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WWF INTERNATIONAL

Policies and Procedures


Manual
WWF Human Resource Policies and Procedures Manual for
Programme Offices (PO’s)
-
Mars 2012
TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................................................................ 4
1. ETHICS .................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
1.1 WWF VALUES ............................................................................................................................................................. 5
1.2 WWF MISSION AND CODE OF ETHICS .................................................................................................................... 5
1.3 HOW WE IMPLEMENT THE WWF CODE OF ETHICS .............................................................................................. 7
1.4 CONFLICT OF INTEREST ........................................................................................................................................... 7
1.5 FRAUD/CORRUPTION PREVENTION AND INVESTIGATION POLICY .................................................................. 8
1.6 WHISTLEBLOWER POLICY ...................................................................................................................................... 13
1.7 ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR ..................................................................................................................................... 15
1.8 GROSS PROFESSIONAL MISCONDUCT AND HARASSMENT ............................................................................. 16
1.9 CONFLICT .................................................................................................................................................................. 17
1.10 DATA PROTECTION .............................................................................................................................................. 18
1.11 SUBSTANCE ABUSE, SMOKING AND ALCOHOL............................................................................................... 18
1.12 HIV/AIDS .................................................................................................................................................................. 19
2. EMPLOYMENT AND RECRUITMENT ............................................................................................................................. 20
2.1 EMPLOYMENT PHILOSOPHY .................................................................................................................................. 20
2.2 WORKPLACE DIVERSITY – developing Human Resources for the Future .................................................................. 20
2.3 EMPLOYMENT OF RELATIVES................................................................................................................................ 25
2.4 EMPLOYMENT OF INTERNAL APPLIcANTS .......................................................................................................... 25
2.5 RECRUITMENT .......................................................................................................................................................... 26
2.6 EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS ................................................................................................................................... 27
2.7 RELOCATION ............................................................................................................................................................. 28
2.8 LANGUAGE TRAINING ............................................................................................................................................. 28
2.9 CONSULTANTS .......................................................................................................................................................... 28
2.10 PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT ................................................................................................................................... 31
2.11 INTERNSHIPS .......................................................................................................................................................... 31
3. COMPENSATION ................................................................................................................................................................. 33
3.1 COMPENSATION PHILOSOPHY ............................................................................................................................... 33
3.2 STAFF CATEGORIES AT WWF ................................................................................................................................. 33
3.3 ANNUAL BASE SALARY .......................................................................................................................................... 34
3.4 HOW DO WWF PAY FOR STAFF SALARIES AND PAY REVIEWS? ....................................................................... 34
3.5 EXTERNAL MARKET DATA .................................................................................................................................... 35
3.6 OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANNUAL PAY REVIEW ................................................................................... 37
3.7 INTERNAL EQUITY ................................................................................................................................................... 37
3.8 GLOBAL GRADING STRUCTURE ............................................................................................................................ 38
3.9 GUIDELINES FOR PROMOTIONAL INCREASES..................................................................................................... 39
3.10 LINKING REWARDS TO PERFORMANCE THROUGH AIM .................................................................................. 39
3.11 ELIGIBILITY FOR AIM FINANCIAL INCENTIVES ................................................................................................ 40
3.12 HOW MUCH TO REWARD FOR AIM? .................................................................................................................... 40
3.13 AIM (Outposted staff) ................................................................................................................................................. 40
3.14 AIM PROCESS .......................................................................................................................................................... 40
3.15 SALARY REVIEW (Outposted staff) .......................................................................................................................... 41
3.16 13th MONTH.............................................................................................................................................................. 41
4. BENEFITS.............................................................................................................................................................................. 42
4.1 SUMMARY OF BENEFITS ......................................................................................................................................... 44
4.2 ACCIDENT INSURANCE ........................................................................................................................................... 44
4.3 MEDICAL INSURANCE ........................................................................................................................................... 45
4.4 LOANS TO STAFF .................................................................................................................................................... 46
5. EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS ........................................................................................................................................... 47
5.1 WORKING HOURS ..................................................................................................................................................... 47
5.2 TELEWORKING ......................................................................................................................................................... 47
5.3 OVERTIME ................................................................................................................................................................. 48
5.4 TITLES ........................................................................................................................................................................ 48
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5.5 WORK STATION/OFFICE CONDITIONS .................................................................................................................. 49
6. HEALTH & SAFETY ............................................................................................................................................................ 50
6.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 50
6.2 POLICY ....................................................................................................................................................................... 50
6.3 RESPONSIBILITY ....................................................................................................................................................... 52
6.4 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTICES FOR ALL WWF OFFICES ............................... 54
7. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................................................... 56
8. LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT .................................................................................................................................... 59
9. ABSENCES ............................................................................................................................................................................ 61
9.1 ANNUAL LEAVE ........................................................................................................................................................ 61
9.2 PUBLIC HOLIDAYS ................................................................................................................................................... 61
9.3 SPECIAL AND COMPASSIONATE LEAVE ............................................................................................................... 62
9.4 SICKNESS LEAVE ...................................................................................................................................................... 62
9.5 MATERNITY AND PATERNITY LEAVE .................................................................................................................. 62
10. GLOBAL MOBILITY ...................................................................................................................................................... 64
10.1 SHORT-TERM INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT POLICY .................................................................................... 64
10.2 LONG-TERM INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT POLICY ...................................................................................... 66
11. END OF EMPLOYMENT ................................................................................................................................................ 74
11.1 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT ........................................................................................................................ 74
11.2 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT DUE TO REDUNDANCY .............................................................................. 74
11.3 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT DUE TO PERFORMANCE/ DISMISSAL ....................................................... 75
11.4 RETIREMENT ........................................................................................................................................................... 76
12.5 WORK /EXPERIENCE CERTIFICATES.................................................................................................................... 76
12. ANNEXES ......................................................................................................................................................................... 77

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INTRODUCTION

Our goal is to create an attractive and empowering work environment for our staff, an environment where our
core values and competencies will be the cornerstone of how we behave. We seek to have policies in place that
reflect the cutting edge of modern management practice, underline our mission and code of ethics and promote
knowledge sharing and entrepreneurship throughout the organization.

We are continuously seeking ways to promote mobility, total rewards and career development so that our
brightest staff will choose to stay and that gifted and visionary people will want to make WWF their career
choice in the future.

This manual contains the key Human Resources policies and procedures for the WWF Secretariat, which have
been developed by the People and Organization Development Department. They are also available on the WWF
International Intranet under Other Resources/Human Resources.

Ideas, Suggestions and Enquiries

We aim to revise and update this document on an on-going basis, in response to ideas from staff and changing
practices in the market place. As sections in the manual are periodically updated, we will send them to the staff.
The date at the bottom of each page shows the most recent update.

We welcome your comments, suggestions and constructive criticism and we will listen to what you have to say.
Please send your feedback to:

Christopher Hutton
Director, People and Organization Development
chutton@wwfint.org
Tel: +41 22 364 9276
Fax: +41 22 364 7850
WWF International
Avenue du Mont Blanc
1196 Gland
Switzerland

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1. ETHICS

1.1 WWF VALUES

WWF's core values help describe what makes WWF a unique and special place to work. WWF's values guide
individual employees, shape interactions between all employees and departments, and foster strong
relationships with our external partners and supporters.

We are:

• Engaging
Open, available, accessible

• Optimistic
Inspiring, positive, ambitious, successful

• Determined
Passionate, urgent, results-oriented

• Knowledgeable
Science and facts based, wise/smart, intelligent, expert

1.2 WWF MISSION AND CODE OF ETHICS

How we behave towards our Mission, Our World, and Ourselves

OUR MISSION

WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the planet's natural environment and to build a
future in which humans live in harmony with nature by:

conserving the world's biological diversity


ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable
promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption

WWF has a clearly stated mission and purpose. All of our programmes support that mission, and its
goals will be more easily reached if the following principles are embraced.

1. We will be global, independent, multicultural and non-party political.


2. We will use the best available scientific information to address issues and critically evaluate all our
endeavours.
3. We will, wherever possible, seek dialogue and avoid confrontation.
4. We will build concrete conservation solutions through a combination of field-based projects, policy
initiatives, capacity building and education.
5. We will involve local communities and indigenous peoples in the planning and execution of our
field programmes, and we will respect their cultural and economic needs.
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6. We will maximize our effectiveness by building partnerships with other organizations,
governments, businesses and local communities.
7. We will run our operations in a responsible and cost-effective manner, and apply donors’ funds
according to the highest standards of accountability and transparency

OUR WORLD
We will at all times seek to minimize the environmental impact (especially any adverse impact) of our
activities, and make sure that they always comply with all environmental protection legislation. In our
daily lives, both at work and in our private time, we will practice what we preach by doing all we can to
reduce pollution and waste, and wherever possible use renewable and recyclable materials. And we will
encourage all those with whom we interact to do the same.

OURSELVES
1. Our behavior towards each other. We will at all times respect the rights of our colleagues,
welcome the strengths of our differences, enjoy the richness of diversity, treat each other with
dignity and respect, encourage teamwork and collaboration, foster an atmosphere of candour and
openness, whilst always condemning all forms of discrimination and political manoeuvring.
2. Our behavior towards the public at large. Just as we respect the cultural and ethnic diversity of
our colleagues, so we respect the diversity of the peoples of the world. In our dealings outside our
organization we will always be honest and open, never discriminate or pre-judge others for cultural,
ethnic, religious or political or any other reasons. We will record and respond to criticisms we
receive, in order to learn from, and avoid repeating mistakes.
3. Our behavior towards governments and organizations. As a global, multi-cultural organization,
we embrace the concept of “better together”; we recognize and encourage cooperation and
collaboration with like-minded organizations. While their missions may not be the same as ours, we
recognize the validity and value of their goals. At the same time, we maintain our independence
and vigorously defend our point of view. We will always share credit with our partner
organizations, be they strategic, funding or implementing partners.
4. Our behavior towards the media and opinion influencers. While we recognize and appreciate the
value of the world’s media in disseminating our point of view and informing governments, industry
and the public at large of our mission and goals, we will always be honest, unambiguous and
politically neutral in all contacts with them. We will do all we can to prevent our statements being
manipulated or misused in order to support any political, ethnic or religious viewpoints with which
we disagree.
5. Our behavior towards our corporate partners. In order to achieve our mission, we recognise the
need to engage with the corporate sector and foster active cooperation with sector leaders. We will
work with the corporate sector in a professional, open, honest and straightforward way. We will
maintain our independence whilst respecting their views and we will challenge and inspire them to
move towards a more sustainable future.
6. Our behavior towards our suppliers and consultants. In selecting outside, independent
resources, we will at all times be fair, objective and open-minded in our assessment of their abilities.
We will not accept favours or bribes, and we will not allow any tokens of appreciation we are
offered, to affect our judgment. We will not allow family, religious, tribal, political or any other
personal connections to influence the award of contracts.
7. Our behavior towards our institution. We will at all times conduct ourselves in a manner which
brings credit to WWF and which enhances the efficiency and effectiveness or our organization. We
will be careful custodians of the funds placed in our care, managing them with stringent honesty and
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transparency and constantly seeking the most cost-effective solutions, even at the price of personal
inconvenience.

1.3 HOW WE IMPLEMENT THE WWF CODE OF ETHICS

The WWF Code of Ethics will form part of the Employment Contract at WWF Programme Offices, which is
signed by all staff members. All staff members must abide by the Code of Ethics in letter and spirit.

The Code of Ethics, accompanied by a Conflict of Interest statement, will be repeated in the annual
performance assessment process, so that staff are reminded of it, and verify that they subscribe to the conduct
and principles contained therein, on an annual basis. The documents need not be signed annually to verify that.

If you feel that the Code of Ethics is being breached in any way, your first recourse is to report your concern to
your Line Manager. If you feel this is not appropriate, you should bring the issue to the attention of the HR
Director / HR Manager at PO’s, who will take up the matter with senior management, or with the WWF Board,
or if deemed necessary, with an independent, outside legal advisor. There is also the possibility to report
breaches of our Code of Ethics anonymously (see also Chapter 1.6 Whistleblower Policy.)

1.4 CONFLICT OF INTEREST

The WWF Conflict of Interest Policy is designed to assure the highest level of ethical conduct of persons
employed by or involved in the governance of WWF and to avoid perceptions and consequences detrimental to
WWF that could arise from the real or perceived misuse of an individual's position or influence.

Any member of management team who has an actual or perceived conflict of interest with WWF shall notify
the Representative (at regional level) or Country Director (at country level) of such conflict in writing, and staff
members shall notify the HR Director (at regional level) or HR Manager (at country level).

A conflict of interest is defined as an interest that might affect, or appear to affect, the judgment or conduct of
an individual associated with WWF. A conflict of interest may exist when the real or potential interests of any
director, or staff member, or close relative, or any individual, group or organization to which he or she has
allegiance, competes with the interests of WWF, or may impair such person's loyalty to WWF.

For example, a conflict of interest may exist if such person:


Has a more than 5 per cent business or financial interest in any third party dealing with WWF.
Holds office, serves on a Board or is employed by any third party dealing with WWF.
Derives financial gain from transaction(s) involving WWF.
Receives non-monetary gifts from any third party above a reasonable value e.g at WWF International
this value is CHF 50, unless they are made available to the whole team, or placed in a common area.
Engages in any outside activity that will materially affect obligations to WWF, competes with WWF's
activities, jeopardizes WWF’s reputation or on-going work in region, involves WWF equipment,
supplies or facilities, or implies WWF support of the activity.

Should a change in circumstances arise in the course of employment that might trigger a conflict of interest,
staff undertake to spontaneously inform their Line Manager or HR Director (at regional level) or HR Manager
(at country level)
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Staff are bound by rules of discretion in regard to all matters of WWF business externally or internally. They
shall not communicate to any third party information not already made public that is known to them because of
their position within the organization. They shall not use such information to personal or third party advantage,
or to the detriment of WWF. These obligations shall not cease upon termination of employment. Staff will
familiarize themselves with the organization’s detailed policies and procedures and ensure that they are
implemented. Staff have the right to use the organization’s information system services in work that is directly
related to their terms of reference. The use of network and email services for personal purposes is permitted to a
reasonable extent. The use of these services for illegal, commercial or political purposes is forbidden. Photos,
videos and written material related to WWF's work produced whilst being employed by WWF must be made
available to the WWF Network, without any further payment or compensation, for use during and after the
employment term. Nevertheless, "Intellectual Property Rights" (Copyright) always remains with the employee,
unless otherwise stated.

1.5 FRAUD/CORRUPTION PREVENTION AND INVESTIGATION POLICY

WWF International is committed to an effective approach to the management of the risk of fraud and corruption
in its activities both at WWF International itself and in all the operations managed directly by it.

WWF International has a zero tolerance principle to fraud and corruption. As an organization that condemns
and fights corruption as one of the key drivers of poverty, environmental degradation and bad governance, it
requires its own staff at all times to act and comply with its zero tolerance principle by fully conforming to all
procedures and policies adopted to prevent corruption and fraud in our offices. All staff and volunteers should
therefore be irreproachable in their personal conduct.

Fraud and corruption are an ever-present threat to WWF International’s assets and reputation and so must be a
concern of all members of staff and volunteers. Where there is any evidence or possibility of fraudulent or
corrupt activities, WWF International will deal with it in a firm and controlled manner.

WWF International seeks, at all times, to deal with its employees, volunteers, partners, supporters and suppliers
with honesty and integrity. The organization expects these individuals to treat it and each other in the same
way.

Behaviour that falls short of the required standards is not acceptable. Where such behaviour is suspected it will
be investigated and, where proven, legal and/or disciplinary action taken.

All staff of WWF International and its field offices (e.g. Programme Offices and other offices reporting into
WWF International or its Programme Offices) are tasked with ensuring that appropriate measures are in place to
prevent, deter, detect and communicate potential fraud and corruption. This Policy is designed to:

Define fraudulent and corrupt activities and increase awareness.


Encourage prevention.
Define standards of personal conduct for the organization.
Define the responsibilities at different levels.
Promote and understand methods of detection; and

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Identify a clear pathway for the investigation and reporting of fraud and corruption.

In all cases, if any employee has any concerns as to whether actions may be fraudulent or corrupt, they should
first review the issue against the policies set out in the Field Operations Manual and if the situation remains
unclear seek advice from the Chief Operating Officer at WWF International.

Definitions

What is Fraud and Corruption?

The term fraud is used to describe a whole range of activities such as deception, bribery, forgery, extortion,
theft, conspiracy, embezzlement, misappropriation, false representation, concealment of material facts and
collusion. It involves the act of deceit against the organisation in order to obtain a personal or collective
advantage, avoid an obligation or cause a loss.

Corruption involves the act of dishonestly obtaining an advantage from a third party by abusing an entrusted
power for private gain. Neither fraud nor corruption are restricted to monetary or material benefit, but could
also include intangible benefits such as status or information.

It can be seen from the above that fraud covers a wide range of activity including (but not exclusive to):

Theft of assets.
Misappropriation of funds.
Misuse of the organization’s assets (e.g. using WWF vehicles privately without permission).
Deception (e.g. misrepresentation of qualifications to obtain employment).
Theft from a partner, customer or supplier.
Theft or misuse of proprietary data.
Theft of Intellectual Property.
Providing favours or money to judges or other government officials to pursue personal or WWF goals.
Providing contracts to third parties for the provider’s personal benefit.

Prevention
WWF International seeks to regulate the actions of staff and to ensure that appropriate procedures are in place
to prevent fraud and corruption. These procedures include:

Field operations/procedures manuals - both those issued by WWF International or manuals issued for
specific offices and in particular:
travel and expense policies
management and control of vehicle usage
management and control of the use of consultants
ensuring adequate segregation of duties where required
The personnel procedure/employee handbook.
The employment contract.
Network standards and in particular the standard for recruitment of consultants.
I.T. policies.
Standard contract conditions protecting the use of the WWF logo etc.

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Although the WWF International Trustees and the Director General bear overall responsibility for establishing,
maintaining and ensuring the enforcement of a sound system of internal control, in practice these
responsibilities fall directly to line management and many involve all of WWF’s employees wherever located,
including staff in Programme Offices (PO’s) and other field offices reporting to WWF International.

