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Candidate Name: Alex Dailey Host Teacher Name: Stephanie Peterson

School: Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary Grade Level: 3 # of Students: 21


Theme of Unit: Adventure Journaling Content Area: Geography, Technology, Language Arts
Classroom Demographics: Students range in age from 8-9 years old. Ethnic diversity is mostly white, with 7 Alaska
Native students, 1 Puerto Rican student, & 1 African student. Gender is about 50/50. There are two students with ADHD,
1 student with significant physical and cognitive disabilities, no students who qualify as G/T, and no students who qualify
for ELL supports. 12 of the students are reading below grade level, with about 4 of those students reading significantly
below grade level.

Alaska Content and Subject Area Standards (5 interdisciplinary standards)


Geography Standards –
A – A student should be able to make and use maps, globes, and graphs to gather, analyze, and report spatial
(geographic) information.
1. – use maps and globes to locate places and regions;
B – A student should be able to utilize, analyze, and explain information about the human and physical features of
places and regions.
1. – know that places have distinctive geographic characteristics;

Cultural Standards –
B. – Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to build on the knowledge and skills of the local cultural
community as a foundation from which to achieve personal and academic success throughout life.
1. – acquire insights from other cultures without diminishing the integrity of their own;
E. – Culturally-knowledgeable students demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the relationships and
processes of interaction of all elements in the world around them.
7. – determine how cultural values and beliefs influence the interaction of people from different cultural
backgrounds;

Writing Standards –
W.3.3. – Use narrative writing to develop real or imagined characters, experiences, or events using effective
narrative techniques (dialogue, description, elaboration, problem‐solution, figurative language) and clear event
sequences (chronology).
W.3.7. – Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of
different aspects of a topic.

Technology Standards –
B. – A student should be able to use technology to locate, select, and manage information.
1. – Identify and locate information sources using technology;

Transfer Goal(s) - Unpacked Standards


 Students will use maps to plan and chart real courses of travel.
 Students will conduct research in order to identify and describe real, distinctive, geographic characteristics of the
various places in the world that correspond with a route of travel designated by the student.
 Students will conduct research in order to identify and describe distinct facts and practices of other cultures that
might be encountered along a route of travel designated by the student.
 Students will use research data to make inferences regarding the possible interaction of individuals from different
cultures.
 Students will apply narrative writing strategies to develop a fictional travel journal.
 Students will use resources including but not limited to the internet, textbooks, and literature, to conduct research
on other cultures and ecosystems.
 Students will navigate the internet to locate specific information.

BIG IDEA of the Unit:


Diversity of culture and ecosystems across the world.

STAGE 1 – Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings (Meaning)


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Enduring Understanding(s) : Essential Questions to be Considered:
Students will understand that….  How does the internet make learning about new
 The internet contains a vast amount of information. things both easier and more difficult?
By understanding how to navigate and sift through  How can we make a journal entry successfully
this information, we can learn a great many things. transport the reader into the mind of the author?
 Maps are useful tools that can be applied to real-  How can maps help us to explore?
world problems.  How does the phrase “less is more” make sense
 Different areas of the world have different when talking about gathering information?
geographical characteristics.  How is our planet diverse, geographically?
 Different cultures around the world share both  How are world cultures (including our own)
similarities and differences. unique?
 Difference in culture is likely to cause unique  How does diversity in culture contribute to the
interaction between individuals. ways in which we interact with one another?
 Research can help us to learn about the outside  How can we learn about other places, people, or
world. events without actually being there or experiencing
 We can explore the world through the minds of them?
fictional characters.  What kinds of writing makes a story come alive?
How can we draw the reader into our literary
world?
 How do stories help us explore places we’ve never
been and/or experience events that we aren’t able to
physically?

STAGE ONE: STAGE TWO:


Objectives/Learning Targets (Acquisition) Assessment/Acceptable Evidence Of Learning
Knowledge: What students should know….
 How to conduct research to collect information  (Pre-assessment) Prior to the start of the unit, have
regarding geographical, ecological, or cultural students complete an internet scavenger hunt
information. activity-worksheet where they must research specific
 Students should know how to draw a reader into and varied items (Religious beliefs of Hindus,
a story using narrative strategies such as climate of Mojave, wildlife found in the Australian
providing sensory/descriptive details, dialogue, jungle, demographics of London, cruising speed of
inner-monologue, realistic reflection/interaction, jetliner, etc.) using the school computer lab or laptop
character development, etc. cart.
 (Pre-assessment/formative) Have students complete a
Skills: What students should be able to do…. journaling exercise where they write about their
 Students will be able to successfully navigate the experience at recess. Instruct students to include
internet to acquire specific information given a sensory details, dialogue, setting, a sense of time, and
broad search parameter. anything else they can think of to make their journal
 Students will construct a short journal entry narratives come alive. Review these journals for
wherein they apply the narrative writing existing narrative strategies.
strategies they are aware of.  Students will conduct research to determine a logical
 Students will use their brainstorming notes to final destination for their adventure journals
select a final destination for their Adventure  Students will complete a series of test items
Journals (multiple-choice, short answer, matching-sets,
 Use maps to plot a realistic course from (Sitka) to true/false, sentence-completion, & cloze passage
a target destination. completion) based on operating and navigating the
 Students will be able to identify, collect, and internet as well as analyzing source information to
organize relevant pieces of information while determine relevance for specific research purposes
conducting research. (test bank attached to assessment portfolio).
 Research relevant geographic locations  (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
(determined by route) and use that information to use the note-taking handout to research a “dummy
help plan a trip. question”. Their research notes should contain source

