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A STUDY ON BRAND EQUITY OF AAVIN MILK

PRODUCTS IN SALEM CITY.

A PROJECT REPORT
Submitted by

M.AISHWARYA
Register No: 098001803003

In partial fulfillments for the award of the degree


Of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

IN

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

SONA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY


SALEM- 636 005.
JULY 2010
SONA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY
SALEM- 636 005
Department Of Management Studies

PROJECT WORK

JULY 2010

This is to certify that the project entitled

BRAND EQUITY OF AAVIN MILK


PRODUCTS IN SALEM CITY

Is the bonafide record of project work done by

M.AISHWARYA

Register No: 098001803003

of MBA (Master of Business Administration) during the year 2010-2011.

------------------ ---------------------------

Project Guide Head of the Department

Submitted for the Project Viva-Voce examination held on

-------------------------- --------------------
Internal Examiner External Examiner
DECLARATION

I affirm that the project work titled “A Study On Brand Equity Of Aavin Milk
Products In Salem City” being submitted in partial Fulfillment for the award of
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) is the original Work carried
out by me. It has not formed the part of any other project work Submitted for award of
anydegree or diploma, either in this or any other University.

(Signature of the candidate)


M.AISHWARYA
Register No: 098001803003

I certify that the declaration made above by the candidate is true

Signature of the guide,

Dr.M. Selvaraj
(Joint Director)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to thank the almighty for being with me throughout this project. I also
extend my heart full thanks to my parents and friends who encouraged me for completing
the project work.
I am highly indebted to DR.CHETAN BAJAJ, Director, Dept. of Management
Studies Administration for his guidance and motivation during the course of the project.

I wish to express my gratitude to DR.M.SELVARAJ ,JointDirector, Dept. of


Management studies for his support and encouragement throughout the project.

I wish to thank Mr. MAHADEVAN ADMINISTRATION AGM of SALEM


DISTRICT COOPERATIVE MILK PRODUCERS’ UNION LTD for allowing me to
undergo training in their organization.

I wish to thank Mr. JAI PRAKASH MARKETING AGM of SALEM


DISTRICT COOPERATIVE MILK PRODUCERS’ UNION LTD for his support and
encouragement throughout the project.

I wish to thank all the staff members who have helped me in the training period. Finally
I bow my head saluting my parents for showering their blessings on me which has
enabled me to attain success in this Endeavour.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
TITLE PAGE NO.
NO.
LIST OF TABLES VI
LIST OF CHARTS VII

INTRODUCTION
1.1 ABOUT THE INDUSTRY 1
I. 1.2 ABOUT THE COMPANY 3
1.3 ABOUT THE PROJECT 13
1.4 REVIEW OF LITERATURE 18

THE MAIN THEME OF THE PROJECT


2.1 TITLE OF THE STUDY 20
2.2 SCOPE OF THE STUDY 20
2.3 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 20
II.
2.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY 20
2.5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 2O
2.6 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 22
FINDINGS 55
III. SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION 56

IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY 57

V ANNEXURE 58

LIST OF TABLE
SNO TITLE PAGE NO
1 1.2.5.1 SALES OF PRODUCTION 8
2 1.2.4.1 DISTRIBUTION DETAILS 7
3 TABLE SHOWING RESPONSES MALE AND FEMALE LEVEL 22
4 TABLE SHOWING THE AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS 24
5 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS OF CHOICES BETWEEN 26
BRANDS
6 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS FAMILIAR LEVEL OF 28
AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS
7 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS OF HOW THEY KNOW 30
AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS
8 RESPONDENTS RANK FOR THE AAVIN BRAND OF MILK 32
PRODUCTS
9 RESPONDENTS CONSUMPTION OF MILK 34
10 RESPONDENTS BRAND OF MILK USED 36
11 PREFERENCE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND 38
12 RESPONDENTS USAGE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND 41
13 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL IN 43
CHOICE OF BRAND
14 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS USAGE OF BRAND AT 45
PRESENT
15 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS LIKING OF TELLING 47
AAVIN BRAND TO OTHERS
16 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS LEVEL WHO TOLD 49
ABOUT AAVIN TO OTHERS
17 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS REASON FOR BUYING 51
AAVIN BRAND
18 TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS OPINION RANK ABOUT 53
AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS

LIST OF CHARTS

SNO TITLE PAGE NO


1 1.2.3.1 MARKETING SECTION 6
2 MALE, FEMALE RESPONSE 23
3 RESPONDENTS AGE GROUP 25

4 RESPONDENTS ABOUT THE CHOICES BETWEEN THE 27


BRAND
5 FAMILIAR LEVEL OF AAVIN MILK PROCUCTS 29

6 RESPONDENTS OF HOW THEY KNOW AAVIN MILK 31


PRODUCTS
7 RESPONDENTS RANK FOR THE AAVIN BRAND OF 33
MILK PRODUCTS
8 RESPONDENTS CONSUMPTION OF MILK 35

9 RESPONDENTS BRAND OF MILK USED 37

10 PREFERENCE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND 40

11 RESPONDENTS USAGE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND 42

12 PONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL IN CHOICE OF 44


BRAND
13 RESPONDENTS USAGE OF BRAND AT PRESENT 46

14 RESPONDENTS LIKING OF TELLING AAVIN BRAND TO 48


OTHERS
15 RESPONDENTS LEVEL WHO TOLD ABOUT AAVIN TO 50
OTHERS.
16 52
RESPONDENTS REASON FOR BUYING AAVIN BRAND
17 RESPONDENTS OPINION RANK ABOUT AAVIN MILK 54
PRODUCTS
ABSTRACT

The project worked titled “A Study On Brand Equity of Aavin Milk Products In
Salem City” has been done in “SALEM DISTRICT COOPERATIVE MILK
PRODUCERS’ UNION LTD”. It has been underwent in the view to study Brand
Awareness ,Consumer Preference, Brand Loyalty of Aavin Brand.
The sampling technique used in this survey was convenience sampling. This
study concentrates only the customers in Salem. They have a wide customer base but
only 100 customers were taken as sample. A well-structured questionnaire has been
formulated for conducting survey and the survey was conducted with the customers of
AAVIN.The data collected was analyzed using simple percentage analysis.

The analysis, findings and suggestions made through this study will give the
feedback about the acceptance of AAVIN and this will be useful for the organization to
make suitable improvement in brand equity .

