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B I J U PAT N A I K I N S T I T U T E O F I T &

MANAGEMENT STUDIES

MBA

B U S I N E S S P RO J EC T R E P O RT

2018

STUDENT NAME BPUT REGD. NO.


ROSALIN MOHANTY 1706258119

F A C U LT Y G U I D E C O R P O R AT E G U I D E

BISHNU PRASAD KAR DEBESH NANDA


A PROJECT REPORT ON

ANALYSIS OF LOAN TO DEPOSIT RATIO OF INDIAN


OVERSEAS BANK FOR THE LAST 3 YEARS

A SIP REPORT SUBMITTED

TO

BIJU PATNAIK UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY,


ODISHA

In the partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of

Master of Business Administration (2017 – 2019)

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF SUBMITTED BY

EXTERNAL GUIDE ROSALIN MOHANTY

MR. DEBESH KUMAR NANDA REGN NO. 1706258119

INTERNAL GUIDE

PROF BISHNU PRASAD KAR


CERTIFICATE BY THE INTERNAL GUIDE

This is to certify that the Project Work titled “ANALYSIS OF LOAN TO DEPOSIT

RATIO” is a benefice work of MISS ROSALIN MOHANTY Reg. No.

1706258119 carried out in partial fulfilment for the award of degree of MBA of

Biju Patnaik University of Technology, Odisha under my guidance. This project

work is original and not submitted earlier for the award of any degree / diploma

or associate ship of any other University / Institution.

Signature of the Guide

Date:
Place:
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to convey my heartiest gratitude to several people, for their support
and guidance which helped me complete my summer internship project. I would
like to thank INDIAN OVERSEAS BANK for giving me an opportunity to do
my internship in their esteemed organisation. My special appreciation extends to
Mr. DEBESH KUMAR NANDA for his support. Finally, I would like to express
my sincere thanks to my faculty guide PROF. BISHNU PRASAD KAR (BIITM)
who gave me a proper guidance and support to complete my project.

I extend my special gratitude to Dr. P. K. Tripathy principal of BIITM and Mr.


K. Chandrasekhar, placement department for giving me this opportunity.

I take this opportunity to express my deep sense of gratitude to my parents for


their constant and inspiration in every walk of life.

ROSALIN MOHANTY

MBA/1706258119
DECLARATION

I ROSALIN MOHANTY, student of MBA Course in BIJU PATNAIK INSTITUTE OF

MANAGEMENT STUDIES, BHUBANESHWAR declare that project report titled “ANALYSIS

OF LOAN TO DEPOSIT RATIO” at INDIAN OVERSEAS BANK which is being submitted in

the partial fulfilment of the requirement for the summer internship project.

This is my original work and has not been submitted as part of another degree or diploma of

other business school or university.

The findings and conclusion of this project report are based on my personal study and

experience during the tenure of my summer internship.

SIGNATURE OF THE STUDENT


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The loan to deposit ratio (LDR) is used to assess a bank’s liquidity by comparing a bank’s total
loans to its total deposits for the same period. This number is expressed as a %. If the ratio is
too high it means that the bank may not have enough liquidity to cover any unforeseen fund
requirements. Conversely if the ratio is too low, the bank may not be earning as much as it
could .

To calculate the loan to deposit ratio divide the total amount of loans granted by a bank over a
specific period, otherwise known as deposit balance. A loan to deposit ratio of 100% would
imply that a bank lends one dollar to customers for every dollar it receives in deposits. Multiple
factors can drive changes in the loan to deposit ratios. For instance when the federal reserve
lowers interest rates, it encourages consumers to take out loans. Simultaneously however these
rates deter investors from investing or buying securities thus increasing the amount of cash
they tend to deposit into bank accounts. Shifts such as these can lower the overall loan to
deposit rates. When the interest rate environment improves deposits grow at a slower pace than
loans because higher interest rates push investors to invest more money, reducing the number
of bank deposits they make. Conversely when rates are lower deposit growth increases like it
did during the low rate environment from 2011 to 2017, the average loan to deposit ratio for
all US banks was roughly 70%.

Ideal LDR ratio

Tradition and prudence indicate that the ideal loan to deposit ratio is 80 to 90%. A loan to
deposit ratio of 100% means a bank loaned one dollar to customers for every dollar received
in deposits it received. It also means a bank will not have significant reserves available for
expected or unexpected contingencies.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 CHAPTER1

Introduction

Scope, objectives, methodology, limitations

 CHAPTER 2

3C report

 CHAPTER 3

Analysis and findings

 CHAPTER4

Suggestions and conclusion

 Bibliography

 Annexure: SAMPLE EXECUTIVE REPORT


CHAPTER1
INTRODUCTION
Banking has come to occupy a pivotal position in a nation’s economy. According to the modern
concept , banking is a business which not only deals with borrowings, ending and remittance
of funds, but also an important instrument for fostering economic growth. Banking regulation
act 1949 defines the term banking as the accepting for the purpose of lending or investment of
deposits of money from the public or otherwise and withdrawable by cheque, draft, order or
otherwise. Thus essentials of banking are:

There should be acceptance of deposits.

Deposits should be from the public.

Deposits should be repayable on demand or expiry of a term or after specified periods. The
purpose of deposits should be lending or investment.

Bank is an institution which deals in money and credit. It buys money from depositors and sells
to the borrowers It is body of persons whether incorporated or not who carry on the business
of banking. A bank may be defined as a corporation or person which collects deposits from the
public, repayable on demand and which supplies facilitates all kinds of exchanges.

A deposit is the monetary amount that is placed with some entity.the deposit is a credit for the
party who placed it , and may be taken back , transferred to some other party or used for a
purchase at a later date.

Loan is the lending of money from one individual , organization or entity to another individual,
organization or entity.

We are going to study the loan deposit ratio of IOB for the last 3 years.

SCOPE
This project will be a learning device for finance student.

Through this we can study various loans and deposits.

The project will be a learning of ratio, this will show the liquidity position of the company and
also how do they maintain a particular liquidity position.

OBJECTIVES
To analyse trend of various deposits and loans.

Segregating various deposits and loans to assess their importance.


Deriving their ratio of deposit to loans at wholesale basis.

METHODOLOGY
RESEARCH DESIGN

Study is all about the deposit and loans offered to small and medium enterprises.

It predicts the future growth of the bank by providing better services by bank can earn
more profit.

Secondary data is required for analysis of report.

Method of data collection

Primary data – information is gathered through discussions with employees of IOB


and visiting the IOB branches.

Secondary data- it is collected from already sanctioned loan files.

Bank and borrower’s annual report

Project proposal

Respective banks websites

Already researched data.

LIMITATION
We cannot do comparisons with other companies unless and until we have data of
other companies on the same subject.

Only the printed data about the company will be available and not the back end
details.

Future plans of the company will not be disclosed to the trainees.


