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A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION IN NICROME LEATHER

PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI

ABSTRACT
The present study is made an attempt to identify Job Satisfaction facilities and
employee’s level about Job Satisfaction facilities adopted. To achieve the aforesaid objective
data is gathered from 100 employees of the organization with random sampling technique. It
is found that most of the respondents are aware about the legislative and non - legislative
employee Job Satisfaction facilities provided at the Company, Job Satisfaction facilities like
medical, canteen, working environment, safety measures etc., are provided by the company.
And most of the employees are satisfied with the Job Satisfaction facilities adopted by the
company towards the employee’s Job Satisfaction.

INTRODUCTION
Every individual has certain needs and motives which want to fulfill. Any job which
fulfills their needs and motives. There are some situational factors responsible for job
satisfaction. The important causes of job satisfaction are wage incentive systems, the work
environment, length of working hours, behavior of the supervisor, security, scope for
promotion and recognition of merit. Besides proper evaluation of work, impartial behavior
and social relationship with co-workers etc. are also contributory factors.
The term Job Satisfaction proposes many ideas, meanings and connotations, such as
the state of well-being, health, happiness, prosperity and the development of human
resources. As a total concept of Job Satisfaction, it is a desirable state of existence involving
physical, mental, moral and emotional well-being.
The social concept of Job Satisfaction implies the Job Satisfaction of man, his family,
and his community. Job Satisfaction is called a relative concept, for it is related to time and
space. Changes in it have an impact on the system of Job Satisfaction as well. Job
Satisfaction is also a positive concept. In order to establish a minimum level of Job
Satisfaction, it demands certain minimum acceptable conditions of existence, biologically and
socially.
The employee Job Satisfaction schemes can be classified into two categories viz.
statutory and non-statutory Job Satisfaction schemes. The statutory schemes are those
schemes that are compulsory to provide by an organization as compliance to the laws
governing employee health and safety. These include provisions provided in industrial acts
like Factories Act 1948, Dock Workers Act (safety, health and Job Satisfaction) 1986, Mines
Act 1962. The non–statutory schemes differ from organization to organization and from
industry to industry.
It is a comprehensive term including various services, benefits and facilities offered to
employees by the employer. Through such generous fringe benefits, the employer makes life
worth living for employees. The Job Satisfaction amenities are extended by in addition to
normal wages and other economic rewards available to the employees as per legal provisions.
The significance of Job Satisfaction were accepted as early as 1931 when the Royal
Commission on Labor stated, the benefits are of great importance to the worker which he is
unable to secure by himself. The schemes of labor Job Satisfaction may be regarded as a wise
investment because these would bring a profitable return in form of greater efficiency.
Employee Job Satisfaction facilities in the organization affects on the behavior of the
employees as well as on the productivity of the organization.
While getting work done through employees the management must provide required
good facilities to all employees. The management should provide required good facilities to
all employees in such way that employees become satisfied and they work harder and more
efficiently and more effectively.
Job Satisfaction is a broad concept referring to a state of living of an individual or a
group, in a desirable relationship with the total environment – ecological economic and
social. It aims at social development by such means as social legislation, social reform social
service, social work, social action. The object of economics Job Satisfaction is to promote
economic production and productivity and through development by increasing equitable
distribution.
Lab our Job Satisfaction is an area of social Job Satisfaction conceptually and
operationally. It covers a broad field and connotes a state of well being, happiness,
satisfaction, conservation and development of human resources.
Employee Job Satisfaction is an area of social Job Satisfaction conceptually and
operationally. It covers a broad field and connotes a state of well-being, happiness,
satisfaction, conservation and development of human resources and also helps to motivation
of employee. The basic propose of employee Job Satisfaction is to enrich the life of
employees and to keep them happy and conducted. Job Satisfaction may be both Statutory
and Non statutory laws require the employer to extend certain benefits to employees in
addition to wages or salaries.

A STUDY ON FRAME WORK OF EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION

INTRODUCTION TO JOB SATISFACTION

Job satisfaction in regards to one’s feeling or state of mind regarding nature of their work. Job
can be influenced by variety of factors like quality of one’s relationship with their supervisor,
quality of physical environment in which they work, degree of fulfillment in their work, etc.

Positive attitude towards job are equivalent to job satisfaction where as negative attitude
towards job has been defined variously from time to time. In short job satisfaction is a
person’s attitude towards job.

Job satisfaction is an attitude which results from balancing & summation of many specific
likes and dislikes experienced in connection with the job- their evaluation may rest largely
upon one’s success or failure in the achievement of personal objective and upon perceived
combination of the job and combination towards these ends.