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

1.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE:


1.1.1INDIAN SCENARIO
India has one of the largest livestock populations in the world. Fifty percent of the
buffaloes and twenty percent of the cattle in the world are found in India, most of which
are milk cows and buffaloes. Dairy development in India has been acknowledged all over
the world as one of the most successful and modern developmental programme. Today,
India is the largest milk producing country in the world.
Milk and milk products are rated as one of the most promising sector which
deserves appreciation in a big way. When the world milk production registered a negative
growth of 2%, India performed much better with 4 percent growth. The total milk
production is over 72 million tonnes and the demand for milk is estimated at around 80
million tonnes.
Manufacture of casein and lactose, largely being imported presently, has good
scope. Exports of milk products have been decanalised. The milk surplus states in India
are Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh,
Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. The manufacturing of milk products is concentrated in these
milk surplus States.
The production of milk products, which include infant milk food, malted food,
condensed milk & cheese stood at 3.07 lakh tonnes in 1999-2000. Production of milk-
powder including infant milk-food had risen to 2.25 lakh tons in 1999-2000, whereas that
of malted food is at 65000 tons. Cheese and condensed milk production stands at 5000
and 11000 tonnes respectively. Some plants are coming-up for producing lactose, casein
and improved cheese varieties.
1.1.2 A SWOT ANALYSIS OF DAIRY INDUSTRY IN INDIA
STRENGTHS
• Enhanced milk production with consequently increased availability of
milk processing.
• Improved purchasing power of the consumer.
• Improved transportation facilities for movement of milk and milk
products.
• Increasing availability of indigenously manufactured equipment.
• Large number of dairy plants (252) in public and cooperative sector
besides several others coming up in the private sector.
WEAKNESSES
• Tropical climate conditions.
• Seasonal fluctuations in milk production pattern.
• Species-wise variation (buffalo, cow, goat etc.) in milk quality received by
milk plants.
• Lack of marketing avenues for the dairy produce.
THREATS
• Introduction of foreign products in Indian market.
• Increasing chemical contaminants as well as residual antibiotics in milk.
• Poor microbiological quality of milk.
• Export of quality feed ingredients particularly cakes under the
liberalization policy.
• Deficiency of molasses, a rich source of energy and binding agent in feed
industry and constituent of urea molasses mineral lick.
• Excessive grazing pressure on marginal and small community lands
resulting in complete degradation of land.
• The liberalisation of the Dairy Industry is likely to be exploited by multi-
nationals. They will be interested in manufacturing milk products which
yield high profits. It will create milk shortage in the country adversely
affecting the consumers.

OPPORTUNITIES
• Great improved export potential for milk products of western as well as
traditional types.
• Established and expanding market for traditional dairy products.
• Increasing demand for fluid milk as well as value added products.
• By product Utilization for import substitution.
• Employment generation.
• Growing demand for milk and milk products.
• Liberalised policies in dairy sector.
• Availability of large resources of unconventional feeds and fodders
• Availability of animal production technologies for faster development and
effective implementation.
• There should be an integrated structure of marketing for milk and milk
products.
• Improved collection of data on contract basis through agencies.
• Market information intelligence system for milk and milk products.
1.2 COMPANY PROFILE:
The Dairy Development Department was established in 1958 in Tamilnadu. The
administrative and statutory control over all the milk cooperatives in the State was
transferred to the Dairy Development Department on first of August 1965. The
Commissioner for Milk Production and Dairy Development was made as the functional
Registrar under the Tamilnadu Cooperative Societies Act. With the adoption of 'Anand
pattern' in the State of Tamilnadu, Tamilnadu Co-operative Milk Producers' Federation
Limited was registered in the State on 1st February 1981. The commercial activities of
the Department such as Milk Procurement, Processing, Chilling, packing and sale of milk
to the consumers etc., to deal with by the Tamilnadu Dairy Development Corporation
Ltd., were transferred to the newly registered Tamilnadu Co-operative Milk Producers'
Federation Limited, popularly known as "Aavin".
The Commissioner for Milk Production and Dairy Development is the Head of
the Dairy Development Department. He is the functional registrar in respect of Dairy Co-
operatives in the State. He is also the Ex-officio Managing Director of the Tamilnadu
Cooperative Milk Producers' Federation Limited. i.e. Aavin.
The Commissioner for Milk Production and Dairy Development exercises all the
statutory powers with regard to the registration of societies, supervision, inspection,
inquiry, disputes, liquidation of milk cooperatives including the District Cooperative Milk
Producers' Unions and Federation under the relevant provisions of the Tamilnadu
Cooperative Societies Act, 1983 and Tamilnadu Cooperative Societies Rules, 1988.
While discharging the statutory functions, the Commissioner for Milk Production and
Dairy Development is assisted by the Deputy Milk Commissioner (Co-operation) in the
rank of Joint Registrar of Cooperative Societies and a Deputy Registrar at the
Headquarters besides 23 Deputy Registrars (Dairying) at the District level by way of
conferring the powers of the functional Registrar.
Salem Dairy complex is situated in about 46 acres of land bound by Sithanur and
Dhalavaipathy village. It is just located 6km away from Salem Railway junction near to
Govt. Medical College. The Salem District Cooperative Milk Producer’s Union Ltd., has
been registered on 10th July 1978 and started functioning from 7th October 1978. The
commercial production of products viz., Butter, Ghee and Skim Milk Powder started on
16th august 1983.

1.2.1 HISTORY
SALEM DISTRICT COOPERATIVE MILK PRODUCERS’ UNION LTD.
Arrival of the Tamilnadu Dairy Development Corporation Team 02/10/1974
Starting the first set of Societies 10/11/1974
Registration of Salem District Cooperative Milk Producers’ 10/07/1978
Union Ltd.
Starting of Salem District Cooperative Milk Producers’ 07/10/1978
Union Ltd.
Area of Operation Salem &
Nammakal
District
No. Of Societies Affiliated 1101
No. Of Functional Societies 1049
No. Of Regular Employees working in the Union 620
Total No. Of Farmer members 3, 27,006
(1) Women Members 1, 10,631
(2) Scheduled Caste & Tribes 48, 860
(3) Pouring Members 51, 311
1.2.2 MARKETING DEPARTMENT
Fluid milk is sold through two different distribution channels
 Milk consumer co-operative institution
 Private agents
The sales takes place outside the state like Ahmedabad, Delhi, Bombay, Pondicherry
and Indore. Head office is located at Chennai. Sales are done only on assignment basis.
The consumer societies and co-operative stores get 30 paise per litre agents get 15 paise
per litre margin. The main activities of marketing section are to float milk and milk
products to the consumer at various distribution points within the Salem district.
1.2.3 MARKETING
The Salem co-operative milk producers’ union ltd has been a dominant player for the last
three details in an in contested manner. On the basis of are the union’s market divided
into three types, which are as follows.
 Local market
 National market
 World market
Objective of Marketing Division
 To develop a market economic outlet for the products produced.
 To monitor customer’s preference.
 To ensure that the resulted milks are available for consumers in time.
 To develop new products to suit the changing requirements.
Types of Milk Being Sold
Two types of milk being sold namely
 Standardised milk
 Full cream milk
Particular Standardised milk Full cream milk
Quality Fat:4.5% Fat:6.0%
SNF:8.5% SNF:9.0%
Selling price Rs 14.50/litre Rs 16/litre
Transport charges Rs 0.25/litre Rs 0.25/litre