LITERATURE REVIEW
Leonall C. Andersen and Albert E. Burger (1969) in their work concluded that the study of
commercial bank portfolio behaviour is important for at least two major reasons; FIRST,
Commercial bank portfolio behaviour is an important explanatory factor for the magnitudes
and changes in the economic quantities like overall savings and credit creation in economy.
SECOND, Portfolio behaviour is a key determinant of the cost and flow of credit to specific
sectors of the economy. The authors define bank behaviour regarding asset portfolio as a
process of allocating a given amount of total deposits between non-earning assets and
earning assets. The earning assets are actually allocated to loans and advances.
S. N. Kapur (1972) empirically studied the portfolio behavior of Indian Commercial banks and
found that the rate of interest remains a key factor to influence crucial variables of bank
portfolio. In the same paper he studied the banks behavior in the context of loans and
advances and holding of government securities. There are number of studies available on
specific issues of portfolio behavior of commercial banks, particularly in the context of banks
in the western countries.
Jack Clark Francis (1978) deals with asset liability management of 27 banks of different size
and concludes that large banks can manage their assets and liabilities better than small and
medium sized banks The large banks also earn a better return on their assets, although, the
small banks generally tend to take more risk. The study also suggests that large banks are
more capable to diversify across different types of assets.
Hendershott and Winder (1979) make a comprehensive study on the changes in the
composition of bank portfolio and conclude that there were long run shifts in the allocation
of bank funds in favor of housing finance and consumer credit. These two sectors find favor
because they are more stable and less risky to the banks. In general more lending options
have great impact on temporary and extraordinary demand of the fund. Even the short term
borrowing options may lead to changes in bank portfolio. The authors find that the proportion
of extraordinary inventory investment financed rose from two-fifth to three-fifth and unusual
fixed investment financing increased from zero to three-fifth in 1970s. The authors presumed
that the economic conditions would remain stable for a long period of time. However
economic system itself undergoes dynamic changes and influenced the behavior of
commercial banks.
Bergstresser Daniel (2008) suggests that U S banks tended to reduce their exposure to very
high risk loans such as construction and land development loans.
N. Kavitha (2012) in her paper used various kinds of ratios to study the asset and liability
management in as many as 56 banks from various categories. She found that the group of SBI
and its associates performed better as compared to private sector banks and nationalized
banks group. It is witnessed that borrowing of private banks group have the least variability
in terms of measures of dispersion.
Kanhaiya Singh (2013) in his paper opined that there are serious attempts by banks to
minimize the asset liability mismatch since the implementation of RBI guidelines in 1997.
Banks have made adequate follow up and monitoring arrangements at different levels.
Individual banks have also fixed maximum tolerance limits of the mismatch for close
monitoring. The study suggests that there is substantial scope for banks to improve
profitability by monitoring and reducing short term liquidity. One of the observations of the
study is that to fill the short term liquidity gap, banks resort to the mismatch for close
monitoring borrowings at 28 higher rate of interest which reduces interest margin and
profitability of banks. Banks have greater scope to manage interest rate risk through various
techniques.
The paper of M R Das (2013) attempts to investigate whether there exist any maturity
mismatch between assets and liabilities of public sector banks and seeks to measure the
extent of concentration of assets (loans, advances and investment securities) and liabilities
(deposit and borrowing) in various maturity buckets. There is maturity mismatch in assets and
liabilities of public sector banks basically because of differences in portfolio selection by
different banks. Moreover, there may be lack of awareness across the branches, particularly
those in the remote rural areas as they do not know the implications of the asset liability
mismatch. The author suggested that by educating the branch level operators about the
subjects of asset liability mismatch, reviewing the maturity wise position of assets and
liabilities at various levels and by computerizing and networking the branches, assets
liabilities mismatch can be detected and problem can be minimized.
CHAPTER 2
3C REPORT
C – COMPANY
Indian overseas bank is a major Public sector bank based in Chennai with about 3400 domestic
branches, including 1150 branches in Tamil Nadu, 3 extension counters and 8 branches and
offices overseas as of 31 Oct 2017. Indian overseas bank has an ISO certified in house
Information technology department , which had developed the software that its branches used
to provide online banking to customers earlier. The bank has achieved 100% CBS status for its
branches. Indian overseas bank has a network of about 3300 ATMs all over India. Indian
overseas bank has branches in Singapore , Colombo, seoul and Bangkok. It has representative
offices in Guangzhou, Vietnam and dubai. IOB also is a partowner of a joint venture bank in
Malaysia.
Traded as BSE 532388
NSE IOB
INDUSTRY – banking capital markets
Founded – 10 February 1937
Founder – M.Ct.M Chidambaram chettyar
Headquarters Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
Key people- Shri TCA Ranganathan (Non executive chairman)
Shri R. Subramania Kumar MD AND CEO
Shri.K.Swaminathan Executive director
Shri. Ajay Kumar Srivastava Executive Director
Products- loans, credit cards, savings, investment etc.
Revenue – 23,517.29 Cr
Operating income 2885 Cr
Net income 2897.33 Cr
Total assets 274,436.76 Cr
No of employees 31,846
Capital ratio 9.66%
Owner Government of India
Website www.iob.in
1957 bank established its own training centre
1964 Innaugration of IOB’s head office in mount road
1974 official language dept established
1984 1000th branch opened
1991 bank moved its staff college premises to an own spacious learning zone at Koyambedu
1996 banks profit reached INR 100 or for the fiRs.t time
2000 initial public offer follow on public offer in2003
The fiRs.t public sector bank to introduce anywhere banking at 129 branches in the 4 metros
is extending the connectivity to another 100 branches in Hyderabad, Bangalore, Ahemdabad
and Ludhiana.
The fiRs.t public sector to introduce mobile banking services using wireless application
protocol.
2005 launched debit card
2006 launched visa card, retail sale of gold and nonlife insurance bank reached INR 1 lac crore
mark in total business.
2006-7 Bharat overseas bank ltd was merged with IOB and fiRs.t off site atm.
2010 2000th branch Yamuna Vihar, New Delhi opened
2011-12 no. of branches in Tamil Nadu reached 1000, IOB celebrated platinum jubilee 2012-
13
2014-15 bank has surpassed landmark of 3000 ATMs.
2015 IOB launched new mobile banking.
IOB entered into non life insurance business with universal sompo general insurance company
ltd. With equity participation of 19% along with Allahabad bank, Karnataka bank. IOB has tie
up with Apollo Munich health insurance to provide specialised health and personal accident
products to its customers.
Marketing mix of IOB analyses the brand which coveRs. 4Ps and explains the IOB marketing
strategy. The article elaborates the pricing , advertising and distribution strategies used by the
company.

PRODUCT

The product portfolio is divided broadly into savings bank, current account, retail products, IOB
card products, third party insurances and term deposits. All these services are the product
strategy in the bank’s marketing mix. Apart from this IOB has online payment services as well
as internet banking solutions as well as mobile apps for smartphones. It also has rural banking
solutions with subsidized loans, consulting for agri business, home loan schemes.
PRICE

IOB strategy of prices has to go in line with what other public sector banks are doing under the
regulation of the government and RBI.IOB has to keep it charges competitive to attract
customers. The pricing strategy in the bank’s marketing mix is as follows. The service charges
although vary for various products and the customers. keeping good and frequent transaction
records are given preference as well as may charges are waived for the same customers. Also
to promote the lower income segments to use its minimum services and it has nil charges for
the same. The service charges of IOB also depend on the loan tenure with longer loans being
charged more.

PLACE

IOB has currently 3300+ branches across the country. The branches are grouped into rural,
semi urban, urban and metropolitan branches. IOB branches are controlled by 7 zonal offices
and 49 regional offices. There are also 18 specialised MSME processing centres. Every year IOB
expands with newer branches to widen its reach and this is focused mainly to rural regions to
include the new customers. in these regions as well as provide basic financial facilities under
the financial inclusion scheme. It also focuses in marketing the insurance products for which it
has employed LIC for the distribution of all the various insurance products. It also reaches to
the customers. through its mobile banking platform, internet banking as well as through SMS
banking and mobile apps.

PROMOTION

To educate its customers. mainly uses the print media as well the branch premises. Even the
employees engaged to make aware of the products. It also has very focused advertisements
which target segments. It also has featured in various programs which has raised the
reputation of the bank and also the trust among the customers. IOB also has various loyalty
programs and merchant tie ups which it uses for promotions to attract customers. IOB also has
various CSR activities such as setting up vocational training institutes, donations, imparting
financial literacy to many people through financial literacy centres and other activities through
IOB Chidambaram Chettyar Memorial Trust.