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 Research the values/practices of cultures found in location, research location, research notes that are
certain geographic locations to help plan a trip detailed, concise, and relevant to the target question,
and make inferences about possible and brainstorming notes of how this question could
encounters/events. be used in a story.
 Research cultures found in certain geographic  (Self-assessment) Students will self-assess their own
locations and compare them to their characters research notes using the research self-review handout
beliefs/behaviors in order to make inferences  (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
about possible personal interactions due to generate notes for their adventure journal – notes
differences and similarities. should be recorded on the notetaking handout
 Use research data to help design a fictional provided in the notetaking mini-lesson. Students
journal detailing a realistic should collect geographic information, human
adventure/journey/trip. structures, climate info, significant landmarks, note
 Use narrative writing strategies including the use possible ideal rest stops, or brainstorm possible story-
of descriptive/sensory details, internal/external events that might occur in these locations.
dialogue, setting, transitional words,  (Self-assessment) Students should review their own
character/plot development, etc., to develop a research notes on geographic information using the
clear, coherent, and chronological journal about a self-review handout.
fictional journey using relevant, logical details.  (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
take notes regarding the values and practices of
cultures that they would expect to encounter along
their adventures. These notes should include general
cultural information (e.g. religious/spiritual beliefs,
family values, dress, ethics, attitude towards
guests/strangers, food preferences, greeting customs,
names, etc.) pertaining to the entirety of their routes
as well as brainstorming ideas for the construction of
their stories.
 (Self-assessment) Students should review their own
work, using the self-review handout.
 (Summative/Performance) Students will complete a
compare/contrast activity-worksheet, highlighting the
similarities and differences between the main
character of their story’s practices/beliefs/behaviors
and those of the cultures for which they expect their
characters to encounter in their adventure journals.
From there, students should generate at least one
potential interaction for each researched cultural
group.
 (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
use their research notes to craft the body of their
adventure journal story. This should take the form of
a rough outline with dates serving as the lead points.
These outlines should incorporate research data on
geography, population, and culture.
 (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
apply narrative writing strategies (introduced through
mini-lessons) to short pieces of writing.
 (Formative/Summative/Performance) Students will
use the self/peer review handout to identify and
suggest possible revisions to a piece of journal
writing.
 (Formative/Summative/Performance) Using their
outlines and brainstorming notes as a guide, students
will craft their journal entries narrative writing using
writing strategies like incorporating descriptive
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details, sensory details, dialogue, inner-monologue,
and others to bring their stories to life. This writing
should follow a clear sequence of events through the
use of setting, transitional words, etc. The details in
these stories should always come from research.
 (Self-assessment/Peer-assessment) Students should
review their own work first, and then have a peer
review it using review guidelines provided in lesson
12.

STAGE TWO : Culminating Performance Tasks

Culminating Performance Task


Title of task: Adventure Journal

As the author, you will be using your research notes and outlines to craft a detailed adventure journal. This journal should
both entertain and educate your readers. The information you use needs to be based on the research you conducted during
the unit and the journal itself should utilize the narrative writing strategies that you’ve learned thus far in class (detailed in
your writing notebook) so that your story feels real/convincing. Your journal should flow from one entry to the next and
follow a logical sequence of events. This story should demonstrate your knowledge of new areas, including geographic
and cultural facts, and should originate in Sitka. While building your research into your journal writing, you should ask
yourself these questions, 1) Does my journal incorporate information from new places? 2) Does this information include
geographic and cultural facts? 3) Is all of this information based on actual research? 4) Does my journal follow a logical
sequence and adhere to standard conventions of English writing? 5) Have I incorporated the use of several narrative
writing strategies to enhance the telling of my story?

Rubric attached to bottom & assessment portfolio

STAGE THREE: Learning for Understanding/ Instructional Activities


Pre-Requisites: What is the prior knowledge students have to have before starting this Unit?

 Independent research experience/skills


 Experience writing in a journaling form
 Should have some understanding of some literature basics (chronology, purpose, narrative-voice, etc.)

Introduction/Hook (Make a connection with students’ backgrounds using an authentic situation to start them thinking
about the Big Idea and the Theme of this Unit.)

 Lessons 1 & 2 are mostly pre-assessment lessons and won’t provide students with materials for their adventure
journals. So not to lose the momentum provided by the hook, I believe this piece should be inserted after the 2nd
lesson and in conjunction with the sharing of the unit goals.
 Write and then read aloud your own adventure journal without revealing that you are the author or that the story if
journal is fictional. When finished, reveal that you are the author and that not all journals have to be non-fiction.
 Describe your own interest in the story content. Explain all the neat things you learned about other places and
people through the creation of this story.
 Explain that students are going to create their own adventure journals. Appeal to their natural curiosities about the
world and their desire to live a life of adventure. Really sell the idea that this is a creative project and students will
be holding the reigns for what they’ll learn and what they’ll do.
 Explain that while this will be a fictional work, it will be based on non-fictional details acquired through real
research. Talk about the fact that this is the perfect opportunity for students to learn about almost anything they
want.
 Discuss the length and commitment required for this project, but also reassure students that if they let their

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curiosity guide them, their journals will essentially write themselves.
 Discuss the goals of the project and introduce the parameters of the adventure journal – 1) Starts from Sitka. 2)
Must travel to new locations, meet new people, and experience new events. 3) Journal details must be based on
research.
 Discuss your expectations of student work, work ethic, and expectations for learning. (Did you challenge
yourself? Were you productive and dedicated? Did you put forth your best work?)
 Lead students in a brainstorming exercise in which they identify several topics that are important or interesting to
them. Next, for each of these items, have students think about where in the world they might be able to
explore/experience/learn about those topics. This should generate a couple ideas for Adventure Journal stories.
 Have students select one and conduct a little bit of research to confirm a potential final destination – somewhere
that could provide a conclusion/major event/learning experience/etc. related to their chosen topic (e.g., exploring
ancient pyramids would probably take place in Egypt).

Title of Lesson Internet Scavenger Hunt


Materials for lesson 1 computer for each student with internet access, 1 scavenger hunt list, Internet Search Skills quiz,
internet research support-handout
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Students will be able to successfully navigate the internet to acquire specific information given a broad search
parameter.
EQ – How does the internet make learning about new things both easier and more difficult?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Technology B.1.
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 1) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 The day prior, lead a discussion in which students
generate a list of geographical, cultural, ecological,  Allow for cooperation
or any other meaningful and worldly questions that  Provide instructions in students’ native language
they might be curious about. (these questions need  Allow students to record their answers in their
to be broad enough that they require a little native language
digging).  Allow students to dictate their answers to the
 Use this list to create several scavenger hunt lists Internet Search Skills quiz
with varying difficulty. These lists should contain  Provide a translated version of the Internet Search
anywhere from 5-10 questions (generated in the Skills quiz in students’ native language
previous step). (example question: “How cold do
winters usually get in the Netherlands?”) (Create
scavenger hunts of varying degrees of difficulty)
 Explain to students that they will be using the
internet to research and come up with answers to
these questions.
 Introduce the internet research support-handout
 Model the process for a sample question or two and
provide students with general tips for using search
engines and conducting internet research (Provide a
list of useful websites/databases as well as a guide
for conducting a web search).
 Set students loose to complete their scavenger
hunts.
 This should demonstrate students’ abilities to
conduct online research and locate specific
information given a broad focus question.
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.

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 Review students’ answer to the scavenger hunt
questions and lead a discussion about how students
acquired their information.
 Introduce the Internet Search Skills quiz. This
should demonstrate students’ internet literacy.
 If students are unable to provide correct answers to
at least 85% of the quiz questions, or demonstrate
an inability to successfully locate information for
the scavenger hunt, insert a mini-lesson about using
the internet to conduct research before continuing
on to the next lesson.