National Market
In national market, the products are marked by and only through Tamilnadu co-operative
milk producers’ federation (TCMPF).Through federation, the Salem milk union receives
order and delivers the products. The main markets for Salem union are Ahmedabad,
Delhi, Kolkata, Jodhpur, Gaya, Mumbai and Pondicherry.
Collection and Despatch Times
Collection morning : 8.30am-11.00am (Avg: 48,000litres)
DEPUTY MANAGER
Evening : 7.30pm-10.00pm (Avg: 30,000litres)
Dispatch morning : 9.00am-12.00pm
Evening ASSISTANT MANAGER
: 9.30am-2.30am
Marketed Products and Their Packing
Milk : 500mlMARKETING
250sachets
Butter : 500gram, 20kg
OFFICER
Ghee : 0.5kg, 1kg, 15kg
Skim milk powder : 0.5kg,SUPERINTENDENT
1kg and 15kg
Kova : 25,100,250,500grams

MASTERS

HEAD OFFICE MOBILE 2 OFFICE FILES & OTHER


PARLOUR WORKS
1.2.3.1.Marketing Section

1.2.4 MARKETING DISTRIBUTION OFFICE-SALEM


The Salem distribution office is located near the collector office .This distribution
office takes the function of the over view of the sales of Aavin milk and milk products in
the city. Milk is primarily distributed by agencies .the milk products are distributed by the
whole sellers and then the retailers which include outlets owned by the union and by the
retailers. There are 11 whole sale dealers who have become dealers by deposit of 50,000
for a period of 3 years .The whole sellers are the primary source of the goods to the
retailers the private owned outlets and parlours. The products that are sold most
frequently are ghee, butter and flavoured milk.
The private and government institutions are also offered Aavin milk products. The
distribution is primarily based on the 15 day credit, and 10 days is given for the payment
of deposit .There is an exclusion of the deposit for government institutions.
The head office also undertakes orders from the collector’s office for the
government functions and the other private orders are given at fixed rates at no
concessions or discounts .there area total of 4 agencies located in Ammapet, Gugai and
Shevapet areas for the wholesale distribution of the Aavin products .The milk is sold by
the various agencies on commission basis retailer of Aavin products are either private
owned or they are owned by the union itself. The private owned agencies are allowed to
goods for a deposit of Rs.1000. and they receive their supply wholly from the whole
sellers only.
1 No. Of Routes Operated 27
2 No. Of parlours (11 union & 9 Private) 20
3 No. Of Agents 482
4 No. Of Institutions 93

S.No Variety of Milk Fat SNF% Rate Sales Qty Sold


% (Rs) commission/ litre in LPD
1 Toned milk 3.0 8.5 19.00 0.65 8000
2 Standardised milk 4.5 8.5 25.00 1.00 73000
3 Aavin gold 5.0 8.5 26.00 0.82 72000
1.2.4.1 Distribution details
Average Sales of liquid milk/ day : 1, 53,000LPD
Average Qty of milk sold in Salem District : 1, 30,000 LPD
Average Qty of milk sold in Namakkal District : 23, 000 LPD
1.2.5 SALES OF PRODUCTION IN TONNES
YEAR BUTTER GHEE SMP
2000-2001 148.556 1302.05 2297.88
2001-2002 1168.53 1492.45 2502.42
2002-2003 1271.38 1894.77 2967.17
2003-2004 1458.79 1853.01 3935.99
2004-2005 1318.58 2488.58 3948.05
2005-2006 1128.54 1222.29 2344.31
2006-2007 1498.00 806.00 1607.00
2007-2008 1164.10 465.30 369.80
2008-2009 1151.95 425.96 621.23
2009-2010 1042 285.6 153.00
(upto Feb 2010)
1.2.5.1 Sales of Production

1.2.6 STORES DEPARTMENT


Stores are meant to collect and safe raw material ancillary materials and
machinery spare parts including electrical portion. There are three sections in stores
namely spares, daily consumable (oil, grease packing materials) and society materials.
The main function of the stores management is to maintain the stock level. The
total turnover of stores is in Erode and is insured. Packing materials are purchased once
in every 3 months. The cost of packing turnover is 25 lakhs. In the storage department,
but butter is stored at temperature 30 degree. The milk powder is also stored and when
there is demand they as converted into milk for sale. Two godown facilities to store the
milk powder, like 1000 tons and 800 tons capacity.
4.4.1 Raw material storage:
Number of Chiller :3
Capacity : 30,000 litres/ hr each
Temperature : 35° -4 °C
Raw Milk Silos :3
Capacity : 15,000 litres each at 4- 5°C
Number of Pasteurizers :3
Capacity : 10,000 litres / hr each
Number of Cream Pasteurizers
Capacity : 2,500 litres/ hr
Number of Cream Separators
5,000 litres/hr- 4 in no
10,000 litres /hr – 2 in no
Number of Silos
Pasteurized with whole milk : 5(30,000 lts each)
Pasteurized skim milk : 4(60000 lts each)
Pasteurized cream : 4(1- 10,000 lts & 3-5,000 lts)
1.2.7 FUNCTION OF STORES:
Receiving of Indent
When departments require materials they will be fill in the indent the standing
specification.
Marketing Enquiry
When it required the indent they are filled with necessary information made above
the price, quailing etc., if the storekeeper is satisfied with the order, which is placed.
Purchasing
Having received the purchase requisition then the form order are placed to the
suppliers. After the receipt of the article they are sent to the concerned department will
check up the stores if not articles will be disposed by the stores.
Payment
Articles are purchased either on cash or DD or cheque. The banks are arrival or the
articles then the accountant pays the amount on the advice of the sores department.
Stores
Any indent form that is receiving from any department requesting for an articles is
attendant by the stores .The indent form should contain the signature of the concerned
department.
VARIOUS RECORDS MAINTAINED IN STORE SECTION ARE:
 Dairy spare parts register I (DSR I)
 Dairy spare parts register II (DSR II)
 Electric spares register (ESR)
 Stationary book register I (SBR I)
 Stationary book register II (SBR II)
 Powder plant register (PPR)
 APS section register (APS)
 Hardware’s register (HWR)
 Equipment register (ER)
 Procurement & Input register(P&I)
 Consumer diary register(CDR)
 Consumable packing register(CPR)
 Service register(SR)
 Old parts register(OPR)
 Miscellaneous register