C- COMPETITOR

ICICI BANK

Is an multinational banking and financial services company headquartered in Mumbai, India


with its registered office in Vadodara .In 2014 it was the second largest bank in terms of assets
and third in terms of market capitalisation. It offers a wide range of banking products and
financial services for corporate and retail customers. through a variety of delivery channels and
specialised subsidiaries in the areas of investment banking, life, non life insurance, venture
capital and asset management. The bank has a network of 4850 branches and 14404 ATMs in
India and has a presence in 19 countries including India.

STATE BANK OF INDIA


Is an multinational public sector banking and financial services Company. It is a government
owned corporation with its headquarters in Mumbai. On 1st April 2017 , state bank of India
which is India’s largest bank merged with five of its associate banks and Bharatiya Mahila bank
with itself. This is the fiRs.t ever large scale consolidation in the Indian banks with a balance
sheet of 33Rs. trillion, 278000 employees, 420 million customers AND more than 24000
branches and 59000 ATMs. SBI’s market share will increase to 22% from 17%. The company is
ranked 232nd on the fortune global 500 list of the world’s biggest corporations as of 2016.

UCO BANK

Formerly united commercial bank established in 1943 in Kolkata , is a major government


owned commercial bank of India. During FY 2013-14 its total business was Rs.4.55 lakh crore.
Based on 2014 data, it is ranked 1860 on FORBES GLOBAL 2000 list. UCO bank was ranked 294th
among India’s most trusted banks according to the brand trust report 2014, a study conducted
by trust research advisory. It was a rise of 796 ranks considering it was listed at the 1090th
position among India’s most trusted brands in the brand trust report 2013. As of 6th January
2017 the bank had 4000 plus service units 49 zonal offices spread all over India.

PUNJAB NATIONAL BANK

Is an Indian multi national banking and financial services company. It is a state owned
corporation based in New Delhi. The bank was founded in 1894. The bank has over 80 million
customeRs.,6937 branches and 10681 ATMs across 764 cities.

CANARA BANK

is one of the largest Public sector banks owned by the government of India. Its headquarter is
in Bengaluru. It was established at Mangalore in 1906. It is one of the oldest Public sector banks
in the country. The bank has a network of 6639 branches and more than 10600 ATMs spread
across all over India.

5 FORCES OF COMPETITION PORTER MODEL ANALYSIS

Threat of new entrants(LOW)


Despite of biggest entry barrier like regulatory and capital requirements between 1977 and
2002 an average of 215 now banks opened each year.
Factors affecting
Govt licensing and RBI regulations
Skills manpower
High initial investment
Protected intellectual property
Entry of foreign banks
Bargaining power of suppliers ( HIGH )
Customer deposits
Mortgage loans
Mortgage securities
Loans from other financial institutions
Factors affecting
rise in investment avenues
providers of funds
interest rates
valuations
role of RBI
off share operation

Bargaining power of customers (HIGH)

The individual customers


High switching costs
Customers loyalty
Technology

Factors affecting
Long term finance
Margin and volume
Multiple options
Banks competitors
Retail lending

Competitive rivalry

Bank is considered highly intense competitive.


Acquisition and mergers
Factors affecting
Too many players of same size
Players. have similar strategies
Less product differentiation
Low market growth rate

Availability of substitutes (MED)

Largest threats are not from rival banks but from nonfinancial competitors, investors and
borrowing avenues.
No real threat of substitute as far as deposit or withdrawals however insurances, mutual and
fixed income securities.
Factors affecting
Close customer relationships

Conservative customers

Risk taking customers attitude

Switching costs.

C – CUSTOMER

Customers are classified as


Depositors
Borrowers
TPP
NRIs
Walk ins

TYPES OF CUSTOMERS.

GENDER male female others

AGE minor major senior citizen

OCCUPATION employed unemployed student housewife

PROFESSION salaried P& SE businessman farmer


INCOME poor rich HNI

MANNER gentle tough short-tempered

Tagline- salah humari fayda apka


USP- Overseas banking and foreign exchange operations
Segment- international and national banking
Target group- small and medium business
Positioning- complete banking solutions.
CHAPTER 3
ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS

TYPES OF DEPOSITS

TERM DEPOSITS

1. Fixed deposit
2. Recurring deposit
3. Special fixed deposit
4. Tax saver scheme
5. Reinvestment deposit
6. Floating rate deposit
7. Education deposit
8. Multiple deposit plan 1
9. Multiple deposit plan 2
10. Multiple investment scheme
11. Automatic cumulative wedding deposit
12. Permanent income plan
13. Fixed deposit and short deposit

Fixed deposit
Objective – invest fixed amount of money for a fixed period at a higher rate of
interest.
End use – retention of savings for a future use.
Mode of deposit- min Rs. 1000 in multiples of Rs. 100
Features – variable deposit periods, ranging from 6 months to 120 months
Interest payable once in 6 months
Loans can be availed up to 90% of principal
Option to withdraw money at any time without difficulty
Premature closure permitted interest applicable according to the deposit
period run
1% charges for premature closure

Recurring deposit
Objective - invest small amounts of money regularly
Meant for salaried individual, small trader, housewife, student or rural server
End use- obtain higher sum of money at future date to meet financial
obligation
Mode of deposit – min Rs. 50/pm , in multiples of 5
Features- interest at rate applicable for FD, quarterly compounding of interest

Special fixed deposit


target group – ideal for depositors who want regular monthly or quarterly
interest income.
Min deposit amount – Rs. 3000
Min and maximum period – 1 year to 120 months
Payment of interest- monthly/quarterly
Monthly interest is payable at discounted rate
Loans can be availed upto 90% principal
Option to withdraw money at any time without difficulty
Premature closure permitted interest applicable according to the deposit
period run
1% charges for pre mature closure

Tax saver scheme


Target group- self employed / salaried individuals
Amount – maximum of Rs. 150000 with min of Rs. 10000
Period – 5 years to 10 years
RDP , FD , SFD , interest can be payable half yearly or quarterly or monthly
Loan cannot be granted against this deposit
Repayment – deposit is repayable on or after maturity date in the normal
course. Premature closure is not permitted till the deposit completes 5 years
from the date of deposit.
Interest – as decided by bank
0.50% additional interest over the normal interest to senior citizens.
Tax liability on interest on the deposit
Tax benefit- the single depositor or the fiRs.t holder of joint deposit can claim
exemption from income tax under section 80 c with a maximum of Rs. 150000
No premature closure
No loan against this deposit

Reinvestment deposit
Objective -reinvest interest earned on deposit
End use – meet future expenditure like children’s education, marriage.
Mode of deposit- min Rs. 1000 initial deposits in multiples of Rs. 100
Renewals any amount
Period of deposit – 6 months to 120 months
Target group – salaried people , professionals, business people etc
Minimum deposit- Rs. 100 and in multiples of Rs. 5
Minimum and maximum period – 6 months to 120 months
Payment of interest – of quarterly compounding and paid at the time of
maturity
Each remittance is accepted for identical period
The amount of the deposit the customer wishes to deposit, may be split into
convenient units and held as different remittances under the same MDA.
The depositor has the option of making any number of deposits under the
same account and each remittance will be deemed as a separate deposit
maturing after the agreed period.
Separate deposit receipt is not issued for each deposit but a passbook is issued
showing each remittance with interest rate ,due date and maturity value.
If the depositor wants to take back a part of his deposit amount the required
number of units can be closed and repaid while the remaining amount
remains intact and earns interest.