Personal Conduct
WWF employees must have, and be seen to have, high standards of personal integrity. They should not accept
or offer gifts, hospitality or benefits of any kind to or from a WWF third party that might be seen to compromise
their integrity or to be benefiting the person offering the service or the recipient personally and/or at the cost of
WWF’s reputation. However, small gifts with no material value may be received or offered in appropriate
situations provided there is no appearance of corruption or conflict of interest (see the Field Operations Manual
for guidance in this area).

In particular, it is WWF policy that under no circumstances should any payments or anything of value be made,
promised or offered to any government employee in contravention of applicable laws in the relevant country.
Furthermore, no assistance, payments or anything of value (monetary or non-monetary) should be made,
promised, offered to, or accepted to or from any government employee or official in order to:

Influence any official government act or decision;


Induce any government employee or official to do or omit to do any act in violation of his/her lawful
duty;
Obtain or retain business for, or direct business to any individual or entity.

In addition, all staff should follow the WWF International Code of Ethics at all times and ensure that there is no
conflict of interest in their activities. This Code is set out in Chapter One of this Manual and provides guidance
in this area.

The WWF International Chief Operating Officer’s Responsibilities


The WWF International Chief Operating Officer has specific responsibility for the promotion of an anti-
fraud/corruption environment and is responsible for:
Providing guidance on the measures to be taken by Directors and Senior Managers and Rep POs in
order to implement this policy.
Arranging for reported incidents of actual or suspected fraud/corruption to be promptly and
appropriately investigated in conjunction with the appropriate directors/managers.
Through these management resources, ensuring that appropriate legal and/or disciplinary action is taken
against the perpetrators of actual or attempted fraud or corruption as well as those complicit in such
acts.
Reporting incidents of fraud/corruption to the Director General and Trustees (through the Audit
Committee).
Updating this policy in line with current best practice.

Directors’/ Rep POs Responsibilities


Each WWF International Director or Rep PO is responsible within his/her specific areas of responsibility for the
promotion of an anti- fraud/corruption environment. Directors/ Rep POs will ensure that:
This Fraud/Corruption Prevention and Investigation Policy is communicated to all managers and staff
and implemented in full.
Managers and staff have the necessary training in order to comply with their obligations.
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Managers and staff have the necessary “atmosphere” in which to ensure compliance (e.g., there is an
understood and accepted “zero-tolerance” rule vis-à-vis fraud/corruption, staff know how and to whom
to address their concerns if fraud or corruption is suspected, etc.).
Reports of suspected fraud and corruption are notified to their superior as appropriate.
Recommendations for control improvements following any investigations are promptly implemented.

Line Managers’ Responsibilities


Line Managers are responsible for:
Assessing the types of fraud and corruption risk involved in the operations for which they are
responsible.
Ensuring that an adequate system of internal control exists within their areas of responsibility and that
these controls are effective.
Ensuring that all staff reporting to them fully understand the internal control system in place and that
they adhere to these control procedures at all times.
Regularly reviewing these control systems to ensure compliance and to satisfy themselves that the
systems continue to operate effectively.

Line Managers should be alert to the possibility that unusual events or transactions could be symptoms of fraud
or corruption. Managers should ensure that satisfactory controls are in place and be alert to any “red flags” that
come to their attention. Particular examples of such “red flags” are as follows:
Unusual or inadequately documented payments.
Purchases which have not passed through the normal procedure for obtaining estimates.
Excessive rates of remuneration paid to consultants.
Regular use of the same consultants (family connections?).
Use of government officials as consultants or the provision of travel grants to government officials.
Excessive fuel usage for vehicles.
Sale of assets to third parties which do not follow laid down procedures.

Such activity may be highlighted as a result of specific management checks or be brought to management’s
attention by a third party. Irregularities may also occasionally come to light in the course of an internal audit or
during the annual year-end audit. Line managers should not however rely on the work of auditors to detect
fraud. The Internal Auditor is always available to offer advice and assistance on control issues.

Internal Audit Responsibilities


Internal Audit is required to give independent assurance on the effectiveness of the processes put in place to
manage the risk of fraud or corruption. As part of this role Internal Audit will:
Review and report on prevention and detection processes put in place by management.
Make recommendations to improve those processes.
Lead or assist such investigations when requested by senior management.
Consider fraud risk in every audit.

Staff Responsibilities
Every member of WWF staff has a duty to ensure that the organization’s assets and funds are safeguarded and
to report immediately if they suspect a fraud has been committed or they see any suspicious acts or events (see
investigation section below). In addition they should alert their Line Manager where they believe that the
opportunity for fraud or corruption exists because of weak procedures or the lack of effective oversight. Staff

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should assist in any investigation by making available all relevant information and by co-operating in
investigators (e.g., interviews, provision of documentation, etc)

Reporting Suspected Fraud


Where any member of staff suspects a fraudulent or corrupt act has been or is being committed s/he should
immediately report it to any Rep PO. This may be done directly or via the employee’s line manager. The Rep
PO must then inform the Director POM and Chief Operating Officer at WWF International who will ensure that
the allegation is promptly and appropriately investigated. If the employee feels unable to report the allegation
through these channels then he/she should use WWF International’s Whistle Blower Policy to do this (see
below).

Investigating Suspected Fraud


It is the Chief Operating Officer’s responsibility to ensure that each allegation is appropriately and promptly
investigated in accordance with the response plan. The Chief Operating Officer should ensure that the Director
General, the Management Team and the Audit Committee are kept aware of developments as appropriate. As a
minimum requirement the Chief Operating Officer should report at the end of any investigation of fraud or
corruption:
Details of what has taken place, the loss to the organization (if any), how it was detected and the likely
reasons this fraudulent or corrupt act was able to take place.
Action taken (if any) to deal with the persons involved in the fraud or corruption.
Action taken to recover lost assets and funds where applicable.
Lessons learned and actions taken to prevent recurrence of such fraudulent or corrupt activities.

Proven fraudulent or corrupt activity by an employee will be treated as gross misconduct and appropriate
disciplinary action will always be taken. In any event, whether an outsider or an employee commits the fraud,
WWF may also initiate civil action to recover losses.

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1.6 WHISTLEBLOWER POLICY

The whistle blower policy provides a mechanism for the reporting of illegal activity or the misuse of WWF
assets while protecting the employees who make such reports from retaliation.

Questionable Conduct. This policy is designed to address situations in which an employee suspects another
employee has engaged in illegal acts or questionable conduct involving WWF assets. This conduct might
include outright theft (of equipment or cash), fraudulent expense reports, miss-statements of any accounts to
any manager or to WWF auditors, or even an employee's conflict of interest that results in financial harm to
WWF but also extends to acts of corruption. WWF encourages staff to report such questionable conduct and
has established a system that allows them to do so anonymously if necessary.

Making a Report. If an employee suspects illegal conduct or conduct involving misuse of


WWF assets or in violation of the law, he or she may report it, anonymously if the employee wishes, and will be
protected against any form of harassment, intimidation, discrimination or retaliation for making such a report in
good faith.

Employees can make a report to any of the following WWF International executives at any time: Director
General, Chief Operating Officer, or Director of People and Organization Development. Their names and
contact information are available on the WWF Intranet site and at the end of this policy statement. Reports can
be made by telephone or in writing. WWF will promptly conduct an investigation into matters reported, keeping
the informant's identity as confidential as possible, consistent with our obligation to conduct a full and fair
investigation.

Alternatively, employees can make a report by calling an independent “whistle blower” phone line that will
be answered by an outside company. The information provided will be forwarded promptly to WWF for
investigation. Callers to the whistle blower hotline may remain anonymous if they wish. The whistle blower
phone line and access requirements are set out at the end of this policy, which is also on the WWF Intranet
site.

All reports received either directly or via the Whistle-blowing hotline will be passed to the WWF International
Audit Committee. This Committee is independent of WWF International management and reports to the WWF
International Board of Directors.

Protection of Employees Who Report Misuse of WWF Assets

No Retaliation. An employee who has made a report of suspicious conduct and who subsequently believes he
or she has been subjected to retaliation of any kind by any WWF employee is directed to immediately report it
to the Director of People and Organization Development. Reports of retaliation will be investigated promptly in
a manner intended to protect confidentiality as much as practicable, consistent with a full and fair investigation.
The party conducting the investigation will notify the employee of the results of the investigation.

WWF strongly disapproves of and will not tolerate any form of retaliation against employees who report
concerns in good faith regarding WWF's operations. Any employee who engages in such retaliation will be
subject to discipline up to and including termination.

Jim Leape – Director General + 41 22 364 9280

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Judy Slatyer – Chief Operating Officer + 41 22 364 9278

Chris Hutton - Director, People and Organization Development + 41 22 364 9259

Alternative Whistle Blower Phone Line: Please see below the telephone contact numbers for each country for
the independent Whistleblower hotline – call charges may be reversed if caller wishes.

WHISTLEBLOWER HOTLINE TELEPHONE NUMBERS

African Countries Africa Telephone Numbers


Madagascar 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Mozambique 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Zambia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Zimbabwe 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Malawi 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Tanzania 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Kenya 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Uganda 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Rwanda 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Democratic Republic of Congo 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Cameroon 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Gabon 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Central African Republic 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Ghana 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Niger 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Senegal 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Cape Verde Islands 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Mauretania 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Gambia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)

Asia/Pacific Countries Asia Pacific Telephone


Numbers
China 00800 3838 3000
Vietnam 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Laos 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Cambodia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Thailand 001 800 442 078
Mongolia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)

Singapore 800 4411 140


Papua New Guinea 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Solomon Islands 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Fiji 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Cook Islands 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)

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Europe/Middle East Countries Telephone Numbers

Italy 800 783 776


Belgium 0800 71025
Tunisia (belongs to Europe Prog) 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Austria 0800 281 700
Romania 08008 94440
Bulgaria 00800 110 44 74
Poland 00800 441 2392
Georgia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Azerbaijan 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
Armenia 0044 1 249 661 808 (collect)
United Arab Emirates 8000 44 138 73

1.7 ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Antisocial behaviour in the workplace is defined as any inappropriate behaviour which conflicts with our Code
of Ethics and annoys or embarrasses other staff members or the general public and brings WWF into disrepute.
WWF will not tolerate such behaviour and disciplinary action will always be taken, ranging from counseling to
warnings (oral and written) or to dismissal. Line Managers are responsible for the good conduct of their teams
and should make every effort to work with staff to correct any problems at the earliest stage possible. At every
step, care must be taken to record facts, objectives, possible solutions, and actions taken.

Departmental Director/Line Manager/ Rep PO:


Should set expectations for appropriate behaviour in his/her team and keep staff informed of how they
measure against expectations.
Is responsible for identifying, documenting, and attempting to correct any problem situation.
In the event that conduct is unsatisfactory, must keep a complete, written record of the problem, and fully
document the meetings held to address those problems.
Should report to the Departmental Director, Rep PO and the Director, POD Department, any behaviour that
continues to be of concern.
Must give at least one documented verbal warning (with intimation in writing to POD) with a reasonable
deadline for the employee to demonstrate an improvement, before considering more severe action.
Should no improvement be evident after the verbal warning, the Departmental Director/ Rep PO will give a
written warning, with a copy to the POD Department. This should state that if no improvement is made
within a given period (1 to 3 months depending on nature of improvement required), termination notice will
be served.
If the situation does not improve, contract termination is the decision of the Rep PO/Departmental Director,
in consultation with the Director, POD, who will ensure that fair and objective procedures have been
followed, and that all alternative options have been fully explored.

The PO HR
Ensures that all the correct procedures have been followed, before any employment contract is terminated.
Listens to the staff member’s perspective, and may possibly seek peer opinion.
Refers staff to professional counselors if this is deemed helpful.
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Keeps a documented record from the Line Manager on the staff member’s file, together with comments
from the staff member. These files, and the information contained therein, are the property of WWF. Staff
may request to see the contents of their personal files, but information will not be disclosed to any third
parties beyond the Line Manager, Departmental Director, and Director General, unless the staff member
has given permission to do so.
Writes letter of termination, if all other options fail, ensuring that due notice
(one, two or three months depending on length of service) is given.

1.8 GROSS PROFESSIONAL MISCONDUCT AND HARASSMENT

Gross professional misconduct, such as theft, fraud, dishonesty, or harassment, is illegal and will be subject to
dismissal.

Harassment, whether based on colour, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, family or marital status, sex,
sexual orientation or disability, is prohibited. Workplace harassment includes offensive, intimidating,
demeaning, hurtful, malicious or threatening comments or conduct towards another person, expressed or
demonstrated repeatedly.

In the case of gross professional misconduct or harassment, WWF reserves the right to take legal action, dismiss
a staff member and terminate the contract with immediate effect, with salary payments stopped at the end of the
week of dismissal.

The workplace is not simply defined as WWF's offices and properties. It also extends to harassment that occurs
at meetings, conferences, or when travelling for business.

The Departmental Director/ Rep PO/ Line Manager:


Must discuss any behaviour that could be considered as harassment with the employee, and take corrective
action.
When a case of gross professional misconduct/harassment is reported to a Representative PO/ Departmental
Director/he must raise it with the Director, POD Department.

The PO HR:
Should inform all new staff about professional comportment during the orientation.
Should be informed of all cases of harassment.
Any reported case of harassment will be subject to investigation by the POD Department and subject to
disciplinary procedures, including the possibility of instant dismissal.
Will be responsible for raising the case, if appropriate, with the Director General.
Will file a written report for the staff member’s file.
Will take appropriate action, which may consist of immediate dismissal and legal action.

WWF Employees:
Harassment must be reported, normally within one week of the harassment occurring.
Harassment should be reported to the Line Manager, or if the staff member does not feel comfortable with
this to the PO HR.

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1.9 CONFLICT

Informal Discussion
Employees are encouraged to discuss any problem or concern with their Line Manager, either privately, or in
the presence of the Representative PO to HR Director / HR Manager.

During informal discussions, no documentation will be placed on the employee’s personal file, and
confidentiality is expected of all participants.

Formal Discussion
If an attempt to resolve an issue or concern with the Line Manager is unsuccessful, staff should contact the PO
HR to agree the next steps to be taken. This may include an open discussion with the PO HR who will act as
neutral arbiter between the parties, or an attempt to work out the issue by counseling, or a request for input from
other employees.

Formal discussions will be documented to ensure that details are not lost and that perspectives are kept
clear. The PO HR will keep file notes.

If discussions with the supervisor and the PO HR do not resolve the issue, the employee may then schedule
a meeting with the Representative PO. POD Department at Secretariat, WWF International will be
involved if employee is not satisfied with the decision of the Representative PO.

In case the conflict is related to the HR, the first discussion will be handled by the Representative PO.

The Representative PO / Line Manager:


Should always maintain an “open-door” policy to give guidance and counsel in cases of grievances.
Should be proactive in resolving grievances whenever spotted and not allow them to grow or spread.
If an attempt to resolve an issue or concern proves to be unsuccessful, either party may contact the POD
Department to agree on the next steps to be taken.

The PO HR
Can provide training in interpersonal skills, team building, and conflict resolution through interactive
learning videos and other courses, upon request.
Provides advice and assistance and acts as impartial mediator, on request.
Maintains file notes.

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1.10 DATA PROTECTION

At WWF, staff personal records are kept private, safe and up-to-date and personal information is treated with
great respect.

The PO HR is committed to respecting each staff member’s right to privacy and utmost confidentiality
regarding his/her personal and professional life.

Staff members’ personal files and the information contained therein, which are held in the POD Department and
PO HR, are the property of WWF. Staff may request to see the contents of their personal files, but information
will not be disclosed to any third parties beyond the Line Manager/Representative PO, unless the staff member
has given permission to do so.

The Departmental Director/ Representative PO:


Ensures that the privacy of every employee in his/her team, is treated with respect.

The PO HR:
Maintains a personal file for each staff member.
Maintains a staff database containing details of name, address, phone number, date of birth, marital status,
family members, next of kin, work permit expiry date, passport number, bank details.
Gives new staff a questionnaire to be completed with personal details as described above.
Ensures at all times compliance with the local laws of the PO country on Data Protection (LPD).

WWF Employees:
Must complete a questionnaire when they join the organization, outlining essential personal details
required.
Must inform the PO HR, if any personal details or situations change, so that records can be kept up to date.
These records form the basis of information that must be provided to local PO country’s authorities, if
required. WWF may also need to contact families in emergency situations.
May wish to read his/her personal file and, if this is the case, will be handed the file in the presence of a
member of the PO HR, and allowed to read it, but not to take it away or remove information from it.

1.11 SUBSTANCE ABUSE, SMOKING AND ALCOHOL

WWF is committed to a workplace free of alcohol, smoking and substance abuse. In the interests of staff health
and protecting the environment, a non-smoking rule applies throughout the WWF offices.

Smokers are requested to go outside for smoking breaks, and to make up any lost working time.

If it is perceived that there is a problem relating to substance abuse, WWF may insist that the staff member
concerned follow a course of treatment. If treatment is refused, the employment contract may be terminated.

The Rep PO:


Is responsible for observing if there are any infringements of the policy.

The HR PO
Is available for consultation as well as assisting with referrals for expert professional help, if required.
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May need to liaise with the Line Manager and the SMT, before terminating a contract, if the employee
refuses counseling or help.

WWF Employees:
Are responsible for bringing any perceived problem to the attention of the PO HR immediately. Every
effort will be made to treat such cases confidentially.

1.12 HIV/AIDS

WWF International recognizes the magnitude and severity of the development of HIV/AIDS epidemic
worldwide. As a global network, WWF is committed to the development of policies and the implementation of
programmes at the Secretariat and in its Programme Offices on HIV/AIDS, which will lead to non-
discrimination, heightened awareness, better prevention and health support.

Non-Discrimination
Consistent with its policy to provide a work environment for its employees free from harassment and/or
discrimination, WWF will manage situations related to HIV and AIDS by the following principles:
Will not discriminate against colleagues or applicants having, perceived as having, living with or otherwise
affected by HIV or AIDS.
Will treat HIV/AIDS the same as other illnesses in terms of employee policies, benefits and leaves of
absence.
Will ensure that staff adhere to our non-discrimination policy with respect to people suffering from
HIV/AIDS, or else face disciplinary action.