DAIRY PRODUCTS AND ANALOGUES

(a) Milk is the normal mammary secretion derived from complete milking of healthy
milch animal without either addition thereto or extraction there from. It shall be free from
colostrums. Milk of different classes and of different designations shall conform to the
standards laid down.
Total urea content in the milk shall not be more than 700 ppm

(b) Pasteurisation, “Pasteurised” and similar terms shall be taken to refer to the process
of heating every particle of milk of different classes to at least 63º C and holding at such
temperature continuously for at least 30 minutes or heating it to at least 71.5ºC and
holding at such temperature continuously for at least 15 seconds or an approved
temperature time combination that will serve to give a negative Phosphatase Test. All
pasteurised milk of different classes shall be cooled immediately to a temperature of
10ºC, or less

(c) Sterilisation: The term “sterilisation when used in association with milk, means
heating milk in sealed container continuously to a temperature of either 1150 C for 15
minutes or at least 1300 C for a period of one second or more in a continuous flow and
then packed under aseptic condition in hermetically sealed containers to ensure
preservation at room temperature for a period not less than 15 days from the date of
manufacture;
(d) Boiled Milk means milk which has been brought to boil.

(e) Flavoured Milk, by whatever name called, may contain nuts (whole, fragmented or
ground) chocolate, coffee or any other edible flavour, edible food colours and cane sugar.
Flavoured milk shall be pasteurised, sterilised or boiled. The type of milk shall be
mentioned on the label.

(f) Mixed Milk means a combination of milk of cow, buffalo, sheep, goat or any other
milch animal and may be a combination of any of this milk which has been made and
conforms to the standards given in the Article 2 below.

(g) Standardised Milk means cow milk or buffalo milk or sheep milk or goat milk or a
combination of any of this milk that has been standardised to fat and solids-not-fat
percentage by the adjustment of milk solids. Standardised milk shall be pasteurised and
shall show a negative Phosphate Test.

(h) Recombined Milk means the homogenised product prepared from milk fat, non-fat-
milk solids and water. Recombined milk shall be pasteurised and shall show a negative
Phosphatase test.

(i) Toned Milk means the product prepared by admixture of cow or buffalo milk or both
with fresh skimmed milk; or by admixture of cow or buffalo milk or both that has been
standardised to fat and solids-not-fat percentage given and by adjustment of milk solids.
It shall be pasteurised and shall show a negative Phosphatase Test. When fat or
dry non-fat-milk solids are used, it shall be ensured that the product remains
homogeneous and no deposition of solids takes place on standing.

(j) Double Toned Milk means the product prepared by admixture of cow or buffalo milk
or both with fresh skimmed milk, or by admixture of cow or buffalo milk or both that has
been standardised to fat and solids-not-fat percentage given and by adjustment of milk
solids. It shall be pasteurised and shall show a negative Phosphatase Test. When fat or dry
non-fat milk solids are used, it shall be ensured that the product remains homogeneous
and no deposition of solids takes place on standing.

(k) Skimmed Milk means the product prepared from milk from which almost all the
milk fat has been removed mechanically.

(l) Full Cream Milk means milk or a combination of buffalo or cow milk or a product
prepared by combination of both that has been standardised to fat and solids-not-fat
percentage, given in Article 2 below, by adjustment/addition of milk solids, Full Cream
Milk shall be pasteurised. It shall show a negative Phosphatase test. It shall be packed in
clean, sound and sanitary containers properly sealed so as to prevent contamination.

(m) Milk Products means the products obtained from milk such as cream, malai, curd,
skimmed milk curd, Chhana, skimmed-milk Chhana, cheese, processed cheese, ice-
cream, milk ices, condensed milk-sweetened and unsweetened, condensed skimmed
milk-sweetened and unsweetened, milk powder, skimmed milk powder, partly skimmed
milk powder, Khoya, infant milk food, table butter and desi butter.
(n) Cream including sterilised cream means the product of cow or buffalo milk or a
combination thereof. It shall be free from starch and other ingredients foreign to milk. It
may be of following three categories, namely:-
1. Low fat cream--containing milk fat not less than 25.0 percent by weight.
2. Medium fat cream--containing milk fat not less than 40.0 percent by weight.
3. High fat cream--containing milk fat not less than 60.0 percent by weight.

(o) Cream Powder means the product obtained by partial removal of water from cream
obtained from milk of cow and / or buffalo. The fat and / or protein content of the cream
may be adjusted by addition and/ or withdrawal of milk constituents in such a way as not
to alter the whey protein to casein ratio of the milk being adjusted. It shall be of uniform
colour and shall have pleasant taste and flavour free from off flavour and rancidity. It
shall also be free from vegetable oil/ fat, mineral oil, added flavour and any substance
foreign to milk. The product may contain food additives permitted in these regulations
including. It shall conform to the microbiological requirements prescribed in. It shall
conform to the following requirements:-
(i) Moisture Not more than 5.0 percent
(ii) Milk fat Not less than 42.0 percent
(iii)Milk protein in Milk solid not fat Not less than 34.0 percent
(p) Malai means the product rich in butter fat prepared by boiling and cooling cow or
buffalo milk or a combination thereof. It shall contain not less than 25.0 per cent milk fat.

(q) Dahi or Curd means the product obtained from pasteurised or boiled milk by
souring, natural or otherwise, by a harmless lactic acid or other bacterial culture. Dahi
may contain added cane sugar. Dahi shall have the same minimum percentage of milk fat
and milk solids-not-fat as the milk from which it is prepared. Where Dahi or curd is sold
or offered for sale without any indication of class of milk, the standards prescribed for
Dahi prepared from buffalo milk shall apply. Milk solids may also be used in preparation
of this product.

