great passions were amateur
dramatics, his garden and local football. It
was through AmDram that he met his wife
Marjorie. They married in 1933, and had
PRIVATE COLLECTION

three children: Ann, Roger and Maggi.


The latter was to be the other artist of the
family and now holds a CBE for her
services to British painting. She knew she
Although the results were was a painter from her schooldays, a calling confirmed in her
when she met Cedric Morris and Lett Haines at their private
often lyrical, his approach art school in Hadleigh. They lived in Benton End, known
locally as the Artists’ House, and considered a den of iniquity
to painting was practical by parents. Marjorie Hambling viewed it with distrust (when
Maggi returned late from her first visit there her mother had
begun to fear her youngest daughter had been sold into the
white slave trade), but Harry was intrigued. Cedric and Lett’s
LEFT Portrait of Maggi, 1968, life-partnership was openly homosexual, whereas Harry’s
PRIVATE COLLECTION

oil on board, 41x32cm ABOVE inclinations in that direction were much more circumspect,
Chrysanthemums with Oil Cloth, and restricted to various gentlemen friends who helped with
1991, oil on board, 64x50cm the gardening. >

Artists & Illustrators 41


XXXXXX

RIGHT Xxxxxxx, Xxxxxx,


xxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx

He painted on hardboard prepared for him


by Maggi, who encouraged his use of colour
Harry, who was born in Snape, that famous part of coastal solid horizontal wall of mist, hovering just above ground level.
Suffolk long associated with Benjamin Britten, was a true I remember with shame how in disbelief I mocked father’s
East Anglian, who loved the big skies over the low-lying truthful rendition of this phenomenon.’’
landscape, punctuated here and there with leafless trees in Harry was a pictorial designer of remarkable sophistication,
winter. He liked derelict buildings for a similar structural balancing form and colour with skill, clarity and considerable
reason. Although the results were often lyrical, his approach boldness. He remarked: “My own view is the composition is
to painting was practical. For instance, when he wanted to the most important part; you get the composition right and
paint grass, he would turn the picture upside down to paint the rest should follow.” He also admitted adapting nature for
grass stems tapering to a point, and when he painted a still the sake of the picture, said he found painting “bloody
life of two herrings on a plate he took the fish he was about to frustrating most of the time”, and wouldn’t start unless he
cook for supper and traced round it in two different positions. really wanted to paint a subject. Portraits, still life, landscape
He usually painted on hardboard prepared for him by – these were his themes and he brought something new and
Maggi, who encouraged his use of colour. Although he used individual to these age-old genres. His 1968 portrait of Maggi
brushes very effectively, a flaming sunset or thunderhead of has poetic delicacy and presence; Chrysanthemums with Oil
cloud would be rubbed in with thumb or finger. His experience Cloth (1991) is a clever rendition of interior and exterior
as a countryman informed everything he painted. When, for space; while Shadow on a Rape Field (1990) demonstrates ABOVE Shadow
instance, he painted Haystack in Rising Mist (1992), his his brilliance as a designer of images. As Maggi writes: “Our on a Rape
PRIVATE COLLECTION

youngest daughter doubted the image. Looking back she jaded eyes are jolted into action by the purity of his vision.” Field, 1990,
writes in a handsome new book about her father: “Now, A Suffolk Eye: Harry Hambling by Jamie Gilham, £20, is published oil on board,
standing by a Suffolk water meadow I witness the reality of a by Lux Books. www.harryhambling.com 43x53.25cm

42 Artists & Illustrators


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Artists & Illustrators 43


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44 Artists & Illustrators


sketchbook

August TIPS • ADVICE • IDEAS

HOW TO USE
GRANULATING COLOURS
HAZEL SOAN on working
with the sedimentary quality
of watercolour pigments

ABOVE Vacation,
Granulation is a sedimentary quality belonging to some as to how a particular colour might behave from the watercolour,
inorganic pigments. Earth pigments such as Raw Sienna information in its name and on the label. For example, 56x76cm
and the umbers have this attribute, as do the heavier the name of Cobalt Turquoise tells you the blue pigment The granulating
metal pigments such as Cobalt and Cadmium. It is used is made from the metal cobalt, so you could guess it to property of Raw
to good effect in watercolour painting, where the be semi-opaque, granulating/sedimentary, lifting and of Sienna, Cadmium
pigment settles in a mottled fashion in the tooth of the low tinting strength. So it probably isn’t a suitable green Red and Cobalt Blue
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Artists & Illustrators 45


sketchbook

BEQUEST OF MISS ADELAIDE MILTON DE GROOT (1876–1967), 1967/METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART NEW YORK
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TRAVELS WITH To p t i p
MY SKETCHBOOK Don’t b
over the
e afraid
join in a
to paint
sketchb bound
In his f inal column, G R AHAM E B O OTH rustles up a quick harb ourside scene ook. It d
the size oubles
of pape
Waiting for the ferry at Saint-Tropez I wondered if I had drawing what is an abstract shape, rather than many availab r
le to yo
time for a watercolour but, to be honest, I couldn’t be separate, familiar shapes that we understand. Our u
bothered unpacking my equipment. To avoid guilt, I brains are not good at recognising the difference in size
thought a quick sketch would salve my conscience. between close and distant buildings, but can manage the
Hinting at the complexity, rather than drawing undulations of a roofline much better. I used Noodler’s Ink
everything, allowed me to complete the sketch with a few with my fountain pen and followed it with a simple wash.
minutes to spare. When faced with so much detail, I begin In a pen and wash, the drawing forms the structure, so be
by drawing the contour of where the buildings meet the free with the wash to avoid a stiff look. I hope you have
sky. This should be a continuous line, ignoring that they enjoyed accompanying me on my travels. There are few ABOVE Saint-
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interconnected group. The added advantage is that the captured in a well-thumbed sketchbook. waterproof ink and
drawing is likely to be more accurate because I am www.grahamebooth.com wash, 42x15cm

46 Artists & Illustrators


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Artists & Illustrators 47


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sketchbook

E d i t o r’ s
Pi c k
Ar t work of
the Month
SKETCH ON LOCATION
Landscap e ar tist R I C HARD H O LL AN D of f er s
his advice f or get ting great source material