Multiple investment scheme


Target group- agriculturist, self employed , traders etc . the scheme will
benefit those who want to save but unable to make fixed monthly payments.
Minimum deposit – Rs. 100 and any further amounts should be in multiples
of Rs. 10 with a minimum of Rs. 100
Minimum and maximum period- one year and maximum period of 10 years.
Payment of interest – compounded quarterly and invested
The scheme is a combination of RD & RDP
Remittance become due for payment on the same date fixed at the time of
opening the account.
Various remittances made into account at irregular intervals at the
convenience of the depositor , mature on the specified maturity date
Each remittance under the MIS account should be treated as a separate RDP.

Automatic cumulative wedding deposit


Target group – targeted at small traders, professionals, and self employed
salaried persons etc. the deposit can be made in such a way that maturity
proceeds are used for marriage expenses of their children.
Minimum deposit amount – Rs. 50
Minimum and maximum period – may be opened for 63 months, 84 months,
or 120 months.
Payment of interest – compounded quarterly and reinvested.
This is a variation of RD.
The monthly instalment payable by the depositor increases uniformly year
after year .

Permanent income plan


Target group- ideal for depositors who wants to have permanent income
either monthly or quarterly after 5 to 8 years . salaried people, rural savers.,
self employed persons etc.
Minimum deposit – minimum of Rs. 50 and in multiples of Rs. 5
Minimum and maximum period – 60 months, 84 months, or 96 months.
Payment of interest – compounded quarterly
Permanent income plan is a combination of RD & SFD scheme. The scheme
operates in 2 stages
Stage 1- the depositor remits to the bank monthly instalments for a period of
sixty, eighty, four, or ninety six, months to recurring deposit accounts.
Stage 2 -bank pays a fixed sum monthly / quarterly to the depositor along
with an annual bonus for sixty, thirty six, or twenty four months for deposits
of sixty, eighty four or ninety six months respectively.
The total period of the deposit in both stages should not exceed 120 months.
The interest paid in round sum every month and the fraction is accumulated
and paid as bonus at the end of each year. The accumulated capital will
remain intact.

Fixed deposit and short deposit


Target group- ideal for senior citizens /salaried class/ business people who
want to retain savings for a fixed period for some future use.
Minimum deposit amount – Rs. 1000 and in multiples Rs. 100
Minimum and maximum period – 6 months to 120 months
Payment of interest- interest at simple rates payable every half year.
Money deposited for 6 months and above are called fixed deposits and
deposits for fifteen days (amount less than Rs. 15 lakhs) for 7 days.
(amounts more than Rs. 15 lakhs ) and above but less than six months are
called short deposit.
Interest on short deposits is payable only on maturity of the deposit.
Interest on fixed deposits is payable half yearly on the fiRs.t working day of
April and October.

VARSHIK AAI YOJANA


Target group – parents with school going children , housewives, salaried
individuals etc.
Minimum amount – Rs. 1000
Minimum and maximum period – 2 years and above
Payment of interest – compounded quarterly and paid annually.
The scheme is a combination of RDP and fixed deposit scheme.
The principal remains instant till the date of maturity.
Useful for depositors to pay annual school fee of their children, payment of
taxes, annual insurance premium etc.

TYPES OF LOANS

SAHAYIKA
TARGET GROUP – confirmed salaried persons with 40% take home pay,
professional, self employed and businessmen with 3 years. standing in the
field and IT assessed.
Loan to meet social commitments like marriage etc.
Application should be an individual in employment or business/professional
or self employed with regular income.
Quantum – quantum of loan amount is Rs. 10 lacs
Repayment- 60 EMIs.

PENSIONER’S LOAN SCHEME


TARGET GROUP- all pensioners excluding Malaysian government
pensioners receiving pension through IOB branch
Repayment – out of pension amount in 36 EMI for above 65 years and 60
EMIs for those below 65 years
Quantum of loan – upto 65 years of age – 10 times the monthly pension of Rs.
1 lac whichever is lower.

SUBAGRUHA
TARGET GROUP- individuals / group of individuals/members of
cooperative society having regular and independent income – employed
persons 2 years in the line of employment. age not to exceed 60 years
Quantum of loan- upto 90% of the cost of construction /purchase value of the
house for loans upto Rs. 20 lacs and 80% for loans above Rs. 20 lacs to Rs. 75
lacs and 75% for loans above Rs. 75 lacs . maximum no ceiling . 50% norms (
RMs can follow 40% norms). Stamp duty,registration expenditure etc. not to
be included.
Repayment – the repayment can be done upto 75 years or 360 months
whichever is earlier.

HOME IMPROVEMENT SCHEME


Target group- individuals (salaried, business people, professionals) owing a
flat/house in his /her name confirmed service, take home pay more than 50%
, balance of service equal to or more than the repayment period, proof for
other source of income P& SE ,IT assessee ,minimum 3 years standing.
Quantum of loan – minimum Rs. 25000 max Rs. 15 lacs 50% of value of
security or estimated cost of repairs whichever is less.
Repayment – maximum 144 EMI subject to maximum age of 70 years. for
salaried persons entire loan should be recovered before 1st borrower attains
the age of 70 years.

HOME DÉCOR
Target group- individuals who own a house/flat in their name or in the name
of their spouse – confirmed service, three years standing for P.S.E – if in close
relative’s name -joint borrowers - age not more than 55 years.
For interior decoration/furnishing of existing homes.
Quantum of loan – 15 times gross monthly income or Rs. 2 lacs whichever is
less if 3rd party guarantee is offered 20 times the gross monthly income or Rs.
10 lacs whichever is less if collateral equal to the loan amount is offered.
Repayment – 72 EMI subject to maximum age of 60 years and ( not to exceed
60% of gross pay including EMI for any housing loan).

HOME LOAN FOR NRIs


Target group – existing NRI/Persons of Indian passport or passport of any
other country except Pakistan and Bangladesh, PIOs with fresh account
relationship with minimum monthly salary equal to Rs. 10000.
For purchase or construction of residential flat /house and for
repair/renovation of existing house/flat.
Quantum of loan- with a maximum of 80% of cost for construction
Repayment – construction / purchase – 180 EMI
Repair / renovation 60 EMI -upto Rs. 75 lacs payment and above 75 lacs 75%
of the cost of construction /purchase excluding stamp duty and registration
charges.
Fresh inward remittance or to the debit NRE/FCNR/NRO account or by
close relatives of the NRI borrower in india. Branches should ensure that the
payment made by the relative is through his/her bank account and credited
directly to the borrower’s loan account. Should not accept cash towards
repayment of home loan account of NRI.
Security – mortgage of property.

IOB CAREER DREAM


Students preparing for professional couRs.es, entrance exam, civil services
examinations and various career and skill development couRs.es.
For financial coaching/tuition fee of reputed institutions in india to prepare
for professional couRs.es entrance exam and skill development couRs.es.
Quantum- min Rs. 25000 and maximum Rs. 200000
Repayment- within 3 years.

PUSHPAKA
Target group- individuals in employment, business, self employed
professionals, firms, companies and NRIs are also eligible.
To purchase new/old car (not older than 5 years) only new 2 wheelers.
Quantum
– new car 90% of the cost , old car- 75% , 2 wheelers 90% of the cost
Repayment – maximum 84 EMI for new car and old car maximum 84 months
– age of car should not go beyond 8 years. At the time of closure (last
instalment). Two wheelers 72 months.