BRAND EQUITY

1.3 BRAND :

A brand is a name, term, symbol or design to identify the goods or services and to
differentiate them from those of the competitors. American marketing association defines
a brand as, the use of a name, term, symbol or design, or some combination of these , to
identify the product of a certain seller from those of competitors.
BRAND NAME :

That part of a brand which can be vocalized- UTTERABLE. for EXAMPLES: FIAT
CAR , SONY T .V, BATA SHOE ETC.
BRANDING :

B randing is the practice of giving a specified name to a product or group of products of


one seller. Branding is the process of finding fixing the means of identification.
Reasons for branding:
1. It is an instrument for sales promotion in the market, where stiff competition exists.
2. It facilitates easy advertisement and publicity.
3. It creates special consumer preference over the product.
4. Sales can be increased through brands.
5. It arrests the immediate attention of buyers.
6. It differentiates the goods of a producer from the goods of competitors.
7. It ensures standard quality and satisfaction to buyers.

1.3.1 BRAND EQUITY

Brand equity research measures your brand value. We use leading edge brand equity
research models and quantitative marketing research tools to tailor each client firm's
research analysis study.

Here are examples of differing goals companies may have for brand equity research:

1. Track the components of brand equity as compared to benchmark and


competitive brands.
2. Explore decision options available relating to branding by assessing the depth of
brand strength of the current corporate or product brands. A brand name or
product line naming change, for example, may provide an opportunity.
3. Assess brand equity power in terms of product or business line extensions using
an existing brand or a brand naming variation of the existing brand.

Brand Equity Research Methods


Brand equity market research methodology is straight-forward and our portfolio of
marketing research tools and methods provide the needed range of measurements. As for
any study, a brand equity study research methodology is driven by management and
research objectives. While most brand equity research studies are viewed as quantitative
market research tasks, we may recommend qualitative research if the goals include an
exploratory research assessment or evaluation of brand naming alternatives.

Full brand equity research studies often begin with Brand Base research, followed by
Brand Qualitative research and targeted quantitative Brand Equity Screening Survey
studies. If the objectives are primarily for brand equity tracking, then we may proceed
directly with a quantitative research design and execution.

We build our brand equity research methodology from the following core components.

 Brand Base Research


Here we gauge the brand equity landscape evaluating existing available research.
Our review includes existing brand architecture of both client and competitive
brands. We conduct far reaching interviews with client management, field sales,
product development and customer service staff. We talk to sales people in the
channel about their own preferences and their perception of customers. We cap
Brand Base Research with an initial round of qualitative depth interviews among
a small sample of client product customers and those loyal to competitor brands.

 Brand Qualitative Research


we employ a unique qualitative methods in brand equity research studies
involving the exploration of branding options. Our typical starting point is a small
sample round of depth interviews. In the beginning stages of brand equity
development, this method can be far more useful than focus groups which may
come later. Here, we use a non-directive design and style, combined with
projective interviewing techniques to uncover buyer motivations and brand
perceptions. We do not bombard respondents with a laundry list of questions, but
rather, let them talk freely in a wide ranging manner about their brand experience
with client brands and competitive brands. We may continue the qualitative
exploration with a larger sample using an online qualitative time-extended method
which combines both qualitative and quantitative assessments. If certain
conditions exist, we may add focus group discussions to the qualitative market
research work.
 Brand Quantitative Research
Here we precisely measure with custom and tracking studies the components of
brand equity:
 Brand Awareness
 Brand Image Associations
 Brand preference
 Brand loyalty and switching likelihood

1.3.1.2 Brand Awareness:

Brand awareness is related to the strength of the brand in memory, as reflected by


Consumers' ability to identify various brand elements (i.e., the brand name, logo, symbol,
Character, packaging, and slogan) under different conditions. Brand awareness relates to
the
Likelihood that a brand will come to mind and the ease with which it does so given
different type
Of cues.
Several measures of awareness of brand elements can be employed (Srull, 1984).
Choosing the appropriate measure depends on the relative importance of brand awareness
for
Consumer behavior in the category and the resulting role it plays to the success of the
marketing
Program for the brand. For example, if research reveals that many consumer decisions are
made
At the point-of-purchase where the brand name, logo, packaging, and so on will be
physically
Present and visible, then brand recognition and visual awareness measures will be
important. If
Research reveals that consumer decisions are mostly made in other settings away from
the pointof-Purchase where the brand elements are not physically present, on the other
hand, then brand.

1.3.1.3 Image

Brand awareness is an important first step in building brand equity, but usually not
sufficient. For most customers in most situations, other considerations, such as the
meaning or
image of the brand, also come into play. One vitally important aspect of the brand is its
image,
as reflected by the associations that consumers hold toward the brand.

Brand associations come in many different forms and can be classified along many
different dimensions. Consistent with the laddering concept described above, it is useful
to make a distinction between more "lowerlevel"considerations related to consumer
perceptions of specific attributes and benefits versusmore "higher-level" considerations
related to consumer responses and their judgments andfeelings toward the brand. There is
an obvious relationship between the two levels as consumers'responses typically are a
result of perceptions of specific attributes and benefits about the brand.

1.3.1.4 Brand Preference

Brand preference relates to the ways in which the product or service attempts to
meet
customers' more functional needs. Thus, brand preference refers to the intrinsic properties
of
the brand in terms of inherent product or service characteristics. How well does the brand
rate
on objective assessments of quality? To what extent does the brand satisfy utilitarian,
aesthetic,
and economic customer needs and wants in the product or service category?
The specific performance attributes and benefits making up functionality will vary widely
by category. Nevertheless, there are five important types of attributes and benefits that
often
underlie brand performance and can be measured, as follows:

1) Primary characteristics & supplementary features. Customers often have


beliefs about the levels at which the primary characteristics of the product
operate. Additionally, they may also may have beliefs as to special, perhaps even
patented, features or secondary elements of a product that complement these
primary characteristics.

2) Product reliability, durability, & serviceability. Reliability refers to the


consistency of performance over time and from purchase to purchase. Durability
refers to the expected economic life of the product. Serviceability refers to the
ease of servicing the product if it needs repair.