Title of Lesson Recess Journal


Materials for lesson Writer’s notepad for each student, ½ hour+ of recess, ~10 phones with camera/audio recording
capabilities
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Students will construct a short journal entry wherein they apply the narrative writing strategies they are aware
of.
EQ – How can we make a journal entry successfully transport the reader back in time?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
W.3.3
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 2) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Lead a brief discussion about the process of journal
writing, making sure to emphasize the importance  Students can be provided with recorders to audio
of details, recording of events/feelings, reflection, record their journal entries while on-the-go
and sequence.  If it would allow a student to more fully
 Next, lead a brief discussion with students about demonstrate their understanding and ability to use
narrative writing and explain that students will be narrative strategies, allow them to dictate their
practicing with this style of writing through a journal entry using their audio recording device
journal entry.  Students may be allowed to take pictures to use as
 Inform students that this journal entry will be based reminders/notes for their journals.
on their lunch recess experiences (students are free  Provide instructions in students’ native language
to write about whatever parts of their recess they  Allow students to utilize their native language
choose). when writing their journal entries
 As they leave for lunch, have each of them take
with them their writer’s notepad to make notes
about the things they might want to include in their
journal entry (if possible, allow students to use
their phones as tools for note-taking).
 When students return from recess, have them use
their notes/memory to write their journal entries
using the writing strategies they are aware of
(including those discussed before recess).
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 Review these journals to determine which narrative
strategies require the most review/instruction and to
plan the writing portion of the unit.
Title of Lesson Identify the Destination
Materials for lesson Computers with internet access, brainstorming notes
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Students will use their brainstorming notes to select a final destination for their Adventure Journals
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EQ – N/A
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Technology B.1.
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 3) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Have students select from their brainstorming notes
the theme/purpose/activity/story that they are most  Allow students to work together to help each other
interested as the heart of their Adventure Journal find suitable locations for their stories.
project.
 Next, have students conduct a little internet
research to determine a logical final destination for
their Adventure Journals (somewhere that their
selected theme/purpose/story might be resolved or
experienced).
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction (allow students
complete creative freedom, so long as their final
destinations logically follow their
story/purpose/theme/etc.).

Title of Lesson Plotting a course


Materials for lesson Computers with internet and printing capabilities, SmartBoard, access to google maps or another
service where students can access world maps including geographic and human landmarks
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Use maps to plot a realistic course from (Sitka) to a target destination.
EQ – How can maps help us to explore?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Geography A.1
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 4) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Lead a discussion with students about travelling.
Talk about how the first step in going somewhere  Students will use Google Maps (or another online
new is figuring out how to get there. program) to plot their course. This provides visual
 After students have brainstormed, researched, and support.
determined a logical final destination for their  Provide a collection of paper maps for students to
journeys have them use a map (internet program or use as reference.
paper) to plot a realistic course from Sitka to their  Provide instructions in students’ native language
final destination (provide a set of step-by-step
instruction for using google maps [or another
program] to plot out a course for this project).
 Explain that for the purposes of this project, these
routes should make a stop or two – these should be
at populated areas where the main character of the
Adventure Journal can interact with unfamiliar
cultures/populations/wildlife/etc.
 They should keep in mind the modes of
transportation they plan on using in their travels
and plan accordingly (cars don’t drive over
mountains, small vehicles don’t travel for long
periods without stopping, etc.). Whenever they
think they might have a change in transportation, it
should be noted on their maps (students should
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have full creative freedom in determining modes of
transportation and route – so long as they are
logical).
 Model this process by creating your own map using
your own final destination.
 Students will record this draft route on an actual,
to-scale, map. Explain to students that this route is
just a first draft and will likely be altered
throughout the project (just as plans are often
altered in real life).
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 Students who produce unrealistic routes or neglect
the requirements of the route planning process need
to revise.

Title of Lesson Research note-taking


Materials for lesson SmartBoard, whiteboard, computers with internet access, note-taking handout, note-taking
guidelines handout
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Students will be able to identify, collect, and organize relevant pieces of information while conducting
research.
EQ – How does the phrase “less is more” make sense when talking about gathering information?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards) W.3.7
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 5) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Lead a discussion about the importance of note-
taking and note-taking strategies.  If beneficial to the student, allow them to use an
 Provide students with the note-taking handout and audio recorder to record notes
explain that they will use this, or a process similar  If beneficial to the student, allow them to take
to this one, to collect and organize important screen shots of their websites in order to create a
information they come across while researching for visual album of notes.
this project.
 Model the process of conducting research and
taking notes on the handout (emphasize the
importance of recording only the most important
points from large swaths of information,
summarizing key ideas in your own words,
documenting where you found your information
should you need to return to the source, and never
leaving an interesting or potentially relevant piece
of information behind {this point in particular may
be confusing after telling students to minimize
what information they collect from a source –
elaborate if need be}).
 Explain the importance of recording potential story
ideas as they come into your head – this will
happen a lot while conducting research and many
of these ideas will be things you won’t want to
forget.
 Next, because the research portion of this project is
so important, students will be conducting self-
assessments of their research notes – the last thing
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they’ll want to do during the final portion of this
project is to have to return to the search engines
because they missed important ideas or items
necessary for the completion of their Adventure
Journals.
 Introduce the note-taking self-assessment guideline
handout and model its use in reviewing notes that
you have taken.
 Provide students with a “dummy” question and set
them off to answer the question through online
research in order to give them practice using the
note-taking handout and self-assessment piece.
 Review students notes to identify areas of note-
taking that need to be revisited. Student notes
should include source location, research location,
relevant notes that are detailed enough to be
understood yet concise enough to be efficient, and
an idea for how these notes might be incorporated
into a story. You don’t want to move on from this
point until you are sure that your students are
competent note takers.
 Students will also use the note-taking review
handout to check their own notes for these
qualities.
 Really drive home the idea that note-taking is going
to be a significant part of this project and that if
students are not diligent in their note-taking, they
will experience serious difficulties.