LIQUIRENT
Target group- owners who let out their properties to reputed
companies/PSUs/MNCs/banks/institutions/commercial
organizations/individuals/landholders of iob premises/officers/executive’s
quarters.
Advance against rent receivables
Quantum – maximum 70% of rentals ( net of service tax ) for the unexpired
lease period less TDS @ 22.67% and rent advance taken if any or discounted
value of @12.75% whichever is less subject to maximum 120 months rent
including renewal period.
Repayment- maximum 120 EMI

IOB AKSHAY
Loan against life insurance policies of companies approved by IRDA.
Maximum loan 90% of surrender value in the form of CC/DL/TOD
Repayment – 48 EMI

EASY TRADE FINANCE


Hassel free loans to retail traders ( metro and urban Rs. 300 lacs fund based
and Rs. 150 lacs non fund based ),(semi urban Rs. 150 lacs fund based and Rs.
50 lacs non fund based based).
Insurance of stock, submission of stock statement etc are not insisted.
Margin ranges from 10% to 50%

CLEAN LOANS
Target groups- employment of govt corp, psus, central / state govt and reputed
pvt sector undertaking which are highly rated and are in existence for
minimum 10 years LIC agent 3 years average yearly commission Rs. 84000 age
not to exceed 55 years , minimum experience 5 years, IT assessee.
Quantum of loan – 10 times of gross monthly salary or Rs. 15 lacs whichever is
lower for employees whose salary is routed through us.
Quantum of loans- for lic agents, 10 times of average monthly commission in a
year with a maximum of Rs. 10 lakhs.
Repayment- 60 emi where the loan amount is based on 10 months salary /
commission and 36 EMI for others.

VIDYA JYOTHI EDUCATION LOAN


Target group – students who have secured admission to higher education
course in recognized institution in india through merit channel selection
process after completion of HSC. In the state there is no common entrance test
the applicant must secure 60% for general and 55% for SC/ST in the qualifying
examination as cutoff marks. Students selected under merit channel, no
minimum marks.
Expenses towards persecution of higher studies.
Maximum loan amount Rs. 30 lacs for study in india and Rs. 40 lacs for study
in abroad.
Repayment – for loans up to Rs. 7.5 lacs -upto 10 years. For loans above Rs. 7.5
lacs upto 15 years.
No collateral security for loans upto Rs. 4 lacs

IOB SCHOLAR
Target group- students who got admission in approved colleges and secured
minimum of 60% marks in the plus2 or equivalent exam for general and 55%
for SC /ST.
Students who want to pursue vocational training and skill development
courses that are kept outside the model scheme (VJEL)
Any other courses pursued by students which are having employability on
completion.
Expenses towards persecution of higher studies + living expenses
Quantum – loan for inland studies upto Rs. 30 lacs . loans for studies upto Rs.
40 lacs
Repayment – for loans upto Rs. 7.5 lacs – upto 10 years for loans above 7.5 lacs
upto 15 years.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING


Target group – students who have the minimum educational qualification. Has
been developed as an extension of the existing model educational loan
scheme,to support the national initiatives for skill development.
For pursuing vocational educational in india,to support the national initiatives
for skill development.
Quantum – need based finance to meet expenses will be considered subject to
the following ceilings : for couRs.es duration upto 3 months Rs. 20000 for
courses duration 3 to 6 months Rs. 50000 for couRs.es of duration 6 months to
1 year of Rs. 75000 for couRs.es of duration above one year Rs. 150000
Repayment -cours.es upto one year in 2 to 5 years . courses above one year in 3
to 7 years

IOB ROYAL
Target group – high net worth individuals /self employed professionals like
doctors, cas, engineers ,architects and salaried employees of select public and
private limited companies ,higher judiciary officials, professors of
colleges/universities, high end IT employees etc. minimum salary /disclosed
income Rs. 75000 /month
Fulfilling all financial aspirations ,whether it is for a dream holiday or any
marriage expenses or any of their social/financial commitments.
Quantum – maximum loan limit of Rs. 15 lacs. ( quantum to be assessed
according to the 50% norms.
No security /guarantee required.
Repayment – from 12 to 84 months

REVERS.E MORTGAGE LOAN


Target group – applicant should be a senior citizen having completed 60 years
of age.
Joint loans with spouse is possible provided the fiRs.t name applicant is a senior
citizen and the age of the spouse is not below 55 years
Applicant be the owner of a self acquired , self occupied residential property
located in india with clear and transferable title, free from any encumbrance.
For up gradation, repair, renovation or extension of the house property medical
expenses of maintenance of family.
Supplementing pension payment . upto Rs. 50000 per month
Meeting any other need.
Quantum – depend on market value of the property , age of the borrower and
the rate of interest prevailing. Minimum Rs. 5 lacs and maximum; no ceiling
(monthly inst(<50000)
Repayment- loan period – maximum 15 years the loan will become due after
recovery and payable six months after the death of the last surviving spouse.

SANJEEVINI
Loan scheme for registered medical practitioneers to construct nursing
homes/hospitals/purchase of equipment/vehicle/ambulance.
Maximum loan Rs. 5 crores irrespective of area
Margin 15-25% for purchase of equiments , 25 -30% for construction of nursing
home.
Repayment – in 5 – 7 years normally. Can be extended upto 10 years.
COMMERCIAL CASH CREDIT AGAINST JEWELLERY
Target group – individuals who own jewels, engaged in business activities like
small business/trade/professional and self employed.
To meet the business need for running a commercial activity against the prime
security of jewels.
Quantum- minimum Rs. 50000 and maximum Rs. 10 lacs
Repayment – similar to cash credit limits.

IOB PERSONAL LOAN SCHEME


Eligibility – professionals and self employed person whose income is between
Rs. 5000 to 75000 including spouse income.
To finance the purchase of consumer durables. Consumer durables including
all electrical and electronic items, wooden and metal furniture , electrical and
electronic goods as a generic term would include among others refrigerators,
mixers, grinders, cooking ranges,cell phone, music system.
Quantum – 10 times the gross monthly salary of the applicant or 90% of the cost
of the article whichever is less. However loan should not exceed Rs. 5 lacs
Repayment – maximum of 60 months

IOB SURYA (SCHEME A)

Target group – all individuals satisfying 50% take home pay norms. To purchase solar
cookers , solar heaters., home/indoor lighting systems.

Quantum – 85% on the project cost which includes cost of the system ,
accessories,transportation & installation. Minimum Rs. 30000 maximum Rs. 10 lacs.

Repayment – maximum upto 5 years

IOB SURYA ( SCHEME B)

Target group- hospitals, hotels, restaurants etc. to purchase solar cookers ,solar
heaters.

Quantum – 85% on the project cost which includes cost of the system ,
accessories,transportation & installation. Minimum Rs. 1 lacs maximum Rs. 10 lacs.

Repayment – maximum upto 5 years


AGRICULTURE AND RETAIL CREDIT SCHEME

IOB ROSHINI

Target group – women 18-55 years. from rural households from well functioning
SHGs,NGOs,SF/MF/share croppers. and landless laborers./SC/ST. to pay deposit
for LPG connection and purchase of gas stove with accessories.

Quantum – max Rs. 5000

Repayment – 60 EMI.

Bhoomi shakti

Target group- women farmers ,comprising of the following women having farm land
in their own names ,tenant farmers is a woman. For all activities under agriculture.

Quantum – not fixed.

Repayment – as applicable to general agri advances.

AGRI CLINIC

Target group – agricultural graduates/graduates in subjects related to agriculture like


horticulture,animal husbandry, and fisheries,dairy, veterinary,poultry,pisciculture.

To provide gainful employment to agri , gradutes to set up agri clinics, agri business
centre’s for input supply and services to needy farmers.

Quantum – maximum project cost to Rs. 20 lacs for individuals and Rs. 100 lacs for
group of 5 entrepreneurs.