HIV Testing, Confidentiality and Disclosure:


We will encourage routine, confidential, voluntary testing and counseling.
HIV and AIDS will be treated confidentially, as are all other medical conditions, in accordance with WWF
policies.
WWF will not require staff, their dependents, job applicants or other third parties to undergo HIV testing as
a condition of employment or receipt of benefits.

Promoting a Safe Work Environment:


WWF is committed to providing a work environment that protects staff health and safety. This commitment
recognizes that HIV/AIDS cannot be transmitted through casual contact. Employees who know the facts about
HIV infection and AIDS are less likely to react negatively or inappropriately to a colleague’s illness. Therefore
WWF will minimize the risk of HIV infection in the workplace through ensuring that HIV/AIDS information is
included in first-aid training and that staff have access to training and awareness on the use of infection control
measures at work.

Education and Awareness:


WWF will ensure that staff have access to print, video or computer-based communication strategies to promote
medically accurate, relevant information on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment and information on effective
safety programmes.

Access to Treatment and Care:


We will ensure that any employees who test positive for HIV have adequate provision to obtain anti-retroviral
therapy and other approved medications, through our medical insurance schemes.
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2. EMPLOYMENT AND RECRUITMENT

2.1 EMPLOYMENT PHILOSOPHY

At WWF, we know that our people, men and women worldwide, qualified, professional and motivated, are our
main asset. WWF is an equal opportunity employer and will always apply objective and fair criteria to ensure
that staff members are selected, assessed, promoted and treated on the basis of their relevant skills,
competencies and experience. No suitable job applicant or staff member will ever receive less favourable
treatment on grounds of race, colour, national or ethnic origin, gender, marital status, sexual orientation,
disability, class, age, political or religious belief.

2.2 WORKPLACE DIVERSITY – DEVELOPING HUMAN RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

One of our greatest strengths is the diversity of our workforce, with men and women of many nationalities and
backgrounds working together and sharing common objectives. WWF does not have a “nationality” which
describes its culture, but operates in a truly global fashion throughout the world. As an organization, we
encourage fair employment practices worldwide and offer equal opportunities to all our employees. We also try
to take family considerations into account in any decisions about personnel matters or assignments.

The world we serve is global and diverse and will listen to us only if our workforce reflects this diversity. We
recognize that we could be justly criticized if our workforce at the Secretariat, or in any of our offices, is
predominantly northern and western, or has predominantly men in senior positions.

We must attract and retain top performers worldwide from the full depth of the talent pool and address the
evolving needs of our workforce in terms of quality of life and dual career expectations. By creating a variety of
perspectives – gender and culture – that stimulate productive creativity and innovation – we will maintain our
credibility and effectiveness in the world.

The prerequisites upon which we will proceed with our diversity efforts are:

Meritocracy drives our actions, decisions and employee advancement.


While it is understood that our workforce around the world will communicate in a variety of languages,
English is the common language of our internal management communication.

2.2.1 NATIONAL DIVERSITY – LEVERAGING THE HUMAN RESOURCES OF ALL NATIONS

Our goal is to attract staff from non-western and non-northern nationalities into all levels of the workforce,
particularly senior management, and ensure that we have in our Programme Offices and Secretariat a wide
representation of nationalities and cultures.

The People and Organization Development Department:

Will monitor ratios of diverse nationalities and cultures on an on-going basis and will bring these
statistics regularly to the attention of the Senior Management Team;
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The Senior Management Team at POs

Will ensure that sex-disaggregated data are analyzed periodically with regards to staffing and
advancement patterns at different levels to identify areas of improvement and bring these statistics
regularly to the attention of the Senior Management Team;
Will ensure that employment decisions about recruiting, hiring, responsibilities, training and
professional development, promotion, transferring, compensation and termination are uniformly based
on qualifications, including skills, abilities, knowledge, and experience and, actively pursues gender
balance at all levels of the organization;
Will ensure that WWF management and other staff are aware of what constitutes discrimination, respect
diversity and prevent discriminatory practices including stereotyping and sexual harassment;
Will ensure that compensation is entirely equitable between men and women;
Will promote the value of gender equity in recruitment and all spheres of activity;
Will implement family-friendly policies, flexi-time and mobility initiatives that work for dual-career
parents and families (see Chapter 5.1 Working Hours and Chapter 11 Mobility).

2.2.2 GENDER POLICY

1.Policy summary

The objective of this policy statement is to ensure that WWF’s conservation policies, programmes and activities
benefit women and men equally and contribute to gender equity, as part of WWF’s broader commitment to
strengthen the social dimensions of its projects, programmes and policy work. It describes the rationale for
gender mainstreaming in the context of WWF mission, biodiversity and foot print goals and outlines WWF
commitment to integrate a gender perspective in our programmatic and operational structures and procedures.

2. WWF believes

WWF understands that conservation is about facilitating social change and our work is largely about
influencing and changing people’s behaviour, policies and social institutions towards a more sustainable use of
natural resources. People’s behaviour and natural resource management decisions are shaped by complex and
interlinked cultural, social and economic structures and processes, including ethnicity, wealth, religion and
gender. We understand that gender refers to the socially constructed roles, responsibilities and opportunities
associated with women and men in a society at a specific time and place. Women’s and men’s roles,
responsibilities and opportunities affect how they use and manage natural resources and gender relations
influence how households, communities and institutions are organized, how decisions are made, and how
resources are used, accessed and controlled.

Hence, WWF believes that:


Enhancing our understanding of gender differences and addressing inequities can improve effectiveness and
sustainability of our programmes and projects;

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Promoting gender equity is an essential building block for sustainable development and effective
conservation and it is an integral part of our mission to ensure that the natural resources of our planet are
shared equitably;
Contributing to gender equity is about promoting equal opportunities and creating fair conditions under
which women and men benefit equally, and inequality is not perpetuated;
Promoting gender equity requires appreciation that every WWF policy, programme and project may affect
women and men differently, and may include specific measures to empower specific marginalized groups
and individuals.

WWF recognizes that its offices and programmes might have different levels of experience and capacity in
mainstreaming gender. Therefore the implementation of this policy will be achieved through a process that
recognizes these differences and builds on existing capacity, expertise, experience and culture within the
organization.

3. WWF’s commitment

WWF has learned that lasting success in conservation and natural resource management is only possible when it
is sustained by, and benefits, the people concerned and involved. We recognize that in places where we work,
social norms, gender differences and inequities shape women’s and men’s roles and responsibilities, access to
and control over land and resources, knowledge of resources, and authority to make decisions about resource
use. We appreciate that we need to work with a gender perspective in order to enhance our understanding of
these differential roles and responsibilities, relationships, needs and interests (as well as other relevant
differences such as those between ethnic groups, religions, wealth classes and age groups). We understand that
integrating a gender perspective also means going beyond understanding these differences to promoting more
equitable gender relationships.

Hence, WWF commits to creating programmatic structures and procedures that:

1. Incorporate a gender perspective into programme and project development processes through the application
of gender awareness and analysis in the project cycle, including design, implementation, monitoring and
evaluation. Where appropriate, develop gender analysis and sex-disaggregated social and economic
indicators and targets;
2. To the extent possible, assess potential impact of programmes and projects on gender equity, and ensure that
potential negative impacts on women and men are addressed, if appropriate also identify and use
opportunities to reduce gender inequities;
3. Apply a culturally sensitive approach, especially when working with local communities, and that respects
and takes account of different roles, responsibilities, entitlements and knowledge among men and women
involved and/or affected by the programme/project;
4. Examine how policies, processes and institutions at and beyond community level (i.e. national, regional and
global) affect gender equity, and men and women’s access to and control over resources, as well as power of
decision-making in our programmes/projects and identify options and, where appropriate, promote gender
equity within these;
5. Encourage continuing effort to expand WWF’s knowledge and commitment to social and gender equity,
through staff training, documentation and sharing of lessons.
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WWF understands that the pre-condition for implementing gender responsive conservation programmes is that
gender sensitivity is also mainstreamed across WWF’s internal human resource policies, procedures and
governance mechanisms, as well as in the overall culture of our organization.

Hence, WWF commits to ensure an organizational culture and work environment where:

1. Employment decisions about recruiting, hiring, responsibilities, training and professional development,
promotion, transferring compensation and termination are uniformly based on qualifications, including
skills, abilities, knowledge, and experience and, actively pursues gender balance at all levels of the
organization;
2. Staff can work in an environment of inclusion, civility, and respect for the rights of each individual and
where all employees shares key organizational values focused on equal opportunity, good governance,
accountability and transparency;
3. Benefit policies are gender sensitive and equitable (to the extent possible under applicable national laws)
and appropriately respond to local staff needs for balancing work, family, and civic life;
4. WWF management and other staff are aware of what constitutes discrimination and respect diversity in
work and management styles and prevent discriminatory practices including stereotyping and sexual
harassment;
5. Sex-disaggregated data are analysed periodically with regards to global, national and project staffing and
advancement patterns at different levels to identify areas for improvement;
6. There is a minimum global network HR anti-discrimination and harassment policy with provision for
reporting, investigation and sanctions for employment-related discrimination and/or harassment.

4. WWF will work with governments, international organizations, local communities, business to:

WWF will strive to partner with global, national and local organizations with greater gender expertise to build
capacity to collect, understand and act upon gender information to contribute to constructive environmental
solutions while integrating and addressing issues of equity and gender. WWF’s is also committed to make an
exerted effort to expand its knowledge and commitment to social and gender equity through sharing of lessons
learned and by applying this policy’s recommendations in partnership activities with governments, donors, the
private sector, NGOs and communities, as criteria for determining which activities to support, and to promote
their broader implementation by other actors.

5. Field examples

WWF-WMPO has a draft gender and equity policy that outlines their commitment to an organizational
culture that embraces equity and promotes incorporation of gender considerations into project design,
implementation and monitoring and evaluation. To date, specific surveys on gender issues have been
conducted (e.g., WWF India) and training on gender mainstreaming has been conducted in several offices
(e.g., WWF Malaysia). Women are beneficiaries of specific projects (e.g., women in fisheries; livelihood
alternatives, small economic enterprises, and micro-financing). In other projects, across the region, women
are recognized as important social and political enablers (women committees for natural resources

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management; women and social networks; women in decision-making positions). WWF also plays an
important role promoting gender equity by assisting government in the development of special policies on
women, gender, poverty and social equity indicators (WWF Nepal);
WWF-Australia has specific employment-related Equal Opportunity, Bullying Harassment and
Discrimination Free Workplace, Grievance /Dispute Resolution policies.
WWF-UK has specific Equal Opportunities, Disability and HIV and AIDS policies in line with legislation
on disability and gender.
The WWF Norway Strategy for International work 2009-2011 strives to contribute to constructive
environmental solutions while integrating issues of poverty, equity and gender. It calls for a pro-active
incorporation of gender analysis into design and implementation. At least 5 ongoing projects have attempted
to improve programme implementation through mainstreaming gender equality issues.
WWF Girls and Women Program has been active since 2000 in five of WWF’s priority places, including
Coastal East Africa, Coral Triangle, Eastern Himalayas, Madagascar and the upper Mekong. It has empowered
girls and women through a series of educational, training, scholarship and micro grant/micro loans initiatives.
For example, in the Spiny Forest of Madagascar, WWF has provided literacy and livelihood training to local
girls and women. Women have learned to run tree nurseries to generate a sustainable source of fuel wood and
build improved cooking stoves that burn less wood and produce fewer fumes, decreasing pressure on the Spiny
Forest and preserving wildlife habitats and hundreds of endemic and endangered species. For more information
see: http://www.worldwildlife.org/what/communityaction/people/phe/women/girlseducationprogram.html

6. Background notes

This gender policy statement is consistent with WWF’s Mission, Guiding Principles and Code of Ethics. It is an
integral part of WWF’s other adopted and/or mandated social policies and position statements, including (but
not limited to) Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, Poverty and Conservation, Population and HIV/AIDS. It is
envisaged that the implementation of this policy will be executed in coordination with the other social policies
and within the implementation framework outlined in the social policy umbrella framework. This policy is
supportive of existing commitments to gender equality for those countries which are signatories to the United
Nations Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

WWF understands that full implementation of this policy will require involvement and commitment of all staff,
especially senior management across the organization who has the ultimate responsibility for implementing this
policy and adapting it to local contexts and cultures. We understand that this will require knowledge, reflection,
and firm commitment among all staff and will be a long-term undertaking which will require strong internal
leadership, systematic monitoring and periodic review of progress.

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2.3 EMPLOYMENT OF RELATIVES

As part of our strategy to encourage both nationality and gender diversity, mobility, retention and employment
opportunities for dual-career families, WWF permits the relatives of staff to apply for positions, provided that
there is no direct reporting line to their relatives and that there is no conflict of interest. However,
understandably, relatives and partners working at WWF may not have first or second-level reporting lines to
one another.

The relatives are defined as parents, parents-in-law, spouses, children, brothers, sisters, brother-in-law, sisters-in-
law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and second cousins. This shall apply to the case of marriage among
colleagues after their entry to WWF. If the marriage happens, one employee should be transferred to a department
which satisfies above state conditions or resign.

The Programme Office (PO) HR:


Will monitor the employment of relatives of staff to ensure there is no conflict of interest, or first or second
reporting lines
Will bring any issues of concern to the attention of the Senior Management Team for their decision.

2.4 EMPLOYMENT OF INTERNAL APPLICANTS

As part of our strategy to increase both nationality and gender diversity and to promote career development,
mobility and network alignment, we actively encourage applications from internal candidates from throughout
the WWF network.

The following should be observed:


Internal applicants are eligible to apply for a new in-house position once they have filled their current
position for at least a year.
Internal applications will be treated in strict confidence. However, if candidates are offered an interview, it
is considered good practice for them to inform their current Line Manager of their application.
In-house references will be taken up only with the candidate’s permission.
If the position is offered to an internal candidate, and accepted, he/she must inform the current Line
Manager immediately. The PO HR will then liaise with the current Line Manager to determine the notice
period to be worked, which may need to be as long as the legally required notice period (i.e. one, two, or
three months depending on length of service).
When candidates from NOs or POs apply to WWF International, it is considered good practice for them to
inform their Line Manager, but they must inform their Line Manager if they are called for interview at the
International Secretariat.

The PO HR:
Ensures that employment vacancies are advertised internally and in the Network;
Protects the confidentiality of internal candidates according to the above guidelines;
Manages the transfer process when internal candidates are successful.

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2.5 RECRUITMENT

The PO HR Manager and the PO Line Manager concerned are responsible for ensuring the professionalism,
rigor and integrity of the recruitment process. The Line Manager must sign off the finally selected candidate for
each position.

The Line Manager:


Must formally make the request for a new position or staff replacement using the ‘Staff Request Form’
and must obtain the sign-off from the Head of Division confirming that the vacancy exists and the
budget is in place to fund it before any recruitment process starts. The ‘Staff Request Form’ is attached
as Annex I for reference and implementation.
Must provide the Job Description for the position.

The PO HR Manager:
Finalizes the Job Description and grades the position once the staffing request has been approved by the
Head of Division.
Agrees the Recruitment Strategy with the Line Manager, including timelines, channels of advertising
and the interviewing panel.
Advertises the position internally and externally, according to the agreed Recruitment Strategy and
acknowledges applications.
Compiles an initial long-list and works with the Line Manager to draw up the shortlist.
Arranges telephone and face-to-face interviews of short-listed candidates.
Following interviews, takes up references by phone of the top two candidates.
Once a final decision has been reached, offers the position to the selected candidate, agrees the starting
date and draws up the contract.
For recruitment of the Rep PO, the Secretariat will manage the entire process. For RMT & SMT
positions in POs, the Secretariat is available to provide the necessary support,
For core positions at POs, the PO HR must abide by the budget availability from Core funds while for
project positions, the staff could be employed based on the Project funds availability for the duration of
the contract.
Database of all staff recruited by each PO must be updated and forwarded to POD Department on a
monthly basis.
A quarterly status of new recruitments is to be forwarded by PO HR to Regional HR Manager.

The HR/Resourcing Manager and Line Manager jointly:


Conduct phone interviews of the shortlisted candidates in order to arrive at a final shortlist of candidates
for face-to-face interviews.
Conduct face-to-face interviews as part of the wider interview panel.
Ensure that candidates undergo a test, presentation or case study, depending on the position.
Ensure that the team members are able to meet with the top two candidates solicit their input (and for
senior level positions present the top two candidates to the Senior Management Team (SMT) and key,
relevant senior staff from the Network.
Based on the above input, reach a decision on the candidate to hire.

Monitoring of Recruitment Status.

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Monitoring of recruitment status at a Programme Office is very vital for efficient management of the
recruitment process.

The Recruitment Status Form, as attached at Annex II is to be completed for all positions and updated. It
should be updated at least weekly by the PO HR Manager in order to monitor the status of all ongoing
recruitments and shared with the PO Representative and Regional HR Manager.
The Recruitment Status Form will also allow POs to monitor the ‘Lead time to Recruit’ positions at the PO,
a key indicator which, from FY 12 onwards, will be monitored through the PO Dashboard. In general, a PO
should target a lead time of 6 to 8 weeks to recruit suitable staff for all positions.
The format for the “Lead time to Recruit” to be filled by POs as a key indicator is attached as Annex III.
Lead time to recruit is measured as the length of time (in weeks) between the receipt of the Staff Request
Form and the date when the contract of the finally selected candidate for that position is signed.

2.6 EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS

All staff who are employed by POs, whether for open-ended, fixed-term, full-time, part-time or temporary
assignments, will be issued with an employment contract, a job description and WWF Employment Conditions,
which form the contractual agreement between WWF PO concerned and the staff member. The WWF PO
employment contract is subject to Local PO country’s laws and may be modified, if these laws change.
Contracts are to be signed by the Rep PO, the PO HR, and the staff member concerned.

Contracts at WWF POs will state whether they are core or project funded contracts. Core staff contracts will
often (but not necessarily) be open-ended contracts of employment. Project contracts will usually be fixed term
and will state that they are dependent on project funding.

