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[UNIT|PLAN-|MATHEMATICS]

Title: Location, direction and mapping Year Level: R/1

Learning Area: Mathematics Strands: Measurement and geometry

Learning Intention:
Ø Reception students will be able to:
§ Understand and use everyday language of location and direction e.g. between, near, next to, forward & toward.
§ Give simple directions
Ø Year 1 students will be able to:
§ Understand the importance of giving and following directions
§ Understand concepts of turns, direction and distance
§ Understand more complex language of location & direction e.g. clockwise, anticlockwise, forward, under
§ Interpret and follow directions to familiar locations

AUSTRALIAN CURRICLUM- Content Descriptor:


§ Reception: Describe position and movement (ACMMG010)
§ Year 1: Give and follow directions to familiar locations (ACMMG023)

AUSTRALIAN CURRICLUM- Achievement Standard: AUSTRALIAN CURRICLUM- General Capabilities:


§ Reception: ‘They use appropriate language to describe location.’ § Literacy
§ Year 1: ‘They use the language of direction to move from place to place.’ § Numeracy
§ Creative & critical thinking

AUSTRALIAN CURRICLUM- Cross Curriculum Priorities: AUSTRALIAN CURRICLUM- Cross Curricular Links:
n/a § Literacy: Learning position, movement and direction vocabulary
§ Geography: The representation of the location of places and their features on
simple maps and models (ACHASSK014)- Reception & The natural, managed and
constructed features of places, their location, how they change and how they can be
cared for (ACHASSK031)- Year 1

Learning|Experiences
Lesson 1: Monday 20 th August Resources
Lesson Aim: To introduce position, movement and direction words and start to develop students’ understanding of how features/buildings are placed on maps. § Rosie’s walk by Pat
§ Read Rosie’s walk in a previous lesson or at the start of the lesson Hutchins
§ Re-read focusing on the position, movement and direction words: stop on each page and ask students to point out these words (print the Rosie’s Walk § Enlarged photo of
posters/cards to aid discussion) farmyard on the
§ While reading also focus on the buildings and ask students to identify where the hen and fox are and what they can see à this will give an insight into title page of Rosie’s
students’ prior knowledge Walk
§ Ask students to identify what they see on the enlarged picture of the farmyard that they saw throughout the book and discuss the differences due to
viewpoint and orientation.
§ Get students to draw their own map of a farmyard with the features that they remember as well as extra features that they may wish to add.
Encourage students to show a route around the farmyard like the hen took. Emphasise words of position, movement and direction when explaining task
-Ask students how could you show me the route that the hen took?
-Make your own map to illustrate to students what they need to do
§ Reflection: get students to sit in a circle and put the maps in the centre and ask questions about the features of each of the maps e.g.
-Which maps have a windmill?
-Which maps have a farmhouse that has a round tower like the one in the picture?
- Do any of the maps show a route like the one that the hen took? How do they show this route?
-Most maps are drawn as if a bird is looking down on the buildings. Do any of these buildings look like that?
-How could the hen get from the windmill to the pond?
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right. Explain this
task to students and tell them why you are doing it (too make sure that the activities you plan are suitable for them)
Lesson 2: Tuesday 21 st August Resources
Lesson aim: Students will construct key features of a farmyard and will begin to use positional language and consider where their models may be placed in § Materials for
relation to other models. making models e.g.
§ Re-read Rosie’s Walk and make a list on the board of the different features that students could make toilet roll tubes,
§ Students will plan and create models of a farmyard during this lesson: before students to this show them how you would plan and make a model using boxes, paper, tape,
the materials they have. sticks, cotton wool,