1 Travel light enough paints to Sienna on at home.


I have simplified my kit achieve what you want On location, build the
to a micro-tripod and and sort them out darker midtone layers
a video case or two – before you leave. thinly. Add highlights
which carry paints in with neat paint. ABOVE Shady Place, watercolour, 55x43cm
– with disposable 3 Go straight
in with a brush 5 Touch up
HOW I MADE…
palettes, a couple of
brushes, a jam-jar of Never sketch out with highlights
turps and kitchen a pencil. A brush is The paint tends to
paper. I have made a more instant, and you sink in when working June’s winner K ARO LYN BAKE R
rig that attaches to can correct with a on MDF, so it can be M O RT on her painting process
the easel, so I am cloth as you go. I tend touched up with Jeska (the cat) was relaxing in our garden when
hands free. I carry to use flats and highlights at home I took the photo I worked from to paint Shady
MDF board in an A4 filberts but a round before using it to Place. I didn’t copy it exactly. I used my
document holder. All brush for sketching. create a larger studio imagination. For the fur, I painted a very light
this, and a folding painting. wash of all the colours and built them, working in
seat, fits in a day bag. 4 Build A sketch Paint with Richard on the direction of her fur. I exaggerated the lights to
Try to build as much his outdoor workshops create atmosphere, using masking fluid on the
2 Get your as you would for a in Glossop, Derbyshire. leaves. The light on the fine hairs in her ear and
paints sorted finished work. I put a See www.richardholland whiskers were painted with gouache and a
Make sure you have base layer of Raw landscapeartist.co.uk fine-pointed brush. I use synthetic brushes. The
shorter the fur, the smaller the brush I used, and
vice versa. Being patient and not sticking to the
Product of the rules frees me up to experiment.
Month: Staedtler www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/karolyn-mort

pigment liners
The p opular p en now
comes in six colour s how to get your work selected
Staedtler’s 308 fineliner in black is a •Each month, we select seven Portfolio Plus
favourite with many sketchers for its artworks on a theme to feature in our Editor’s
dense, indelible ink and lightfast line. Pick email, which is sent to more than 50,000
Now the range has been extended to people. Our favourite wins a £50 art materials
include six colours – red, blue, voucher from Pegasus Art.
orange, green, violet and brown – in •Our next theme is wildlife. Portfolio Plus
a choice of 0.3mm and 0.5mm. The members can submit artwork online at www.
waterproof ink means it can be artistsandillustrators.co.uk/submit-editors-
coloured over without bleeding – pick before 11.59pm on 25 July.
ideal for adding colour highlights •Not a member? Sign up to Portfolio Plus for
and line work to watercolours. just £2.49 a month to share, showcase and
www.staedtler.com sell your art from a dedicated webpage.
www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/register

Artists & Illustrators 49


OF
LANDSCAPE
PAINTING Explore everything you need to know about this principal
subject of art with NORFOLK PAINTING SCHOOL tutors

A D
TMOSPHERIC IVINE watercolour. Easy to transport and
PERSPECTIVE PROPORTION fast-drying, you won’t get luscious
Create the illusion of Landscapes can be hard colours or lively taches, but it’s easy to
depth by decreasing to compose. Simply use mix with dry media on paper.

F
contrast or range in the “distance”, the rule of thirds – or “divine
which is also known as recession. proportion” – and place the focal area OCAL POINT
This is typically achieved by bluing about a third of the way into your Landscapes are complex
down. You’ll need three changes: picture. All the masters did it. The best with lots of potential focal
for the foreground, midground and ones learned when not to, as well. points. Cut through confusion

E
background. But there’s more to by increasing the contrast in one area.
recession than using blue, so be SSENCE PAINTING Place this on one of the thirds for a
inventive. Joan Eardley stuck grasses, ( PEINTURE classical look or use an asymmetrical
flowers and stalks to the foregrounds D’ESSENCE) placement for bold work.

G
of her Catterline landscapes. A quick-drying oil sketching

B
technique that uses half dried oils and LAZE
ITUMEN half re-wetted with solvent. Leach your A translucent layer of
This is a warm orange oils on uncoated cardboard until they paint and the easiest way
glaze used to set the are congealed, and use the resulting to create common light
atmospheric perspective paint with solvent as you would effects, such as a sunset. Choose a
in the foreground of traditional
landscapes. Lignitic earths
(bituminous pigments), such as
Asphaltum or Cassel Earth, are the
classical choices but any warm colour
will do. John Constable was advised to
emulate the tone of a Cremona violin
in place of his green foregrounds. He
didn’t, and the rest is history.
MARQUAND FUND, 1959/METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART NEW YORK

C
OLOUR
BEGINNING
Start a chromatic
landscape with a soft and
colourful wash before working it up
with more bodied colour and you’ll be
using JMW Turner’s “colour beginning”
technique. It’s ideal for ethereal,
atmospheric landscapes. Use it to
start a landscape as an abstract blur.

50 Artists & Illustrators


translucent colour, mix with a medium
and paint it over a dry underpainting.
Glaze over old work to transform
FRIENDS OF THE MUSEUM, 1967/METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART NEW YORK

i
PURCHASE, SPECIAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND FUNDS GIVEN OR BEQUEATHED BY

tired-looking landscapes.

H
YDRATED OXIDES ABOVE Claude
Reddish, orange and Monet, Garden
yellow modern pigments at Sainte-
designed to replicate the Adresse, 1867,
high-quality, translucent earth oil on canvas, IMPRESSIONISM
pigments used by the Old Masters. 98.1x129.9cm It is easy to live with, but deceptively hard to do well. The
Try red and yellow transparent iron LEFT JMW Turner, trick to Impressionism is to build your landscape with
oxides, which are indispensable for The Lake of Zug, warm and cool colours rather than tones, and keep your
bringing out the abstract tonalist 1843, watercolour brushwork lively. Make each mark once and don’t touch
painter in you. over graphite, it again. Your work will glow with fresh colours. >
29.8x46.6cm

Artists & Illustrators 51


j k
HENRY L PHILLIPS COLLECTION, BEQUEST OF HENRY L PHILLIPS,
1939/METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART NEW YORK

JAPANESE PRINTS KNIFE PAINTING touch of white. Mix


If classical landscape painting isn’t your thing, look at Palette knives are hard to complementary lake
the aesthetics of Japanese prints. They revolutionised control, making everything colours as a base grey
ideas about composition, flash colour and cropping in the you paint with them a little for neutral shadows.