According to pestonejee, Job satisfaction can be taken as a summation of employee’s feelings


in four important areas. These are:

 Job-nature of work (dull, dangerous, interesting), hours of work, fellow workers,


opportunities on the job for promotion and advancement (prospects), overtime
regulations, interest in work, physical environment, and machines and tools.

 Management- supervisory treatment, participation, rewards and punishments, praises


and blames, leaves policy and favoritism.

 Social relations- friends and associates, neighbors, attitudes towards people in


community, participation in social activity socialibility and caste barrier.

 Personal adjustment-health and emotionality.

 Job satisfaction is an important indicator of how employees feel about their job and a
predictor of work behavior such as organizational citizenship, Absenteeism, Turnover.
 Job satisfaction benefits the organization includes reduction in complaints and
grievances, absenteeism, turnover, and termination; as well as improved punctuality
and worker morale. Job satisfaction is also linked with a healthier work force and has
been found to be a good indicator of longevity.

 Job satisfaction is not synonyms with organizational morale, which the possessions of
feeling have being accepted by and belonging to a group of employees through
adherence to common goals and confidence in desirability of these goals.

 Morale is the by-product of the group, while job satisfaction is more an individual
state of mind.

 Job Satisfaction is the feeling an employee gets when the job he does fulfils all his
expectations. While morale refers to the attitude of the employees of an organization
and is a group concept, Job satisfaction is the feeling of an individual employee. Job
satisfaction has been defined as a pleasurable emotional state resulting from the
appraisal of one’s job; and affective reaction to one’s job; and an attitude towards
one’s job. Job Satisfaction can be an important indicator of how employees feel about
their jobs and p predictor of work behaviors such as organizational citizenship,
absenteeism, and turnover.

DEFINITIONS:

Weiss (2002) has “argued that job satisfaction is an attitude but points out that researchers
should clearly distinguish the objects of cognitive evaluation which are affect (emotion),
beliefs and behaviors”.

DETERMINANTS OF JOB SATISFACTION:

There are various personal and organizational factors that influence job satisfaction. The age
of a person does have its influence on his level of job satisfaction. People that are young
usually have a higher level of job satisfaction provided they rightly choose their career. Those
in their twenties or thirties are energetic and have the stamina to work hard and derive
pleasure out of their work. As a person gets older, he gets tired physically and mentally.
Further, he reaches the saturation point at this stage and the work, usually, does not give him
the pleasure it gave earlier.
STEPS TO IMPROVE EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

The following measures are necessary to improve the satisfaction employees:

 Selection of right man for the right job:


Proper care must take while recruiting persons for various jobs. Persons without
attitude and aptitude for work should not be selected. When it comes to placement of
workers, they should be given jobs in tune with their educational qualification, skills,
attitudes and abilities.
 Satisfactory conditions of service:
All those who have been appointed in the organization should be provided with job
security. They should be given decent pay. Social security benefits like provident fund
insurance etc. should be provided to employees as per the rules.

 Conducive working environment:

The working environmental should be made informal. Undue important need not be
given to hierarchy. The organization should make use of both formal and informal
channels of communication. The bureaucratic approach of the management should go

 Conducive physical conditions:


The place of work should be neat and tidy. There should be free flow of natural light
and air in any workroom. There should be proper provision for canteen. Lunchroom,
etc.
 Better work methods:
Conventional work methods and age-old practices should be given up. The enterprise
should come forward to adopt the latest technology. The employees may be trained to
make use of the various electronic devices in their day-to-day work. This not only
simplifies their work but also makes it more interesting.

 Proper superior-subordinate relationship:


The relationship between the superior and the subordinates should always be cordial.
The superior’s style of functioning must be democratic. He should not make an
attempt to impose his ideas on his subordinates. Whenever necessary and possible, he
can seek his subordinate’s viewpoints. Likewise, the subordinates, on their part, must
repose faith in their superiors and come forward to accept responsibilities.
 Good inter-personal relationship:
The relationship between the employees should also be proper. The work done in any
organization is teamwork. In the absence of proper understanding between the
employees, teamwork is not possible. The employees should not give scope for their
personal interest to clash with those of the organization.
 Job rotation:
If certain jobs are, by nature, dull and monotonous, job rotation may help to break the
monotony of workers, i.e., such jobs may be assigned to operation at a certain level by
rotation
 Provision of suitable incentives:
Only human resources can be induced to work. Inanimate objects like machines
cannot be motivated to work. The management therefore, should offer suitable
incentives to motivate employees to perform better. Incentives need not be in the
forms of money payment. There are also non-monetary incentives. Further, these
incentives may be gives for individual performance or group performance.