3) Service effectiveness, efficiency, and empathy. Service effectiveness refers to


how completely the brand satisfies customers’ service requirements. Service
efficiency refers to the manner by which these services are delivered in terms of
speed, responsiveness, etc. Service empathy refers to the extent to which service
providers are seen as trusting, caring, and with customer’s interests in mind.

4) Style and design. Consumers may have associations to the product that go
beyond its functional aspects to more aesthetic considerations such as its size,
shape, materials, and color involved. Thus, performance may also depend on
sensory aspects as to how a product looks and feels and perhaps even what it
sounds or smells like.

5) Price. Finally, the pricing policy for the brand can create associations in
consumers' minds to the relevant price tier or level for the brand in the category,
as well as to its corresponding price volatility or variance

1.3.1.5 Brand loyalty:

Brand loyalty in marketing, consists of a consumer's commitment to repurchase or


otherwise continue using the brand and can be demonstrated by repeated buying of a
product or service or other positive behaviors such as word of mouth advocacy.

Brand loyalty is more than simple repurchasing, however. Customers may repurchase a
brand due to situational constraints a lack of viable alternatives, or out of convenience.
Such loyalty is referred to as "spurious loyalty". True brand loyalty exists when
customers have a high relative attitude toward the brand which is then exhibited through
repurchase behavior. This type of loyalty can be a great asset to the firm: customers are
willing to pay higher prices, they may cost less to serve, and can bring new customers to
the firm. For example, if Joe has brand loyalty to Company A he will purchase Company
A's products even if Company B's are cheaper and/or of a higher quality.

An example of a major brand loyalty program that extended for several years and spread
worldwide is Pepsi Stuff. Perhaps the most significant contemporary example of brand
loyalty is the dedication that many Mac users show to the Apple company and its
products.

1.4 REVIEW OF LITERATURE


A literature review is a body of text that aims to review the critical points of
current knowledge including substantive findings as well as theoretical and
methodological contributions to a particular topic. Literature reviews are secondary
sources, and as such, do not report any new or original experimental work. This literature
review was undertaken to know about the brand equity of aavin brand.
“The ‘added value’ with which a given brand endows a product” - Farquhar

Financial meaning from the Perspective of the value of the brand to the firm, and
customer-based meaning the value of the brand for the customer which comes from a
marketing decision-making context. -Kim, Kim, and An 2003

Brand equity has also been defined as “the enhancement in the perceived utility and
desirability a brand name confers on a product” -Lassar, Mittal and Sharma

High brand equity generates a “differential effect”, higher “brand knowledge”, and a
larger “consumer response”,which normally leads to better brand performance, both from
a financial and a customer perspective. -Keller 2003

High brand equity is considered to be a competitive advantage since: it implies that firms
can charge a premium; there is an increase in customer demand; extending a brand
becomes easier; communication campaigns are more effective; there is better trade
leverage; margins can be greater; and the company becomes less vulnerable to
competition -Bendixen, Bukasa, and Abratt
CHAPTER II

2.1 TITLE OF THE STUDY :

A study on BRAND EQUITY of AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS IN SALEM CITY.

2.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY :

 To study Brand Awareness for Aavin.


 To study on Consumer Preference of Aavin Brand.
 To study Brand Loyalty of Aavin Brand.

2.3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY :


 The study would contain analysis of the factors that contribute to the brand and
says about how consumers and non consumers are aware of the brand.
 It say about the consumer preference , are they loyal to the brand.
 This study also reveals the brand equity of the consumers and non consumers in
different wings.

2.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

 E very study will go according to the rules and regulations of the organization
because of that the researcher is unable to consult every department in the
organization.

 This study was conducted in short period of time.

 Due to the short period of time the sample size is 100 based on convenience
sampling.
2.5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It
may be understood as a science of how research is done scientifically.
RESEARCH DESIGN
Research design provides the glue that holds the research project together.
It is the basic framework or plan for the study that guides the collection and analysis of
data. A design is used to structure the research, to show how all of the major parts of the
research project-the samples or groups, measures, treatments or programs, and methods
of assignment work together to try to address the central research questions.
The type of the research for this study is descriptive research. Descriptive
researches studies are studies, which are concerned with describing the characteristics of
a particular individual or a group. The major purpose of descriptive research is
description of the state affairs as it exists at present. Since in this study, training
programmes of Salem steel Plant is studied, so it is a descriptive study.
SOURCES OF DATA COLLECTION:
1. PRIMARY DATA:
Primary data were collected by interviewing customers with the help of
questionnaires and discussions with the management staffs of different department.
2. SECONDARY DATA:
Secondary data were collected from company profiles, records, magazines, annual
reports and so on.
RESEARCH INSTRUMENT :

Questionnaire method is used as research instrument in this study. The questionnaire


consists of both open ended and closed ended.
TOOLS FOR ANALYSIS:
PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS:
Simple percentage analysis refers to a special kind of ratio in making comparison
between two or more data and to describe relations between the data. Percentage can also
be used to compare the relative terms, the distribution of two or more series of data.
Simple percentage = No. Of respondents x 100
Total no. of respondents

2.6 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

TABLE NO .1

TABLE SHOWING THE RESPONSES : MALE AND FEMALE LEVEL

DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

MALE 39 39

FEMALE 61 61

TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE : Primary data

INTERPRETATION :

39% are male and 61% are female of the responses from the people in salem city .
CHART NO.1

MALE, FEMALE RESPONSE


TABLE NO.2

TABLE SHOWING THE AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

DIMENSIONS NO.OF RESPONDENTS PRECENTAGE(%)


20-30 20 20
30-40 50 50
40-50 25 25
ABOVE 50 5 5
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:

20% of people respondents was of 20-30 age group and 50% was of 30-40 and 25%
was of 40-50 and 5% was of above 50.
CHART NO.2

RESPONDENTS AGE GROUP


TABLE NO.3

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS’ CHOICES BETWEEN BRANDS

DIMENSIONS NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE(%)


CARE 50 50
SOME WHAT CARE 28 28
DONT’CARE 22 22
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:

50% of respondents care and 28% some what care and 22% don’t care about the
choices between the brands.
CHART NO .3

RESPONDENTS ABOUT THE CHOICES BETWEEN THE BRANDS

TABLE NO.4
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS FAMILIAR LEVEL OF AAVIN MILK
PRODUCTS

DIMENSIONS NO OF PERCENTAGE(%)
RESPONDENTS
VERY FAMILIAR 38 38
FAMILIAR 22 22
HEARD 24 24
HEARD BUT NOT YET 16 16
BOUGHT
NEVRE HEARD 0 0
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:

38% are very familiar , 22% are familiar, 24% have heard,16 % have heard but not yet
bought and 0% never heard about aavin milk products.