Fixed-term contracts will state that, unless advised otherwise, employment will automatically end on the date
set out in the contract. If the local PO laws of the country so lay down, after a certain number of extensions of a
fixed-term contract, the next extension will be an open-ended contract and it must be accordingly adapted as per
the local laws.

A suggested format for the contract is attached as Annex IV which may be modified to suit the local labor laws
of the PO country.

If an internal transfer, promotion or change of assignment occurs, the staff member will be issued a letter which
amends the original contract, but the original starting date will always be taken as the start of the contractual
relationship with WWF.

The PO HR / Line Manager


Ensures that no new employee starts work in his/her team without an employment contract being issued
by HR at PO.
Notifies staff on fixed-term contracts at least 2 months in advance, that their contracts are coming to an
end.
Monitors the completion of probation periods and gives staff confirmation that their probation period, as
laid down in the contract has been satisfactorily completed.

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The PO HR
Issues employment contracts and ensures that they are signed by new employees before commencing
employment.
Keeps an original copy of all employment contracts on file.
Monitors the ending dates of fixed-term contracts.
Ensures that WWF PO employment contracts comply with Local PO country employment law.
Issues amendments to the original employment contract when required, e.g. internal transfers,
promotions or changes of assignment.

2.7 RELOCATION

WWF offices should contribute to the moving costs for staff members and their families who have to relocate
from another country when they commence employment.

This allowance is made up of the following elements:

Single economy airfares from place of domicile to the Programme Office location for staff member and
staff member’s family.

Staff will be compensated for shipping household goods, door-to-door, from the home country, based on
the lowest of three quotes. Weight and volume limits for shipment should be reasonable and as per local
laws of the PO country, if any

(See also the Chapter 11 as Global Mobility)

The PO HR:
Discusses and explains the relocation allowance entitlement to staff hired from abroad, works out the
exact amount and writes this into the employment contract.
Mandates the best professional relocation service and acts as the liaison between that service and the
staff member.

2.8 LANGUAGE TRAINING

Actual and reasonable costs will be paid for language training for the staff member and spouse for the language
of the host country. This benefit is meant to assist staff (and their spouse /partner) in adjusting to living in their
new work location and integrate better in the cultural environment. Staff are responsible for arranging
appropriate language training, which may be taken before departure or after arrival and will be capped at a
maximum of 50 hours instruction, for a maximum period of one year. Anything additional will be at the
employee’s cost. Children are not included on the assumption that they will be offered such lessons as part of
their schooling.

2.9 CONSULTANTS

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Consultants are specialists in various fields of work who may be asked to complete a specific assignment for a
fixed-time period. They are hired as independent consultants under third party agreements, and do not have a
contractual employment relationship with the organisation.

The rules and best practices contained in WWF Operational Network Standards on use of the consultants and
the Field Office Manual should be followed when engaging a consultant.

Most of the PO countries have important legal distinctions which define who may be designated as a consultant
and who should be designated an employee with full employment rights. These should be followed by PO HR
as per local country laws.

The guidelines set out below highlight important aspects of ‘Consultancies’ where an office must ensure that it
complies with the laws of the countries in which we operate.

The engagement of consultants will be subject to periodic audits by the internal auditor.

Anyone who engages a consultant for more than three months in a year, based in PO country, must get a
Consultancy Approval Form signed off by:

The Line Manager


The Manager, Finance

This sign off must be within the signatory limits of the offices (please see signatory policies of the office). A
sample Form is shown at Annex V and should be adapted to reflect the local legal requirements regarding
consultants. These approvals must be renewed annually.

The PO HR must be aware and track the consultants employed in the PO countries.

The following policies apply to all consultants engaged by POs:

1. Any costs arising from non-compliance with local laws will be charged to the department who engaged
the consultant.
2. If local PO laws require registration of a consultant for any statutory requirements in that country, the
proof of registration with the concerned authorities must be provided by the consultant to the PO
Finance Department. Finance Departments must not make any payments until they have received
proof of this registration.
3. Consultants may not use the WWF logo or letterhead, or represent WWF to an external audience, unless
written approval has been given by the PO Rep
4. In general, consultants are expected to use their own IT equipment (laptop computer). They can make
use of the WWF Internet connection provided they have obtained clearance from the local PO IT
Department, who will check that adequate anti-virus software is installed and other equipments such as
printer, photocopier, scanner and fax machine for work purposes as agreed in the contract.
5. All independent consultants must be issued with a written standard consultancy contract. The template
can be obtained from the WWF International Project Finance Unit.

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The following guidelines highlight important aspects of engaging a consultant which need to be investigated
and local PO policies adapted to ensure that POs comply with local labour laws:

1. If a consultant’s main residence is outside the PO Country, PO to check whether certified proof of their
registration as independent in their country of residence is required by local law prior to making any
payments. (To be checked by PO against local legal requirements for consultants versus employees).
2. In principle, consultants should have mandates from other organisations and should not have exclusive
economic dependence on WWF (to be checked by PO against local legal requirements for consultants
versus employees).
3. In principle, the assignment should be specific, task-based and time-limited. A consultant should not be
engaged on a long-term basis to fulfil core on-going activities of the PO (to be checked by PO against
local legal requirements for consultants versus employees).
4. In principle, consultants should not use WWF PO premises for long periods (to be checked by PO
against local legal requirements for consultants versus employees).
5. Any consultant who has been engaged by a PO for long periods over multiple years may be deemed to
be an employee, subject to the normal internal approval process and engaged as an employee of the PO
(unless the consultant can provide proof, with confirmation from the local fiscal and/or social security
body that he/she is registered as independent in the country of domicile and that the local laws of the PO
country permit such long term consultancies). (To be checked by PO against local legal requirements
for consultants versus employees).

The Line Manager


Must involve the PO HR for any consultant who will be hired.
Engages consultants and ensures that the relationship would not be construed as an employee/employer
relationship under the laws of the PO country or the country in which the consultant is based.
Ensures that all Local PO country based consultants are registered with the concerned PO country
authorities, and that proof of this is forwarded to the Finance Department.
Ensures that all consultants based outside the local PO country comply with the policy.

The HR Department
Issues contracts for consultants.
Ensures that all necessary approvals are obtained and that the policy is complied with, before contracts are
issued.

The PO HR and Finance Departments


Will jointly monitor this policy as part of the legal protection of the organisation, in conjunction with the
Internal Auditor, to check on an ongoing basis that this policy is being followed.
Provide advice and assistance in case of questions, problems, or unusual situations.

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2.10 PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT

WWF supports staff seeking to achieve a balance between their professional and private life and will approve
some part-time work schedules, provided that this does note impede the overall work objectives of the
Department concerned.

Part-time contracts of 50%, 60%, 70%, 80% or 90% work schedules may be granted. Their approval will
however depend on the needs of the organization and the nature of the position. No fractions of these
percentages will be accepted.

Positions at Director and above grades level must be on a 100% work schedule.

The number of staff working on part-time schedules cannot exceed 40% of the total number of staff in the
department

The reduction of one staff member’s work schedule cannot be accepted, if it necessitates the hiring of another
part-time employee to fill the gap.

There may be some flexibility, at quiet periods of the year, for staff to take some unpaid leave, if the supervisor
agrees. If unpaid leave is agreed, it is not permitted to hire temporary help to replace the absent staff member
(Pl see paragraph 9.6, Unpaid Leave & Sabbaticals)

The Line Manager:


Ensures that any requests for working part-time will not impede the goals and work plans of the
department, before seeking agreement from the PO HR.

The PO HR
Monitors levels of part-time work schedules, approves and issues contract amendments.

Any request for working part time should be submitted by the employee to the line manager, who will submit
the request to the PO HR for final approval.

Approval will only be given if the Line Manager confirms that the goals of the Department can be accomplished
in a reduced time-frame, and that no further request for replacement staff will be made.

2.11 INTERNSHIPS

The Internship Programme is designed for young graduates interested in building a career in conservation,
allowing them to gain direct exposure and acquire practical, hands-on experience in the organization. It is not a
legal requirement to have interns in most of the POs, however, depending upon the need of the student
community in the area and the capacity of the office to guide interns, the same may be engaged.

Interns:
The Internship Programme is designed for students about to graduate and/or young graduates with little or no
experience. Interns can either be employed by the PO, their university, a Government Aid Agency, or another
recognized institution.
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If the interns are engaged by WWF, they will be issued a contract from WWF, and paid an internship allowance
and be subject to PO country’s laws, as applicable. If the intern is employed by another institution, all parties
will sign a letter of agreement.

Interns may be engaged under the following conditions:

Interns in projects are to be taken based on availability of specific project work.


One intern per Department per year.
No more than 2 interns per country in a WWF PO per year
Internships duration may be from 3 months to 1 year.
All concerned with engaging of Intern must sign an Intern Request Form (To be provided by PO HR).

The Line Manager:


Should submit a request for an intern by means of the signed approval form, typically during normal
student holiday periods.
Must accompany the request with a detailed work plan, including the time frame, required skills and the
physical location where the student will be based.
Makes the final selection, from the candidates provided by the POD Department.

The PO HR
Will provide a list of candidates to the Line Manager, based on the students who have applied/
institutions who have approached.
Once an intern has been selected, drafts a contract and applies for work permits, if required, as per local
PO country specifics.
Maintains a file for each intern joining the organization.
Holds an exit interview with the intern at the end of the internship to gain feedback on their experience.
From time to time, will advertise the services of interns and students who have sent in their applications

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3. COMPENSATION

Staff remuneration (Compensation & Benefits) represents a considerable part of the operating budget at WWF
and represents the major source of income for most of our employees.
It is important that remuneration is approached in a considered, consistent and sensitive manner.

3.1 COMPENSATION PHILOSOPHY


We strive to pay our staff salaries that consider:
• Externally competitive- ensuring that our salary ranges compare favourably with what other
organisations offer. (see External Market Data)

• Internal equity- that staff understand different pay grades reflect differing levels of skills,
responsibilities and abilities (see Internal Equity)

• The fiscal realities of our Organisation. (see Salary Budget)

The compensation process should be


• Easily understandable

• A Global process with global vendors

• Consistent with recognizable standards around grading

Our target is to pay Annual base salary at a level where 50% of the market pays higher and 50% of the market
pays lower. Our market is defined as the place where our staff comes from. In most PO’s this is the other
NGO’s operating in the nearby geographic locations to the office.

3.2 STAFF CATEGORIES AT WWF

For the purpose of staff remuneration we have established four categories of staff:

Local Staff: full or part-time. Holding a local contract in local currency and subject to local
employment labour law and local taxation and local social security.

Hosted Staff: usually full time. Holding a letter of appointment from either WWF International
or a National Organisation (NO), but on local contracts, ie, hosted in another location. This staff
is subject to local employment labour law, local salary scales, local taxation and local social
security of the Hosted location.

Expatriate Staff:
-WWF Staff on short term or long term assignment appointed from WWF,
OR
-Recruited from outside WWF and outside the country on a fixed term contract due to rare skills.
Holding a contract from another country which is not their “home” country. Living in this other
country for the duration of the contract. This contract is subject to local employment labour law.
This staff should be managed under the terms of a local plus plus agreement as set out in the
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Global Mobility Policy (Long Term International Assignment Policy). Often these staff are
incorrectly called “regional” staff, or “international” staff.

Outposted Staff (OPS) are REP’s and COO’s holding employment contracts from WWF
International. They may or may not make contributions to the swiss pension scheme. These staff,
for historical or economic reasons must be treated in this way.

(External consultants are not staff. They are sub-contracted to WWF and should not be
considered for Annual Pay Review, Annual Performance Review incentives or Staff benefits.)

3.3 ANNUAL BASE SALARY

Policy:
Annual Base Salary should be paid in local currency wherever possible. Annual Base Salary consists of 12
installments of the monthly salary.

Process:
HR should ensure all Employment Contracts should state
“Employee will receive an Annual Base Salary of (XXX local currency) paid in 12 installments of
(monthly total ) monthly salary in local currency.”

Contract Example; Employee Earns 120 chf per year


“Employee will an receive an Annual Base Salary of 120chf paid in 12 installments of 10chf monthly
salary in local currency.”

When recruitments, new contracts, extensions are being issued HR should ensure that this phrase appears in the
contract or legal document being offered to staff.

3.4 HOW DO WWF PAY FOR STAFF SALARIES AND PAY REVIEWS?

At the beginning of each financial year, WWF sets aside money to pay for the total salaries for the year.
Total Salaries= current base pay for all staff + salary budget

Staff pay reviews are paid from the Salary Budget. The Salary Budget is a small % or a portion of the total
monies put aside for paying staff salaries. The salary budget is decided in April when the budget is prepared for
the following financial year.

Policy: Salary Budget


Salary budgets consider the following 3 fixed Compensation events .
None of these elements are mandatory and all are subject to local availability of funds.
Each is explained in more detail further in the document

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1. Annual Salary Review (Base Pay Review) :
– Movements in the local Market pay

OR

Local inflation rate (often called Cost of Living adjustment or COLA)


- ONLY where no market data exists.
– Pay adjustments for underpaid “key” or “critical” staff

2. Annual Performance Review (AIM)


– Budget based upon local ability to pay

3. Mandatory Statutory increases


a. In certain countries the level of a pay increase (or decrease) may be decreed by local
government. WWF respects local statute and will apply the mandatory action. Often this will be
a cost of living adjustment (COLA), sometimes called an inflation payment, and in this event, it
will replace the Base Pay review.

The total value of Salary Budget (1, 2 &3) to be distributed to employees is budgeted as a % of the total
budget for salaries and is set out in advance of the financial year. This should not be increased.

Process: Salary Budget


• Process:

– POD Secretariat collects market data on salary budgets annually for each country (April). This
data is shared with POM.

– Director POM approves a guideline per country

– POM/ POD communicate proposals around salary budgets to all locations. (please note these are
not mandatory, these are guidelines only)

• Timing: Guidelines provided by POD Secretariat in April for profit planning

3.5 EXTERNAL MARKET DATA

It is important that the salary ranges at WWF reflect what value the local market is paying (annual base salary)
for similar jobs. We engage a Birches Group to supply us with Market data for all jobs. They do also collect
benefit data but we are concentrating on Annual Base Salary. We use this data to prepare an annual salary
review.

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In general, it is not appropriate for to compare, let’s say, WWF staff salaries against those in a private bank or
multinational.
WWF have a partnership with Birches Group (www.birchesgroup.com) to supply us with Market data for 28
countries where we operate. They are familiar with our salary grades.

Birches Group also supply WWF with benefits data and information on local pay trends.
Local HR should work with the Birches Group consultant to ensure we capture any areas of concern or specific
cases within the region. Some countries may have multiple offices in different locations (some rural, some city)
and Birches Group can also help us with this.
Secretariat manage the global contract with Birches Group.

3.5.5. Annual Salary Review (high level Process)


1. PO HR delivers compensation data to Secretariat (and market vendor if applicable).

2. PO HR receives salary ranges from Secretariat in April. Ranges include cost of living adjustments
COLA (inflation).

OR (where no market data available), PO HR receives cost of living (Inflation) adjustment guideline
from Secretariat in April/May.

3. PO HR and Secretariat complete analysis around impact of new ranges on current staff.

4. PO HR and Secretariat propose adjustments (or longer term transition plans) if necessary.

3.5.6 COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment): Inflation


In countries where market data may not be available, Secretariat proposes a guideline figure on COLA each
April. This figure should be applied all WWF salaries in that country.
This is a maximum % figure and can be applied to all staff salaries. The same figure should be applied to all
salaries. The % does not increase with seniority. All Local staff with an employment contract in local currency,
subject to local taxations and social payments are eligible.
Cost of living adjustments related to inflation are not mandatory and are subject to availability of local finance
as outlined in the Salary Budget.

Example: Paul earns 100 in FY10,


Secretariat & POM proposes maximum 5% cost of Living to local SMT
Local decision to decide to recognize inflation of 4% in all staff salaries
Paul’s salary increases to 104 in FY11

Also, Secretariat will also propose a cost of living adjustment for all staff not on local currency. This figure is
available in July each year and will be circulated to senior HR in each region.

In countries where market data is available it is not correct to do both an annual pay review and a Cost of living
Adjustment (COLA).

The Annual Pay Review should include a review of COLA. It is not acceptable to do both an Annual Pay
Review and then a separate COLA adjustment.

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3.6 OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANNUAL PAY REVIEW

PO HR takes the lead in working out Base Pay reviews within the budget and its implementation for the PO
staff. The Manager Compensation & Benefits, POD Department at WWF International is involved in
monitoring the salary review strategy and its implementation in each PO.

PO HR :

Coordinates and administers the process for the annual salary review, and makes recommendations
based on local market practice.
Meets with Head of Finance and then with Line Managers to discuss recommendations.
Sends salary lists to the Line Managers every July.
Prepares recommendations for the SMT/ RMT.
Ensures compensation information is provided to Finance, in line with the Annual budget development
and approval practices.
Based on the final decisions, prepares year-end letters for all staff, for distribution in August
(retroactive to 1 July).

The Line Manager:


Makes recommendations concerning individual staff salaries.
Meets annually with the PO HR with the salary lists, discusses anomalies and agrees proposed salaries
for his/her team.
Distributes salary letters.

The Finance Director PO:


Ensures funding availability of compensation changes; Signs off recommendations and ensures updated
compensation is reflected in budget proposals and forecasts.
Ensures recommendations are approved by POM and PO REP before implementing changes.

3.7 INTERNAL EQUITY


An Employees perception of their responsibilities, rewards, and work conditions as compared with those of
other employees in similar positions in the same organization.

WWF does do this through

• Job evaluation
• Peer comparisons within PO
• Pay for sustained individual performance through Promotional increases

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Considering salaries
• All staff should be paid in local currency

• PO HR guides preparation of job description with input from Hiring Manager

• Local evaluation of salary should consider

– What is the range for this IPE score?

– Peer group- what are similar roles being paid?

– The availability of budget.

– Any adjustments in IPE grading for existing roles should be validated by regional PO HR.