Title of Lesson Geographical Elements


Materials for lesson Computers with internet access, note-taking handout, internet research support-handout, collection
of geographical books and other potentially helpful resources checked out from the library
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Research relevant geographic locations (determined by route) and use that information to help plan a trip.
EQ - How is our planet diverse, geographically?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Geography B.1
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 6) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Explain to students that the next step in the
Adventure Journal is the research block – this will  If beneficial to the student, allow them to use an
likely be the most intensive and important portion audio recorder to record notes
of the project and it is extremely important that  If beneficial to the student, allow them to take
students are diligent researchers and that they screen shots of their websites in order to create a
record everything! visual album of notes.
 Using the handout and instructions provided in the  Provide instructions in students’ native language
mini-lesson on research note-taking, students will  Allow students to take notes in their own language
use their preliminary travel route (created in lesson  Help students to find search engines, databases, and
4) as a research guide. books that use the student’s first language
 In this first session, students will be conducting
research on the geographic features of their route
(special attention should be paid to any transition or
stopping points).
 Lead a discussion with students about what
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geographic features are and what they should be
looking for in their research. Create a list as the
class discusses the topic. While created through
discussion, this list should ultimately include
landmarks, human structures, climate info,
ecoregion characteristics, & geographic features.
 Briefly model this process for your students using
the route you outlined in lesson 4. Demonstrate
good search skills and especially note-taking
habits.
 Explain to students that if they come across
interesting items that they should be noted in the
brainstorm section of their research notes. Don’t be
afraid to alter your course should you learn of an
interesting item that could be included in your
adventures (example: if passing through South
Dakota, it might not be a bad idea to revise your
travel route so that you could visit Mt. Rushmore).
 Students should also be thinking about developing
the story behind their adventure journal. Whenever
they think of a new potential idea, they should
write it down. Conducting research is bound to
spark creative ideas and so students should always
be ready to record.
 Make sure to explain that students should utilize
geography books checked out from the library and
other sources of reliable information such as
interviews or artifacts in addition to internet
research.
 Set students loose to conduct research.
 They should be recording any and all potentially
relevant notes gleaned from research.
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 When they are finished researching (will take more
than a day), students should review their own work,
using the self-review handout provided in the note-
taking mini-lesson.
 After self-review, students should turn their
research notes into you for review. Their notes
should be filled with geographical information and
brainstorming ideas for their stories.
 Students who do not collect notes sufficient enough
to support their stories should revisit their research.
 If many students have produced insufficient notes,
consider re-teaching note-taking
strategies/practices before moving on.

Title of Lesson Culture Elements


Materials for lesson Computers with internet access, note-taking handout, internet research support-handout, collection
of books containing cultural information and other potentially helpful resources checked out from the library
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Research the values/practices of cultures found in certain geographic locations to help plan a trip and make
inferences about possible encounters/events.
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EQ – How are world cultures (including our own) unique?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Cultural B.1
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 7) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Using the handout and instructions provided in the
mini-lesson on research note-taking, students will  If beneficial to the student, allow them to use an
use their preliminary travel route (created in lesson audio recorder to record notes
4) as a research guide.  If beneficial to the student, allow them to take
 In this second research session, students will be screen shots of their websites in order to create a
conducting research on the cultural characteristics visual album of notes.
of the human populations along their planned route  Provide instructions in students’ native language
(special attention should be paid to any transition or  Allow students to take notes in their own language
stopping points).  Help students to find search engines, databases, and
 Lead a discussion with students about what cultural books that use the student’s first language
characteristics are and what they should be looking
for in their research. Create a list as the class
discusses the topic. While cultural characteristics is
enormously broad, try to guide the discussion in a
way that your list covers religious/spiritual beliefs,
family values, dress, ethics, attitude towards
guests/strangers, food preferences, greeting
customs, names, behavior-considered-insulting, and
anything else that might seem relevant based on the
direction of your students’ adventure journals.
 Briefly model this process for your students using
the route you outlined in lesson 4. Demonstrate
good search skills and especially note-taking
habits.
 Explain to students that if they come across
interesting items that they should be noted in the
brainstorm section of their research notes. Don’t be
afraid to alter your course should you learn of an
interesting item that could be included in your
adventures (example: if you have an interest in
sumo wrestling, it might makes sense to stop in
Japan on your voyage across the pacific).
 Students should also continue thinking about
developing the story behind their adventure journal.
Every time they uncover a little creative spark, they
need to record it!
 Make sure to explain that students should utilize
relevant books checked out from the library and
other sources of reliable information such as
interviews or artifacts in addition to internet
research.
 Set students loose to conduct research.
 They should be recording any and all potentially
relevant notes gleaned from research.
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 When they are finished researching (perhaps more
than a day), students should review their own work,
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using the self-review handout provided in the note-
taking mini-lesson.
 After self-review, students should turn their
research notes into you for review. Their notes
should be filled with demographic information and
brainstorming ideas for their stories.
 Students who do not collect notes sufficient enough
to support their stories should revisit their research.

Title of Lesson Character & Culture Brainstorm


Materials for lesson Culture compare & contrast worksheet, research notes from previous lesson
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Research cultures found in certain geographic locations and compare them to the beliefs/behaviors of their
characters in order to make inferences about possible personal interactions due to differences and similarities.
EQ – How does diversity in culture contribute to the ways in which we interact with one another?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
Cultural E.7
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 8) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 By this point, students should have a somewhat
decent idea of the story behind their adventure  Allow students to compare/contrast their
journals. characters’ behaviors with the likely encountered
 Instruct students to take a moment to think about cultures of their adventures in other ways besides
the main character(s) in their story. Have them the worksheet so long as they accomplish the same
brainstorm personality characteristics of their main objective and maintain a record of their work – this
character along with behavioral preferences, could include the use of pictures or audio recording
physical characteristics, and history – students are devices.
essentially laying down the foundation of their  Provide instructions in students’ first language
protagonist (for some, this information will already  Allow students to utilize their first language when
be known, others may find this process difficult). completing the worksheet
Emphasize that these ideas are not necessarily set-
in-stone and as the author, students can change
their characters at any time.
 Briefly model this brainstorming process for your
own story.
 Afterwards, students will use the research
notes/brainstorm ideas they’ve compiled from
previous lessons (especially lesson 7) to complete a
compare/contrast worksheet in which they
highlight the similarities and differences between
their character’s practices/beliefs/behaviors and
those of different culture groups that they expect to
encounter throughout their adventure.
 Using this compare/contrast info, students will
brainstorm more ideas for possible interactions
their character might have with the culture groups
they encounter.
 Be sure to model this process with your own
story/research.
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 By the end of the lesson, students should have
generated at least one logical, potential interaction
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(based on cultural differences/similarities) for each
culture group that they intend for their character to
interact with.
 Students who have not produced a reasonable
amount of potential-interactions should revisit their
cultural research, or continue developing their
story’s character(s) until they are able to.