M
19th century. If you love the post-Impressionist look, then random. This makes them
it started here. Crop landscapes on your smartphone and the ideal tool for clouds,
apply a vector filter to get bold designs. bushes, foliage and all
kinds of natural landscape
features. Mix knives with
brushes to get the best of M AHOGANY PANEL
both worlds. If you love John Singer

L
Sargent’s plein-air oils of
ABOVE Katsushika AKE Mediterranean landscapes,
Hokusa, Banana COLOUR look into this traditional
Garden at Not a colour for painting support. If you’d
Nakashima painting lakes but rather make your own,
(Nakashima a traditional term for prepare a midtoned,
shōen) c.1832, translucent colours, which warm-reddish ground and
polychrome are ideal choices for make sure it’s not too
woodblock glazing. Best combined absorbent. Experiment with
print, ink and with a medium, lake grained and naturally tinted
colour on paper, colours don’t look their surfaces, such as woods
25.1x37.1cm best impasto but can be and fabrics, to discover
TOP RIGHT A nocture beautiful in tint with just a new visual combinations.
ISTOCK

by Martin Kinnear

52 Artists & Illustrators


A-Z O F L A N D S C A P E S

n
NOCTURNE
Moonlit landscapes look stunning
and are relatively easy to do well. The
trick? Reduce your palette, mass the
forms into shadows and maximise
the contrast on your light source.
Glaze or scumble nocturnal colours
over fussy or over-coloured works to
reinvent them as elegant nocturnes.

0
MARTIN KINNEAR

OIL PAINTS
The Impressionists’ choice for
direct landscape painting offers
intense colour, covering power and

P
texture for taches. Oils are tricky to
transport though, so invest in a LEIN AIR
decent French easel or pochade If painting outdoors – or
box if you’re going to take painting en plein air – is your thing,
on the spot seriously. Take a course keep it simple and use
with materials included to try them Impressionist colours on an ébauche
out before you invest in the kit. (preliminary underpainting or quick
oil sketch) base. That way you’ll get
eye-catching temperature contrasts
on a strong optical base.

Q
UICK-DRYING
OILS
Developed with plein-air
painting in mind, these
oils combine tube colours with a
drier – often a medium such as alkyd
– making them a good choice if you
want to take less kit out into the field
with you.

R
OMANTICISM
If you want to paint
grand views, get into
Romanticism. It’s
exaggeration in paint. The trick is to
make everything bigger, bolder and
more dramatic than it really is.
Start with the French painter
Claude-Joseph Vernet as your guide
to the form. Apply the style to your
MARTIN KINNEAR

local landscapes and you’ll stand out


from the crowd. >

Artists & Illustrators 53


A-Z O F L A N D S C A P E S

MARTIN KINNEAR

PURCHASE, THE ANNENBERG FOUNDATION GIFT, 1993/METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART NEW YORK
RIGHT Vincent
van Gogh,
Wheat
Field with
Cypresses,
1889, oil
on canvas,
73.2x93.4cm

S
CUMBLING or sunlit boughs on trees. Before you
All painters scumble, but use a second colour, check you can’t
it’s especially at home as a get it through undertone.

V
landscape technique for
creating impossibly subtle gradations ELATURA
of colour for atmospheric perspective. A semi-opaque colour
JMW Turner was a master of the form. traditionally applied like
Give your old brushes a new lease of a veil to the foreground
life as rough brushes for scumbling. corners of a sky to create

T
atmospheric perspective. Vignette
ACHE your landscapes with subtle
The classic Impressionist velaturas: it can bring the depth
brushmark: a spot or dab in them to life.
or colour. Keep them joined
or modulated for classical
Impressionism, and separate for
more chromatic Divisionism or
Pointillism. Invest in springy synthetic
brushes for sharp taches and keep

W
your old ones for Claude Monet’s
expressive, random style.

U
NDERTONE
The undertone of a colour
when it’s diluted or
brushed out is often very WATERCOLOUR
different from when it’s placed more The traditional choice for landscape sketching because
thickly, or in mass-tone. Exploit this it’s easy to take over hill and dale, but it lacks the opaque
by rubbing into large areas of colour punch of bodied media, such as oils or acrylics.
to make subtle gradations of If traditional watercolour isn’t your thing, mix it up with
temperature, which can suggest pastel, ink or acrylic for Kurt Jackson-style studies, or go
ISTOCK

wispy clouds in a sky for instance, for large-scale contemporary pieces.

54 Artists & Illustrators


X
X MARKS THE SPOT
Stand where famous artists painted
from and you’ll see the difference
between reality and art. If you can’t
MARTIN KINNEAR

Z
travel, there are books on artists
including Claude Monet, JMW Turner,
Vincent van Gogh and Paul Cézanne
comparing views with their paintings.

Y
ELLOW GROUND
Give your landscape more ZINC WHITE
luminosity by working Used to soften the harsh opacity
over a dull yellow or of Titanium White, Zinc White
‘Flemish’ ground. Desaturated Yellow makes a great choice for skies
Ochre or Raw Sienna are good choices and light effects. However recent
for that classical Dutch landscape research shows that it cracks, so
look. Make it contemporary by using consider a safer alternative or
vivid yellows. restrict it to top glazes only.
1
YOU NEED A LOT
O I L MY TH S B U S TE D OF BRUSHES
Artist studios are often filled with

3. BRUSHES
drawers, pots and boxes full of brushes in all
shapes and sizes. We love these images, but
do we really need all those brushes? I
suspect we don’t. We keep buying them in
Artist SOPHIE PLOEG helps you find the hope of finding that one perfect brush.
the perfect tools to create your painting And then we can’t throw away worn-out
brushes because we might find a good use
for them. The fact is that you can make a
masterpiece with a single brush. No amount
of brushes will change that. Try a good range
and find what works for you.