CHART NO.4
FAMILIAR LEVEL OF AAVIN MILK PROCUCTS

TABLE NO.5
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS OF HOW THEY KNOW AAVIN MILK
PRODUCTS

DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE(%)


NES PAPER 16 16
YELLOW PAGES 4 4
PUBLIC COMMUNICATION 52 52
EXHIBITION 28 28
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:

Respondents know aavin milk products by news paper 16%,yellow pages 4%,public
communication 52%, and exhibition 28%.

CHART NO. 5
RESPONDENTS OF HOW THEY KNOW AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS
TABLE NO.6
RESPONDENTS RANK FOR THE AAVIN BRAND OF MILK PRODUCTS
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS
EXCELLEN GOOD NEITHER BAD VERY TOTAL
T GOOD OR BAD BAD
QUALITY 34 36 18 12 0 100
PRICE 14 34 38 14 0 100
TASTE 28 34 26 12 0 100
PACKAGE 26 28 38 9 2 100
SERVICE 20 34 20 22 4 100
QUALITY

DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS
EXCELLENT GOOD NEITHER BAD (%) VERY TOTAL
(%) (%) GOOD OR BAD (%) (%)
BAD (%)
QUALITY 34 36 18 12 0 100
PRICE 14 34 38 14 0 100
TASTE 28 34 26 12 0 100
PACKAGE 26 28 38 9 2 100
SERVICE 20 34 20 22 4 100
QUALITY

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:
Respondents has given ranks as 34% excellent, 36% good, 18% neither good
nor bad,and 12% bad in quality.
Respondents has given ranks as 14% excellent, 34% good, 38% neither good nor
bad, and 14% bad in price.
Respondents has given ranks as 28% excellent, 34% good, 26% neither good nor bad
and, 12% bad in taste.
Respondents has given ranks as 26% excellent, 28% good, 38% neither good nor bad,
9% bad and 2% very bad in package.
Respondents has given ranks as 20% excellent, 34% good, 20% neither good nor bad,
22% bad and 4% very bad in service quality.

CHART NO.6
RESPONDENTS RANK FOR THE AAVIN BRAND OF MILK PRODUCTS
TABLE NO .7

RESPONDENTS CONSUMPTION OF MILK

DIMENSIONS NO OF PERCENTAGE (%)


RESPONDENTS
BELOW 1LTR 30 30
1-2 LTR 50 50
ABOVE 2 LTR 20 20
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE : Primary data

INTERPRETATION:

Respondents consumption of milk below 1 ltr is 30%,1-2 ltr is 50%.above 2 ltr is


20%.

CHART NO. 7

RESPONDENTS CONSUMPTION OF MILK


TABLE NO. 8

RESPONDENTS BRAND OF MILK USED

DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)


AAVIN 48 48
AROKIYA 28 28
KOMATHA 0 0
OTHERS 24 24
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:
Respondents brand of milk used was 48% of aavin,28% of arokiya,24 % of
others.

CHART NO.8

RESPONDENTS BRAND OF MILK USED


TABLE NO .9
PREFERENCE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND

DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS TOTAL


AGREE DISAGREE NEITHER AGREE AGREE
AGREE SLIGHTLY STRONGLY
NOR
DISAGREE
HIGH QUALITY 20 20 55 0 5 100
PROCESSED IN 40 20 15 25 0 100
HYGIENE
PLACE
AVAILABLE OF 50 30 0 0 20 100
MORE
PARLOURS
AVAILABLE AT 30 15 5 1O 40 100
ANY TIME
COMPARED TO
OTHER BRAND
HIGH QUALITY 40 10 10 20 20 100
OF TASTE
ITS FRESH 40 0 20 15 25 100

DIMENSION NO OF RESPONDENTS TOTAL(


S AGREE(% DISAGR NEITHER AGREE AGREE %)
) EE AGREE NOR SLIGHTL STRONGLY(
(%) DISAGREE( Y %)
%) (%)
HIGH 20 20 55 0 5 100
QUALITY
PROCESSE 40 20 15 25 0 100
D IN
HYGIENE
PLACE
AVAILABLE 50 30 0 0 20 100
OF MORE
PARLOURS
AVAILABLE 30 15 5 1O 40 100
AT ANY
TIME
COMPARED
TO OTHER
BRAND
HIGH 40 10 10 20 20 100
QUALITY
OF TASTE
ITS FRESH 40 0 20 15 25 100

SOURCE: Primary data

INTERPRETATION:
Respondents has given preference level as 20% agree, 20% disagree, 25%
neither agree nor disagree, o% agree slightly and 5% agree strongly for high quality.

Respondents has given preference level as 40% agree, 20% disagree, 15%
neither agree nor disagree, 25% agree slightly and 0% agree strongly for processed in
hygiene place.
Respondents has given preference level as 50% agree, 30% disagree, 0%
neither agree nor disagree, o% agree slightly and 20% agree strongly for available of
more parlours.
Respondents has given preference level as 30% agree, 15% disagree, 5%
neither agree nor disagree, 1o% agree slightly and 40% agree strongly for available at
any time compared to other brand.
Respondents has given preference level as 40% agree, 10% disagree, 10%
neither agree nor disagree, 2o% agree slightly and 20% agree strongly for high quality of
taste.
Respondents has given preference level as 40% agree, 0% disagree, 20%
neither agree nor disagree,15% agree slightly and 25% agree strongly for its fresh.

CHART NO.9
PREFERENCE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND

TABLE NO. 10
RESPONDENTS USAGE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE(%)
1-2 YEARS 32 32
2-3 YEARS 22 22
3-4 YEARS 30 30
MORE THAN 4 YEARS 5 5
NO RESPONSE 11 11
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents usage level of aavin brand is 32% of 1-2 years,22% of 2-3 years,30% of 3-4
years,5% of moe than 4 years,and 11% of no response.

CHART NO .10
RESPONDENTS USAGE LEVEL OF AAVIN BRAND
TABLE NO. 11
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL IN CHOICE OF
BRAND
DIMENSIONS NO OF PERCENTAGE
RESPONDENTS (%)
YES 74 74
NO 4 4
NO RESPONSE 22 22
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents satisfaction level in choice of brand is 74% yes,4% no and 22% no
response.