§ Ask students to draw up a plan of what they are going to create (each student should create at least one model). glue, scissors, large
§ Once their planning is complete students can start to construct the parts of their farmyard using materials that will be set out on the carpet (front of sheets of card,
the classroom) textas etc)
§ During the creation of their models make sure that you discuss the possible position of each part of their model with them to assess their use of
position, location & direction words by asking questions e.g. Can you tell me about your model? What buildings/features have you chosen to make?
Where would you place this in the farmyard?
§ Make a conscious effort to model the use of position, location and direction language.
§ HAVE DESIGN CRITERIA: E.G. IT NEEDS TO STAND UP ETC.
§ If time get students to share what they have made with the class
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.
Lesson 3: Wednesday 22 nd August Resources
Lesson aim: Students will start to give simple directions to a peer and use positional language to describe how they would navigate their way around the § Large sheet of card
farmyard. for each group (8 if
§ Start the lesson by having the students in a circle and place a large sheet of card in the middle. Then place a selection of the models made in the whole class is
previous lesson on the card and ask students to choose where each model should be placed (Which requires them to use positional language). there)
§ Using textas or leftover materials add any missing features to the farmyard e.g. ponds, roads etc. § Models created
§ Demonstrate the start of a route and use the positional word posters to support this. Display these posters so that students are able to refer to them during previous
when labelling their own maps. lesson
§ Choose pairs or groups of three for for students to work in. § Posters of
§ Students will put their models onto the card and add extra features if necessary. positional words
§ Students can then plan Rosie’s walk around their farmyard and consider where the fox would hide along the way. § Rosie and the Fox
§ One partner will start by give directions, one partner will label the route using arrows and positional language labels and the other will follow the cut-out
directions using the Rosie and the fox character cut-out and then they will swap until each group member has a turn in each role. § Labels for positional
§ Reflection: what sort of directions worked best and why? What made a route easy/hard to follow and why? Did anyone find a route that used all the words
positional words? What were some of the hiding places for the fox? What could the fox see from each of these hiding places? How do you know what § Scissors to cut out
the fox could see from his hiding place? labels
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right. § Ipads if available to
§ Differentiation: record some of
-Extension: Encourage students to talk about alternative routes/ the different routes and how this would change the positional words used. their work
-Support: using pictures to label their route rather than verbal language to show that they understand what each character will be doing at each point
along their route
Lesson 4: Thursday 23 rd August Resources
Lesson aim: Students will place features on a map and plan out directions to find their treasure. § Treasure island
§ Start by talking about the theme of book week: find your treasure and talk about treasure maps as a way that treasure can be found in stories. blank map and roll
§ Demonstrate the activity to students: roll the dice, and find the row that matches the number you rolled, for your first roll pick from the first roll column to create a
and then draw this feature to your map, then repeat these steps but pick from the 2nd roll column and so on until you have done 5 rolls. Once all of the treasure map sheet
features have been added students can choose a secret place for their treasure and then label a starting point on their map. § Dice
§ Students can either write a list of directions to find their treasure or they can use arrows on their map from the starting point to the treasure to show
their directions.
§ If there is time we will share our maps as a class at the end of the lesson
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.

