Anda di halaman 1dari 11

EDUC 4206 Professional Experience 4: Teacher as Inquirer

Professional Inquiry Project Proposal


Pre-service Teacher: Nikolina Zarkovic ID no: 110156540

Context  (approx.  100  words)  


 
 
The  primary  school  in  which  I  am  conducting  my  final  practicum  is  a  category  7  school  and  is  within  an  
area  of  significant  socio-­‐economic  advantage.  In  2017  total  enrolments  for  the  Western  suburbs  school  
equalled  259.  The  classroom  is  a  composite  of  Reception  and  year  1  students  with  23  students.  It  contains  
17  Receptions  and  6  year  1’s,  with  12  girls  and  11  boys.  20%  of  students  in  the  school  have  a  language  
background  other  than  English  and  2%  of  students  are  of  an  Indigenous  background  although  within  this  
class  only  1  student  speaks  English  as  an  additional  language.    
 
Plan  (approx.  1000  words)  
 
 
Whilst  engaging  in  the  pre-­‐service  teacher  self-­‐review  activity  I  have  discovered  I  wish  to  strengthen  my  
ability  to  provide  timely  and  relevant  feedback  to  my  students  in  the  curriculum  area  of  literacy.  This  
relates  to  the  AITSL  area  of  professional  practice  within  standard  5  –  Assess,  provide  feedback  and  report  
on  student  learning.  Standard  5.2  states  that  at  graduate  level  I  must  provide  feedback  to  my  student  on  
their  learning.    
 
Though  I  have  engaged  in  this  throughout  my  practicums,  I  have  never  deeply  considered  how  this  
feedback  affects  students.  I  am  unaware  of  whether  it  has  been  particularly  beneficial,  or  whether  it  has  
not  impacted  on  their  learning  and  engagement.  As  I  will  be  in  a  composite  reception  and  year  one  class  
the  feedback  data  focused  on  will  be  verbal.  This  is  because  written  feedback  is  not  as  beneficial  to  
students  who  are  not  fully  competent  readers.  I  don’t  want  to  provide  my  students  with  tokenistic  praise  
as  feedback  as  this  is  not  individualised  and  won’t  make  significant  impact  on  their  progression  in  the  
learning  area.  I  wish  for  my  feedback  to  be  timely  and  relevant  and  in  order  to  achieve  this  I  want  to  
monitor  what  feedback  I  provide  to  students  and  how  they  respond  to  it.      
 
Providing  oral  feedback  requires  highly  specific  word  choices  as  well  as  consideration  of  the  setting,  
whether  I  am  speaking  to  a  group  of  students  or  an  individual  privately  (Brookhart  2008,  p.  47-­‐48).  Ways  
to  give  this  feedback  are  to  the  entire  group  during  explicit  teaching  time,  quietly  at  the  student’s  desk,  
when  returning  student  work  or  at  the  teacher  desk  either  informally  or  conference  style  (Brookhart  2008,  
p.  48).  The  ways  that  feedback  and  praise  is  given  to  students  will  be  recorded  for  the  purpose  of  this  
inquiry  project.    

Praise  differs  from  feedback  as  it  refers  to  expressing  approval  or  admiration  as  to  how  one  has  done  
something  (Al-­‐Ghamdi  2017,  p.  40).  For  the  sake  of  this  research  inquiry  both  praise  and  feedback  will  be  
monitored.  Students  generally  feel  good  about  themselves  when  they  are  praised  and  are  often  
motivated  by  the  prospect  of  receiving  more  praise  (Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  148).  Al-­‐Ghamdi  (2017)  
suggests  a  specific  criteria  for  praise  stating  it  must  be  specific  to  the  task  at  hand,  provided  immediately  
following  the  task  or  behaviour  that  has  been  performed,  must  be  teacher  initiated,  free  from  
exaggeration,  delivered  using  a  positive  voice,  should  be  provided  whilst  students  are  acquiring  skills  and  
then  decreased  after  it  has  been  acquired  (p.  40).  Limitations  to  how  much  praise  should  be  given  to  
students  does  exist  though  as  students  who  receive  significant  praise  may  become  satisfied  with  their  
accomplishments  and  not  willing  to  put  forward  extra  efforts  (Al-­‐Ghamdi’s  2017,  p.  40).  