Repayment – 5-10 years depending upon the activity.

IOB GREEN CREDIT YOJANA

Modified for kisan green credit card.

To meet short term and long term credit needs of farmers

50% of the value of the farm – land mortgaged to bank, subject to min 1 lac and max
Rs. 25 lacs.

Repayment – seven years in monthly, half yearly or annual instalments, depending


upon the cropping pattern.
IOB GOLD

target group – all existing business customer , irrespective of enjoying credit limits or
not are eligible for the loan under IOB GOLD, subject to following:

must have a CA or CC account with the branch.

In case of non borrowers , the CA should be at least one year old with satisfactory
operations.

Quantum – min amount Rs. 100000 max amount Rs. 250000

Repayment – a period of 12 months either in monthly instalments or through one


bullet repayment.

3 years data on loans and deposit

2016

DEPOSITS GL SUBHEAD AMOUNT


Short deposit receipt 10001 47570854
Fixed deposit receipt 10004 5510437
Special fixed deposit 10010 50827097
Special fixed deposit 10015 64465767
Reinvestment deposit 10022 553271922

NRO reinvestment 10026 2718341


deposits
Nro reinvestment deposits 10027 1300480
Recurring deposit 10036 19573674
Cga reinvestment deposit 10040 0.00
Earn and save for you 10043 1955575
scheme
Liqui deposits savings 10113 23482000
bank
Special fixed deposits 10510 2600000
Special fixed deposits 10515 3033000
Nro special fixed deposits 10518 13308
Reinvestment deposit 10522 829456425
Nro reinvestment deposits 10526 291321
Nre reinvestment deposits 10527 10657949
Automatic cumulative 10532 177000
wedding deposits
Recurring deposit 10536 403966
Tax saver special fixed 10550 810000
deposit
Tax saver special fixed 10551 300000
deposit
Tax saver reinvestment 10553 13514550
deposit
Suraksha dep gift 10558 177
Jeevan suraksha dep gift 10559 8634
Savings bank accounts
SB-NRO 11001 422285
SB PUB 11002 256732466
SB FCRA 11003 0.00
SB NSIG 11004 15171
SB PLAT 11006 180181.35
SB CORP 11007 12609
SB GOLD2 11011 1177473.19
SB GOLD1 11012 518934.59
SB SLVR1 11014 2668366.52
SB SLVR2 11015 368335.50
SB STAFF 11017 13830107.22
SB STUDNT 11018 143539.41
SB CGA 11020 0.00
SB small accounts 11023 169223.51
SB IN OPEARATIVE 11100 5430404.24
DEPOSITS
BSBDA ACCOUNTS 11206 182231.78
NRE SB DEPOSITS 11208 4231200.90
NRE SB INOPERATIVE 11210 234083.44
A/CS

CURRENT ACCOUNTS

CD BANKS 12002 1496898.21


CD PUB 12003 33489132.83
CD SUPER 12004 31887
CD PLAT 12006 0.00
CD CLASS 12007 473706.45
CD STAFF 12009 141.88
CD SPL 12012 881593.54
CD NRO 12016 25079
IN OPERATIVE 12100 399838.02
CURRRENT ACCOUNTS
CASH CREDIT 12103 660118.91
ACCOUNTS

LOANS AND ADVANCES

Current account 33001 154147.50


SB overdraft balances 33002 72813.75
Cash credit against deposit 33060 514425.24
33061 254012406.41
Cc for public
Easy trade finance 33102 1717520.03
IOB SME contractor 33109 5672087.05
Cash credit mudra loans 33123 311567.68
Cash credit for staff 33151 8583214.85
Atm cash management 33152 928600.00
horticulture 33236 128311
TL to SME CORPORATE 33303 89628381
TL TO TCD CORPORATE 33305 283056578
Suit filed non decreed 33374 3503840.36
Suit filed decreed 33375 904503.91
Clean loan to individuals 33401 15667787.34
Pensioners loan 33402 1552658
Akshay Adv Ag LIC INDIV 33404 172450
Loan against nsc 33407 345485.35
Demand loan against 33409 12071
shares
Dl against deposit brdep 33410 7160254
Sahayika social obligation 33451 740601.53
Pushpaka car/ two 33452 19268466.68
wheelers
Subhagruha – housing 33464 91102569.61
loans
Revese mortgage loan 33466 544905

Home improvement 33468 1710928.40


scheme
Housing loan to nri hlnri 33469 6011309
Spl Housing loan 33480 2090062.46
Vidyajyothi education 33481 14965499.55
loan
Sme advance term loan 33603 5080536
Iob sme add on 33610 0.00
Small loans non cgc cover 33701 3648636.08
Tl others 33707 108032203.83
Small loans mudra 33708 968795.12
Flood loan to staff 33731 539327
Winter loan to staff 33732 41521
Clean loan to staff 33733 6541
Staff vehicle loan 33735 815345
Staff housing loan 33737 12255688
Dpn loan staff 33740 41070
Staff vehicle loan 33844 99123
Suit filed non decreed 33850 21730512
Past due 33950 401090.44

2016

total deposits- 1825621575

total loans- 966537885

Ratio = total loans/ total deposits

0.529

2017

deposits

Short deposit receipt 10001 47570854


Fixed deposit receipt 10004 5510437
Special fixed deposits 10010 50827097
Special fixed deposits 10015 64465767
Reinvestment deposits 10022 553271922
NRO reinvestment 10026 2718341
deposits
NRE reinvestment 10027 1300480
deposits
Recurring deposits 10036 19573674
CGA reinvestment 10040 0.00
deposits
Earn and save for you 10043 1955575
scheme
Liquid deposits saving 10113 23482000
bank
Special fixed deposits 10510 2600000
Special fixed deposits 10515 3033000
NRO special fixed deposits 10518 13308
Reinvestment deposits 10522 829456425
NRO reinvestment 10526 291321
deposits
NRE Reinvestment 10527 10657949
deposits
Automatic cumulative 10532 177000
wedding deposits
Reccuring deposits 10536 403966
Tax saver special fixed 10550 810000
deposit
Tax saver special fixed 10551 300000
deposit
Tax saver reinvestment 10553 13514550
deposit
Suraksha dep gift 10558 177
Jeevan suraksha dep gift 10559 8634

Saving bank accounts


SB NRO 11001 422285.46
SB PUB 11002 256732466.27
SB FCRA 11003 0.00
SB NSIG 11004 15171
SB PLAT 11006 180181.35
SB CORP 11007 12609
SB GOLD2 11011 177473.19
SB GOLD1 11012 552613.09
SB SLVR1 11014 1560709.59
SB SLVR2 11015 876384.03
SB STAFF 11017 12244935
SB STDNT 11018 36623.90
SB CGA 11020 3366203
SB small accounts 11023 214198.05
SB AROGIYA MAHILA 11024 0.0
SB IN OPERTIVE 11100 10843222.13
DEPOSITS
BSBDA ACCOUNTS 11206 207541.42
NRE SB ACCOUNTS 11208 2157333.65
NRE SB INOPERATIVE 11210 236489.54
A/CS
CURRENT ACCOUNTS

CD BANKS 12002 213998.48


CD PUB 12003 36023784.13
CD SUPER 12004 102615.64
CD PLAT 12006 0.00
CD CLASS 12007 534592.45
CD STAFF 12009 141.88
CD SPL 12012 493500.96
CD NRO 12016 25079
INOPERATIVE 12100 1714694
CURRENT ACCOUNTS
CASH CREDIT 12103 1212478
ACCOUNTS
OVERDUE DEPOSITS 12105 500000