56 Artists & Illustrators


2
YOU MUST USE OIL like the feel of an expensive brush, then it and soap. I prefer to thoroughly wipe brushes
PAINTING BRUSHES is not the tool for you. There is no point on kitchen paper and clean with brush soap.
A brushmaker will have a medium and sticking to it just because it is supposed to

5
its unique qualities in mind when it makes be a good. Try something else. A good brush BRUSH SIZE IS RELATED
brushes. An oil brush needs to hold a decent holds lots of paint so that you don’t have to TO FERRULE WIDTH
amount of oil, while a watercolour brush dip all the time; makes consistent strokes It was thought a brush’s size refered
needs to hold water. But there is nothing that you like; does not lose hairs; keeps its to the width of the ferrule (the metal bit that
wrong with using watercolour or acrylic shape; and takes a bit of rough handling. It holds the hairs together), but brushmakers
brushes for oil paint. They might suit your is great if it can also be cleaned easily and now seem to use their own sizing formats.
needs perfectly. I am one of many oil painters is affordable. A size 2 in one brand will be different from a
who use sable watercolour brushes. Many size 2 in another brand. Look, compare and

4
brushes are suitable for oil as well as acrylic. YOU HAVE TO USE decide for yourself.
SOLVENT TO CLEAN www.sophieploeg.com

3
EXPENSIVE BRUSHES YOUR BRUSHES
ARE BETTER It is perfectly possible to work with oil paints
As with many things in life, sometimes without using solvents. If you prefer to ban
you have to pay for quality. But not all toxic materials from your studio, you can
expensive brushes are premium quality and clean brushes with brush soap, oil, or water Your ideal brush is
some cheap brushes are brilliant. Good
one that best suits
ISTOCK

brushes come in all price ranges. If you don’t


your hand, painting
approach, paint
medium and style

Artists & Illustrators 57


58 Artists & Illustrators
i
did this painting on a visit to La Ciotat on
the Cote D’Azur. It’s where Georges Braque
and the Fauves painted in 1906. I wanted
to explore the sheer vibrancy of light and
transpose what I saw into colour equivalents.
Some parts are descriptive and others
MASTERCL ASS develop the tonal elements into pure colour.
I used a light Daler-Rowney acrylic wash as

PAINTING
an underpainting, making the initial drawing
in Prussian Blue. What attracted me to the
view was the way the pine trees framed the

LIGHT WITH
rocky outcrop of Cap D’Aigle. I think it’s
important to understand that you are always
painting light. It is the real subject of my

COLOUR
paintings, and summer is an excellent time to
observe high-contrast landscape elements.
Terence’s works are on show at York Fine Arts,
Harrogate, and Thompson’s Gallery, Aldeburgh.
www.yorkfineartsonline.co.uk; www.thompsons
gallery.co.uk; www.terenceclarke.co.uk
Inspired by the South of France’s
beauty, artist TERENCE CLARKE Terence’s materials
creates a bold, beautiful landscape
using high-contrast colours •Canvas Vermillion, Pthalo
Primed canvas, Green, Prussian Blue.
60x50cm Winsor & Newton:
•Acrylic Winsor Yellow.
Daler-Rowney: Sennelier: Manganese
Prussian Blue Blue.
•Oil •Brushes
Lukas Terzia Artists’ Rosemary & Co: Ivory
Oil Colours: Yellow Filberts, sizes 2, 4, 6;
Ochre, Ultramarine hog-hair filberts, sizes
Blue, Lemon Yellow, 4, 6, 8

1 Take a reference photo

This is a picture taken near the spot where I


painted. As you can see, it’s an amazing view
but a photograph never gives you the quality of
colour you can find in observation. It’s also
interesting to see the abbreviations I made to
suggest distance and aerial perspective. >

Artists & Illustrators 59


To p t i p
int impasto
Placing pa
blending
rather th n
a 3 Rework the underpainting
urs to
allows colo
contrast
effec tively Having established the main drawing, I rework
ther
with each o
the underpainting to make it more pink so it
contrasts with the blues and green of the
water. I also redraw the shape of the bay.

4 Block in the sky


2 Draw in the composition
The light tone starts to define the shape
Having established a light midtone wash, I use of the tree and also establishes the light
Prussian Blue and a small Rosemary & Co schema, which will operate throughout
ivory filbert to draw. See how far out my original the painting. I’m using Lukas Artists’ Oil
drawing of the horizon was. It’s easy to Colours and a short, flat brush, which gives a
overestimate the scale of distant elements. nice edge to draw with.

5 Define edges 6 Develop the image 7 Review the stages

You can see how richly the heavy canvas I use a basic, flat hog-hair brush almost like a Here you can see all the stages of the painting
takes the thick, undiluted oil paint. Simple palette knife to “draw out” the forms of the at work. The underpainting tone, the Prussian
cloud forms help punctuate the expanse of rocks. A broad handling of paint needs broad Blue line drawing of the Cap D’Aigle, some
light Cobalt Blue. A touch of Ultramarine to brushes, and the development of the image initial tonal washes of paint to develop the
define the edges of the cloud forms gives a requires that this initial openness is subtly form, and the thick impasto brushwork that
bit of colour contrast, too. adjusted at a later stage. will dominate the conclusion of the painting.

60 Artists & Illustrators


8 Work with the underpainting 9 Create light and form 10 Turn up the colour

Blocking in the sea, I use the underpainting to It’s important to let go of your original bold Here colour is being ramped up. Purple in
excite the colour. The range of blues turning drawings as you work the paint into the the sea is reflected from the clouds and
into almost emerald near the shore is amazing. forms. The drawing can stop brush marks horizon. The shadows on the pines are
I used a combination of Ultramarine, Manga- elucidating the light and forms. You can developed using colour as tone. There
nese Blue, Yellow Ochre and Emerald Green. re-emphasise the structure later on. are great variations in shadows.