In  conducting  research  about  the  forms  of  feedback  provided  to  students  I  have  been  able  to  narrow  it  
down  into  categories.  This  consists  of  non-­‐targeted  more  general  feedback  with  comments  such  as  good  
work,  well  done  and  excellent,  negative  feedback  comments  such  as  that  is  not  very  good  and  that  work  is  
messy,  effort  feedback  stating  things  indicating  you  can  see  how  much  determination  a  student  is  showing  
in  completing  their  work  and  lastly  ability  feedback  stating  how  capable  you  think  a  student  may  be  at  
something  (Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  145).  ‘You  are  not  trying  as  hard  as  I  know  you  can’  is  effort  
feedback  and  ‘You  are  really  good  at  spelling’  is  comment  providing  a  student  with  ability  feedback  
(Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  145).  

Burnett  &  Mandel’s  (2010)  research  indicates  that  the  most  common  praise  amongst  teachers  is  general  
and  non-­‐targeted  despite  much  research  indicating  the  ineffectiveness  of  its  use  (p.  151).  General  
feedback  is  not  targeted  towards  completion  of  a  specific  task  or  behaviour,  hence  not  affecting  student  
progression  (Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  145).  It  rarely  translates  into  commitment  to  learning,  increased  
engagement,  enhanced  perceptions  of  ones  self  and  a  greater  understanding  of  a  task  (Burnett  &  Mandel  
2010,  p.  147).  

They  also  state  that  younger  students  respond  best  to  ability  praise  and  older  students  to  effort  feedback  
(Burnett  &  Mandel’s  2010,  p.  151).  Despite  this,  ability  feedback  is  a  slippery  slope  as  it  is  argued  students  
need  this  to  develop  a  positive  concept  of  themselves  and  their  competence  in  a  learning  area  and  
cognitive  appraisal  by  educators  helps  to  do  this,  although  students  who  receive  low  levels  of  ability  
feedback  also  report  that  they  think  they  are  particularly  bad  in  specific  subject  areas  (Burnett  &  Mandel  
2010,  p.  146).  As  well  as  this  it  is  reported  students  who  receive  ability  feedback  and  proceed  to  fail  have  
a  likelihood  of  not  performing  well  in  future,  whereas  those  who  receive  effort  feedback  still  perform  well  
following  failure  (Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  146).  This  is  because  those  who  exclusively  receive  ability  
feedback  attribute  their  failures  to  their  intelligence  and  how  smart  they  are,  as  opposed  to  the  effort  
they  put  in  (Burnett  &  Mandel  2010,  p.  146).  One  teacher  in  Burnett  &  Mandel  (2010)  study  stated  that  
students  with  high  academic  ability  require  more  effort  feedback  to  motivate  them  to  further  develop  (p.  
149).  Interestingly  despite  research  showing  that  ability  feedback  is  beneficial  to  students,  Australian  
children  have  shown  to  prefer  effort  feedback  (Burnett  2003,  p.  16).    

Burnett  (2003)  states  that  providing  positive  ability  feedback  leads  students  to  persist  longer  and  that  it  
shapes  their  thoughts/self  talk  (p.  11).  For  primary  school  students  positive  self-­‐talk  arises  from  positive  
teacher  statements,  though  the  absence  of  these  leads  to  negative  self-­‐talk  (Burnet  2003,  p.  12).  Ability  
feedback  can  have  both  positive  and  negative  impact  on  students  self-­‐talk.  Burnett’s  (2003)  study  shows  
that  students  whose  teachers  frequently  engaged  in  providing  ability  feedback  had  high  levels  of  positive  
self-­‐talk  and  low  levels  of  negative  self-­‐talk  (p.  15).  In  Burnett  &  Mandel’s  (2010)  research  students  
reported  positive  relationships  with  teachers  who  gave  little  negative  feedback  and  negative  perceptions  
of  those  who  gave  consistently  undesirable  feedback  (p.  146).  In  other  research  though  it  is  found  that  
negative  feedback  emphasises  failure  which  in  turn  leads  to  greater  student  achievement  due  to  fear  of  
failure  (Shin  et  al.  2017,  p.  28).    