 Valuation of employee performance:

The performance of employees needs to be assessed regular intervals. Such an


assessment will level their level of efficiency. Such of those Employees who are
found to be highly efficient may be given suitable rewards. Those employees who are
less efficient may be made to undergo training to acquire better skills. If some
employees are found to be highly inefficiency, such people need not be retained. It is
only these people who spoil the work atmosphere in any organization.

BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY


Human life has become very complex and completed in now-a-days. In modern society the
needs and requirements of the people are ever increasing and ever changing. When the people
are ever increasing and ever changing, when the peoples needs are not fulfilled they become
dissatisfied. Dissatisfied people are likely to contribute very little for any purpose. Job
satisfaction of industrial workers us very important for the industry to function successfully.
Apart from managerial and technical aspects, employers can be considered as backbone of
any industrial development. To utilize their contribution they should be provided with good
working conditions to boost their job satisfaction. Any business can achieve success and
peace only when the problem of satisfaction and dissatisfaction of workers are felt
understood and solved, problem of efficiency absenteeism labour turnover require a social
skill of understanding human problems and dealing with them scientific investigation serves
the purpose to solve the human problems in the industry.
 Pay.
 The work itself.
 Promotion
 The work group.
 Working condition.
 Supervision.

PAY
Wages do play a significant role in determining of satisfaction. Pay is instrumental in
fulfilling so many needs. Money facilities the obtaining of food, shelter, and clothing and
provides the means to enjoy valued leisure interest outside of work. More over, pay can serve
as symbol of achievement and a source of recognition. Employees often see pay as a
reflection of organization. Fringe benefits have not been found to have strong influence on
job satisfaction as direct wages.

THE WORK ITSELF


Along with pay, the content of the work itself plays a very major role in determining how
satisfied employees are with their jobs. By and large, workers want jobs that are challenging;
they do want to be doing mindless jobs day after day. The two most important aspect of the
work itself that influence job satisfaction are variety and control over work methods and work
place. In general, job with a moderate amount of variety produce the most job satisfaction.
Jobs with too little variety cause workers to feel bored and fatigue. Jobs with too much
variety and stimulation cause workers to feel psychologically stressed and ‘burnout’.

PROMOTION
Promotional opportunities have a moderate impact on job satisfaction. A promotion to a
higher level in an organization typically involves positive changes I supervision, job content
and pay. Jobs that are at the higher level of an organization usually provide workers with
more freedom, more challenging work assignments and high salary.

SUPERVISION
Two dimensions of supervisor style:
 Employee centered or consideration supervisors who establish a supportive personal
relationship with subordinates and take a personal interest in them.
 The other dimension of supervisory style influence participation in decision making,
employee who participates in decision that affect their job, display a much higher
level of satisfaction with supervisor an the overall work situation.

WORK GROUP
Having friendly and co-operative co-workers is a modest source of job satisfaction to
individual employees. The working groups also serve as a social support system of
employees. People often used their co-workers as sounding board for their problem of as a
source of comfort.

WORK CONDITION
The employees desire good working condition because they lead to greater physical comfort.
The working conditions are important to employees because they can influence life outside of
work. If people are require to work long hours and / or overtime, they will have very little felt
for their families, friends and recreation outside work.

DETERMINANTS OF JOB SATISFACTION:

While analyzing the various determinants of job satisfaction, we have to keep in mind that:
all individuals do no derive the same degree of satisfaction though they perform the same job
in the same job environment and at the same time. Therefore, it appears that besides the
nature of job and job environment, there are individual variables which affect job satisfaction.
Thus, all those factors which provide a fit among individual variables, nature of job, and
situational variables determine the degree of job satisfaction. Let us see what these factors
are.
INDIVIDUAL FACTORS:
Individuals have certain expectations from their jobs. If their expectations are met from the
jobs, they feel satisfied. These expectations are based on an individual’s level of education,
age and other factors.
LEVEL OF EDUCATION:
Level of education of an individual is a factor which determines the degree of job
satisfaction. For example, several studies have found negative correlation between the level
of education, particularly higher level of education, and job satisfaction. The possible reason
for this phenomenon may be that highly educated persons have very high expectations from
their jobs which remain unsatisfied. In their case, Peter’s principle which suggests that every
individual tries to reach his level of incompetence, applies more quickly.

AGE:
Individuals experience different degree of job satisfaction at different stages of their life. Job
satisfaction is high at the initial stage, gets gradually reduced, starts rising upto certain stage,
and finally dips to a low degree. The possible reasons for this phenomenon are like this.
When individuals join an organization, they may have some unrealistic assumptions about
what they are going to drive from their work. These assumptions make them more satisfied.
However, when these assumptions fall short of reality, job satisfaction goes down. It starts
rising again as the people start to assess the jobs in right perspective and correct their
assumptions. At the last, particularly at the fag end of the career, job satisfaction goes down
because of fear of retirement and future outcome.