3.8 GLOBAL GRADING STRUCTURE


• All staff jobs at WWF are graded internally
– The 7 grades at Secretariat are: A1, A2, A3, B1,B2, C1, C2 . Other locations may have 7
different grade names (e.g. A,B,C,D,E,F,G ) but this is ok

– Each grade has 3 known values: a minimum, midpoint and a maximum

– Each grade contains a collection of jobs

– Each job is evaluated using the Mercer system which assigns points based on the following
factors: Impact, Communication, Innovation and Knowledge

High level distribution of job types per grade

G
Director
F
E Management & Senior
D Specialists
C Administrative Support
B Functions &
A Administration Specialists

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3.9 GUIDELINES FOR PROMOTIONAL INCREASES
Staff salaries should be reflective of the relative worth of the position to the organization as represented by
responsibility, skill level required, and salary.

– Staff being promoted should have the salary increased to at least the level at which this role
would be externally recruited (ie the minimum of the IPE less 10%).

– Staff being promoted (within the same IPE), should have their salary increased by a minimal
amount (2-3%) in recognition of the move to the new role only.

– Staff being demoted (down an IPE or down a grade) should have their salary decreased to (the
higher of) current salary less 5-7% or the midpoint of the lower IPE

3.10 LINKING REWARDS TO PERFORMANCE THROUGH AIM


Annual Performance Review (AIM)

• Financial incentives only if budget available

• Secretariat will set out a guideline (per country) of maximum payment per rating. This is available in
July each year for each country. This is a guideline only and it is a local decision to offer less or nothing.

– Exceptional, Excellent (lump sum payments at top 2 ratings only)

– Fixed amounts per rating. The philosophy of AIM is that managers and non-managers get the
same amount for exceptional or excellent

• Eg. All staff with exceptional get X amount

All staff with excellent get Y amount


• AIM payments are a lump sum payment and are not added to the annual base salary. These payments
are subject to local income tax

• Until AIM is fully implemented and established (ie objective setting uniformly aligned) across all of
WWF, then it will remain separate from anything around Base salary including the Annual Salary
review.

The financial reward linked to AIM is sometimes referred to as a ‘bonus’. However, we are making a distinction
between a lump sum payments made for a high performance in AIM and a bonus award. Please see 4.0 Benefits
section for the definition of a bonus.

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3.11 ELIGIBILITY FOR AIM FINANCIAL INCENTIVES

All staff (including long term consultants) at WWF can do AIM but not all staff are eligible for financial
incentive from the performance rating. A guideline around eligibility for payments is that
The staff needs to have been employed since December of the financial year (ie. To have completed at
least one mid- year review and one end of year review)

Staff who are not eligible for financial incentives include:


Staff with contracts less than one year old OR Staff who did not complete the AIM evaluation as they
were employed less than 6 months at the time of the review.
Temporary staff of less than one year
Professional consultants engaged by WWF

3.12 HOW MUCH TO REWARD FOR AIM?

Entirely dependent on availability of local budget


Fixed amounts for top 2 ratings only not exceeding a maximum amount
Maximum amount: guideline published by Secretariat in July
Lump sum payment paid through payroll but not as part of Base Salary.

3.13 AIM (OUTPOSTED STAFF)


All Out posted staff from Secretariat and all REPs get AIM payments aligned to WWF International.
Payment of financial incentives for OPS either come directly from Secretariat or can be charged back
(internally) to Secretariat from the payroll paying the employee.
AIM payments for OPS are not subject to Cost of Living adjustments (COLA) but may be subject to local
income tax.

3.14 AIM PROCESS

Who pays who and how much? some guidelines here to help you:

Local staff in country XX get payments of whatever the XX budget allows for Exceptional & Excellent
Hosted staff in XX get exactly the same fixed amount payments for Exceptional and Excellent as Local
Staff in XX
All Out posted staff from Secretariat get AIM payments aligned to Secretariat(no COLA applied)

It is not possible for any manager to offer an additional top up to any financial incentive related to AIM.
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Local HR should issue the (including Hosted staff) with receive the usual “congratulations on your AIM rating”
letter.

OPS and REP AIM letters are prepared and signed at International.

3.15 SALARY REVIEW (OUTPOSTED STAFF)


Out posted staff will have the total remuneration (salary + benefits) evaluated per job on an annual or bi-annual
basis. This evaluation is completed by Birches Group and the results of this evaluation are shared with the
manager of the individual. The summary of the total evaluation may be shared with the employee. This process
is centralised and administered from International.

3.16 13th MONTH


In some countries it is very commonplace to offer a 13th month salary. This practice should be separately
addressed in all employment contracts.

In reality, the employee earns the same annual base salary, but in 13 installments (instead of 12)

Example:
Employee earns 120 per annual base salary
In country X this is 12 installments of 10 (12x10= 120)
In country Y this is 12 installments of 9.23 plus a 13th installment of 9.23
(12 x 9.23) + 9.23 =120

Employment Contracts should contain the following wording:


Employee will receive an Annual Base Salary of X local currency paid in 12 installments of gross
monthly total monthly salary in local currency. In addition, Employee will receive an additional
monthly installment (13th month), of gross monthly total payable (pro rata) at the end of each financial
year. Tax treatment for this 13th month installment will be the same as the preceding 12 monthly
installments.

Contract Example; Employee Earns 120 chf per year


Employee will receive an Annual Base Salary of 120chf paid in 12 installments of 9.23chf monthly
salary in local currency. In addition, Employee will receive an additional monthly installment (13th
month), of 9.23chf, payable (pro rata) at the end of each financial year. Tax treatment for this 13th month
installment will be the same as the preceding 12 monthly installments.

Process:
The implementation of a 13th month should be discussed with and validated by POM and must be supported by
POD Department.
The 13th month is payable (pro rata) at the end of the financial year and should not be split into multiple
payments.
The salary ranges published by Secretariat are available in a 13th month schedule.

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4. BENEFITS

Benefits practices vary from country to country. Because benefits are either mandated or provided by
government an assessment of benefits practices across countries must look at the local situation. Benefits to be
provided to WWF staff should meet the minimum requirements of laws of the PO countries

Many of the differences in benefits practices relate to the extent of governments involvement in providing
retirement and medical security to its citizens. Consequently, the level of benefits provided by WWF is often
directly related to the level provided by or mandated by the statutory benefits. The role of WWF PO HR in
benefits is to provide benefits in the regions that are competitive with local NGO levels without duplicating
benefits already provided by the state.

Wherever possible WWF benefits include some or all of the following: Health plans, and pay-for-time-not-
worked programs (vacation, travel time etc), Income protection programs (Mandatory and voluntary:
unemployment, death and disability, social security). Budgetary considerations, taxation of certain benefits and
available financial resources play a significant role in the impact and possibility of each PO to deliver a benefit.
Any changes in the benefits programs at a PO require that PO HR prepare a business case to be discussed
thoroughly with Finance and Manager Compensation & Benefits before implementation. Any changes to
Benefits must be clearly communicated to all employees.

Accident Insurance
As per WWF policies on insurance, all staff who work more than 8 hours per week are to be fully insured
against accidents, both professional and non-professional. Staff members who work less than 8 hours per week
are insured against professional accidents only. The same needs to be followed at the PO for all staff working
under their charge. Any local PO country requirements must be fully adapted and followed as well as the POD
Department updated.

WWF presently pays the full costs of this insurance. (Further details are set out in paragraph 4.1)

Medical Insurance
WWF provides group medical insurance, which staff and members of their family may join, if they wish. WWF
contributes towards the medical insurance costs of WWF staff members and staff administers part of the
payment of monthly premiums. (Further details are set out in paragraph 4.1).

Vehicles
Company vehicles should only be utilized for WWF related business.
It is preferable to avoid the reward of a vehicle as a benefit to individuals owing to the high taxation of this
benefit. Car allowances are (usually) subject to income tax at the local PO rate.

Bonus
To date, there is no organization-wide Bonus Program at WWF. A bonus is a discretionary reward typically
recognizing exceptional results or behavior. Typically bonuses are given without prior objectives being
established (unlike AIM). Bonus payments are ad hoc and can be financial or non-financial and should be
awarded close to the time the results/ behavior occurs. Financial bonus are generally of a small monetary nature.
PO HR should advise managers that the reward of bonus payments is likely to affect the manager’s budget.
(Unless finance has accrued a small provision for this in the annual budget).
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There is no step-rate bonus at WWF.

WWF PENSION

There is no Global WWF International Pension scheme at this time. There are state pension schemes
applicable in certain offices and the same need to be adapted at the POs, as applicable. If so established,
the Pension scheme policy must be forwarded to the POD Department at Secretariat for approval and
thereafter local implementation.
Wherever required to be implemented by law, the following guidelines could be used, as relevant for
implementation of the pension scheme, and the same could be adapted, as required, by the PO HR :

o PO HR
Ensure that all staff is signed on to the Pension scheme and all departing staff is signed
off.
Provides an annual statement of pension capital accrued to each staff member.
Provides copies of pension rules to staff upon request.
Ensures that premium, as applicable are deducted from staff salaries, and to the
respective pension foundation, as applicable.

o Staff Members
The staff members will be responsible for following all legal provisions as applicable.

LONG SERVICE AWARDS

Long service awards are a way of recognizing staff who have served the organization for durations of five years
or more to motivate them and to reward them for their long service. As a guideline, the staff that has completed
5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 years long service with WWF office are (usually) given suitable and appropriate
long services award. One option is that it is in the form of additional number of paid leaves in the year of
completion of that many years. An appropriate amount of cash award for those who have completed 15 years or
more of service can be managed with the WWF office. The Long Service awards policy could be finalized by
the POs and shared with the POD Department.

The PO HR
Informs Line Managers of employees’ eligibility for service awards.
Issues personal letters and organizes payments where appropriate.

The Line Manager


Organizes a celebration as appropriate.

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4.1 SUMMARY OF BENEFITS

Details of social benefits are to be provided by the PO HR under the WWF Employment Contract. Staff is
informed of any changes that are made to the benefits package, resulting from changes to laws of PO country or
WWF policy and are spelt out below.

Accident Insurance
. (Further details are set out in paragraph 4.2)

Medical Insurance
(Further details are set out in paragraph 4.3).

The PO HR:
Ensures the administration of social benefits, in compliance with local PO country laws, external
benchmarking with market practice, and orientation and advice to staff regarding their rights and
entitlements.
Meets with new staff on their first day and registers them with the following:
Accident insurance.
For Medical Insurance coverage for the staff & family, as per PO country’s laws statutory laws.

WWF Employees:
Provide details of medical insurance cover requirement for family, for which expenses are to be borne
by the employee

4.2 ACCIDENT INSURANCE

The Programme Offices and associated countries should provide an appropriate worldwide accident insurance
cover as per the laws of each country. As a guideline, for example, WWF International provides to its staff
members and the out posted staff an accident insurance for both, professional and non-professional cover.
As per WWF policies on insurance, all staff who work more than 8 hours per week are to be fully insured
against accidents, both professional and non-professional. Staff members who work less than 8 hours per week
are insured against professional accidents only. The same needs to be followed at the PO for all staff working
under their charge. Any local PO country requirements must be fully adapted and followed as well as the POD
Department updated.

WWF presently pays the full costs of this insurance.

Guideline

As a guideline, within the laid down number of days of suffering an accident, specified as per the terms &
conditions of Insurance policy, staff must contact the PO HR, who will inform the insurance company and give
guidance on how to fill out the insurance form on-line, or for claiming the accidental insurance money as per
the terms & conditions of the local insurance company.

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The main elements of the insurance cover should be circulated by PO HR to their staff and should, cover the
following:
The terms & conditions for accident insurance at the PO level should relate to:-

Medical costs,
Temporary incapacity or
Permanent invalidity.
Death

The PO HR:
Maintains the accident insurance contract with the best possible provisions, and monitors changes in
market practice and the law.
Ensures that premiums are paid to the insurance company on time for all staff and the cover renewed
regularly.
Registers all staff for accident insurance cover by signing them on the WWF payroll when they arrive
and sends updated yearly staff lists to the insurance company.
Provides all staff with a pocket card containing the accident insurance contract details and an emergency
number to call.
Helps staff fill out the accident declaration for the insurance company.
Sends staff updated lists to insurance company when staff leave the organization.

WWF Employees:
Must contact the PO HR without delay in the event of an accident, who will announce the accident to the
insurance company and provide them details within the laid down number of days.
Must forward the medical certificates promptly to the PO HR, as per the period laid down in the policy
document deadline, as these deadlines are strictly observed by the insurance company for reimbursement
of benefits.
Should not settle accident-related invoices directly but send them to the insurance company as per laid
down procedure.

4.3 MEDICAL INSURANCE

The medical insurance cover will be based on the mandatory/ obligatory requirement of the laws of the PO
country for all staff working and residing there. If it is legally mandatory, WWF PO is obliged by law to have
medical insurance for staff from an insurance company, besides this being the WWF policy for staff. WWF PO,
in such a case should conclude a group medical insurance contract with the concerned reliable insurance
company, which offers a range of coverage options to WWF staff and their families (spouse/partner and
children), as per suggested terms & conditions spelt out above. All details about this group scheme are to be set
out in an attachment to the WWF Employment Conditions to be issued by the PO HR.
Staff who are resident in PO country at the time of joining WWF, may opt to maintain their own insurance, as
per the provisions of the local laws and will receive a part monthly contribution towards costs, as is done for
those who opt to join the Group medical insurance company..

The amount contributed by WWF, to either the group or private insurance premiums, would normally be subject
to income tax laws of the country, if so applicable and must be abided. PO HR of the PO is responsible for
ascertaining the relevant laws and taking suitable action to meet the statutory requirements, as applicable.

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WWF contributes towards the medical insurance costs of WWF staff members and staff administers part of the
payment of monthly premiums.

The PO HR:
Provides all staff with information on the registration process, level of premiums and level of cover for
the Group medical insurance.
Registers staff with the Group insurance.
Administers the payment of premiums and the appropriate payroll deductions from staff for their part of
the premium contributions for themselves and, if opted for their family members.
Communicates to staff any legal or other changes relating to medical coverage in PO country.

WWF Employees:
Should settle all invoices for outpatient treatment directly and then send them to the insurance company
for reimbursement.
The notice period required for leaving an insurance company, or changing the level of cover, will be
different depending on the type of coverage, and needs to be checked with the insurance company. Staff
who leaves PO country permanently may resign from the medical insurance scheme at the end of the
month that they leave the country, upon provision of proof of departure from their country, as per local
laws.

4.4 LOANS TO STAFF

The provision of any loan to staff does not exist at most of the POs, and it should not be encouraged. However,
if due to such an exigency a loan is given to a staff member, the following guidelines will be followed:-
The loan is given only for pre defined personal staff exigencies with a defined upper limit of one
month of salary, which could be permitted - and is recovered in maximum 12 equal monthly
installments and should be fully repaid during the duration of the contract.
The loan should be fully liquidated at the time of exit of the concerned staff out of the full & final
settlement amount due to the staff.
The loan is sanctioned only on approval of a committee comprising the PO Finance Head/ PO HR.

The PO HR
The PO HR will ensure that the loan is sanctioned as per the laid down approval process.
The loan amount is deducted monthly automatically from the concerned staff salary.
The loan amount is fully liquidated before the staff member exits from the PO.

The Staff Member


The staff member is entirely responsible for requesting for the loan by providing suitable documentary
proof for the purpose of the loan.
The loan is paid back on a monthly basis from his/her salary and settled in full before exit.

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5. EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS

5.1 WORKING HOURS

WWF believes in a flexible working environment based on trust. This enables staff to achieve a balance
between professional and private life through flexible working hours.

Staff are required to follow the laid down statutory working hours of the PO country. Where there are no
statutory working hours, the PO staff are entitled to flexible working hours within the framework of an
eight-hour working day and a 40-hour working week. However, all staff should be at work from 0900 to 1200
hrs and from 1400 to 1700 hrs, and compensate the number of hours required to complete 40 hours of work
working week, Monday to Friday or follow the local PO laws.

Lunch break shall be minimum of 30 minutes duration.

The Line Manager:


Is responsible for ensuring that staff abide by the policy and for taking appropriate action in cases of
abuse.
Agrees working hours with staff and finds a balance between staff wishes and team needs.

WWF Employees:
May choose their own working hours according to the above schedule and in agreement with their Line
Manager.
When working late, must take necessary precautionary measures and responsibility for his/her own
safety and for turning off lights and electrical equipment and locking up when leaving.

5.2 TELEWORKING

Tele-working from home should be only an optional policy. It should be based on the requirement and the
availability of the I.T infrastructure related provisions at the PO.
Accordingly, the staff may do a certain amount of special work from home under exceptional requirements on
an ad-hoc basis, if needed with the agreement of the Line Manager. In these cases, staffs are responsible for
their own computer facilities and telephone lines.

This should be done when it is both in the interests of the organization and of the staff member, WWF may
agree that some staff under such circumstances work for the day from home but for a specified reason. All
cases of regular tele-working must be approved by the PO HR and by the Line Manager. The PO HR should be
approached in the first instance, and he/she will monitor the reasons, number and scope of such requests and
will consider the request based on recommendations of the Line Manager.

Staff needs to cover:


The costs, purchase and maintenance of required equipment.
The provision of internet access.

The agreement to tele-work on a regular basis will be reviewed periodically by the PO HR and the Line
Manager, will be based on the need of the organization and may be revoked at any time.
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5.3 OVERTIME

Within the laid down policy and statutory laws of the PO country for overtime work and labor code regulations,
if any, the PO should adapt the policy.

The draft policy should be forwarded to the POD department at WWF International for approval and then
circulated amongst the staff. The basic guideline on the subject is that the overtime is normally applicable to
non-managerial positions. There is no compensation (financial or non financial) available for Managers and
above. When asking staff for overtime work, it is important that the Managers respect work-life balance and any
external priority that staff may have. Managers must have an agreement with the staff for overtime work.

5.4 TITLES

With its policy on titles, WWF aims to:


Bring clarity to the functions performed at different levels within the organization.
Simplify the use of multiple titles and thereby reduce hierarchy.
Align titles across all departments within Secretariat and also within all PO’s for sake of uniformity.
Keep WWF International abreast of best practices externally.