One  thing  that  has  become  apparent  from  my  research  into  feedback  is  that  there  are  negative  
consequences  in  only  giving  one  form  of  it  and  that  to  be  successful  I  need  to  be  balanced  and  strategic  in  
how  I  praise  and  respond  to  students  (Burnett  2003,  p.  16).  Although  the  impact  on  feedback  will  differ  
with  every  group  of  students,  like  everything  in  education,  it  is  clear  that  the  research  around  praise  and  
feedback  is  conflicting,  hence  why  I  wish  to  discover  how  this  group  of  students  responds  to  it.  In  doing  
this  I  intend  on  taking  on  Burnett  &  Mandel’s  (2010)  four  categories  of  feedback  and  Al-­‐Ghamdi’s  (2017)  
criteria  for  praise  and  implementing  them  into  my  data  collection  proformas.    

 
Action  (approx.  100  words)    
 
 
This  research  inquiry  will  result  in  me  consciously  providing  my  students  with  an  array  of  different  forms  
of  verbal  feedback.  This  means  that  I  will  be  sure  to  distribute  a  balance  of  praise  and  general  feedback,  
ability  feedback,  effort  feedback  and  where  necessary  negative  feedback.    
 
The  data  will  be  collected  during  the  literacy  block  time  period,  usually  occurring  in  the  early  morning,  
following  the  morning  introduction  routine.  In  this  time  I  will  be  doing  both  instructional  teaching  and  
overseeing  students  completing  work  I  have  allocated  to  them.  I  will  provide  feedback  to  students  both  as  
a  group  and  as  individuals.    
 
Observation  (approx.  400  words)  
 
 
1.  Feedback  from  teacher  in  the  form  of  checklists  and  frequency  charts.  
2.  Surveying/conferencing  the  child.  
3.  Field  notes  obtained  by  observing  child  responses  by  both  me  and  my  supervising  teacher.  Reflecting  
on  their  initial  responses.    
 
All  data  will  be  collected  throughout  the  time  of  the  literacy  block  or  immediately  following  it.  This  will  be  
done  in  three  methods  including  both  qualitative  and  quantitative  forms  of  data  collection  (Davis  et  al.  
2018,  p.  61).    The  first  being  feedback  from  the  supervising/mentor  teacher  in  the  form  of  checklist  and  
frequency  chart  (See  appendix  1).  This  checklist  will  allow  the  observer  to  categorise  which  form  of  
feedback  I  am  giving  students,  whether  that  be  general  or  praise,  ability,  effort  or  negative.  From  this  they  
will  be  able  to  note  the  child’s  immediate  response  to  the  task  and  whether  it  has  impacted  on  their  level  
of  engagement.  The  supervising  teacher  will  act  as  the  critical  friend  in  this  form  of  data  collection  as  they  
will  be  closely  observing  the  situation  and  then  sharing  their  notes.    

The  second  method  will  be  via  verbally  surveying  or  conferencing  students  (See  appendix  2).  This  will  
allow  me  to  gain  information  about  student’s  attitudes,  feelings  and  opinions  about  the  task  and  monitor  
their  response  following  forms  of  feedback  given  to  them.  Survey  question  will  focus  on  what  forms  of  
feedback  students  most  prefer.  This  is  a  way  of  exploring  children’s  perceptions  in  relation  to  the  topic.    I  
will  give  examples  of  praise,  ability,  effort  and  negative  and  note  their  opinions  on  each.  I  want  to  monitor  
which  forms  of  feedback  students  prefer  as  well  as  which  forms  I  believe  keep  them  most  engaged  as  the  
research  shows  conflicting  evidence  in  this  area.    

The  final  method  will  be  by  writing  field  notes  obtained  by  monitoring  immediate  child  responses  to  
feedback  (See  appendix  3).  This  can  be  done  by  both  me  and  the  supervising/mentor  teacher  to  ensure  
sufficient  data  can  be  gained  throughout  the  lesson  time.  This  final  form  of  data  collection  will  allow  me  to  
gain  a  deeper  insight  as  to  how  that  feedback  is  impacting  on  student’s  engagement  and  learning,  as  
opposed  to  collecting  data  of  the  type  and  frequency  of  feedback,  and  the  preferred  feedback  for  
students.    
 
Reaction  and  perception  do  not  give  us  a  good  platform  for  judgement,  hence  why  evidence  must  be  
collected  to  have  a  rational  basis  for  what  truly  occurred  (Grundy  1995,  p.  15).  By  using  this  triangulation  
technique  and  the  three  forms  of  data  collection  outlined  above  I  will  be  able  to  first  monitor  the  
frequency  and  form  of  feedback  I  give  students,  then  by  conferencing  them  I  will  gain  an  insight  into  their  
preferred  feedback  and  lastly  by  taking  observatory  notes  of  child  responses  I  will  be  able  to  monitor  
which  forms  of  feedback  most  heavily  impact  student  engagement.    
 
