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I would like to acknowledge my school

management for giving me an


opportunity to do the project work and
providing me all support and guidance
which made me complete the project
on time.
I would like to convey my sincere
thanks to Mr.Digvijay Nath Dwivedi,
our Chemistry teacher, who constantly
gave me precious suggestions and
supervision for completion of this
project.
One further imperative individual is
my sister who helped me in furnishing
additional magnetism to my project.
 
 

(1) Introduction
(2) Chemical Treatment
(3) Activated Sludge
(4) Origins of sewage
(5) Process overview
(6) Pretreatment
(7) Disease Potential
(8) Treatment of sludge in sewage water and
its disposal
(9) Sewage treatment in developing countries
(10)Aim of the project
(11)Experiment _ 1
(12)Procedure
(13)Experiment _ 2
(14)Procedure
(15)Observation
(16)Result
(17)Conclusion
(18)Bibliography
 

 
Dialysis of sewage water is the process of
removing contaminants from wastewater and
household sewage, both runoff (effluents), domestic,
commercial and institutional. It includes physical,
chemical, and biological processes to remove physical,
chemical and biological contaminants. Its objective is to
produce an environmentally safe fluid waste stream (or
treated effluent) and a solid waste (or treated sludge)
suitable for disposal or reuse (usually as farm fertilizer).
Using advanced technology it is now possible to re-use
sewage effluent for drinking water, although Singapore is
the only country to implement such technology on a
production scale in its production of NEWater.  
 
 
 
 
       

Sewage is generated by residential, institutional, commercial 
and industrial establishments. It includes household 
waste liquid fromtoilets, baths, showers, kitchens, sinks and 
so forth that is disposed of via sewers. In many areas, sewage 
also includes liquid waste from industry and commerce. The 
separation and draining of household waste 
into greywater and blackwater is becoming more common in 
the developed world, with greywater being permitted to be 
used for watering plants or recycled for flushing toilets. 
Sewage may include stormwater runoff. Sewerage systems 
capable of handling storm water are known as combined 
sewer systems. This design was common when urban sewerage 
systems were first developed, in the late 19th and early 20th 
centuries. Combined sewers require much larger and more 
expensive treatment facilities than sanitary sewers. Heavy 
volumes of storm runoff may overwhelm the sewage 
treatment system, causing a spill or overflow. Sanitary sewers 
are typically much smaller than combined sewers, and they 
are not designed to transport stormwater. Backups of raw 
sewage can occur if excessive infiltration/inflow (dilution by 
stormwater and/or groundwater) is allowed into a sanitary 
sewer system. Communities that have urbanized in the mid‐ 
 
 

 
Few reliable figures exist on the share of the wastewater collected
in sewers that is being treated in the world. In many developing
countries the bulk of domestic and industrial wastewater is
discharged without any treatment or after primary treatment only.
In Latin America about 15 percent of collected wastewater passes
through treatment plants (with varying levels of actual treatment).
In Venezuela, a below average country in South America with
respect to wastewater treatment, 97 percent of the
country’s sewage is discharged raw into the environment. In a
relatively developed Middle Eastern country such as Iran, the
majority of Tehran's population has totally untreated sewage
injected to the city’s groundwater. However, the construction of
major parts of the sewage system, collection and treatment, in
Tehran is almost complete, and under development, due to be
fully completed by the end of 2012. In Isfahan, Iran's third largest
city, sewage treatment was started more than 100 years ago.
In Israel, about 50 percent of agricultural water usage (total use
was 1 billion cubic metres in 2008) is provided through reclaimed
sewer water. Future plans call for increased use of treated sewer
water as well as more desalination plants.
(!) COLLECT 3-4 DIFFERENT SAMPLES OF SEWAGE WATER
FROM DIFFERENT PLACES.

Dialysis of Sewage Water :


1. FILTER SAMPLE 1 TO REMOVE THE SUSPENDED IMPURITIES
AND COLLECT THE FILTRATE IN A BEAKER.

2. MAKE A BAG OF THE CELLOPHANE PAPER BY FOLDING IT,


INSERTING THE STONE OF THE FUNNEL INTO THE MOUTH OF
THE BAG AND TYING IT WITH A THREAD, AS SHOWN IN THE
FIGURE.

3. PUT THE FILTERED SEWAGE WATER INTO THE BAG


THROUGH THE FUNNEL FILL 3/4TH OF THE BAG IS FULL.