GENERIC TITLES APPLICABLE ACROSS THE ORGANIZATION. As a guideline for all POs, the table
below indicates the Grades and titles with relevant functions followed at WWF International Secretariat. We
should aim for consistency in titles across the organization over the next 2 years. It is not mandatory to
implement this in programme offices at this time.

WWF International GRADE TITLE PROPOSAL WHEN

C2 Director Heading department


Managing multiple teams

C1 Director Heading unit


Line management of a larger team
Advisor Very senior technical expert

B2 Head of Managing a function with wider


scope
Manager Managing a small team
Managing budgets

B1 Team Leader Managing a function with limited


scope
Project Coordinator May manage one or two staff
Specialized role with wider
Project Analyst professional scope

Specialist
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A3 Executive Assistant to PA to SMT
(SMT) Coordination roles with a team
Coordinator Specialized role with limited scope

Administrator

Associate

A2 Technician/ Receptionist Assistant to Directors, Heads,


Managers
Assistant Few roles in Admin Unit

A1 Assistant Junior Assistants


Administration roles

The Line Manager:


Liaises with the PO HR to finalize the Job Description, Job Evaluation, Grade
and Title for a specific job.
For new positions, or a change in existing position, submits the “Staff Request Form” with a draft Job
Description.
Validates titles together with the PO HR.

The PO HR:
Evaluates positions together with the Line Manager using the IPE Mercer tool.
Validates titles together with the Departmental Director/Line Manager.
Validates titles with the SMT for C level positions.
Provides insight into market standards or practices for certain titles specific to functions
(eg: Business Partner, Media Officer, Financial Controller, Auditor, Planner, Accountant, etc).

5.5 WORK STATION/OFFICE CONDITIONS

WWF is committed to ensuring that all staff have a suitable work-station, with ergonomic seating and computer
positioning, adequate light and an ambient temperature.

The PO HR:
Will work closely with the PO IT and Administration Departments to ensure that work stations meet high
ergonomic standards for all staff

The Line Manager:


Has a duty to ensure that all staff have comfortable working conditions
Should bring any issues or problems to the attention of the PO HR, Administration and IT Departments.

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6. HEALTH & SAFETY

6.1 INTRODUCTION

WWF is committed to ensure that its staff are protected from risks that might threaten their health and safety.
We recognize that effective health and safety policies and procedures are essential to promoting the safest
possible working environment for WWF staff. Every WWF office is committed to develop its own Health and
Safety Policy using these standards as a base.

However, health and safety cannot be assured by simply drafting and distributing policies. Creating a safe
working environment requires commitment and action at every level of WWF. Awareness, compliance and
enforcement of the policies are key factors in minimizing hazards.

The successful implementation of policies requires a commitment from every staff member of WWF. The
Organization must ensure that all staff are aware of risks and what can be done to minimize or avoid them. They
are encouraged to work together to achieve a safe and healthy work environment.

This document is intended to identify a small number of basic measures that are mandatory for all WWF offices
and staff, and to outline further recommendations on health and safety considerations. This document will be
updated as we get feedback and additional information.

6.2 POLICY

Objectives of this policy:

Develop a positive safety culture in WWF


Proactively manage health and safety issues, with an emphasis on prevention

Safety First
WWF believes that the safety of staff is paramount and that it should not be compromised under any
circumstances. Staff members who feel that their health or safety may be at risk are encouraged to voice their
concerns and, if warranted, are empowered to refuse an activity they deem dangerous without that refusal
reflecting badly on their performance or incurring repercussions from their manager.

Prevention
WWF is committed to prevent, to the greatest extent possible, accidents and injuries, and acknowledges that the
directors, managers and staff are all responsible and accountable for ensuring that high standards of health and
safety are consistently maintained. Where a hazard has been identified, the hazard must be assessed to
determine the risk posed to staff, then an appropriate action and response need to be undertaken to correct it.

Investigation
When a serious incident does occur, WWF will ensure that an investigation is carried out to identify causes and
contributing factors, and that remedial and preventive measures are put in place if warranted. A central database
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of serious incidents will be created in WWF International to improve risk management processes in the
Network.

EIGHT RULES THAT ALL WWF OFFICES WILL ADHERE TO

Each WWF office will:


1. Develop a comprehensive, locally relevant health and safety policy for its staff. This should address
issues such as transport, driving, chartering aircraft or watercraft, etc. and any other specific risks that
are relevant to the local context, and must comply with all applicable laws in the country or jurisdiction.
This policy will be communicated to all relevant staff, including through briefings for all new staff.
2. Appoint a focal person, responsible for communicating with all staff on health and safety issues as well
as for monitoring health and safety practices in the office.
3. Ensure that it has a number of staff trained in first aid and that the names of these trained staff members
are known to all staff.
4. Be prepared in case of an incident, including having a crisis management process defined.
5. Brief non-local visitors to the office on relevant health and security considerations.
6. Explore and seek to provide the most effective and relevant insurance coverage for its staff, in line with
local regulations and possibilities. When coverage is not provided to staff by the office, they will work
with staff to ensure that staff members who travel have adequate medical coverage for the destination of
their business related travel.
7. Not insist that a staff member undertake an activity that he or she reasonably feels put his or her health
or safety at significant risk
8. When a serious incident1 occurs, investigate causes and contributing factors, put in place remedial or
preventive measures, and inform WWF International.

Breach of any of these rules will be treated as a disciplinary incident for the Head of Office.

SEVEN RULES THAT ALL WWF STAFF MEMBERS WILL ADHERE TO

Each WWF staff member will:


1. Comply with the local office’s health and safety policy.
2. Conduct themselves responsibly at all times, with a view to ensuring the health and safety of themselves
and others.
3. Especially in the field, take all due precautions to avoid personal injury and risks of an external nature in
the course of their duties which could prove detrimental to their health. Particular care will be taken
when travelling at night or in field locations.
4. Weigh risks involved in an activity and evaluate his or her comfort level with it.
5. Before travelling, consult travel advisory ratings for travel in-country and internationally, and inform
themselves on the health and safety situation in the destination.

1 A ‘serious' incident is any incident where at least one of the following has occurred or was ‘likely’ or ‘almost certain’ to have occurred:

Death of one or more people


Permanent injury to one or more people
Hospitalisation of one or more people
Lost time or restricted duties for one or more people
Any incident of abuse or harassment that is based on gender, race, religion or ethnic background.

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For destinations with a low or moderate risk rating, staff will take all reasonable precautions for their
health and safety, including preventative medicine if recommended. In all cases, staff will provide
managers with an itinerary and emergency contact information.
For destinations with a high risk rating, staff will seek their manager’s approval for travel, and will
provide justification for travelling and a travel plan (suggested format in Annex 4).
Staff will not travel to countries with an ‘extreme’ risk rating.
6. Not travel on blacklisted airlines2 when an alternative exists. Safety is a higher priority consideration
than cost.
7. Be responsible for ensuring that their medical insurance coverage is sufficient to cover
hospital/treatment costs as a result of illness or disease, as appropriate to local circumstances. If in doubt
they must contact their local HR team before travelling.

Breach of any of these rules will be treated as a disciplinary incident.

6.3 RESPONSIBILITY

CEO Responsibilities
CEOs are ultimately accountable for the efforts to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and
for ensuring that the Network and office health and safety policies are implemented. They are responsible for
ensuring that financial and human resources are allocated to implement and ensure compliance with a health
and safety risk management programme that is in line with or exceeds local legislation and for providing regular
orientation to all employees. Final decisions in emergency situations lie with the CEO.

CEOs will promote health and safety awareness3 at every opportunity. They will ensure that staff receive
adequate training, and that health and safety measures are effectively implemented by line managers and the
Human Resources Department. They will also ensure that employees are advised that they will be held
accountable if they fail to comply with safe work practices or the rules for staff, and are accountable for
implementing the rules for offices (the rules are outlined in the above section).

Serious incidents must be reported to WWF International.

Head of Office for Programme and Project Offices Responsibilities


Heads of Programme Offices or Project Offices are accountable for the efforts to protect the health, safety and
welfare of employees under their supervision and for ensuring that the Network and office health and safety
policies are implemented. They are responsible for ensuring that financial and human resources are allocated to
implement and ensure compliance with a health and safety risk management programme that is in line with or
exceeds local legislation and for providing regular orientation to all employees.

2 The reference is either the EU blacklist.


3 Example of a consistent message : “And please remember that safety comes first. No matter how inspiring, groundbreaking or
exciting our work is, in the office or in the field, please take measures to ensure your own safety and the safety of your staff and
colleagues."

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Heads of offices will promote health and safety awareness4 at every opportunity. They will ensure that staff
receive adequate training, and that health and safety measures are effectively implemented by line managers and
the Human Resources Manager. They will also ensure that employees are advised that they will be held
accountable if they fail to comply with safe work practices or the rules for staff, and are accountable for
implementing the rules for offices (the rules are outlined in the above section).

Normally Heads of Office will consult with their Home Office for guidance if an incident occurs before taking
any action or taking disciplinary or dismissive action when security lapses occur. However they may make final
decisions in a crisis situation based on their assessment of the urgency of the situation.

Serious incidents must be reported to the Home Office and to WWF International.

Manager/Supervisor Responsibilities
Managers should receive information, training and supervision to provide the practical knowledge and skills to
ensure that the behaviour and work practices of all persons under their supervision are safe and that risks are
minimized. They are responsible for explaining safety procedures at the start of large meetings, especially those
that involve international participants.

Managers will take appropriate action to report on, and to eliminate, unsafe or unhealthy working conditions or
practices.

Staff Responsibilities
WWF staff members have an obligation to understand the health and safety policy in their offices, as well as the
security situation of their environment, including familiarity with the political, social and cultural features of the
country in which they work or travel.

Employees should familiarize themselves with the health and safety measures in place in their office. They
should also seek information beforehand on potential hazards associated with countries they will be visiting
(e.g. through government and travel information websites).

Employees have a duty to identify and address issues of safety, and to report any hazardous situation, injury or
incident to their supervisor or manager. They are accountable for adhering to the seven rules for staff listed
above.

DEFINITIONS USED IN THIS DOCUMENT

CEO The Director General of WWF International or the Chief Executive


Officer of a National Organization
Home Office WWF International or a National Organization that manages one or
more Programme Offices or Project Offices
Head of Office The person who has been appointed by their Home Office as the

4 Example of a consistent message: “And please remember that safety comes first. No matter how inspiring, groundbreaking or exciting
our work is, in the office or in the field, please take measures to ensure your own safety and the safety of your staff and colleagues."

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Representative/ Director or person in charge of a Programme
Office, Project Office or other WWF entity reporting to WWF
International or a National Organization
Programme Office A WWF office reporting to WWF International or a National
Organization
Project Office A WWF office normally reporting to a Programme Office, but
sometimes to a Home Office
Staff WWF employees, including management
High Risk Countries Countries that are identified according to the travel advisory
service.
Travel Plan A plan filed prior to travel that includes the reason for, and details
of the trip. Travel Plans are attached to Travel Requests for high
risk countries or remote areas that need to be approved by the CEO
or their delegate. (Suggested format in Annex 4 – Travel Plan
Form)

6.4 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTICES FOR ALL WWF OFFICES

1. Keep a record of emergency data which provides phone numbers of emergency services, contact numbers
for key staff at the WWF home office, phone numbers of next of kin for staff (this should be part of
personnel files), insurance policy numbers, etc.

2. Aim for an office that is built to high standards with emergency exits, adequate lighting and a pleasant
working environment. There must be fire extinguishers, first-aid kits and staff trained in first aid
procedures. A plan must be in place for emergency evacuation in case of fire, and regular fire drills must be
conducted.

3. Engage external support for health and safety management. (Subject to confirmation, we anticipate
entering into a contract with an organization to provide advisory services.) Also, local networks with other
NGOs are a great help in times of emergencies.

4. Nominate a Focal Point Person5 who takes responsibility to develop, implement and maintain a Health and
Safety Policy that takes into account local risks and hazards. The Focal Point Person should receive regular
training provided by external risk management specialists. Knowledge of local health and safety
regulations is essential.

5 Responsibilities of the Focal Point Person include:


– Training of local staff in the office and on project sites on a regular basis
– Receiving and processing of security alerts
– Networking with other international NGOs in the area to share knowledge and training activities
– Mobilizing task forces when emergencies arise, and having plans to respond to emergency situations
– Keeping abreast with local developments in case of political or civil unrest, and briefing colleagues
– Relaying of serious incident reports to WWF International
– Keeping abreast of developments on health and safety issues in the Network

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5. Implement periodic in-person and on-line (or CD-Rom) training to sensitize staff to the risks they may
encounter in working and travelling, and how they can avoid or minimize them. WWF International will
develop an introductory training module.

6. Timely reporting of incidents can aid in protecting staff. Incidents should be reported to the appropriate
senior staff member through the most expedient means, with a written report provided as soon as feasible.
Serious incidents should be reported to a WWF International. (Annex 2 – Serious Incident Report Form).

7. Cars are the main cause of injury and fatality amongst NGO staff, and particular attention must be paid to
ensure that cars are safe, drivers are well qualified and not under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and seat
belts are worn at all times. Each WWF office with cars must develop a transportation policy where car
users are prepared to respond to a range of possible incidents and where curfews such as on night driving
are observed if necessary (Annex 3 provides guidelines).

8. When travelling long distances, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and other conditions due to long immobility
are a real hazard, and staff should take measures to avoid these by moving at regular intervals and wearing
supporting stockings. Purchase of a pair of support stockings or socks will be reimbursed by WWF.

9. When staff travel to potentially dangerous or remote areas, a Travel Plan must be submitted together with
the Travel Request. This will help the traveller to think through the journey before setting off and allow
him/her to be tracked if necessary or when assistance is required. (Annex 4 – Travel Plan form)

10. Carrying of large amounts of cash by staff members should be avoided. In exceptional circumstances
where there is no other alternative, guidelines must be observed on safe procedures, and information
provided on a need-to-know basis only. In the event of an attempted robbery or attack, staff members
should never risk their lives to protect cash.

11. Be prepared to enforce the policies by applying disciplinary measures for breach of health and safety
standards, as lapses in safe conduct can jeopardize the health and safety of all staff.

For further information please find attached in the Chapter 12 ANNEX VI: 1 – HEALTH AND SAFETY
GUIDELINES, 2 - SERIOUS INCIDENT REPORT FORM, 3 - RULES FOR DRIVING WWF VEHICLES, 4 –
TRAVEL PLAN FORM

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7. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

WWF puts critical importance on creating a high performance culture in order to drive its conservation
objectives. Our Performance Management System (AIM), which stands for Achievement and Impact
Management, focuses on both the achievement of outcomes (the what) and the impact of behaviors (the how).
The behavior are described in details in the Competency Framework, please see Annex VII These two elements
will equally impact the overall assessment of annual performance. The aim is to raise the bar and build
consistency on performance standards, to give Line Managers ownership and accountability for managing
performance and to link the AIM Review to a recognition programme that will in turn reinforce effective
behaviors and reward achievement.

By end FY 12, our goal is that all WWF offices will have AIM implemented for their staff.

The objective for the organization is to:


Drive organizational performance and strategic alignment.
Attract, retain, develop and engage talent effectively.
Embed specific effective behaviors in order to shape culture.

The objective for employees is to bring clarity on:


How they contribute to results of the organization.
How they are rewarded.
How they are being developed.

The Review Cycle

Strategic Alignment and Goal Setting


The organization sets a five-year strategic plan, from which cascades an annual action plan for the organization
and an annual action plan for each department which Directors and Line managers then use to set individual
goals, so that each staff member understands clearly how his/her individual objectives are aligned to the
strategic goals of the organization. This process takes place in March/April of each year for the following fiscal
year, starting July. Line Managers must set goals and a development plan for newcomers, to be implemented
after completion of probation for the remainder of the year. During their first month of service, the objectives
should be set for the probationary period.

Coaching and Mentoring


Line Managers are expected to have regular meetings with their staff, preferably once a month, but at least once
a quarter, to ensure that goals and development are on track, give and receive feedback, coach and support staff
and re-prioritize if needed or flag problems areas. Staff should actively seek feedback and coaching from their
Line Managers in this respect.

Mid-Year Review
At mid-year, there will be a more formal meeting with the same desired outcomes, where Line Managers and
staff document progress in writing.

Year-End Review
In July of each year, there will be a formal year-end review conducted by the Line Manager and staff, on a laid
down AIM Form (The 3-level specific AIM Forms required to be filled by the staff at 3 different levels i.e.
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Director, People Manager and Individual Contributor are attached as Annex VII), with the key activities as
given below
The staff member rates his/her overall performance using the AIM form, having sought feedback from key
stakeholders, and shares the self-assessment with the Line Manager.
The Line Manager also seeks feedback from key stakeholders, makes his/her assessment of overall
performance and shares it with the Departmental Director.
The Departmental Director collects all the draft ratings and takes his/her direct reports and any end-of-scale
ratings to a Divisional Peer Review (a meeting of Departmental Directors with their Divisional Director)
for further input, which is then shared with his/her Line Manager.

The Line Manager then conducts the Yean-End Review meeting with the staff member as follows:
A discussion about how the employee has worked and why he/she was successful or not.
A discussion about the competencies that were used effectively, or less effectively, giving specific
examples.
A conversation about which goals were achieved and which were not.
The Manager summarizes the achievement and impact of the past year’s performance.
The Employee makes final comments and gives feedback on working with the Manager.
The Manager rates overall performance, with the agreement of the employee.
A development plan is agreed, based on the assessment of competencies, with a maximum of three
development objectives and clear actions and timelines of how to achieve them.
The Staff member completes and signs form, which is then signed by the Line Manager and counter-signed
by the second-level Manager.
The Line Manager owns the final assessment of overall performance on the Year-End Review.
In case of any dispute, staff may have recourse to the PO HR Department at Secretariat.

A copy of the summary sheet of the ‘Year – End Review’ of the staff needs to be shared by PO HR with the
POD Department, immediately on completion.