Reflection  (approx.  400  words)  
 
 

The  next  phase  of  the  action  research  involves  analysis  of  the  data  collected.  When  analysing  my  data  I  
will  be  looking  for  patterns  in  the  feedback  I  provide  to  students  and  the  level  of  engagement  following  
this.  What  should  become  clear  from  the  data  collection  and  observation  processes  are  the  frequency  of  
feedback  given,  the  different  forms  of  feedback  or  praise,  student’s  responses  to  this  feedback  and  their  
preferred  forms  of  feedback.  I  intend  on  collecting  evidence  and  reflecting  on  it  on  the  day  of  each  literacy  
block.  At  the  end  of  each  week  I  will  then  have  sufficient  data  for  a  more  thorough  evaluation  of  it.      

I  will  interpret  the  different  forms  data  by  creating  graphs  to  determine  the  frequency  of  feedback  in  the  
different  forms.  This  should  make  it  clear  which  feedback  I  have  been  favouring,  which  upon  reflection  I  
will  be  able  to  balance  to  ensure  I  distribute  the  different  forms  more  evenly.  I  will  then  do  the  same  with  
the  survey  data  where  I  will  consider  the  most  preferred  forms  of  feedback  student’s  state  and  then  
monitor  their  reactions  when  I  give  this.  I  will  then  cross-­‐reference  the  feedback  to  see  whether  students  
preferred  form  of  feedback  is  indeed  the  most  beneficial  to  them.  Finally,  I  will  monitor  engagement  
through  field  notes  and  observation  which  should  indicate  which  forms  of  feedback  are  most  beneficial  to  
student  learning  and  development.    

My  supervising  teacher,  Rebekah  Bleby,  will  be  significantly  involved  in  the  data  collection  process  and  
will  support  me  throughout  my  research.  As  well  as  her  my  critical  friend,  Kate  Docking,  will  be  available  
to  help  to  reflect  on  and  analyse  the  data  collected.  Having  a  critical  friend  involved  in  the  process  will  be  
useful  as  she  will  be  able  to  provide  a  new  perspective  on  what  has  shown  in  the  research  and  how  this  
could  be  best  presented  (Smith  &  Rebolledo  2018,  p.  46).    

Luttenberg  et  al.  (2017)  state  that  within  the  process  of  action  research,  reflection  is  considered  as  
something  with  consequences  for  practice  and  the  place  where  theory  and  practice  merge  (2017,  p.  70).  I  
will  initially  attempt  to  distribute  a  balance  of  all  the  four  different  types  of  feedback.  After  analysing  data  
collected  from  this  it  will  be  made  more  evident  what  forms  of  feedback  students  are  best  responding  to.  
In  order  to  ensure  the  accuracy  of  this  though  these  forms  will  be  further  implemented  and  monitored.  
This  research  inquiry  is  ongoing  although  I  am  confident  it  will  allow  me  to  develop  the  ability  to  provide  
more  useful  verbal  feedback  to  my  students  in  literacy.    

 
References
Al-­‐Ghamdi,  A  2017,  ‘Building  a  positive  environment  in  classrooms  through  feedback  and  praise’,  English  
Language  Teaching,  vol.  10,  no.  6,  pp.  37-­‐43.    

Brookhart,  SM  2008,  ‘How  to  give  effective  feedback  to  your  students  ’,  Association  for  Supervision  and  
Curriculum  Development,  Virginia,  USA.    

Burnett,  PC  2003.,  ‘The  impact  of  teacher  feedback  on  student  self-­‐talk  and  self-­‐concept  in  reading  and  
mathematics’,  The  Journal  of  Classroom  Interaction,  vol.  38,  no.  1,  pp.  11-­‐16.    

Burnett,  PC  &  Mandel,  V  2010,  ‘Praise  and  feedback  in  the  primary  classroom:  Teachers’  and  students’  
perspectives,  Australian  Journal  of  Educational  &  Developmental  Psychology,  vol.  10,  no.  1,  pp.  145-­‐154.  