Title of Lesson Adventure Journal Outline


Materials for lesson All research notes /brainstorming ideas from previous lessons, draft paper
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Use research data to help design a fictional journal detailing a realistic adventure journey/trip.
EQ – How can we learn about other places, people, or events without actually being there or experiencing them?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
W.5.7
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 9) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Now that students have constructed a rough travel
timeline, it’s time to start crafting the actual stories.  Allow students to craft their outline through the use
 Using dates (pulled from timeline) as major points, of an audio recording device
and research data/brainstorming notes as sub-items,  Allow students to draft their outlines in their first
students will create a rough outline of their language, though they should keep an English
adventure journals. translation in mind and should be encouraged to
 The purpose of these outlines is not to get actual utilize both English and their first language to craft
journal style writing done. It should act as an the base to a quality piece of literature. Provide
organizer for key ideas and events that students translation dictionaries as well as potential option
want to have occur in their adventure journals. to use a translation program for small chunks.
 Students do not need to account for every day of
their journeys – only those in which a significant
event occurred or to mark the passing of a chunk of
time (it should form the skeleton of the adventure
story and therefore only needs to include items that
progress the story meaningfully).
 The sub-items beneath each important date should
incorporate research data on geography,
demographics, and culture.
 Make sure to do a fair bit of modeling for this
portion of the project. It is important that students
utilize their research notes here, so that they have a
foundation that meets the objectives of the unit as
they begin the next step of actual narrative writing.
 Note that while the details and events included in
these stories are expected to be logical and
research-based, they do not need to necessarily be
realistic. This is a creative research project at heart
and it is creativity that will drive this project. If
students wish to incorporate fantastical, whimsical,
or science-fiction style items in their stories, that is
fine – so long as aspects of those items are based
on research (e.g., time travel to the past in France
should portray a realistic version of historic France
-and- Dragons encountered in East Asia should
represent the local-cultural depiction of dragons in
that area).
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 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
might benefit from direction.
 Allow students to craft their outlines in any way
they see fit, so long as they follow the original
adventure journal parameters.
 Students who do not properly incorporate their
research data need to continue revising their
outlines or need to do additional research that
supports their story goals.
 Students should return to computers to collect any
research data needed for their stories that arises as a
product of creating their outlines (this will most
likely be the case for every student).

Title of Lesson Narrative Writing Strategies Mini-lessons


Materials for lesson Draft paper, SmartBoard, Word processor for instruction/shared-modeling, List of narrative
strategies with examples in literature, Self/peer review guideline handout
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Students should know how to draw a reader in a story using narrative strategies such as providing
sensory/descriptive details, dialogue, inner-monologue, realistic reflection/interaction, character development, etc.
EQ – What kinds of writing makes a story come alive? How can we draw the reader into our literary world?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
W.3.3
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 10) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 Using the information gleaned from students
outlines and Lesson 2, create a set of mini-lessons  Allow students to demonstrate their application of
based around specific narrative writing strategies. narrative strategies and revision skills through the
 These lessons should be brief and follow a gradual use of an audio recording device
release structure whereby you identify a strategy in  Provide materials in students’ first language
an existing literature piece -> lead a class
discussion/dissection of the strategy -> model the
use of said strategy in a new piece of writing ->
have the class work together to revise an existing
piece of writing to incorporate the strategy -> have
students practice using the strategy in short-short-
writing pieces (no longer than 2 paragraphs).
 For each completed mini-lesson, design a sort of
quick reference guide for implementing the chosen
narrative strategy and have students copy it into
their writer’s notebooks (provide students with
examples of these strategies being applied in real
literature).
 One mini-lesson should be focused on self/peer
review. Focus on teaching students to review for
meaning, prose, structure, chronology, and to keep
an eye out for revisions that might improve the
actual story behind the text. Grammar items should
be a low priority in the review process and should
only be focused on once the story no longer needs
revision. Provide students with a self/peer review
handout detailing the basic steps for review.
 Along with this review handout, students will also
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be given a piece of journal writing that could use
some revision. Using the handout as a guide,
students will identify areas of the writing piece that
warrant possible revision and make suggestions for
potential revisions.
Title of Lesson Adventure Journals
Materials for lesson Adventure Journal outlines, draft paper, computers with internet and word processing capabilities,
all research/ brainstorming notes from previous lessons, Narrative writing supports provided in previous lesson
Objectives and Essential Questions for lesson
Objective – Use narrative writing strategies including the use of descriptive/sensory details, internal/external dialogue,
setting, transitional words, character/plot development, etc., to develop a clear, coherent, and chronological journal about
a fictional journey using relevant, logical details.
EQ – How do stories help us explore places we’ve never been and/or experience events that we aren’t able to physically?
Content areas covered in lesson (from standards)
W.3.3
Embed Assessments in Lesson activities
Lesson 11) Differentiation Strategies for the
process/product/assessment
 After students have completed their adventure
journal outlines, they will begin the process of  Allow students to cooperate and conduct peer
turning their outlines into a real story following the reviews through dictation or narration when
structure of a journal. beneficial
 Utilizing their brainstorming notes, writing strategy  Allow students to draft with an audio recorder,
references, and outlines as a guide, students will though their final draft should be written out – they
work through each journal entry date crafting it into may receive help in the transcription of their
a real piece of literature that incorporates adventure story by a person or program (voice-to-
information acquired through real research and that text).
follows a logical timeline supported by timeline.  If necessary, allow students the opportunity to
 These journal entries should incorporate effective dictate their final draft through the use of an audio
narrative strategies such as the inclusion of recording device.
descriptive details, sensory details, character  If it would be beneficial to the student, allow them
dialogue, inner-monologue, character growth, and to substitute pictures with minimal captions for
any other strategies that will help bring the writing some of the written entries in their story
to life.  Provide all materials in students’ first languages
 Because these are journal entries, writing should be  Allow students to utilize their first language during
done from a first-person perspective and should the drafting process, but encourage them to
follow a clear sequence of events through the use incorporate English wherever and whenever they
of setting, transitional language, and time can. The final draft should be at least partially
references. written in English
 Model for students the process of turning an outline
point into an actual journal entry that utilizes
writing strategies as well as research data. Make
sure students understand that grammar is a low
priority during drafting and the focus should be on
quality of comprehensive story writing and paying
attention to unit objectives. (model the process
through drafting, side notes, revision, re-reading,
revising again, and editing).
 The details in these stories should always be rooted
in real research – even when they’re fantastical or
heavily fictional.
 Student will likely work through several drafts
before they are ready to finalize their stories.
 Circle and observe students while they work.
Provide support to students who are stuck or who
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might benefit from direction.
 Allow students complete creative freedom in
writing their adventure journals, so long as the
information they use is logical, based on research,
and follows the original parameters set forth for the
project.
 Provide a handout containing self-review/peer-
review instructions/guidelines (model the use of
this handout).
 After each draft completion, students should self-
review their work to look for areas that warrant
revision.
 After self-review, students will submit their drafts
for peer review (which will be focused on meaning,
flow, and structure before grammar).
 After self and peer review, students may submit
their drafts to the teacher for review of meaning,
flow, structure, and grammar.
 Use student writing as a guide to plan mini-lessons
regarding narrative writing, specific writing
techniques, the writing process (drafting, revision,
review, etc.) and implementation of research notes.
 When students have completed their final drafts,
they should print them in a professional format and
submit them for review.
 Once each student is finished with their adventure
journals, split students into small groups 2-4 and
have them share their adventure stories with their
groupmates. Later, these journals will be posted in
the hallway in all their glory for the rest of the
school to admire.