Overall ‘Annual Achievement Ratings’


The 5 Annual achievement ratings i.e ‘Doing an Exceptional Job’, ‘Doing an Excellent Job’, ‘Doing a Good
Job’, ‘Meeting some Requirements of the Job’ and ‘Not Meeting requirements of the Job’, that the staffs are to
be assessed as in the AIM Form are attached as Annex VIII for perusal and information.

Exceptional & Excellent Performance


WWF will seek to find ways to reward exceptional and excellent performance within its Total Rewards Policy
(see Chapter 3) and the compensation strategy will be decided every year as laid down under that Chapter.

Meeting some requirements of the job


This rating requires a six-month development plan with clear goals and objectives to be reviewed formally at
mid-year. The Line Manager should monitor progress closely and provide coaching as needed. If a “doing a
good job” rating is not achieved the following year, the rating automatically becomes “not meeting the
requirements of the job”.

Not meeting requirements of the job


This rating requires a written improvement plan, to be reviewed after three months and if there is no significant
improvement, employment termination will be initiated under the provisions of local PO country’s laws and
according to WWF’s internal polices set out in Chapter 12.

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The Line Manager:
Must ensure that organizational goals, team goals and individual goals are aligned.
Owns the AIM process and the final yearly assessment.
Is responsible for on-going coaching and mentoring and monitoring progress.
Must seek stakeholder views to support his/her assessment of performance.
Accountable for supporting staff in the implementation of their development goals.
Inform names of staff with the rating of ‘Meeting some requirements of the job’ and seek advice from
PO HR Department.

WWF Employees:
Should proactively set his/her objectives in consultation with the Line Manager and consider options for
development plan.
Should seek regular feedback and coaching from their Line Managers.
Self-assess their own performance and seek stake-holder views to support their conclusion.
Develop and implement their Development Plan, with support from their Line Manager.

The PO HR:
Manages the process of the AIM Performance Review and coaches Line Managers.
Provides support and advice on development plans through the People Learning and Development
Policy (Chapter 8).
Assists Line Managers and/or employees when there are performance issues or any areas of dispute.
Manages performance reward, within the strategy agreed.

The AIM, as prepared and being implemented for WWF International staff at Secretariat can be accessed for
information, as an example at www.google.com/a/wwf.panda.org/aim

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8. LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

WWF recognizes that learning, development and knowledge-sharing are absolutely critical to building both a
strongly motivated workforce and a high-performance organization which can deliver its far-reaching
conservation objectives.

We have therefore developed a framework of core and level-specific competencies to help Line Managers and
staff set development priorities based on current levels of performance and long-term career objectives. These
competencies focus on the development of those skills and behaviors needed both to accomplish meaningful
goals and to create a constructive culture.

As part of the end-of-year AIM review, Line Managers are requested to discuss with staff the specific
competencies essential to their role and those areas where they need to focus their development in the coming
year. In defining a plan for meeting those objectives, staff are encouraged to explore the full range of
possibilities, including on-the-job learning, coaching, mentoring, virtual learning, in-house courses and other
options.

The Line Manager:


Must ensure that each member of his/her team has a concrete development plan which is directly linked
to the results of the performance review and the work objectives for the coming fiscal year. For new
staff members, this should be part of their induction.
Must monitor progress regularly and provide on-going feedback, coaching and support for the
implementation of the development plan.
Is accountable for assessing the successful implementation of development plans for each member of
his/her team.

The WWF Employee:


Drafts his/her development plan as part of the AIM self-assessment and discusses and agrees the final
development priorities with the Line Manager as part of the year-end AIM review. These must be
linked to the results of the Performance Review and the work objectives for the coming fiscal year.
Is responsible for the implementation of the plan as part of his/her objectives for the forthcoming year,
with support from the Line Manager.
Is encouraged to seek on-going support from the Line Manager and the PO HR.
Develop action plan after the training to transfer the knowledge and skills gained into the daily work and
to share with the colleague. This action plan should be reviewed and evaluated during the annual AIM.

The PO HR:
Will provide on-going advice and support on the implementation of development plans;
Will collect the learning needs recorded in the AIM development plans, define the most common and
provide organization-wide development and learning solutions which will be published in an annual
learning calendar.

Learning solutions available from the POD Department include:


A catalogue of online courses, available free of charge to all staff is at http://learning.wwfint.org
My Learning Space https://sites.google.com/a/wwf.panda.org/learning/. This link will provide details on the
current news on Learning & Development.

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LEAD: https://sites.google.com/a/wwf.panda.org/learning-sharing-leading/home. This link will provide
information on ‘Managing my Development’ and for gaining knowledge on and for ‘competencies’ development
plan.
360 feedback
Coaching
Mentoring

Please contact pdt@wwfint.org to discuss any of the above developmental opportunities.

Further Education
WWF cannot provide financial support to staff for formal further education studies such as Masters’ or
Doctorate programmes. However, Line Managers and PO Representatives are encouraged to be flexible in
terms of some time-off allowance, for staff who make commitments to distance learning and further studies,
provided it is in line with the organisational needs.

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9. ABSENCES

9.1 ANNUAL LEAVE

Annual leave should be planned in each PO to allow all staff to take their full annual entitlement, while ensuring
appropriate coverage and minimizing disruptions of work plans. Leave must be approved by the Line Manager
prior to the commencement of the leave period.

The entitlement of annual leave during a calendar year will be based on the statutory labour laws of the PO
country and the policy should be framed by PO taking the same into account and followed. All staff must abide
by the Annual Leave entitlement of the country in which they are based. If there is no entitlement, the
following guidelines will be followed:-

- Full-time staff are entitled to 2.08 working days per month, amounting to 25 working days per calendar
year. Leave may be taken from the commencement of employment with WWF. For periods shorter than
a full calendar year, leave entitlement will be pro-rated to the number of months worked. At the end of
employment, any debit leave balance will be deducted from the last salary. Conversely, accrued leave
balance, up to a maximum of 35 days, will be paid, subject to the maximum number of days permitted as
leave to be accrued as per the compliance of the local laws. Part-time staff are granted leave on a pro
rata basis.

-Staff must take their full annual entitlement and avoid accumulating outstanding leave as far as possible
keeping in mind that the annual leave is entitled for rest & recuperation for efficiency and performance
and to achieve work life balance and not for accumulation. WWF allows staff to carry forward a
maximum of 10 days, to be taken by 30th April of the next calendar year. Staff may also ‘borrow’ up to
a maximum of 10 days from the following year’s entitlement.

-Excess leave of more than 10 days can only be carried forward to the following year with approval
from the PO HR and the, Line Manager/Department Manager at the PO.

Long service within the WWF network is recognized by additional days’ leave as follows:-
-From the 1st January of the year in which 5 years of service are completed: 26 days
-From the 1st January of the year in which 10 years of service are completed: 28 days
-From the 1st January of the year in which 15 years of service are completed: 30 days

9.2 PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

The POs may permit staff to have a maximum of 10 days as public holidays. This should be decided in line with
the public holidays of the PO country, unless the maximum number of public holidays is more than 10 by the
statutory legal laws of the country, in which case the staff may be granted that many maximum number of
holidays. A list of such closed holidays, decided by each country for the calendar year should be forwarded to
POD Department before 01 January for the ensuing calendar year.

Whenever a public holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday, it will be compensated by an extra day’s leave at a
time stipulated by WWF, and notified to all staff at the beginning of each year.

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For part-time staff, if a public holiday falls on a day when they do not normally work, WWF will not
compensate this with another day’s leave.

9.3 SPECIAL AND COMPASSIONATE LEAVE

Special and Compassionate Leave, in addition to Annual Leave entitlement, is to be granted to the staff
members of each PO country, as per the provisions and requirements of relevant local PO statutory regulations.

Where the same is not mandated by laws of the country, as is in some POs, such a leave could be granted for
reasons such as own marriage, sickness of dependent, death of partner, child, parent, brother, sister, or any other
member of the immediate family, for moving house (once a year) or for appearance in court. The maximum
number of days of leave for these contingencies could be granted between 1 to 3 days, as required and the list
must be forwarded by each PO to the POD Department for approval and records.

9.4 SICKNESS LEAVE

Leave may be authorized for sickness of a staff member. However, absences of more than three days must be
justified by a medical certificate which should be sent by the staff to the Line Manager or PO HR without delay.
Failing adequate justification, these days of absence will be deducted from annual leave. For absence in the case
of sickness or accident, staffs will be entitled to benefits based on the specific laws of the PO country. The PO
HR must adapt this policy based on PO country’s laws.

The provision of salary continuation during the sickness period will be based on terms of insurance in each PO
country and as per the PO country’s laws.

If staff fall ill or have an accident on holiday, days covered by a medical certificate will not be deducted from
annual leave.

For absences in excess of one month in the case of sickness, or accident, or unpaid leave, staff will lose their
monthly leave entitlement on a pro rata basis.

9.5 MATERNITY AND PATERNITY LEAVE

WWF grants paid maternity leave which will be governed by the country specific Govt regulations and laws on
the subject

If under the country’s maternity laws, paternity leave is provisioned then the maternity-paternity leave policy
must be adapted as per the county’s applicable laws.

9.6 UNPAID LEAVE AND SABBATICALS

WWF is ready to consider the demand from staff for unpaid leave under certain circumstances related to
unforeseen personal changes or requirements. The local PO country’s policy on the subject will be based on the
country specific laws and will be forwarded to Director POD for approval and subsequent implementation.
Requests for unpaid leave will be decided by the local PO authorities i.e. the Representative PO.
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As far as sabbaticals, these normally are of long duration and would be treated on merits of each case. Any
request for sabbaticals from any PO staff could only be considered, if it meets the organizational requirement
leading to better delivery on job, besides relating to academic excellence for the staff member. Requests for
sabbatical will be decided by the Representative PO and Director POD and Director POM notified all such
cases. The decision on the same will be of the Representative PO based on merits of each case.

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10. GLOBAL MOBILITY

This section covers Policies & Procedures related to staff mobility as follows:-

-Short Term International Assignment Policy


- Long Term International Assignment Policy

These Policies cover the mobility of the staff from WWF International to NOs/POs and vice versa, or NOs to
POs and vice versa or from POs to POs. The mobility of the staff in these offices will depend upon the needs of
the destination office and willingness of the originating office to be able to spare the concerned staff member.
Short-term International Assignment, and Long-term International Assignment are also referred to as
‘Secondments’.

The following will not be considered as part of the Global Mobility:-

Extended Business Travel (up to 89 days).


Local hires - individuals who regardless of citizenship are recruited locally.
Assignments of more than five years – which are subject to “localization” and the assignee is transitioned
to the status of a local employee in the host country.

10.1 SHORT-TERM INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT POLICY

Short-term assignments or Secondments are defined as lasting for three months to one year. In the case of
short-term assignments / Secondments, employment will remain in the home country. WWF International
wishes to promote short-term international assignments/ Secondments as part of its policy to provide rewarding
career opportunities, knowledge sharing and network alignment. The benefits include:

Development and expansion of a group of skilled employees who are experienced in working with
National Organizations, Programme Offices and/or at WWF International.
Increased career opportunities within the WWF Network.
Increased experience of working in different cultural settings.

Any Short – Term International Assignment / secondment must be approved by the Departmental Director at
WWF International / CEO at an NO / Line Manager & Representative PO at a PO, as applicable, in conjunction
with the POD Department at Gland for moves involving to and from WWF International. For other moves it
will be between the authorities of the concerned NOs/POs .

The Short Term assigned /seconded person will remain an employee of his/her WWF Home Office.

The Host Office will pay a supplementary allowance to meet the daily cost of living if the host country is more
expensive than the home country. If day-to-day living in the host country is cheaper than the home country, the
salary will be completely covered by the employer without any adjustments. The Home Office will be
reimbursed by the Host Office for the cost of the employee while on secondment.

The seconded employee is subject to the rules and regulations of the Host Office while on secondment.

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Compensation & Benefits

The Short Term assigned /seconded person will remain an employee of his/her WWF Home Office under
unchanged home country terms and conditions. That office will be responsible for payment of salary, pension,
medical / accidental insurance cover and social charges, as applicable with cover and contributions unchanged.
Should any additional insurance be necessary to cover the employee in the host country, the WWF Host Office
will cover the cost.

The Departmental Director/ CEO NO/ Representative PO work together with Human Resources Department
concerned to assess and coordinate requests for Secondments to and from WWF International and amongst
NOS/POs.

For such Assignments to and from WWF International:-

1. If the Secondment is involving WWF International, the Departmental Director / CEO NO/ Representative
PO draws up a detailed work plan for the seconded staff member for the period that they are in Gland. The
department is responsible for covering all costs related to the secondment, including accommodation, per diem
allowances and reimbursement of employment costs to the employer.

2. Human Resources Department draws up a letter of agreement between WWF International and the NO or PO
concerned, setting out the terms of the short –term assignment /secondment, which is signed by the
Departmental Director and the Director of the POD /Human Resources Department.

Pre-Departure

The following services will be provided and conditions apply:


Pre-assignment orientation from the HR Department of the originating and destination country.
Medical/inoculations as required, with costs reimbursed.
Tax consultation with an expert is mandatory, with costs reimbursed.
Air shipment is provided to a limit of 300 kg airfreight and 2 bags excess baggage up to 75kg per bag.
Home country residence is maintained with no contribution to cost provided.
Travel costs to and from the host location will be covered according to WWF International’s Travel
Policy.

On Assignment

The following services will be provided and conditions apply:


Housing will normally be provided and paid for by the host-office, in a hotel or extended-stay furnished
accommodation.
Transportation will be provided according to host-country office policy.
Home Leave will not normally be provided.
Holidays will be granted according to the home country entitlement with host country public holidays.
Emergency provisions will be covered under WWF International policies.
Death on assignment will be covered under WWF International policies.

End of Assignment

The following services will be provided and conditions apply:


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Air shipment will be provided as above.
Assignment Extension for more than one year, will transfer the employee to the
Long-Term International Assignment Policy (see Chapter 11.2 below).
Termination of Employment, whether voluntary or involuntary, will be dealt with according to the Long-
Term Assignment Policy provisions.

Family Accompaniment

On a short-term international assignment/ secondment, depending upon the duration, the family of the staff
member could move with the employee or remain in the home country, which will be decided on a case to case
basis.

Staff may not undertake direct contractual engagements with other WWF offices, because of taxation and
auditing issues as well as potential conflict of interest. Staff should also not take on additional paid assignments
from other departments within the Secretariat / concerned NO or PO, particularly with assignments outside of
their own terms of reference.

10.2 LONG-TERM INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT POLICY

WWF International aims to promote staff mobility within its global network in order to increase career
opportunities, knowledge sharing and network alignment. To this end, the organization has developed a policy
to encourage staff to move globally, whilst maintaining living standards and long-term benefits.

WWF International’s Long-Term International Assignment Policy covers employees from the network who
undertake an international assignment at the request of the organization for a period of at least one year to
normally three years, with a possible extension to a maximum of five years.

Assignments of at least three months, but less than one year are covered under Chapter 10.1 Short-Term
International Assignment Policy.

Also excluded from the policy are:


Extended Business Travel (up to 89 days).
Local hires - individuals who regardless of citizenship are recruited locally.
Assignments of more than five years – which are subject to “localization” and the assignee is transitioned
to the status of a local employee in the host country.

10.2.1 LEGAL PROVISIONS AND CODE OF CONDUCT

This policy pertains to all WWF International’s locations However, in those cases where these policies conflict
with the law of the host country, the applicable country legislation will prevail. The Organization reserves the
right to change or eliminate any provisions of this policy at any time, without the Organization incurring any
liabilities.

Family
Family is defined as dependents or relatives under the domestic benefit plan of the home country. However, it
is important to note that while WWF recognizes domestic partners of same or opposite gender, there are certain
host countries that do not recognize such relationships and therefore it may not be possible to accommodate

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such relationships for reasons outside the Organization’s control. If the size of the family changes during the
assignment, all benefits will be updated accordingly.

Administration and Responsibilities


This policy is administered by WWF International’s POD Department. WWF International’s willingness to
approve an assignment will be decided on a case-by-case basis, according to the needs of the Organization, the
total estimated cost for the assignment and the prevailing conditions.
Before any assignment commences, a Letter of Understanding (LOU), must be signed by the staff member and
returned to WWF International to formally accept the terms and conditions of his/her international assignment.

The letter will contain:


Effective start date of assignment and estimated duration.
Designation of home country and host country.
Reporting responsibilities.
Compensation (including benefits) and method of payment; and
Assignment provisions.

Staff will establish a point-of-origin when signing their Letter of Understanding (LOU). This is defined as an
employee’s city, state/province/canton and country of residence immediately prior to accepting the assignment.
Family members will be considered to have the same point-of-origin as the staff member. If an extension is
made to the original assignment, a new LOU or LOU Extension Agreement must be issued, which may vary the
benefits and allowances compared to the original agreement.

Tax
The staff member is responsible for the filing and payment of all personal income taxes in both the home and
host countries and will be personally responsible for all taxes. He/she is also required to use the WWF
International-designated third-party tax consultant for all tax return preparation and filing.

Conduct
WWF International expects the conduct of all staff members to be in keeping with their role as WWF
representatives and for them to make themselves aware of and respect, applicable local laws, customs and
practices.

The staff member must comply with WWF International Policy, which includes adherence to regulations
governing tax and social security, as determined by relevant jurisdictions in the host country as well as the
home country, if applicable.

Host-Country Severance
Severance payments may be required by law in some host countries and should the staff member qualify for any
additional compensation at the end of the assignment, he/she will pay any such benefits to the Organization,
unless these are offset against any applicable home-country benefits.

10.2.2 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

Base Salary
Base salary is set at host country level, as if the employee was a local hire. It is expressed in host-country
currency and is subject to changes according to host-country merit and promotional guidelines. It is also used

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to determine the level of WWF-International provided benefits, e.g. pension contributions and life insurance
coverage.

Benefits
Staff will be eligible for host-country benefits, with some additional benefits:

Pension
Employees will be part of local schemes where they exist. WWF International plans to introduce a pension
scheme for all its Programme Offices during FY12 and all staff on WWF International PO contracts will be
eligible to join.