Davis,  J,  Clayton  ,  C  &  Broome,  J  2018,  ‘Thinking  like  researchers:  action  research  and  its  impact  on  novice  
teachers’  thinking’,  Educational  Action  Research,  vol.  26,  no.  1,  pp.  59-­‐74.    

Grundy,  S  1995,  Action  research  as  professional  development,  Innovative  Links  Project,  Murdoch,  Western  
Australia.    

Luttenberg,  J,  Meijer,  P  &  Oolbekkink-­‐Marchand,  H  2017,  ‘Understanding  the  complexity  of  teacher  
reflection  in  action  research’,  Educational  Action  Research,  vol.  25,  no.  1,  pp.  88-­‐102.    

Shin  J,  Lee,  K  &  Seo,  E  2017,  ‘The  effects  of  feedback  on  students'  achievement  goals:  Interaction  between  
reference  of  comparison  and  regulatory  focus’,  Learning  and  Instruction,  vol.  49,  no.  1,  pp.  23-­‐31.    

Smith,  R  &  Rebolledo,  P  2018,  A  handbook  for  exploratory  action  research,  British  Council  Publications,  
United  Kingdom.    
Appendix  1  
 
Frequency  of  feedback    
Whole  group    
 
Individual  Students     At  student  desk    
  Teacher    
desk/conference  
 

 
Type  of  feedback  (Frequency)   Comment  given:  
General        
 
 
 
 
Negative      
 
 
 
 
Effort      
 
 
 
 
Ability      
 
 
 
 
 
Impact  on  engagement   Comment  
High      
   
 
 
Low      
   
 
 
Unknown      
   
 
 
 
Praise  –  Does  it  meet  the  criteria?     Frequency:    
✓  or  ✗  
Specific  to  the  task      
 
Provided  immediately  following  the    
task/behaviour  
 
Teacher  initiated    
Free  from  exaggeration    
 
Delivered  using  a  positive  voice    
 
Provided  whilst  students  are  acquiring  skills  and    
then  decreased  after  it  has  been  acquired  
 
 
Key  for  type  of  feedback:  
 
General  =  Not  specific  to  student  e.g.  good  work,  well  done  and  excellent  etc.    
 
Negative  =  Feedback  stating  the  student  has  produced  undesirable  outcomes/actions  e.g.  Not  what  I  wanted,  messy  
writing,  not  very  good  
 
Effort  =  Stating  how  much  determination  has  gone  into  the  task  e.g.  you  are  trying  really  hard,  I  can  see  how  much  
effort  has  gone  into  this  
 
Ability  =  Stating  the  students  capability  to  do  something  e.g.  you  are  very  clever,  you  are  a  good  reader  
Appendix  2    
*Consider  possibility  of  positive  and  negative  self-­‐talk    
 
Student  being  observed:   Reaction  to  feedback   Most  preferred  feedback  
Student  1      
 
 
 
Student  2      
 
 
 
Student  3      
 
 
 
Student  4      
 
 
 
Student  5      
 
 
 
Student  6      
 
 
 
Student  7      
 
 
 
Student  8      
 
 
 
Student  9      
 
 
 
Student  10      
 
 
 
Student  11      
 
 
 
Student  12      
 
 
 
Student  13      
 
 
 
Student  14      
 
 
 
Student  15      
 
 
 
Student  16      
 
 
 
Student  17      
 
 
 
Student  18      
 
 
 
Student  19      
 
 
 
Student  20      
 
 
 
Student  21      
 
 
 
Student  22      
 
 
 
Student  23      
 
 
 
 
Appendix  3  
 
Observed  by:  Pre-­‐service  teacher/Mentor  Teacher  (Circle  relevant)  
 
*Ensure  you  reflect  on  child  response    
 
Student  being  observed:   Immediate  reaction  to  feedback   Impact  on  student  work  
Student  1      
 
 
 
Student  2      
 
 
 
Student  3      
 
 
 
Student  4      
 
 
 
Student  5      
 
 
 
Student  6      
 
 
 
Student  7      
 
 
 
Student  8      
 
 
 
Student  9      
 
 
 
Student  10      
 
 
 
Student  11      
 
 
 
Student  12      
 
 
 
Student  13      
 
 
 
Student  14      
 
 
 
Student  15      
 
 
 
Student  16      
 
 
 
Student  17      
 
 
 
Student  18      
 
 
 
Student  19      
 
 
 
Student  20      
 
 
 
Student  21      
 
 
 
Student  22      
 
 
 
Student  23