Closure for Unit


Materials for Closure Completed Adventure Journals
Objectives and Essential Questions for closure
 How does the internet make learning about new things both easier and more difficult?
 How can we make a journal entry successfully transport the reader into the mind of the author?
 How can maps help us to explore?
 How does the phrase “less is more” make sense when talking about gathering information?
 How is our planet diverse, geographically?
 How are world cultures (including our own) unique?
 How does diversity in culture contribute to the ways in which we interact with one another?
 How can we learn about other places, people, or events without actually being there or experiencing them?
 What kinds of writing makes a story come alive? How can we draw the reader into our literary world?
 How do stories help us explore places we’ve never been and/or experience events that we aren’t able to
physically?
Content areas covered in Closure (from standards)
Embed Assessments in Closure activities
Closure: Differentiation Strategies for the
Bring it all together with reflection, assessment, and process/product/assessment
performance. Tie the closure in with the Essential
Questions and Enduring Understandings.  Allow students to use their first language when
responding to each poster during the roam-and-
 Discuss with students each of the essential write.
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questions and how this project helped us to answer  Allow students to dictate their answers to the EQ
them questions either directly or through the use of an
 Post the essential questions on poster-paper around audio device.
the classroom and have students do a roam-and-  Provide the EQ questions as a handout in students’
write with sticky notes where they visit each poster first language
and post their own answers.
 Collect each students Adventure Journal and post
them in the hallway where students can
demonstrate their learning and receive recognition
for all their hard work.

Cultural Capital:

Adventure journaling provides students the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of other cultures and places in the world in a way
that mirrors and teaches real-world, life-long-learning strategies. Further, by embedding this learning into the activity of creative
journaling, students are asked to imagine themselves actually experiencing these new cultures and places. This mental immersion
provides a deeper and more meaningful connection to the world-diversity the students are learning about.

By starting their adventures (and research) in Sitka, students are able to make an immediate connection between their own world and
the project. From here, students are given full creative license with their adventure journals. This allows them to pursue questions and
ideas that are meaningful to them; and in a way that will lead them to exposure and virtual interaction with the unfamiliar. They are
both in full control of their learning and delving headlong into the unknown diversity of our world.

The unit takes place over several weeks and follows a highly structured process in which the skills necessary for virtual exploration
and communication are delivered through 11 scaffolded lessons. Each lesson provides skills and information that students will build
upon and use in the subsequent lesson, ultimately leading to a culminating writing activity that is fun, rewarding, and demonstrative of
their learning.

Throughout this process, students will be building self-regulation skills through self-assessment and review. Additionally, while
students are expected to complete tasks, the ultimate expectations set forth for students are growth-focused and not product-based.
This helps students to develop a mindset where they see learning as an end-in-itself as opposed to a means to an end.

Altogether, self-regulation, motivation to learn, communication skills, exposure to diversity, and technological literacy are what I
would consider to be the five most important qualities and skills a person can have in the 21 st century. This unit targets those skills and
qualities in a way that allows educational access for learners of all types and backgrounds.

Attachments: Graphic Organizers and Assessment Rubrics for Lesson.

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Culminating Performance Task 2 - Rubric
As the author, you will be using your research notes and outlines to craft a detailed adventure journal. This journal should
both entertain and educate your readers. The information you use needs to be based on the research you conducted during
the unit and the journal itself should utilize the narrative writing strategies that you’ve learned thus far in class (detailed in
your writing notebook) so that your story feels real/convincing. Your journal should flow from one entry to the next and
follow a logical sequence of events. This story should demonstrate your knowledge of at least 3 new areas, including
geographic, cultural, and demographic facts, and should originate in Sitka. While building your research into your journal
writing, you should ask yourself these questions, 1) Does my journal incorporate information from at least 3 new places?
2) Does this information include geographic, cultural, and demographic facts? 3) Is all of this information based on actual
research? 4) Does my journal follow a logical sequence and adhere to standard conventions of English writing? 5) Have I
incorporated the use of several narrative writing strategies to enhance the telling of my story?

Incomplete Getting close Complete


Accuracy of Information The real-world details used The real-world details used The real-world details used
in the adventure journal are in the adventure journal are in the adventure journal are
not accurate or based on based on research, but all accurate and based on
research contain many errors research
Exploration The adventure journal does The adventure story
not detail new areas and/or originates in Sitka and
does not originate in Sitka -- details new areas.

Integration of research The adventure journal does Cultural, geographic, and Cultural, geographic, and
not utilize cultural, demographic information demographic information is
geographic, and included in the adventure included in the adventure
demographic information of journal is only incidental and journal in a way that leads
new areas in the construction does not contribute to the the story
of the story story
Form The adventure journal does The adventure journal is The adventure journal is
not take the form of a journal presented in journal form, presented in journal form
though it is difficult to and the story flows from one
determine one entry from the entry to the next in a logical
next or the entries do not fashion. Conventional errors
follow a sequential pattern. are few.
The story is filled with
writing convention errors.
Story There is no evidence of One or two narrative writing The story feels real due to
narrative writing strategies strategies are used to make the fact that many narrative
used to draw the reader in or the adventure journal come writing strategies are used to
make the story feel real alive and feel real. These bring the story to life. These
might include might include
 Sensory details  Sensory details
 Descriptive details  Descriptive details
 Dialogue  Dialogue
 Setting  Setting
 Presence of voice  Presence of voice
 Character  Character
development development
 Plot development  Plot development
 Other items  Other items
covered in writing covered in writing
mini-lessons mini-lessons

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Sample Adventure Journal – rough draft (to be read during unit intro)

August 3rd
It’s dark and wet, as it often is. The spruce and hemlock loom overhead like statues, their branches like arms
reaching down as if to grab you in the night. There are eyes in the dark. I know the totems are here to tell the
stories of the past, but their faces peer at me through the bushes and make me ill at ease. That’s why I came
here, the legends. The tale of a creature half man, half otter. A monster who steals people in the night. The
Kushtaka. I came to see if the tales were true. It’s my business. I hunt monsters. A modern day Van Helsing you
could call me.

It’s a wonderous place Sitka, but still… I’ve done my deed here, it’s time to move on. The ship departs
tomorrow. I’ve secured passage on the Enterprise. A seining boat returning south after a summer’s catch. She’s
a sturdy vessel, like many are here. This crew didn’t fare all that well, that’s why I chose this boat. Cheaper
passage, and more importantly, they haven’t used up their luck. I believe in that sort of thing. You have to in my
line of work.