OTHER FACTORS:
Besides the above two factors, there are other individual factors which affect job satisfaction.
If an individual does not have favorable social and family life, he may not feel happy at the
workplace. Similarly, other personal problems associated with him may affect his level of job
satisfaction. Personal problems associated with him may affect his level of job satisfaction.

NATURE OF JOB:
Nature of job determines job satisfaction which is in the form of occupation level and job
content.

OCCUPATION LEVEL:
Higher level jobs provide more satisfaction as compared to lower levels. This happens
because high level jobs carry prestige and status in the society which itself becomes source of
satisfaction for the job holders.
For example, professionals derive more satisfaction as compared to salaried people: factory
workers are least satisfied.

JOB CONTENT:
Job content refers to the intrinsic value of the job which depends on the requirement of skills
for performing it, and the degree of responsibility and growth it offers. A higher content of
these factors provides higher satisfaction. For example, a routine and repetitive lesser
satisfaction; the degree of satisfaction progressively increases in job rotation, job
enlargement, and job enrichment.

SITUATIONAL VARIABLES:
Situational variables related to job satisfaction lie in organizational context – formal and
informal. Formal organization emerges out of the interaction of individuals in the
organization. Some of the important factors which affect job important factors which affect
job satisfaction are given below:

1. WORKING CONDITIONS:
Working conditions, particularly physical work environment, like conditions of workplace
and associated facilities for performing the job determine job satisfaction. These work in two
ways. First, these provide means job performance. Second, provision of these conditions
affects the individual’s perception about the organization. If these factors are favourable,
individuals experience higher level of job satisfaction.
2. SUPERVISION:
The type of supervision affects job satisfaction as in each type of supervision; the degree of
importance attached to individuals varies. In employee-oriented supervision, there is more
concern for people which is perceived favourably by them and provides them more
satisfaction. In job oriented supervision, there is more emphasis on the performance of the job
and people become secondary. This situation decreases job satisfaction
.
3. EQUITABLE REWARDS:
The type of linkage that is provided between job performance and rewards determines the
degree of job satisfaction. If the reward is perceived to be based on the job performance and
equitable, it offers higher satisfaction. If the reward is perceived to be based on
considerations other than the job performance, it affects job satisfaction adversely.

4. OPPORTUNITY:
It is true that individuals seek satisfaction in their jobs in the context of job nature and work
environment by they also attach importance to opportunities for promotion that these job
offer. If the present job offers opportunity of promotion is lacking, it reduces satisfaction.

1. Work group: Individuals work in group either created formally of they develop on
their own to seek emotional satisfaction at the workplace. To the extent such groups
are cohesive; the degree of satisfaction is high. If the group is not cohesive, job
satisfaction is low. In a cohesive group, people derive satisfaction out of their
interpersonal interaction and workplace becomes satisfying leading to job satisfaction.

EFFECT OF JOB SATISFACTION

Job satisfaction has a variety of effects. These effects may be seen in the context of an
individual’s physical and mental health, productivity, absenteeism, and turnover.

Physical and Mental Health:


The degree of job satisfaction affects an individual’s physical and mental
health. Since job satisfaction is a type of mental feeling, its favorableness’ or
unfavourablesness affects the individual psychologically which ultimately affects his physical
health.
For example, Lawler has pointed out that drug abuse, alcoholism and mental and physical
health result from psychologically harmful jobs. Further, since a job is an important part of
life, job satisfaction influences general life satisfaction. The result is that there is spillover
effect which occurs in both directions between job and life satisfaction.

PRODUCTIVITY:
There are two views about the relationship between job satisfaction and productivity:

 A happy worker is a productive worker,


 A happy worker is not necessarily a productive worker.

The first view establishes a direct cause-effect relationship between job satisfaction and
productivity; when job satisfaction increases, productivity increases; when satisfaction
decreases, productivity decreases. The basic logic behind this is that a happy worker will put
more efforts for job performance. However, this may not be true in all cases.
For example, a worker having low expectations from his jobs may feel satisfied but he may
not put his efforts more vigorously because of his low expectations from the job. Therefore,
this view does not explain fully the complex relationship between job satisfaction and
productivity.

The view: That is a satisfied worker is not necessarily a productive worker explains the
relationship between job satisfaction and productivity. Various research studies also support
this view.