CHART NO.11
RESPONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL IN CHOICE OF BRAND
TABLE NO.12
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS USAGE OF BRAND AT PRESENT
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)
AAVIN 56 56
HUTSUN 22 22
KOMATHA 0 0
OTHERS 22 22
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents usage of brand at present is 56% aavin,22% hutsun,0% komatha,22%
others.

CHART NO.12
RESPONDENTS USAGE OF BRAND AT PRESENT
TABLE NO.13
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS LIKING OF TELLING AAVIN BRAND TO
OTHERS
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)
YES 74 74
NO 26 26
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents liking of telling aavin brand to others is 74%of yes and 26% of no.

CHART NO.13
RESPONDENTS LIKING OF TELLING AAVIN BRAND TO OTHERS
TABLE NO.14
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS LEVEL WHO TOLD ABOUT AAVIN TO
OTHERS.
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE(%)
YES 60 60
NO 40 40
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents level who told about aavin to others is 60% of yes and 40%of no.

CHART NO.14
RESPONDENTS LEVEL WHO TOLD ABOUT AAVIN TO OTHERS.
TABLE NO .15
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS REASON FOR BUYING AAVIN BRAND
DIMENSIONS NO OF REPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)
GOOD TASTE 38 38
LOW PRICE 24 24
QUALITY 14 14
AVAILABILITY 24 24
TOTAL 100 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents reason for buying aavin brand is 38% for good taste, 24% for
low price, 14% for quality and 24% for availability.

CHART NO.15
RESPONDENTS REASON FOR BUYING AAVIN BRAND
TABLE NO.16
TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS OPINION RANK ABOUT AAVIN MILK
PRODUCTS
DIMENSIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE(%)
QUALITY 40 40
BRAND NAME 6 6
LOW PRICE 20 20
SERVICE QUALITY 14 14
TASTE 20 20
TOTAL 1OO 100

SOURCE: Primary data


INTERPRETATION:
Respondents opinion rank about aavin milk products is 40% is quality,6 % is brand
name, 20% IS lowpricE,14% is service quality,20% is taste.

CHART NO.16
RESPONDENTS OPINION RANK ABOUT AAVIN MILK PRODUCTS
FINDINGS:

 60% of respondents has recommended aavin to others


 74% of respondents has given yes to liking of telling aavin brand to others
 50% of people prefere aavin brand

 34% of “excellent” and 36% of “ good” with respect to quality is given to aavin
brand.
 Respondents know aavin milk products by public communication 52%, and
exhibition 28%.
 38% are very familiar about aavin milk products in salem city.
 48% of respondents use aavin brand.

CHAPTER III

SUGESSTIONS:
 Aavin could improve their market by promoting through advertisements.
 There should be a proper communication between the dealers or agencies.
 Aavin could sell their products in private institutions, retail outlets, super market
etc..,
 Aavin could increase the quantity of milk products.
 Promote more parlours in the salem city.
 If the organization adapts modern technologies and equipments it will update the
current industry position.

CONCLUSION:
 Brand equity is an important aspect in marketing any product. Because people
should be aware of them first then only they can afford the product
 This research would help the organization to know where their brand equity level
is present, and it will improve in the quality and quantity of the products.
 Most of the respondents are aware and prefer aavin but the availability is less.
 The research helped the researcher to learn about aavin dairy, about how they
market their products, and about the dealers and the agencies.It also helped the
researcher to know about different departments and how they work in the dairy
plant.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
REFERENCE:
1. GEORGE E.BELCH, ADVERTISING & SALES PROMOTION,
Sixth Edition TATA MC EDITION.
2. C.R.KOTHARI, RESEARCH METHODOLOGY METHODS &TECHNIQUES,
second edition
3. SALES PROMOTION ,Encyclopedia of small business,2nd ed., (2010)
WEBSITE:
1. www.aavin.com (June 2010)
2. www.surveysystem.com (June 2010)
3. www.google.co.in (June 2010)
4. www. wikipedia.com (June 2010)
5.www.quirks.com (June 2010)

ANNEXURE
QUESTIONNAIRE
1. Name :
2. Address:

3. Age:
a) 20-30
b) 30-40
c) 40-50
d) Above 50
4. How many members are there in your family?
a) 2-4
b) 4-6
c) 6-8
d) Above 8

5. How much do you care about your choice between different brands of milk
products?
a) Care
b) Somewhat care
c) Don’t care

6. Name the brands you know?


a)
b)
c)
d)

7. Identify the brands by their logo or images?


a) C)

b)

8. How familiar are you with aavin milk products?


a) Very familiar
b) Familiar
c) Heard
d) Head but not yet bought
e) Never heard

9. How you know about aavin milk products?


a) News paper
b) Yellow pages
c) Public communication
d) Exhibition

10. What are the milk products you are aware of aavin brand?
a)
b)
c)
11. Below are number of statements that have been made about aavin brand. For each
statement please indicate how much do you rank that it applies to aavin brand for
milk products?

1-excellent 2-good 3-neither good nor bad 4-bad 5-very bad

a) Quality
b) Price
c) Taste
d) Package
e) Service Quality

12. How much milk you consume per day?


a) Below 1 ltr
b) 1-2 ltr
c) Above 2 ltr

13. Which brand of milk you have been used?


a) Aavin
b) Arokiya
c) Komatha
d) Others
14. Why do you prefer aavin brand of products, if you’re using?

Agree Disagree Neither Agree Agree Slightly Agree Strongly


Or Disagree

High Quality
Processed In Hygine
Place
Available Of More
Parlours
Available At Any
Time Compared To
Other Brand
High Quality Of
Taste
Its Fresh

15. If you’re using aavin brand how long you have been using?
a) 1-2 Years
b) 2-3 Years
c) 3-4 Years
d) More Than 4 Years

16. Are you satisfied with the choice of your brand?


a) Yes
b) No

17. Which brand your using at present?


a) Aavin
b) Hutsun
c) Komatha
d) Others

18. Would you like to tell others about aavin?


a) Yes
b) No

19. Have you already told to others about aavin?


a) Yes
b) No

20. Reason for buying aavin brand compared to others?


a) Good Taste
b) Low Price
c) Quality
d) Availability
21. If you’re, using aavin please give your opinion about the following feature of
aavin milk products?

Rank

Quality

Brand Name

Low Price
Service Quality

Taste