I’ve loaded up on provisions, this is probably going to be a long trip along the coast, and it may be the last time
I’m able to find fresh pacific salmon, I’m particularly fond of silver, or coho as the locals call it. I’m making my
way towards Haiti. The Caribbean has a very different types of seafood, and monsters… It’s rumored that I’ll
find zombies there. We’ll see…

August 10th
The weather has been as good as can be expected. Enterprise has held her own. She was a powerful ship, but a
bit smelly. We’ve arrived in Crescent City. I’ll have to find a different means of travel from this point on.

I was able to charter a flight to Florida. A little more expensive than I had hoped, but it beats going through the
Panama Canal. I could use a break from the stench as well.

August 11th
I arrived in Naples Florida in the afternoon. This is a pleasant city. Nice weather, mildly hot temperature. Very
wealthy from the looks of it. I’m more accustomed to the back-alley joints and inns – more information to be
had from the locals you’ll find in a small fishing town, but I’m not here for information. Besides, it’s been a
while since I’ve slept in a comfortable bed. The Enterprise may have been large, but she was no cruise line.

I decided to bunk up in one of the local hotels with a nice restaurant on the first floor. It must’ve been the luxury
surrounding me, but I felt like eating fancy tonight. I had an order of the local swordfish. After all, I am
searching out zombies… This may be the last time I get to dine where I’m the one holding the fork…

Naples has its own kind of monsters with giant gaping mouths, housing nearly 80 razor sharp teeth, and living
in the darkest, murkiest environment you can imagine. These creatures are the things of nightmares. Alligators.
A relic of the dinosaur age. It’s no wonder these creatures have lived so long, they’re the perfect killing
machine. I may have the stomach for ghosts and undead, but I’m sure glad I’m not here for these. While they’ll
typically leave you alone if you grant them the same courtesy, I don’t want to have to deal with these animals.
I’d rather leave that to the Steve Irwins of the world – brave souls.

August 12th
In my profession it’s always a good idea to keep a low profile so I’m not too keen about the idea of flying
directly to Haiti. I decided to rent a boat and make my way there, stopping in Cuba. It took me about 9 hours to
get to Havana from Naples. Not bad. Luckily for me, the water was fairly calm. I’m a little nervous about that.
So far this trip has gone too smoothly for my taste. I’m a particularly superstitious person, I don’t like the idea
of using up all my good luck too quickly. I have a feeling I may need it by the end of this job.
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Havana is beautiful. The architecture here is astounding, a holdover from the 17th century when Havana was a
main port for the Spanish fleet. I need to refuel and resupply anyways before I continue on to Haiti, so I don’t
see the harm in joining the ranks of tourists for a day. Zombies by definition don’t die, if they are in Haiti,
they’ll still be there in a day or two. Besides, tomorrow is Friday the 13th. If I have a choice, I’d rather spend
that day doing something relatively safe.

August 13th
I visited the old Presidential Palace turned history museum as well as the Cathedral de San Cristobal today and I
must say, wow. Old Havana is astounding. The buildings are so alive with the past, you half expect a
conquistador to walk around the corner. One of the perks of hunting monsters around the world is that I get to
experience amazing places. I’m a bit of a culture connoisseur. I have an appreciation for new places, especially
when they’re old places. You also never know what you’ll learn from the people in an unfamiliar region. I
always make sure to speak with the locals on a job, it’s saved me a lot of trouble on several occasions.

Tomorrow is going to be a long day. I imagine I’ll be boating for a solid 20+ hours. I’ve stocked up on water. I
can’t imagine inland Haiti would be very forgiving to those who come unprepared.

August 15th
I arrived in Haiti late last night, not exactly the time of day you want to show up in zombie territory, though it’s
probably more dangerous to boat in the dark, and I couldn’t exactly anchor up in the middle of the Caribbean. I
hung around ‘till morning and then hitched a ride with a local driver heading inland. My destination, the
farmlands near Hinche, right in the center of Haiti. It’s surrounded by the Dominican Republic border on one
side and natural mountain borders on the others. The ride was bumpy, but I was just glad I had one. We made
decent time, maybe 4 hours.

During our little road trip I got the chance to speak with Samuel, the driver. I asked him about the zombie
rumors, I expected a laugh or a sideways look, but much to my surprise he seemed rather unmoved by the idea
and simply responded

“They’re not as common as you might’ve heard. What about ‘em?”

His casual tone told me that he wasn’t just toying with me. I remember thinking to myself, this is it. This isn’t
just another goose chase. I may actually find what I’m looking for! And it terrified me.

He must have read my face as he laughed and assured me that zombies are nothing to fear. “Yeah right” I
thought. But I was intrigued.

“What do you mean? Have you seen one?”

“Me personally? Maybe. I don’t spend much time in the fields, I’m a courier so I spend most of my days on the
road, back n’ forth. But I think I saw one, one time when I was delivering some oil.”

I was trembling now, half with excitement, half with terror. “How did you escape?”

He laughed. “After I delivered the oil, I walked away. I told you, they are nothing to be frightened about. Pity.
That is how you should feel. It’s not natural.”

I was a bit confused, this didn’t sound like a savage, brain eating monster to me. “I’m sorry if I sound ignorant,
but would you care to explain?”

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“It’s simple. When someone dies unnaturally, their soul lingers in this world, wandering aimlessly. There are
certain people who take advantage of these poor souls. They resurrect the body and put them to work. Some call
these people witchdoctors.”

“Put them to work? Isn’t that dangerous? What if they bite someone?”

“Bite someone?” He laughed. “Then they get a band-aid! But that won’t happen, I told you, they are harmless,
and mindless. They don’t want to hurt you. They don’t want to do anything.”

“Do many people believe these stories?”

“Well yes. It is natural. Unnatural, but natural. Supernatural.” He laughed again. “Is that why you are here? Are
you looking for a zombie? I would be wary if I were you. Not of the zombie, but of his master. People do not
like their affairs to be trifled with. And a witchdoctor is no-one to upset.”

“Can you take me to this farm where you saw the zombie?”

“Yes I suppose, it is on the way. But I will not stay. It’s not my business. And not yours either. I warn you, do
not stir up trouble or you may find yourself as the walking dead.”

I knew the Haitian people were deeply religious, but I rarely find locals who believe the legends. The Kushtaka
in Southeast Alaska was believed by some, but most people shrugged it off as a bedtime story, something to
scare naughty children. The vampires in Transylvania were feared in in the past, but today they are mostly
played up to entice tourists to come spend money. This was different. This seemed almost genuine…

Samuel dropped me off by a small Batey near Maissade, maybe 12 miles west of Hinche. This is where he
claimed to have seen the zombie. The area was like you might expect for farm country, not too hot, maybe 80
degrees, not too dry. In fact, it was relatively comfortable except the knot in my stomach which had been
growing tighter and tighter all afternoon. I wasn’t sure what I would find here, probably nothing, but still,
Samuel seemed so sure. I had to know. This was, after all, why I was here.