Lesson 5: Friday 24 th August


Lesson aim: Students will begin to develop an understanding of how to program a bee bot and how to make it follow a planned route § Bee bots
§ Ask students to sit in a circle and introduce the bee bots: explain what each button means using the direction posters to show the buttons on a larger § Bee bot direction
scale. posters
§ Show some examples of routes using the bee bots on the bee bot mat and the start and finish cards. Explain to the students that each time you press a § Bee bot mats
button the bee bot moves one box. § Start and finish
§ Students will then work with a partner to experiment with using the bee bots and use counters to map out each box that the bee bot moves through. cards
§ Ask students to try three different routes each and each time their partner will choose the start and the finishing point. § Counters or blocks
§ At the end of the lesson the class will discuss what they found tricky and what worked well. Talk about persisting in order to get to where you want the to map out route
bee bot to go. Discuss the importance of working collaboratively and what that would look like.
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.
Lesson 6: Monday 27 th August Resources
Lesson aim: students will develop their ability to navigate their bee bots around obstacles and record the different routes they took. § Blank bee bot mat
§ Start by asking students what each button means to recap and ensure that they understand how to use the bee bots. § Treasure map
§ Demonstrate the activity for the class: place treasure map themed cards on the mat and talk about your thinking when choosing where to put it (not themed cards
putting the treasure too close to your starting point), talk about what would be key features of a treasure map then get students into pairs. § Treasure map grid
§ They will take turns to use the bee bot to get to the treasure (one partner will place the obstacles on the mat and then the other student will navigate for students to
around it). They will try a few routes each in order to get practice using the bee bots. Students will record each of their routes on a grid that matches record their route
the bee bot mat and they will need to show where they started, where the obstacles were and where the treasure was. § Bee bot mat grids
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right. for students to
record their routes
§ Bee bots
th
Lesson 7: Tuesday 28 August
Lesson aim: Students will continue to develop their ability to navigate their bee bots around obstacles and consider if there was more than one way to reach § Bee bot mat
their finishing point. § Blocks, pop sticks
§ Involve students in creating an obstacle course for the bee bot to travel through and talk about how they may need to change their obstacle course or etc. to create
use trial and error to get their bee bot through the obstacle course. obstacle course
§ Tell students how many obstacles you want them to have (start with 4 and work up to more each time they do it) § Start and finish
§ One partner will create the obstacle course on the bee bot mat using materials around the classroom that will be organised at the front of the cards
classroom for students to get § Counters
§ Once the obstacle course is set up the other partner will need to navigate the course to get to the finishing point, students can use counters to mark § Bee bots
out the route that they took.
§ Once they have mapped out their route they can talk to their partner about alternative routes they could’ve taken to get to the finishing point, if there
are any.
§ Each student should get at least two chances to set up the obstacle course and two chances to navigate the course.
§ Once students have completed the task we will discuss as a class what students found challenging: ask students if they think it would be easier if they
were given directions to help guide them.
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.
Lesson 8: Wednesday 29 th August
Lesson aim: Students will develop their ability to give and follow simple directions using bee bots and will continue to develop their vocabulary of positional § Paper for each
words. student
§ Start lesson by giving each student a piece of paper and you give students directions like on top of, behind, in front, right, left in order to recap the § Bee bot mats
position words we learnt (5 mins) § Start and finish
§ Discuss giving directions and possible directions you could give to your partner. Model these directions by asking a few students to follow the directions cards
you give them using a bee bot. § Bee bots
§ We will then discuss as a class the importance of collaboration and listening when following and giving directions.
§ Ask students to then set up obstacle courses for their partners like in the last lesson however students will now give their partner directions to reach
the end point.
§ Students will need to have two turns to give directions and two turns to follow directions.
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.
Lesson 9: Thursday 30 th August
Lesson aim: Students will identify features that they may see on a map and use positional language to describe the location of their building/feature on the § Poster card/paper
map. with roads already
§ Introduce students to the class bee bot map task and discuss as a class the buildings/features we could have on our maps: place the roads on the floor on the map
and show students the gaps where their buildings/features will go. Write a list on the board of possible features students could draw. § Square 15x15cm
§ Students can then start to create the buildings & features of the map on a 15x15 cm blank square of paper blank square paper
§ At the end students will share their part of the map and why they chose it and then choose a place to put it on the map. Highlight the positional language
they use when placing their square on the map.
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.
Lesson 10: Friday 31 st August
Lesson aim: Students will compare the class map to proper maps and navigate their way from one position on a map to another using the bee bot. § Google maps
§ Start by discussing how the class map could be similar to maps of our local area. Use google maps and show the school area and ask students what § Class bee bot map
they see and the similar features that our bee bot map has. § Bee bots
§ I will ask students to go from one spot on the map to another and then I will ask students to choose the bee bot destination and students will take turns
programming it. If students are stuck they can ask a peer to help them by giving directions.
§ Finish off the lesson with the student feedback sheet, which will enable you to see whether the task was too easy, too hard or just right.

ASSESSMENT
Formative Assessment:
§ Observation of students engaging with the tasks
§ Analysis of students’ work
§ Student feedback: Too hard, too easy, just right
§ Checklist (find below: will be used throughout unit when student illustrates understanding/skills listed)

Under Across In
Around Over Past
Beneath Through On
Under Into Behind
In front of

Start Finish
Bee bot map grid:

Student feedback template

Was it too easy, too hard or just right?


Assessment checklist:
Reception
Student Interprets and uses everyday language of Follows and gives simple
location and direction (e.g. between, near, directions around
toward, backward, next to, forward) obstacles
Year one

Student Interprets and uses everyday and Follows and gives Understands the importance
more complex language of location directions around of giving and following
and direction (e.g. between, near, obstacles directions and that this
toward, next to, forward, involves turns, direction and
clockwise, anticlockwise, under) distance