12 Encourage contrast

Close up, you can see the paint isn’t blended


but rather placed with some impasto. This
allows the brilliance of each hue to contrast
most effectively with the surrounding colours.
It’s the “tone” of colour creating form, moving
from bright yellows to dark blues and greens.

11 Redefine structure

With some Prussian Blue oil I reaffirm the


original structure of the drawing on the tree.
I also use the intense blue sea tones to
contrast and define the edge of the rocks.

Artists & Illustrators 61


I just picked up a feather one day
and started to play. I loved the movement
and expression that it gave the image

YO U R Q U E S T I O N S

WILDLIFE
IN INK
Artist CLARE BROWNLOW’s feather
artworks adorn everything from
kitchenware to scarves. Here she
reveals her working methods

62 Artists & Illustrators


YO U R Q U E S T I O N S

FAR LEFT Flamingo Walking,


ink on watercolour paper,
105x90cm LEFT Gold Hares
Boxing, ink with gold leaf
on watercolour paper,
106x95cm BELOW Bees,
ink on watercolour paper,
105x90cm

individual, find their own style and take


on the subject matter. Be true to
yourself and don’t be scared to try
different things, mediums and so on. Be
unique and free. There are no mistakes
in art.

Is it best to work from life or from


photographs?
I like to work from both. I love sketching
wildlife and always have a sketchbook
on me, as well as the trusty camera on
my phone. I work from videos, sketches
and photographs all together. You get a
sense of movement from your sketches
and it brings back the memory of being
in the situation.

What is the benefit of working pheasant, fish or anything with a What paper is best to use with
with feathers rather than brushes shimmer, I use some fantastic metallic this technique?
to create artworks? inks. I have also painted a massive I use thick watercolour paper because
It creates a sense of movement and flamingo that uses neon ink. the ‘bumps’ catch the end of the feather
brings the subject matter to life. You and then the splatters come from the
can never recreate the same picture What other tools does this feather skipping across the paper, giving
because you have limited control with technique require? a wonderful sense of movement to the
the feather, which is always fun and It’s just a feather and inks. It really is subject matter.
sometimes frustrating. that simple. www.clarebrownlow.co.uk
The way I paint means that the
feathers, fur, scales, and so on, are How do you balance
all painted in the direction of how they achieving a good
fall on the animal. This also creates likeness and creating
directional splatter. vibrant marks?
Also no-one else paints in the way I try my best to get as
that I do, so it’s a great unique selling much of a likeness as
point. I came across it by accident. possible but when you are
I just picked up a feather one day doing a commission with
and started to play. I loved the something such as a
movement and expression that it gave Dalmatian it might have a
the image. couple of extra spots. The
way I paint has a lot of
What kind of ink should I use freedom and expression,
with this technique? so it is a case of weighing
I use a variety of Indian inks and up the two when you get
watercolours. The brighter and more into the painting.
fluid the medium, the better.
Do you have any
How do you create such vibrant colour advice for capturing
with ink? a wild animal’s spirit
The inks I use are great quality, and I or character?
love the vibrancy that the Indian inks I think there needs to be
can give you. Also, when I do a more people who are
ESSENTIAL COLOUR

2. BLACK
AL GURY gets to grips with the paint colour’s
history and explains how you can put it to good use
64 Artists & Illustrators
ESSENTIAL COLOUR

LEFT George
Inness (1825-
1894), Woodland
Scene, 1891,
oil on canvas,
76.29x114.3cm.
Inness uses an
earth palette,
including black
in neutrals
and shadows,
played off against
brighter colours to
create a powerful
tonal effect.
GIFT OF JOHN FREDERICK LEWIS JR

colour that is rich


in its chromatic
quality can be
softened, and
made more
subtle, by adding

B
black, or black
lack, along with Yellow Ochre, Red Earth and and white, to the mixture. Because most black paints such
white, is one of the oldest colours used in art. The as Ivory Black are transparent, it makes a good colour for
earliest black paints were made from carbon, transparent glazing.
burned wood, burned bone, charred fruit pits and Misunderstandings about black have arisen since the
charcoal. These have acquired the names of Ivory Black, late-19th century. Aristotle’s essay, ‘De Coloribus’, was
Carbon Black, Bone Black, Peach Black and so on. A popular at the time. He felt the extremes of black and white
second type of black paint comes from burned iron rich were the absence of colour. Many artists experimenting
clay and is commonly called Mars Black. The first group is with the possibilities of colour reacted to the excessive use
typically transparent, while the second is opaque. of browns, blacks and neutrals by academic painters, and
Black paints have practical uses in colour mixing and recommended not using black, or other earth colours.
application. First, black is the Earth Blue in an earth palette Also, Impressionist painters believed that there was
LEFT Benjamin West triad of Yellow Ochre, Red Oxide and Ivory Black. Ivory colour in all darks, so, for many, black was a worse solution
(1738-1820), Self Black, and most black oil paints, look very blue when mixed than mixing darks with a hint of colour, often from
Portrait, 1806, with white and compared to other colour tints. For example, complements or triads of red, yellow and blue. Ironically,
oil on canvas, a sky in a landscape made from Ivory Black and white looks Impressionist painters such as Renoir included black on
91.8x71.4cm. blue compared to the rest of the land. Black is also used to their palettes. It is both an extremely useful and practical
GIFT OF MR AND MRS HENRY R. HALLOWELL/COLLECTION OF THE

West, a president make cool or neutral mixtures of other colours. For colour, as well as a misunderstood one.
of the Royal example, Cadmium Red mixed with black produces a rich www.algury.com
Academy of Arts maroon red.
following Sir Joshua Black can cool or darken other colours and make
PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF THE FINE ARTS

Reynolds, used gradations of cooler neutrals. It works well in modifying Black is also an
transparent black tints that you want to recede spatially. For example, flesh
with Burnt Umber mixtures greyed with a little black and white look recessive excellent tool for
to create neutrals in the hollows of the face compared to more chromatic creating shadows
in skin tones and forward-moving colours of the nose, mouth and so on.
to make strong The colour is also an excellent tool for creating shadows
when mixed with
tonal shadows. when mixed with other darks. For example, a shadow other dark colours

TOP TIPS COMPARE COLOUR TINTS


Make tints of black pigments and
of colours, especially where you need to
use a subtle neutral.
compare them to other colours. THINK BLUE
USE GRADATIONS Work with black as a bluish colour in your
Use black to make subtle gradations work in its own right.