A Batey is a sugar cane plantation, often filled with slave workers. It’s a sad sight, many of the people here
work 100+ hours a week for less than $1 a day. But then there are apparently worse things than being a slave,
you could be a zombie.

I made my way through the fields towards and old house on the northern edge of the farm. I wasn’t sure what I
would say, but it seemed like a good place to poke around for information. The house was pretty normal, maybe
a little worn, could’ve used some paint here and there, but nothing you would expect to house monsters or dark
magic.

Inside there was a slightly older man, maybe in his early fifties. He didn’t seem surprised to see a stranger at his
door, it was almost as if he knew I were coming… Perhaps it’s not uncommon for visitors to pass through here.
He allowed me into his home and introduced himself as Jameson. He spoke kindly, but his eyes betrayed his
words. I was not welcome here.

“We don’t often see strangers here”

There goes that theory, I thought to myself.

“Just passing through to Hinche”

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For some reason I didn’t think it would bode well to explain that I was here on account of an alleged zombie
sighting.

“I’d prefer that you wouldn’t lie to me in my own home. But I suppose we all have our secrets.”

Normally I would have felt embarrassed, caught in a fib, but his eyes were so off-putting, all I felt was unease.
That last thing he said… we all have our secrets…

Just then, a shadow was cast over the room and I turned to see a large slumped man standing in the doorway,
face obscured by the sunlight behind him. There was something odd. Jameson motioned the man to enter. My
heart stopped. I was standing not 10 feet from a zombie! I had no idea what to do. I wasn’t prepared! I froze.
Surely this was the end. But then… nothing… The large zombie shuffled slowly past me. In his eyes there
weren’t any signs of aggression. No bloodthirst. In fact, there was nothing. He had no expression, showed no
emotion.

Jameson was giving him instructions. I don’t speak Haitian very well so all I got was “…. fields …. more ….
tonight…” Jameson handed the man a small bowl of food, maybe beans of some sort. It was about dinner time.
The zombie swallowed his meal, turned, and then shuffled past me again towards the door. I hadn’t moved a
muscle. And then it hit me. He was breathing. There were no gruesome marks. And his skin, it was flush with
life. He was alive? But dead too, only… on the inside. It was almost as if he were drugged. Jameson must have
noticed my reaction.

“I figured that is why you came here.”

“I fear you have wasted your time. You’ll find no monsters here, only men. Dead men, but men.”

“…What happened to him?”

His unwelcoming expression darkened. “It is his path. His time had come, but God was not ready to take him
yet. So he stays. You’ll stay here tonight as well. I should send you away, but the day is growing dark. I would
not have you walk to Hinche, or wherever you intend on going, in the dark. There are dangerous people who
might take advantage of a wanderer like yourself.” He smirked as he said this last part. I had a mind to take off
right then and there. But as much as Jameson made me uneasy, he was right. I knew very little of this country,
I’d probably end up lost. Besides, I needed to know more. This was hardly the zombie I expected to see.

I couldn’t sleep that night. I kept thinking about the man in Jameson’s house. Was he really dead? There was
something strange about his interaction with Jameson. Maybe I was simply disturbed by the presence of the
zombie, but no… something else… … The food! That’s it! Jameson seemed very focused
while the zombie was eating. Almost as if he were watching to make sure the meal was finished. But why
would he care? Unless of course the zombie was not a zombie after all, and was in fact a man. A man being
drugged by Jameson!

In my earlier travels to the Caribbean Islands I’d heard tale of certain poisonous plants that can cause amnesia,
delirium and even suggestibility… I wonder if those plants could be found in Haiti. This was too much, I
needed fresh air. I left my room and went to sit on the porch, maybe the cool breeze of night would help me
think. I stepped outside and… There he was! The zombie! Standing perfectly still on the far end of the porch. It
was dark and all I could see was his silhouette, but I could tell it was him. The same build. The same slouched
shoulders. The same lifeless gaze.

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He turned that gaze on me. My heart fell to the pit of my stomach. My throat swelled up. But those eyes… They
were almost disarming. They were so human. Empty, but human. Then he looked back out at the fields. He
looked exhausted. This poor creature was no threat to me. Samuel was right, I felt pity for the thing. Without
thinking I asked “Are you OK?”

He simply turned his head to look at me.

“Who are you?” I asked.

“My name is Patrick.”

He could talk! I didn’t’ know what to think! “Are… Are you alive?”

“I walk, but I am not alive.”

This was more than anything I had expected. On my way here I thought at most I would get a sample or capture
a zombie for study, I had no idea I would be interviewing one! “How can that be?”

“The man Jameson.” He replied.

There was something sluggish in his speech, and it wasn’t his unfamiliarity with English. It was almost
familiar… Yes. It was as I thought. This man was being poisoned. It all made sense! Probably tricked into death
through some sort of paralyzing toxin, only to awake to a life of slavery. What cheaper laborer could you find
than one who thinks he is dead? What would a dead man want with money? The cruelty. There was no monster
standing next to me. The real monster was inside – Jameson!

A thought raced through my mind. I may not know my way around here at night, but Patrick does!

“Patrick, are you allowed to leave?”

He only looked at me.

“Would you lead me to Hinche?” I asked.

“Yes.”

“Good.” I said quickly. “We are leaving now. We must be quiet. We cannot wake Jameson.”

“Jameson is my master.”

I wasn’t sure what to say. “He has instructed you to take me to Hinche.” What I said didn’t make sense, but
Patrick simply nodded. Those eyes still lifeless, almost as if he didn’t really comprehend, or didn’t care.
Whatever it was, he started walking… My heart was pounding. I followed silently.

August 26th
I’ve rented a room for Patrick and myself in a remote part of Hinche. We’ve been here over a week now and
just as I thought, Pat has been slowly regaining consciousness. It wasn’t easy, especially those first few nights.
Can you imagine sharing a room with a dead man? I did a little bit of research in the meantime and found that
some witchdoctors, the unsavory ones, are rumored to paralyze people on occasion who have angered them,
using the poison found in puffer fish. That must be what happened to Patrick! I can’t imagine what Jameson
would have done if he had caught me. Now I understand the warnings Samuel gave me.
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It took a while to convince Patrick of this. In fact, he is still unsure as to whether or not his is dead or alive. Like
I said, the people here are very religious and have a very strong belief in afterlife. It makes sense that they might
believe zombies are real, or even that they are one. It is their culture. And perhaps I am the one who is wrong.
Maybe Patrick is the walking dead. Who am I to say? Regardless, dead or alive, he is free now. Free to return to
life.

I guess when you hunt monsters for a living, you just might end up finding one who needs help.

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