Housing
WWF International will provide a housing allowance according to a table of allowances, so that staff and their
families may live in safe, comfortable accommodation. The housing allowance is applicable only to Program
offices. The method and delivery of this allowance will be dependent on the tax-effectiveness of the benefit in
specific locations, and must be approved by WWF International. In case of south – north mobility no housing
allowance will be provided.

Purchase of Housing
Purchase of housing generally restricts a staff member’s mobility, could result in a financial loss and is
discouraged. For staff who choose to purchase housing, no housing benefit will be provided and any costs
relating to such ownership will be borne by the employee.

Childrens’ Education Assistance


If state-provided schooling in the host country is deemed suitable and enable normal grade/yearly promotion
upon return to the home country, there will be no education assistance provided. If comparable local state-
provided schooling in the host country is not available, or not in the native language of the child WWF will
provide/reimburse the cost for international or private schooling to an equivalent maximum 75% of the
schooling fee per eligible child per year.
If applicable, International schooling will be provided as of the official schooling start date of each eligible
child. Costs of nursery/pre-school, college or university will not be reimbursed. Expenses related to tuition,
transportation to and from school (only where this is a normal requirement for attendance at school in that
jurisdiction), books, uniforms and related fees (e.g. application fees etc.) will be reimbursed for each child. The
costs of laptops, field trips, sports participation, extracurricular activities and/or recreational activities will not
be reimbursed.

Unaccompanying dependent children


WWF will provide one annual trip for the dependent children who remain in the home country to visit the staff
member and family in the host country. Travel reimbursement will be provided by WWF for the most direct air
route by economy class air.

Medical/Accident/Life Insurance
Employees will be on the local medical insurance schemes of the offices concerned. Staff working in WWF
International Programme Offices on local contracts will be covered by Van Breda international medical,
accident and life insurance cover.

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Bereavement
If the staff member and/or accompanying family need to return to the home country because of a death or
serious injury in the immediate family, one round trip airfare will be reimbursed.

10.2.3 PRE-DEPARTURE AND RELOCATION

Pre-Assignment
The staff member and spouse, if applicable, will meet with the WWF International person responsible for
coordinating the transfer, in order to review the approved international assignment compensation and benefits.

Tax Consultation
The staff member and spouse, if applicable, should meet with the WWF-designated tax consultant for an initial
review of the organization’s tax policies and practices prior to departure in the home country and upon arrival in
the host country. This service provides understanding of tax obligations but excludes any other services such as
personal financial planning. Actual and reasonable costs for this service will be covered by WWF International.
Personal information is held in strict confidence by the tax consultant and is not shared with the organization.

Immunization and Medical Examination


Staff members and their families may be required to undergo a medical examination performed by a host-
country designated physician, but are in any case strongly encouraged to undergo a thorough medical
examination with the physician of their choice prior to departure, where they can also receive recommended or
compulsory inoculations. Reasonable costs will be reimbursed by WWF International on provision of receipts
as well as provision of proof that the costs were not reimbursed by the home country medical insurance.

Immigration and Travel Documents


WWF International will always be in full compliance with visa, work permit and immigration laws and
regulations in any country where we operate. International assignees are responsible for taking all required
actions to secure the necessary documents to legally enter and work in the host country, bearing in mind that
obtaining foreign visa/work permit documentation may be a very lengthy process. Staff are not permitted to
move to the host country and begin the assignment until prior approval has been received by the organization.
Any infringement of local immigration laws, including health and safety requirements, will be subject to
disciplinary action, which may include dismissal. WWF International will reimburse staff for standard fees and
expenses, as required in order to obtain the necessary documentation and visas.

Will and Estate Planning


We strongly recommend that staff members either prepare a new will or have an existing will reviewed before
the start of the assignment, as the laws concerning the disposition and taxation of estates are different in every
country. WWF International does not cover this expense.

Pre-move Trip
WWF International will provide a pre-move trip for the staff member and spouse prior to the start of the
assignment in order to find suitable housing, visit schools and become acquainted with the local environment.
This trip is for a maximum of seven days, exclusive of travel time. Wherever possible, this trip should coincide
with a business visit to the host country. Costs will be reimbursed, based on the WWF International Travel
Policy.

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Language Instruction
Actual and reasonable costs will be paid for language training for the staff member and spouse for the language
of the host country. Staff are responsible for arranging appropriate language training, which may be taken
before departure or after arrival and will be capped at a maximum of 50 hours instruction, for a maximum
period of one year. Children are not included on the assumption that they will be offered such lessons as part of
their schooling.

Shipment of Household Goods


Staff will be compensated for shipping household goods from/to the home country and to/from the host country,
based on the lowest of three quotes. Covered expenses include transport from door to door, the cost of packing,
shipping, temporary storage (up to 30 days), import or customs fees, and partial unpacking the household goods.
Weight and volume limits for shipments are:
Single: 300 kg airfreight 20 ft container (3,000 kg) surface freight
Accompanied: 450 kg airfreight 40 ft container (6,800 kg) surface freight
In addition, WWF will pay for up to 2 bags of excess baggage up to 75 kg per bag per person en route to the
host country location.

Insurance
Staff are required to prepare inventories of those goods shipped and stored, prior to shipment, including
replacement values, subject to a limit in value equivalent to USD 10,000 for airfreight and USD 100,000 for
surface freight. The staff member must declare these values for insurance purposes to expedite matters in the
event of a claim.
The organization’s designated relocation services provider will coordinate the international move of household
goods. Staff are not permitted to make their own arrangements. At the time of repatriation, the assignee will be
allowed to transport a surface shipment of 110% of the weight of the original shipment.

Temporary Living
Temporary living costs will be reimbursed up to a maximum of 30 days. Reimbursement for meals,
accommodation, incidentals and car rental (with prior approval) will be based on actual and reasonable
expenses in both the home country and host country. Receipts are necessary for reimbursement.

Travel to and from the Host Location


The staff member and family are provided with travel to the host country and compensated for economy class
airfare and other costs based on the WWF International Travel Policy.

Relocation Services
The staff member and family will receive services provided by a WWF-designated service provider the host
location. WWF International will cover actual and reasonable expenses for this service.

10.2.4 ON ASSIGNMENT

Medical
In the event the assignee or dependents suffer an injury or illness of such severity that adequate medical families
are not available locally, the cost of transportation to the nearest location where adequate medical treatment can
be obtained, will be paid. WWF International has a designated third-part emergency and evacuation service
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provider (Van Breda) that specializes in emergency situations and will assist the staff member and his or her
family members in the event of a medical emergency.

Evacuation
As a precautionary measure, we strongly urge the staff member and family to register with their home-country
embassy (or equivalent) in the host location upon arrival. WWF has a designated third-part emergency and
evacuation service provider (Van Breda) that specializes in emergency situations and will assist the staff
member and his/her family members in evacuation.

Home Leave
Reimbursement of appropriate home leave travel expenses is designed to give the staff member and family the
opportunity to renew ties with family, friends and work associates in the home country. For this reason, it is
required that home leave be taken to the home country once a year (not to another holiday destination) and
economy air travel will be paid.

The staff member is expected to use vacation time during home leave; however travel time will not be charged
against vacation. Travel costs for purposes of home leave for staff and their families will be provided once per
year by economy class air. Leave entitlement will be in accordance with host-country policy and practice.

10.2.5 REPATRIATION

WWF International will provide a similar service for repatriation as for relocating including:
Tax consultations, shipping of household goods, travel arrangements and temporary living expenses as
previously outlined.

The international assignment allowances and premiums will be terminated on the effective transfer date.

Sequential assignment
If the staff member moves on to another international assignment, all benefits will be paid according to the new
host country, as if he or she were relocating from the home country. Additionally, round trip travel to the home
country may be paid, prior to relocating to the new host-country and some additional shipment costs between
home and old and new host countries if required.

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10.2.6 PERMANENT TRANSFER

Review of the assignment will begin during the third year to determine if the assignment will continue beyond
year 3. If the assignment continues for more than five years, the staff member will be considered a “permanent
transferee” and international assignment benefits and allowances will be phased out as follows:

TRANSITION YEAR OF TRANSITION TERMS


ASSIGNMENT
4 75% OF BENEFITS WILL BE PROVIDED IN YEAR 4:
HOST-COUNTRY HOUSING
REIMBURSEMENT OF SCHOOLING COSTS FOR CHILDREN
5 50% OF BENEFITS WILL BE PROVIDED IN YEAR 5:
HOST-COUNTRY HOUSING
REIMBURSEMENT OF SCHOOLING COSTS FOR CHILDREN
6 0% - FULL TRANSITION TO LOCAL EMPLOYMENT STATUS IN YEAR
6:
BASE AND INCENTIVE COMPENSATION OF THE HOST
COUNTRY
BENEFITS (INCLUDING VACATION ENTITLEMENT) OF THE
HOST COUNTRY

For non-repatriating staff-members, WWF will provide round trip travel to the home country for the employee
and family within six months of acquiring local assignment status, with an additional five days’ paid leave and
lodging, expenses in the home country for up to ten days. An additional “shipment of household goods”
benefit will also be paid from the home country if required.

10.2.7 TERMINATION

If the contract of the staff member is terminated for reasons other than “due cause ”, the same benefits will be
paid as for “Repatriation”.

If a staff member retires at the end of the assignment, he/she is eligible for the same benefits set out under
“Repatriation”, to the home country or new choice of destination.

If a staff member resigns voluntarily, WWF International will provide the following benefits:
Cheapest economy airfare to the home country for staff member and family.
Shipment of household goods to the home country.
No other benefits, such as temporary living expenses, will be provided.

If a staff member resigns voluntarily, he/she must return to the home country within 30 days of the end of the
notice period, to be eligible for payment of airfares and shipping of household goods. No other substitution
payment will be made. If the staff member resigns during the first year of the assignment or is terminated for

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due cause, the staff member will be responsible for reimbursing WWF International for a pro-rated amount of
all relocation expenditure.

If a staff member dies whilst on international assignment, WWF International will reimburse the next of kin or
the estate for all reasonable expenses incurred in excess of those that you normally occur had death been in the
home country, including the return of the deceased for internment in the home country and moving expenses for
family members and household goods back to the home country.
Please refer also to the Long-Term International Assignment Annex II

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11. END OF EMPLOYMENT

11.1 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

An employment contract of a staff member can be terminated as per the relevant laws of the PO country. If
there are no such statutory obligations under the law of the PO country, the POs must follow the guidelines as
given below for the staff employed at their office:-

During the probation period (first three months), a staff member’s contract may be terminated by either party
giving one week’s notice. In the event of WWF PO terminating the contract, it is recommended that a verbal
warning be given at least one week before. In such cases, the PO will release staff from their obligation to
complete their notice period, but the salary will be paid until the end of the notice period.

After the probation period has expired, a staff member’s contract may be terminated by either party giving the
contractual notice period. This notice period is set by country’s laws, and if none exists then; it could be one
month during the first year of service, two months thereafter, and three months after ten years’ service.

Where the contract is of a fixed-term duration, the contractual letter will state that unless the employee is
informed otherwise, the contract will expire on the last date of the contractual period. Any changes to this
contract must be discussed between the Departmental Director and the Director, POD at least one month before
the end of the contractual period.

In the case of gross professional misconduct, such as theft, fraud, dishonesty, or harassment, WWF PO Office
reserves the right to dismiss a staff member immediately, with salary payments ceasing at the end of the week
of dismissal.

In the case of maternity, the laws of the PO country must be followed for termination of employment, if so
required.

11.2 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT DUE TO REDUNDANCY

An employment contract of a staff member can be terminated due to redundancy as per the relevant laws of the
PO country. If there are no such statutory obligations under the laws of the PO country, the POs must follow the
guidelines as given below for the staff employed at their office:

The obligation of the employer is to pay the notice period as per the term of engagement, give the reason for
termination in writing as required, if requested as laid down in the employment labor laws of the country.

Redundancy may be defined as the "position" being cut because of financial reasons or restructuring.
Restructuring can include eliminating a post completely, re-creating a post at a more junior or senior level,
creating a completely different post, or merging two or more positions into one.

In all cases of redundancy, an announcement will be made in person to the staff member concerned by the PO
Representative. A registered letter in which the terms of the redundancy are laid out will follow the meeting.

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If a position is cut, that is, a staff member is asked to leave because the position he or she filled will no longer
exist or has been re-structured, and not because of poor performance, there may be a need to give a redundancy
package in compliance with the laws of the country. The PO HR has to ascertain the same and action meeting
the requirement of relevant laws.

In all cases where a staff member loses the job, the staff member and supervisor will agree on the last day of
work, with the best interests of the organization in mind. Any outstanding leave balance will be paid at the end
of the contractual period.

11.3 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT DUE TO PERFORMANCE/DISMISSAL

Staff of WWF International or its Programme Offices, who have been dismissed or asked to resign for reasons
of performance, will not be engaged in any consultancy for work at POs until at least one year after the end of
their contract. They will be given no further responsibility for WWF funds.

Rep POs and Line managers are responsible for setting expectations for both performance and conduct and
keeping staff informed of their status. They are also responsible for identifying, documenting and taking
corrective action on problems relating to staff performance and conduct. In the event of continuing
unsatisfactory performance, the Rep PO may recommend that the contract be terminated. This is done in
consultation with the PO HR and the Director, People and Organization Development, if required and who will
ensure that fair and objective procedures have been followed, and that all alternatives, such as in-house transfer,
have been fully explored.

PO HR is to be present in all cases of formal written warnings and all cases of termination of employment
contracts. The PO HR is committed to respecting each staff member’s right to privacy and utmost
confidentiality regarding his/her personal and professional life.

1. Should the employee wish to terminate the contract, a letter of resignation should be given either to their Rep
PO or PO HR. Both should receive a copy of the resignation letter. PO HR will acknowledge the letter of
resignation and process the same.

2. In the case of WWF terminating the contract, the Rep PO must give the concerned staff member a
‘Performance Improvement Plan’ and then monitor the same in three months time. The concerned staff
member must be supported and counseled by PO Representative. In addition, if there is still no improvement,
the PO Representative must give one formal written warning in the presence of a member of the PO HR at
least one month before notice is served.

3. In the case of a fixed-term contract coming to an end, Representative PO should discuss future plans with
the employee. The PO HR should agree to any changes in the employment contract, after which the
amendment/s will be made to the contract.

4. Confidentiality is expected of all parties. Staff members’ personal files and the information contained therein,
which are held in the Human Resources Department, are the property of WWF. Staff may request to see the
contents of their personal files, but information will not be disclosed to any third parties beyond the
Supervisor, PO Representative unless the staff member has given permission to do so.

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5. Prior to the employee’s departure, the PO HR will arrange an exit interview to complete administrative
procedures and ensure that office keys and computers are handed back. During this interview, the Human
Resources representative will ask for feedback on reasons for the staff member’s departure, what the working
experience at WWF has been like, what are the lessons learned and areas for improvement. The PO HR will
record the comments of the staff member in writing.

11.4 RETIREMENT

Retirement and succession planning will be discussed in the annual appraisal process in the five years prior to
retirement and staff will be reminded of their due date three months before.

The WWF will inform staff of their entitlements and options, eight years before their normal retirement,
including the possibility to take early retirement.

When staff retire, they will be offered a farewell party (if they so desire), and a gift to a reasonable value. After
15 years’ service, they will be entitled to a leaving gift of a reasonable value at the discretion of the Line
Manager, whose cost centre will fund the farewell party and the gift.

The Line Manager:


Discusses retirement and succession planning with the staff member during the appraisal process in the five
years preceding normal retirement age
Organizes a leaving celebration for the retiring staff member and the purchase of a gift, to be debited to the
Departmental budget

The PO HR:
Provides advice and information regarding pension and retirement options
Ensures that the Pension Foundation keeps staff properly informed of their entitlements, if appropriate
Informs staff in writing of their retirement date, at least three months before.

The PO HR’s will conduct exit interviews with departing staff members in all cases.

12.5 WORK /EXPERIENCE CERTIFICATES

When staff leave the organization, they are entitled to a work /experience certificate as per the legal requirement
of the PO country, which serves as an endorsement of their performance for future employers as well as setting
out their dates of employment and their roles and responsibilities.

When staffs change manager or job in-house, they are entitled to an intermediate work/ experience certificate.

It is the employee’s responsibility to request the work/ experience certificate.

The Line Manager:


Gives input to the PO HR on performance

The PO HR:
Provides the work/ experience certificate as relevant to the PO country’s legal requirement, if any for staff.
Else all staff, while leaving the organization will be provided an Experience certificate.
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12. ANNEXES

ANNEX 1: ANNEXES\ANNEX I STAFF REQUEST FORM 2011.DOC.PDF

ANNEX 2: ANNEXES\ANNEX II RECRUITMENT STATUS FORM.PDF

ANNEX 3: ANNEXES\ANNEX III LEAD TIME TO RECRUITMENT.PDF

ANNEX 4: ANNEXES\ANNEX IV TEMPLATE CONTRACT-CORE OPEN ENDED FORM.PDF

ANNEXES\ANNEX IV TEMPLATE CONTRACT-FIXED TERM FORM.PDF

ANNEX 5: ANNEXES\ANNEX V CONSULTANCY APPROVAL FORM.PDF

ANNEX 6: ANNEXES\ANNEX VI-1 HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES.PDF

ANNEXES\ANNEX VI-2 SERIOUS INCIDENT REPORT FORM.PDF


ANNEXES\ANNEX VI-3 RULES FOR DRIVING WWF VEHICLES.PDF
ANNEXES\ANNEX VI-4 TRAVEL PLAN FORM.PDF

ANNEX 7: ANNEXES\ANNEXES VII WWF COMPETENCIES.PDF

ANNEX 8: ANNEXES\ANNEX VIII AIM 2011 - DIRECTOR.PDF

ANNEXES\ANNEX VIII AIM 2011 - INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTOR.PDF


ANNEXES\ANNEX VIII AIM 2011 - PEOPLE MANAGER.PDF

ANNEX 9: ANNEXES\ANNEX IX AIM RATINGS FY2011.PDF

ANNEX 10: ANNEXES\ANNEX X WWF LONG-TERM INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT POLICY.PDF

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