Artists & Illustrators 65


ARTISTS’ 3^UZW_[ef ?WV[g_e Ÿ

VALUE
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Available through a select group of stockists
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66 Artists & Illustrators


PENCILS
TOOLS

FOR SKETCHING
Even if you only sketch
to work out a composition,
you still need the right
materials. KIM SCOULLER
shares her favourites for
specific drawing jobs

w
ith so many pencils to
choose from it can be
difficult to know which is
right for your drawing. I like to have a
range to hand when I’m sketching GREAT FOR DENSE TONES PERFECT FOR WET WASHES
because each one has a unique feel 9000 Jumbo by Faber-Castell Water-soluble Sketching Pencils by Derwent
and possibilities. It helps to have With a lovely, chunky feel this pencil’s These versatile pencils are great for
different grades, too, as the graphite hexagonal profile gives it a nice grip. Its sketching line and tone, and can also be
density impacts the way the drawing extra-thick lead offers a great range of line used to make wet washes. I use them dry
looks. You know you’ve found a good widths and marks. You can use the lead on and take a wet paintbrush to blend tones. If
pencil if you enjoy the way it feels when its side to shade large areas. It also blends you’re sketching outside and it starts to rain,
drawing. A bit of weight or a nice grip well and can produce a wide variety of tones you get a cool rain-spatter effect. Available in
can add to the pleasure of sketching. with real density. Available in HB to 8B. Light (HB), Medium (4B) and Dark Wash (8B).
www.kimscouller.com www.faber-castell.co.uk. Available from www.derwentart.com. Available from
Jackson’s Art. www.jacksonsart.com Jackson’s Art. www.jacksonsart.com

GOOD FOR LAYERING TONE IDEAL FOR QUICK SKETCHING EXCELLENT FOR SMUDGING
Rembrandt Polycolor Pencils by Lyra Grafstone by Caran d’Ache Chunky Graphite by Cretacolor
These come in a neat tin of 12 assorted hard This pure graphite, woodless pencil has a A round-edged, palm-sized, pure-graphite
and soft grey tones (warm and cool), plus plastic coating to keep hands clean. Its stick, this pencil has a nice weight. The sharp
black and white. They behave much like weight and smoothness helps it glide over end works well for line work, or use it on its
coloured pencils, having a slight waxy feel. paper making it a great choice for continuous side for gestural sweeps of tone. The soft
They are great for layering, especially if you tone and quick sketching. You can also break graphite blends well when smudging with a
are using warm and cool tones to modify a it into smaller bits to create broad sweeps finger and for layering line work. There’s no
drawing. They sharpen to a good point with a of tone. Available in HB, 3B and 6B. coating, so it can get a bit messy.
4mm core. Available in 12 grey tones. www.carandache.com. Available from www.apassionforpencils.com. Available
Available from Cass Art. www.cassart.co.uk Jackson’s Art. www.jacksonsart.com from Cass Art. www.cassart.co.uk

Artists & Illustrators 67


H OW T O

CREATE
HARMONY
Careful use of tertiary and analogous
colours can create a sense of unity in
a painting. PETER KEEGAN explains

C
olour is one of the most compelling
elements in a work of art. For many,
its allure is the sole reason to paint.
But tackling the theory can be daunting. It
can take years of practice to fully understand
and use colour fluently. Yet it offers the
opportunity to change, challenge and explore
a subject, as well as a never-ending chance
to learn, experiment and enjoy. The use of
analogous and tertiary colours is also one of
the best ways to unite a work and give it a
sense of harmony.
TERTIARY BLUES
HOW DO THEY WORK?
Colours from the same area on the colour
wheel are known as harmonies. A painting
that uses a harmonious palette will often
appear calm or have a sense of unity.
Think of Claude Monet’s waterlily paintings
or JMW Turner’s seascapes, and you conjure
a feeling of atmospheric splendour and
simplicity. This is because their limited use
of colours results in fewer clashes or effects.
There are two types of harmonious colour
ranges that can be used.

TERTIARY COLOURS
These are sets made by combining a primary
and one of its neighbouring secondary
colours. For instance, blue (a primary) mixed
with green (its neighbouring secondary) will
give you a palette ranging from blue through
TERTIARY GREENS
different shades of turquoise to green,
depending on how much of each you add to a
mixture. The same range from red to orange
can be achieved using these two colours.
Infinite colours can be made by combining
pairs of tertiaries. This can be useful for one type of green (often a pre-mixed, intense
providing a different version of an otherwise green, such as Viridian) and rely on adding
overused colour in a painting. Green is a white to lighten and a brown or black to
common example of a colour that can be darken. However, mixing your own greens and
overused. I hear many students say they hate finding subtle tertiary combinations (adding
green because it is too complicated and green’s complementary colour – red – often
overwhelming. This happens when they use works well) along with its colour wheel

68 Artists & Illustrators


COLOUR HARMONY

ANALOGOUS GREENS

Think of Monet’s
waterlilies and you
conjure a feeling of
atmospheric splendour

neighbour – yellow – can create a diverse


and rich range of convincing greens.