LOANS ADVANCES

CURRENT ACCOUNT- 33001 0.00


DEBIT BALANCE
SB OVERDRAFT 33002 14244.95
BALANCES
CASH CREDIT AGAINST 33060 732746.26
DEPOSIT
CC FOR PUBLIC 33061 45052710.05
EASY TRADE FINANCE 33102 0.00
IOB SME CONTRACTOR 33109 5379305.39
CASH CREDIT MUDRA 33123 340153.54
LOANS
CASH CREDIT FOR 33151 9108187.77
STAFF
ATM CASH 33152 2591200
MANAGEMENT
HORTICULTURE 33236 75621
TL TO SME CORPORATE 33303 3216460
TL TO TCD CORPORATE 33305 0.00
SUIT FILED NON 33374 0.00
DECREED
SUIT FILED DECREED 33375 0.00
CLEAN LOAN TO 33401 13710504.30
INDIVIDUALS
PENSIONERS LOAN 33402 1253998.25
AKSHAY ADV AG LIC 33404 200639
INDV
LOANS AGAINST NSC 33407 425342
DEMAND LOAN AGNST 33409 0.00
SHARES
DL AGAINST DEPOSIT 33410 6083364
BRDEP
SAHAYIKA SOCIAL 33451 633512
OBLIGATION
PUSHPAKA CAR / TWO 33452 12978267
WHEELER
IOB ROYAL LOANS 33458 0.00

SUBAGRUHA 33464 81673393.68


REVESE MORTGAGE 33466 530035
LOAN
HOME IMPROVEMENT 33468 1670223
SCHEME
HOUSING LOAN TO NRI 33469 5826070
SPL HOUSING LOAN 33480 1846475
VIDYAJYOTHI 33481 14644939.11
EDUCATION LOAN
SME ADVANCE TERM 33603 3037260.27
LOAN
IOB SME ADD ON 33610 1373908
SMALL LOANS 33701 1809191.33
TL OTHERS 33707 36690745.68
SMALL LOANS MUDRA 33708 641638.05
TERM LOAN MUDRA 33710 192413.80
CGMU COVER
FLOOD LOAN TO STAFF 33731 284596
WINTER LOAN TO 33732 104460
STAFF
CLEAN LOAN TO STAFF 33733 0.0
STAFF VEHICLE 33735 733582
STAFF HOUSING LOAN 33737 11882968
DPN LOAN STAFF 33740 13939
STAFF VEHICLE LOAN 2 33744 75784
WHEEL
SUIT FILED DECREED 33750 854241.91
SUIT FILED NON 33850 40567132.86
DECREED
PAST DUE 33950 599859687.76

2017

Total deposits- 1963599801

Total loans- 907723681

Ratio= 0.462

2018

DEPOSITS

Short deposits receipt 10001 2944328


Fixed deposit receipt 10004 319615
Special fixed deposits 10010 58273660
Special fixed deposits 10015 52338504
Reinvestment deposits 10022 642941770
NRO Reinvestment 10026 2944178
deposits
NRE reinvestment 10027 1435917
deposits
Recurring deposit 10036 16485269
CGA reinvestment 10040 0.00
deposit
Earn and save for you 10043 46399
scheme
IOB SARAL RDP 10051 141198963
Liqui deposits saving 10113 20254000
bank
Special fixed deposits 10510 11550000
NRO special fixed deposit 10513 15000
Special fixed deposit 10515 7333000
NRO special fixed deposit 10518 13308
Reinvestment deposits 10522 47242626
NRO reinvestment 10526 306568
deposit
NRE reinvestment 10527 11491681
deposit
Automatic cumulative 10532 133000
wedding
Recurring deposit 10536 1862709
Tax saver special fixed 10550 810000
deposit
Tax saver special fixed 10551 300000
deposit
Tax saver reinvestment 10553 13500107
deposit
Suraksha dep gift 10558 177
Jeevan suraksha dep gift 10559 8634

SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNT

SB NRO 11001 502626.77


SB PUB 11002 266587699.44
SB FCRA 11003 0.00
SB NSIG 11004 8715
SB PLAT 11006 1929.87
SB CORP 11007 8361993.39
SB GOLD2 11011 3985990.29
SB GOLD1 11012 665113.39
SB SLVR1 11014 576692.77
SB SLVR2 11015 1744500.79
SB STAFF 11017 14235302.44
SB STUDNT 11018 64262.81
SB CGA 11020 1979267
SB small accounts 11023 6926
SB AROGIYA MAHILA 11024 0.00
SB INOPERATIVE 11100 14438035.54
DEPOSITS
BSBDA 11206 407716.03
NRE SB DEPOSITS 11208 6328363.87
NRE SB INOPERATIVE 11210 210663.04
A/CS

CURRENT ACCOUNT

CD BANKS 12002 4203414.58


CD PUB 12003 70647353.96
CD SUPER 12004 36603.23
CD PLAT 12006 0.00
CD CLASS 12007 326936.79
CD STAFF 12009 0.00
CD SPL 12012 491712.14
CD NRO 12016 0.00
PREPAID CARD 12017 385.85
IN OPERATIVE 12100 1342151.35
CURRENT ACCOUNT
CASH CREDIT 12103 707020.27
ACCOUNTS
OVERDUE DEPOSITS 12105 400000

LOANS AND ADVANCES

CURRENT ACCOUNT- 33001 0.00


DEBIT BALANCE
SB OERDRAFT 33002 0.00
BALANCES
CASH CREDIT AGAINST 33060 1621672.02
DEPOSIT
CC FOR PUBLIC 33061 48657391.24
SUBAGRUHA TOP UP 33067 732769.81
LOAN
EASY TRADE FINANCE 33102 0.00
IOB SME CONTRACTOR 33109 0.00
CASH CREDIT MUDRA 33123 349872.50
LOANS
CASH CREDIT LOAN 33125 114518
AGAINST PROP
CASH CREDIT FOR 33151 10933405.13
STAFF
ATM CASH 33152 0.00
MANAGEMENT
HORTICULTURE 33236 58917
TL TO SME CORPORATE 33303 87268371
TL TO TCD CORPORATE 33305 0.00
SUIT FILED NON 33374 0.00
DECREED
SUIT FILED DECREED 33375 0.00
CLEAN LOAN TO 33401 22666243.98
INDIVIDUAL
PENSIONERS LOAN 33402 2217263.12
AKSHAY ADV AG LIC 33404 14273
INDIV
LOANS AGAINST NSC 33407 359553
DEMAND LOAN AGNST 33409 0.00
SHARES
DL AGAINST DEPOSIT- 33410 4768139.93
BRDEP
SAHAYIKA- SOCIAL 33451 522391
OBLIGATION
PUSHPAKA CAR TWO 33452 16745183.14
WHEELERS
LOAN AGAINST 33453 6247319.60
PROPERTY
IOB ROYAL 33458 720542
SUBAGRUHA 33464 95620018.54
REVESE MORTGAGE 33466 465885
LOAN
HOME IMPROVEMENT 33468 4239091.65
SCHEME
HOUSING LOAN TO NRI 33469 4512695
HLNRI
SPL HOUSING LOAN 33480 1755836.56
VIDYAJYOTHI 33481 11163704.80
EDUCATION LOAN
VIDYA SURAKSHA CGF 33485 305686
EDUCATION LOAN
SME ADVANCE TERM 33603 280919
LOAN
IOB SME ADDON 33610 1104648
SMALL LOANS NON 33701 316169.97
CGC COVER
TL OTHERS 33707 32816972.19
SMALL LOANS MUDRA 33708 1796260.82
TERM LOAN MUDRA 33710 168662.82
CGFMU COVER
FLOOD LOAN TO STAFF 33731 33893
WINTER LOAN TO 33732 161145
STAFF
CLEAN LOAN TO STAFF 33733 0.00
STAFF VEHICLE LOAN 4 33735 2806218
WHEEL
STAFF HOUSING LOAN 33737 21233236.46
DPN LOAN STAFF 33740 5855
STAFF VEHICLE LOAN 33744 98438
SUIT FILED DECREED 33750 850893.91
SUIT FILED NON 33850 120988850.56
DECREED
PAST DUE 33950 443682820.65

