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T&L Instructional Plan Template

(Updated 4/17/15)
(edTPA Aligned)

Overview
The information included in this document is to support faculty in teaching about and supporting students with the
T&L (and edTPA) Instructional Plan. While there are many variations of lesson plans, this format meets
departmental requirements and is aligned with the 2014 edTPA as well.

Background Information (When doing the actual edTPA, leave out identifiers)

Teacher Candidate: Rachel Doran Date:Sep 12, 2018


Cooperating Teacher: Laura Belknap Grade: 3rd
School District: Tacoma School District School: Fawcett Elementary School
University Supervisor: Chris Banks
Unit/Subject: ELA:
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: “Follow Your Inner Conversation”

Section 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment

a. Instructional Plan Purpose:


Good readers are able to think about and respond to a text while they are reading. The inner voice in your
head helps to ask questions, make connections, and synthesize what is being read. The inner voice is what reflects
the reading comprehension. When students begin to understand and think about what they are reading they are able
to understand and remember what they read a whole lot better. When students follow their inner voice, and track
their thinking, they are able to monitor their comprehension and become better aware of what they need to work on.
Annotating a text is one of the most important thinking tools when reading, we model this for the students so they
have a better understanding of what an inner voice conversation might look like.
We will begin by engaging the students with background knowledge of what reading comprehension is, and
how to identify that inner voice. Then we will begin by modeling what this might look like when reading and being
sure to track our thinking on sticky notes. Once we have modeled what this is, we will guide the students to think
about their inner voice while the teacher is still reading the story. The students will be able to track their own
thinking and have time to share with partners about what their inner voice is saying. With this lesson students should
come out of it knowing how to listen to their inner voice and having a better understanding about how to track their
thinking to have better reading comprehension.

b. State/National Learning Standards:


c. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as
the basis for the answers.

Content Objectives:
1. SWBAT… Develop an awareness of the inner conversation readers have as they read.
2. SWBAT… Monitor their comprehension by listening to their inner conversation and paying attention
to their thinking as they read.

Aligned Standard:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as
the basis for the answers.

1
Language Objectives:
1. SWBAT… leave tracks of their thinking by jotting down notes to hold thinking and expand understanding
as they read and talk.

Aligned standard:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the
basis for the answers.

d. Previous Learning Experiences:

Students have learned that when they read a story they should be able to recount the story in order to
demonstrate good reading comprehension. Most students know how to do this, and can accurately tell you
the beginning, middle, and end of a story. We want students to take this a step further and start thinking
about questions that can help them think deeper about the text and support their reading comprehension
even further.

e. Planning for Student Learning Needs (accommodations, student experiences, prior learning and
experiences):
A lot of the students are below reading level, and need a lot of assistance when it comes to reading time. To
accommodate we can give the students who need it sentence starters like “I wonder about” and “I think
that” so while they are reading they can have something to base their thinking on. We can also model or
guide the students longer rather than just sending them on their way. We can read the story together and do
the thinking together so the students can begin to see what we need them to see. A lot of the students need
extra help and it would be beneficial to do this as a whole group. If we notice that a majority of the students
understand what we need them to do, we can pull a small group and focus it even more direct to get those
students on the same track as everyone else. Lastly, the students who are quick and will catch on very fast
can begin doing this on their own, once we send them back to practice we can have these students pick a
book of their choosing and write on sticky notes what they are thinking to track their comprehension.

f. Assessment Strategies (Informal and formal)


Teacher candidates should attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to their
assessment strategies, including accommodations or modifications for students with disabilities as stated in
their IEPs. They may also attach appropriate marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
Consideration for multiple means of expression should occur here. That is, how will teacher candidates allow
for K-12 students to express their learning in different ways? Will K-12 students be given some choice?

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT… Develop an awareness of the inner Informal/Formative: We will walk around to each table as
conversation readers have as they read they are talking about their thoughts from the story. During
this time, we will check off students who have nailed it and
understand the task, and circle students who might need
another lesson on this topic and prepare a small group for
during daily 5.
SWBAT… Monitor comprehension by Informal/Formative: Students will be asked to write on
listening to their inner conversation and “sticky notes” worksheet their thinking during reading.
paying attention to their thinking as they Then they will be asked to talk with their table about their
read. thoughts. These sticky notes will be collected at the end of
the lesson.

SWBAT… leave tracks of their thinking by Informal/Formative: We will collect the sticky notes that
jotting down notes to hold thinking and they have used to track their thinking during the reading to
expand understanding as they read and talk. be sure they are understanding.
2
g. Student Voice:

Student-based evidence to be Description of how students


K-12 students will be able to: collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning.
students: journals, exit slips, self-
assessments, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Explain student learning targets The students will be filling out a Students will give me a thumb
and what is required to meet worksheet to track their thinking for up or down on if they think
them (including why they are the rest of the story. This worksheet they met the target for the day
important to learn). covers all three targets, and will be
turned in at the end of the lesson
2. Monitor their own learning Students will have my examples to Students will star the sticky
progress toward the learning look at when they are doing their note that they think shows the
targets using the tools provided own, as well as time to talk to their big ideas of the story to show
(checklists, rubrics, etc.). group and the teacher about what their reading comprehension
they have written down
3. Explain how to access Students will draw a line on their At circle time I will have
resources and additional paper if they are stuck, and that will students repeat the
support when needed (and signify where the student asked for expectations for how to ask
how/why those resources will help to complete the assignment for help if they are not
help them). understanding the task before
they are set free to work.