ANALOGOUS COLOURS
These are groups of three or four colours that
are next to each other on the colour wheel.
They match well to create serene and
comfortable designs or mood. Analogous
colours are often found in nature, and are
harmonious and pleasing to the eye.
To create an analogous set of colours, first
select a dominant colour. Then, add two or
three colours either side of it on the colour
wheel to your theme or palette. You can use
white to tint, or a darker hue or black to add
shade, to provide a wider range.
Painters often instinctively use analogous
colours. But be careful with preconceptions
about what colours “go together” or “clash”.
This is subjective, rather than scientific. For
example, a hot bright pink can look out of
place in a picture, becoming overwhelming.
However, when used in the right context and
with its neighbouring colours, it can be kept
in check. Whether tertiary or analogous,
colour harmonies can provide atmosphere,
ANALOGOUS BLUES
rhythm and strength of design. The trick is to
limit yourself to a chosen colour range and
utilise a wide value and shade range, using
complementary colours as back up.
Peter Keegan teaches at the Courtyard Art
Studio in Buckinghamshire. www.peterkeegan.
com; www.thecourtyardartstudio.com

Artists & Illustrators 69


Tod’s materials

•Oil
Various brands including
Winsor & Newton, Lefranc
& Bourgeois and Charvin,
plus home-made pigments:
Titanium White, Naples
Yellow, Lemon Yellow,
Cadmium Yellow, Yellow
Ochre, Raw Sienna, Burnt
Sienna, Burnt Umber, Raw
Umber, Terre Vert, Sap Green,
Viridian, Cerulean, Cobalt
Blue, Ultramarine, Cobalt
Violet, Cadmium Red, Winsor
Orange, Cadmium Orange
•Brushes
Green & Stone: Black Russian
Sable, round, filbert and flat,
sizes 1 to 30; hog brushes,
sizes 1 to 16
•Distilled turpentine
•Refined linseed oil
•Paper
Canson and Ingres pastel
paper
•Pencil and charcoal
Coates Willow charcoal
and Conté charcoal pencils,
HB to 3B
D E M O N S T R AT I O N •Canvas

PAINT AT
•Mahl Stick

LIFESIZE
The internationally known painter TOD RAMOS
creates a portrait of a horse in oils on a large
scale from direct observation

d
esafuente, known as Desi, is an Andalusian stallion
I have painted several times. I decide not to paint
a straight profile but to depict him engaged and
interested in the painter and the viewer, his head towards
me. Working from a living animal is not unlike painting
children. We have to get to know our subjects, make them
feel comfortable and understand what we are doing. the detail. There are no tricks in painting from a live being,
The process is always the same: I meet the subject and only sound technique. However, drawing is the foundation
identify its character and demeanour, while making quick of working from life, whether to describe anatomy or to
studies in charcoal or Conté pencil on Ingres paper. As with create shapes in composition.
all direct work from a subject, I work from the abstract Tod teaches at Academy Studios Abroad in the South of
broad forms and brings these up to detail. Working from France. His masterclass on horse painting, Tour de Horse,
the “abstract to the particular” means starting with the runs from Monday 3 to Friday 14 September.
broader shapes and planes, and building on these towards www.academystudiosabroad.com

70 Artists & Illustrators


D E M O N S T R AT I O N

2 3

To p t i p
To load the
long brush
have a pale ,
tte on a
small table
in front of
the canvas
a n d ke e p 6
pigments in
the
same order

1 After the initial studies on


paper, I play with loose
drawings to establish the unique
four metres, we have to be at
least three metres from the
canvas and the horse. With
Rather than give the
tones their full value
straight away, I model
proportions so that, in the future, the composition decided, I the forms gradually.
when I return to paint the horse I attach a round bristle brush,
have a fair idea of how I am
going to depict him. In this
composition, I decided I will paint
size 8 or 10, to the end of an
extending carbon fishing rod.
Holding a paintbrush three
5 Now working
closer to the
canvas, it is
Desi life-size. metres long seems clumsy but, important to see our
if you work from the shoulder, subject in its

2 Having sized and primed a


large, stretched canvas with
an oil-based primer, it is roughly
you can quickly achieve control.
Using a mix of traditional
ground colours, Raw Sienna,
complete state. One
of the mistakes of the
early sporting painters, who also two light sources: a north light
toned with a thinned mixture of Raw Umber and Burnt Sienna, worked from life in the confines behind me casting a cool light
Raw Sienna and Raw Umber and working loosely, I set out the of a stable, was that they painted across Desi’s body, creating the
applied with a brush. This gives a proportions of length to height in section by section. It is surprising sheen and blue reflections on
midtone, which is the key for the marks on the canvas. A how loose and almost abstract his coat; and the morning
painting and stops the glare of composition evolves. the painting appears upclose. sunlight from the eastern door,
the white canvas. The ground The secret is to retain this which illuminates his front and
needs at least a week to dry.
4 As the horse’s shape takes
form, I use the warm
quality. I use the fatter paint and
my whole palette of pigments.
down the left side of the face,
which I depict in primary colours.

3 Painting a canvas life-size


raises specific challenges.
The artist has to be far enough
pigments of Desi’s coat when
drawing his shape with paint. It is
only when the proper proportions
When working over days, the
painting can be very wet, so a
mahl stick is essential to support
In the case of the violet-blue
sheen, I glaze it over the fatter
paint as a suggestion, being
away from the canvas to see it as and composition are established the hand holding the paintbrush cautious to keep such effects
a whole and far enough from the that I put down the extended without smudging paint. in key. The highlights are not
horse to see it as a whole, too. paintbrush. Using the principle of white; the shadows are not
With a horse that stands more
than six-feet high to be painted
on a canvas of three metres by
fat over lean, the thin glazes of
pigment – without added oil
– soon build a convincing form.
6 Combining fat paint and
glazes I continuously study
Desi and build the colour. I have
black. The only pure white is a
flick of impasto in Desi’s eye and
nose marking.