2018

total deposits – 1432010825

total loans – 948405726

RATIO = 0.662
CHAPTER 4
SUGGESTIONS

First of all, the commercial banks should enhance online sales channels in order to increase
the utility for customers because it is the era of digital and the tempestuous development of
social network. It is necessary to do this but it is not easy to implement immediately that
requires the determination of leaders. Furthermore, the commercial banks came from a state
enterprise, "bureaucratic" thought and "lack of enthusiasm" still affects survey in thinking and
perception in many workers.
Secondly, services and serving of the commercial banks need modernizing which should be
systematic and comprehensive. Particularly, modern technology should be applied; modern
machinery is used in serving and performing services to customer as cash, payment machines
Visa Master Card, Visa Debit Card, billing machine, price product scanner and services. Finally,
the commercial banks keep checking operations, maintaining and timely repairing the
vehicles, passenger cars, machinery and equipment and others. This procedure must be
performed regularly and periodically to ensure the comfort, security and safety for customers.
Recommendation for Tangibles First of all, the commercial banks should continue to improve
"Facilities", the commercial banks in particular need good human resources managing the
shops that must present three key tasks as attracting qualified human resources; training and
developing human resources; and maintaining the qualified human resources. Secondly, the
commercial banks staff should be trained foreign language and many different cultures that
require employees to have a lot of knowledge, experience, and skills to perform good duty.
In addition, the commercial banks needs raising awareness and building corporate culture for
the entire personnel in order to form good the commercial banks image in the customers’
minds.
Finally, the commercial banks staff should have to improve the accommodation facilities,
transportation, documentation, publications introducing products and services, souvenir
gifts, staff uniforms, other supports are factors directly involved in the process of providing
quality service to customers, thus offering solutions must focus on the factors mentioned.
Recommendation for Reliability First of all, the commercial banks should set up hotline 24/7
to receive feedback from customers when they have the problem with the product quality.
Its business operations involve many sectors and many other areas, hence, there are many
problems arising from its processes that need "quickly reaction". Although this practice is
commonly used in many businesses, the commercial banks have not applied yet.

CONCLUSION

Banking systems have been with us for as long as people have been using money.
Banks and other financial institutions provide security for individuals, businesses and
governments, alike. Let's recap what has been learned with this tutorial:
In general, what banks do is pretty easy to figure out. For the average person banks
accept deposits, make loans, provide a safe place for money and valuables, and act
as payment agents between merchants and banks.

Banks are quite important to the economy and are involved in such economic
activities as issuing money, settling payments, credit intermediation, maturity
transformation and money creation in the form of fractional reserve banking.

To make money, banks use deposits and whole sale deposits, share equity and fees
and interest from debt, loans and consumer lending, such as credit cards and bank
fees.

In addition to fees and loans, banks are also involved in various other types of
lending and operations including, buy/hold securities, non-interest income, insurance
and leasing and payment treasury services.

History has proven banks to be vulnerable to many risks, however, including credit,
liquidity, market, operating, interesting rate and legal risks. Many global crises have
been the result of such vulnerabilities and this has led to the strict regulation of state
and national banks.

However, other financial institutions exist that are not restricted by such regulations.
Such institutions include: savings and loans, credit unions, investment and merchant
banks, shadow banks, Islamic banks and industrial banks.
BIBLIOGRAPHY

IOB presentation to analysis.

www.iob.in/uploads/CEDocuments

www.iob.in

www.mbaskool.com

sodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in

www.investopedia.com
ANNEXURE : SAMPLE EXECUTIVE REPORT

DAILY EXECUTIVE REPORT

Sl.No. Contact person Duration Discussion Status Follow up


required
From To
1 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Types of deposits, account N
parida pm opening form filling
2 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Types of atm cards, kyc N
parida pm form filling
3 Debasmita 10:00 2:00 Customer issues, debit N
parida am pm card not working, withdrawl
cheque.
4 Subhendra 10:00 am 2:00 Indian overseas products N
dhal pm
5 Sunita patra 10:00 am 2:00 IOB visa international credit N
pm card
6 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 Types of loans, business N
pm loans, retail loans.
7 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Loan taking process N
parida pm
8 Subhendra 10:00 am 2:00 Claim settlement, fixed N
Dhal pm deposit
9 R N sahu 10:00 am 2:00 RD scheme, insurance N
pm policies
10 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Debit card, IOB N
parida pm surakhya,account closing
11 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 Loan deposit ratio, cheque N
pm passing
12 Subhendra 10:00 am 2:00 Activating current account, N
dhal pm closing saving account
13 Sunita patra 10:00 am 2:00 Data collection on deposit, N
pm loans
14 R N Sahu 10:00 am 2:00 Knowledge about lockers N
pm
15 Dilip sir 10:00 am 2:00 Questionnaires on deposits N
pm
16 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 IOB pension plans, N
pm insurance policies
17 R N sahu 10:00 am 2:00 TDS certificate, Fixed N
pm deposit renew
18 Dilip sir 10:00 am 2:00 Duplicate passbook, N
pm activation of account, atm
card
19 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Senior citizen scheme , N
parida pm salary payment cheque,
clearing house.
20 R N sahu 10:00 am 2:00 Housing loans, vehicle N
pm loans, agricultural loans.
21 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Joint account, banking N
parida pm ombudsman, customer
complaint
22 Dilip sir 10:00 am 2:00 Tax saver scheme, multiple N
pm investment scheme
23 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 Recurring deposit, N
pm reinvestment deposit.
24 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 Subgruha , home N
pm improvement scheme,
pushpaka loan.
25 Sunita patra 10:00 am 2:00 IOB surya, bhoomi shakti, N
pm agri clinic
26 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Account if dermat what N
parida pm should be done, nominee
filing
27 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 15 G form, 15 H form filling, N
parida pm IT products, accidental
policy
28 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Retail banking N
parida pm
29 R N sahu 10:00 am 2:00 Saving bank products, N
pm current account products
30 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Health care policies, Apollo N
parida pm munich ,Universal sompo
31 Subhendra 10:00 am 2:00 Clean loan , mudra loans, N
dhal pm drafts
32 Subhendra 10:00 am 2:00 NEFT, FD extend, cheque N
dhal pm passing
33 Sasmita maam 10:00 am 2:00 Atal pension plan, rupay N
pm card, visa card,platinum
card, signature card
34 Sunita patra 10:00 am 2:00 Recommendations for N
pm improving liquidity
35 Debasmita 10:00 am 2:00 Questionnaire, loans N
parida pm deposit of last 3 years ,
calculations, suggestions.

WEEKLY EXECUTIVE REPORT

No of Status Area of Detailed Inference


persons discussion discussion
2 N Indian overseas Types of
products accounts,types of
loans
3 N Customer issues Atm card not
working, passbook
updation, deposit
receipt.
3 N Deposits Short term
deposits, recurring
deposits,
reinvestment
deposits.
4 N Questionnaire Different loans
preparation and advances.
3 N Loans Retail loans,
business loans.
3 N Pension plans Atal pension plan,
kyc form, 15G
form, 15H form.
4 N Atm cards Platinum
card,rupay ,
classic, signature.