h. Grouping of Students for Instruction:


This lesson will start on the carpet. They will first be listening to the story and watching how the teacher
tracks their thinking. Then when it is their turn, they will be asked to grab a clipboard, paper, and pencil and
return to the carpet (acts like a brain break) then we continue the story with the students tracking their own
thinking, and discussing with partners next to them. After the story is complete they will be asked to go back
to their tables and discuss with their table mates what their inner voice was saying, and why. This is a
collaboration time, and time for students who did not complete 6 sticky notes to do so. The teacher is doing
conferencing in this time to be sure students are on the right track. The reason they collaborate in their tables
after the story is done is so the students can see how different people think. It also allows them to self reflect
to see if they got the lesson, or if they need more help. Keeping them on the carpet is to be sure they are
paying attention and are in a more direct environment. We want the students to get individual experience so
they can focus on what THEIR inner voice is saying, but collaboration is a big skill for them to learn too, so
the group time is specific for that skill.

Section 2: Instruction and Engaging Students in Learning

a. Introduction:
“Good morning students, please quickly and quietly come to the carpet for our reading lesson! If we could all
look up at the screen, I want us to read aloud the title. Student A can you read the title for us? Great. Take a
minute and think about what this book is going to be about. Then I want you to turn to your neighbor and tell
them what you think.”
b. Questions:
1. Turn and talk to your neighbor about what we have read so far, what are you wondering? Does this
remind you of anything? (Level 1)
3
2. Why am I asking you to write down your thinking? (Level 2)
3. What were some of the big ideas you picked up on in the story? (Level 2)
4. What should we do if we still have lingering questions? (Level 2)
5. How might we figure out questions that are not directly stated in the story? (Level 2)

o Learning Activities:

Learning Steps and Activities Supporting Theories/Principles


(Why are you doing what you are doing?)
1. Transition from introduction to begin reading Multiple means of engagement & Connections
the story. Stop after the first page “hmmm I between students own lives, experiences, cultures,
wonder why the soldiers came, that must interests and the content.
have been really scary. I am going to write
this down because that is what my inner
voice is telling me. Let’s read the next page”
“wow the mom is very brave. She knew the
soldiers were not safe, so she hid the kids. I
think this is really important so I am going to
write this down” “This family does not agree
with what the soldiers think so they are going
to come to America. This seems like a big
idea, and it makes me think of the pilgrims. I
am going to write this down”
2. Now that I have tracked my thinking this far, Multiple means of engagement & Connections
I want you to turn to your neighbors and talk between students own lives, experiences, cultures,
about what you are wondering, or what interests, and the content.
connection you can make this far. (let the
students talk) now I want you to grab a
pencil, a clipboard, and a worksheet and join
me back on the carpet. (students do this task)
We are going to keep reading but this time I
want you to track your own thinking, being
sure to tune in to your inner voice. Let’s read
the next page. reads 1-2 pages I am going to
stop here, when you are writing your
thinking, I am going to do the same. Who can
tell me what we are doing right now. Student
will respond. Good answer. Okay get writing.
We are going to read the next pages. Reads
1-2 pages okay write down your thoughts.
This time I want you to turn to your partner
after and tell them what you have so far. You
should have at least 4 squares filled up. Okay
we are going to finish the book. Keep writing
down your thoughts as I read. Finishes the
book. Alright. Take a minute and finish your
thoughts. When you are finished I want you
to go back to your tables and talk with your
group about what you have written down and
why you wrote it down. I will be coming
around to talk with each of you. Student A 4
what are we to be doing right now? Student
will say the expectations.
3. Teacher will be walking around the class Accommodations and modifications for
asking each student what they have and students with diverse needs, including those
checking in with the learning targets. with disabilities (as stated in their IEPs)
Students will be starring the ones they think
have the big ideas in the story. Who would
be willing to share some of the big ideas they
found in the story, or a question you might
have? What should we do if you still have
questions that were not answered in the
story? How does tracking your thinking help
with reading comprehension? You all did a
really good job today staying on task. If I
have talked with you, and you are done with
the worksheet, place it on the round table and
pull out your books before lunch. Good work
today.

c. Closure:
You all did a really good job today staying on task. If I have talked with you, and you are done with the
worksheet, place it on the round table and pull out your books before lunch. Good work today. Give me a
thumbs up if you think you hit every target we had today, give me a thumb sideways if you met at least one
of the targets, and give me a thumbs down if you think you did not meet the targets for today.

d. Independent Practice:
Students will be able to listen to their inner voice when reading their own books, when practicing for the
SBAC, when doing iReady, and when practicing their reading comprehension. They will be able to track
their thinking and have a better idea about if they are understanding a story or not. We want the students to
begin taking responsibility for their learning, and this is just the first step in that journey.

e. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology:


f. Acknowledgements:

Monitor Comprehension Toolkit A Lesson 1


How Many Days to America: A Thanksgiving Story by Eve Bunting Illustrated by Beth Peck.