Artists & Illustrators 71


Jake’s materials

COLOURED PENCIL • Derwent

3. foliage
Graphitint
Watersoluable
Coloured Pencils
• Water brush
• Water spritzer
• Portable pencil
JAKE SPICER tackles the tricky subject of greens sharpener
as he draws summer landscapes • Plastic eraser
• Sketchbook
COLOURED PENCILS

i
’m a terrible watercolourist. In summer, when the
air in the studio gets too close and I’m drawn to
working en plein air, I turn to the watercolour
pencil. I err on the muted side, opting for a water-
soluble tinted graphite pencil and a water brush with
a reservoir in the handle to keep kit – and spillage
1 BIG SHAPES
5 minutes
Give yourself a moment to
– to a minimum. With a sketchbook of a decent settle in and look at your
paper weight (160gsm or more), this makes for an surroundings. With a few
ideal sketching kit for verdant landscapes or, in compositional sketches in
urban settings, capturing the bustle from a café hand, you should have an
vantage point. I’ll focus on drawing foliage in the idea of how you’ll start the
landscape. Although this image is worked up from a drawing. Launch into it with
photograph for practicality, my intention is to inspire energy, keeping a loose,
you to work from life, experiencing the landscape, distant grip on your pencil
and letting the scents and sounds embed into your and recording the big
drawing. This picture is from a favourite walk near my shapes of the scene.
studio in north Wales, which takes you from a small
church in Arthog, past the waterfalls that lead up
towards Cregennan Lakes.
www.jakespicerart.co.uk

3 SPRITZ
30 minutes
Use a water spritzer to liquify the coloured pencil. It
takes 30 seconds to spray, but quite a while to dry.
You can use a brush to even out the liquified pencil.
You can spritz the back of your neck to keep yourself
cool while you draw, too.

2 BLOCK COLOUR
10 minutes
Working swiftly from your arm,
rather than your fingers, but
still with a loose grip on your
pencil, build swift parallel
hatching to establish large
areas of colour. Leave any light
areas blank for the moment. 4 BACKGROUND
10 minutes
To create depth in an image, think
about how the distant background of
your scene will appear less detailed,
with the pattern of foliage appearing
tighter and blurring into tonal shapes.

74 Artists & Illustrators


XXXX

Top t ip
Borrow marks fro
m
other ar tis ts – lo
ok at
Van Gogh’s draw
ings
of trees and gard
ens
for mark- making
inspiration

5 MIDGROUND
10 minutes
Foliage patterns become more
important in the midground.
Explore textural marks that
6 FOREGROUND
10 minutes
Foreground foliage departs from the mass pattern of the
respond to what you see. Vary trees and bushes at large, and becomes individualised.
pressure to create a range of The contrasts between light and dark become more
tones, keeping marks swift pronounced, and individual branches and leaves can be
and intuitive. picked out.

7 DARKEST DARKS
30 minutes
Use your darkest pencil to
work into the deepest shadows
and to emphasise detail. Avoid
heavy outlining. Aim to create
stronger contrasts at
boundaries by darkening the
side of branches and leaves,
and establishing hard-edged
8 WATER BRUSH
5 minutes
Think about the finish you want. A variety of textures,
shapes to contrast with the from drawn marks to watercolour washes, will keep a
broken boundaries of foliage. sketch lively and interesting. Use your water brush to
selectively liquify coloured pencil where you think the
drawing needs it.

Artists & Illustrators 75


XXXX COLOURED PENCIL

9 ADD FOCUS
10 minutes
Step back and have a break.
When you come back to your
drawing, approach it from a
distance with fresh eyes.
Where do you intuitively look?
Where would you like the
viewer to focus? Bring detail
and contrast into areas where
10 ERASE FOR LIGHTS
5 minutes
Make sure the paper is entirely dry, and then use

N e xt m o nt h
you’d like to create more focus. a plastic eraser with a sharp edge to rub away at
areas that you would like to lighten to add a final
part of his
In the final at
flourish to the drawing.
e will look
serie s, Jak fe s in
l li
drawing stil
encil
coloured p

Win 1-o f-3


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76 Artists & Illustrators


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Some of the best original art Devon has to offer is available at Speculation Gallery. This
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Speculation Gallery is also the working studio of Anthony O’Keefe were you can see him
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Untutored Life Classes are available on Saturday afternoon; 2pm to 6pm.
A Post Office and Village Shop are also housed in the gallery.
Opening Times. Monday and Friday 9am-5.30pm. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 9am-8pm. Saturday and Sunday 10am-2pm
Contact details. Speculation Gallery, Old Road, Brixton, Plymouth, PL8 2BS
Tel: 01752 881617; 07522 436177 Email: speculationgallery@gmail.com
Website: speculationgallery.com

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things to build form and texture. My
desk is a mish-mash of pots of ink,
pens, watercolour, pencils, colouring
pencils and even Tipp-Ex.

4 ANALYSE MOVEMENT
It’s important to observe an
animal properly – in real life or online
– before putting pencil to paper.

THINGS I’VE
Watch how a creature moves, how it
makes contact with the ground and
how its form changes when it’s doing

LEARNED: 1 GET DOODLING


Keep drawing and inspiration will
things. I like to get to know an animal
inside out, even a fictional one. If I

CATHERINE
strike. Enjoy the process and work will know and love it, other people can too.
stay lively. An animal pops into my
head and I can be doodling it for
5 KEEP A SKETCHBOOK

RAYNER months, sometimes years, before a


story emerges. Eventually, I sketch
one that looks as though it could jump,
Sketchbooks provide me with a
clear visual record of how work has
progressed. This is useful when I’m
The award-winning writer slither or creep off the paper: that’s stuck in a rut. I look through previous
and illustrator lets us in on when I know I’ve found the character. creative journeys and remind myself
her hard-won career hacks of the problems I encountered and,

2 DRAW FOR YOURSELF


Drawing my horse Shannon used
to be what I called my “anti-work”. I
importantly, how I overcame them.
This encourages me to keep going.
Hello, Horse written by Vivian French
could spend time with her and enjoy and illustrated by Catherine Rayner,
the peace. One day my lovely friend is published by Walker Books,
CATHERINE RAYNER/LITTLE TIGER PRESS

Vivian French and I came up with the £11.99. www.walker.co.uk;


An animal idea to write a non-fiction book about www.catherinerayner.co.uk
pops into my Shannon, and Hello, Horse began.
head and I TOP Illustration from the book Augustus

can doodlE
it for monthS
3 BUILD TEXTURE
I use whatever feels right for
each character, using a variety of
and his Smile, ink, watercolour and acrylic
with screenprinted background, 26x52cm
ABOVE Catherine Rayner
MAKE REPRODUCTIONS OF YOUR ARTWORKS

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Point101 is a member of the Fine Art Trade Guild and specialises in gallery-quality giclee printing,
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