This relationship may be explained in terms of the operation of two factors: effect of job
performance on satisfaction and organizational expectations from individuals for job
performance. 1. Job performance leads to job satisfaction and not the other way round. The
basic factor for this phenomenon is the rewards (a source of satisfaction) attached with
performance. There are two types of rewardsintrinsic and extrinsic. The intrinsic reward
stems from the job itself which may be in the form of growth potential, challenging job, etc.
The satisfaction on such a type of reward may help to increase productivity. The extrinsic
reward is subject to control by management such as salary, bonus, etc. Any increase in these
factors does not hep to increase productivity though these factors increase job satisfaction.

THE RELATION BETWEEN PERFORMANCE AND SATISFACTION


ABSENTEEISM:
Absenteeism refers to the frequency of absence of job holder from the workplace
either unexcused absence due to some avoidable reasons or long absence due to some
unavoidable reasons. It is the former type of absence which is a matter of concern. This
absence is due to lack of satisfaction from the job which produces a ‘lack of will to work’ and
alienate a worker form work as for as possible. Thus, job satisfaction is related to
absenteeism.
HIGH

TURNOVER

JOB ABSENCES
SATISFACTION

LOW
LOW HIGH
TURNOVER AND ABSENCES

RELATIONSHIP OF JOB SATISFACTION, EMPLOYEE TURNOVER AND ABSENCES

EMPLOYEE TURNOVER:
Turnover of employees is the rate at which employees leave the organization within a given
period of time. When an individual feels dissatisfaction in the organization, he tries to
overcome this through the various ways of defense mechanism. If he is not able to do so, he
opts to leave the organization. Thus, in general case, employee turnover is related to job
satisfaction. However, job satisfaction is not the only cause of employee turnover, the other
cause being better opportunity elsewhere.

DIMENSIONS OF JOB SATIFACTION


Job satisfaction is a complex concept and difficult to measure objectively. The level of job
satisfaction is affected by a wide range of variables relating to individual, social, cultural,
organizational factors as stated below:-

DIMENSIONS

INDIVIDUAL SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL


CULTURAL
FACTORS FACTOR

 Individual:- Personality, education, intelligence and abilities, age, marital status,


orientation to work.

 Social factors:-Relationship with co-workers, group working and norms,


opportunities for interaction, informal relations etc.

 Organizational factors:- Nature and size, formal structure, personnel policies and
procedures, industrial relation, nature of work, technology and work organization,
supervision and styles of leadership, management systems, working conditions.

 Environmental factors:-Economic, social, technical and governmental influences.

 Cultural factors:-Attitudes, beliefs and values.

These factors affect job satisfaction of certain individuals in a given set of circumstances
but not necessarily in others. Some workers may be satisfied with certain aspects of their
work and dissatisfied with other aspects .Thus, overall degree of job satisfaction may differ
from person to person.

IMPORTANCE TO STUDY JOB SATISFACTION


The importance to the study of job satisfaction level is very important for executives. Job
satisfaction study importance can be understood by the answer of the following question
1) Is there room for improvement?
2) Who is relatively more dissatisfied?
3) What contributes to the employee satisfaction?
4) What are the effects of negative employee attitudes?

BENEFITS OF JOB SATISFACTION STUDY


Job satisfaction surveys can produce positive, neutral or negative results. If
planned properly and administered, they will usually produce a number of important benefits,
such as-
1. It gives management an indication of general levels of satisfaction in a company.
Surveys also indicate specific areas of satisfaction or dissatisfaction as compared to
employee services and particular group of employee.
2. It leads to valuable communication brought by a job satisfaction survey.
Communication flow in all direction as people plan the survey, take it and discuss the
result. Upward communication is especially fruitful when employee are encouraged to
comment about what is on their minds instead of merely answering questions about
topics important to management.
3. as a survey is safety value, an emotional release. A chance to things gets off. The
survey is an intangible expression of management’s interest in employee welfare,
which gives employees a reason to feel better towards management.
4. Job satisfaction surveys are a useful way to determine certain training needs.
5. Job satisfaction surveys are useful for identifying problem that may arise, comparing
the response to several alternatives and encouraging manager to modify their original
plans. Follow up surveys allows management to evaluate the actual response to a
change and study its success or failure.

IMPORTANCE TO WORKER AND ORGANIZATION

Frequently, work underlies self-esteem and identity while unemployment lowers self-worth and
produces anxiety. At the same time, monotonous jobs can erode a worker's initiative and enthusiasm
and can lead to absenteeism and unnecessary turnover. Job satisfaction and occupational success are
major factors in personal satisfaction, self-respect, self-esteem, and self-development. To the worker,
job satisfaction brings a pleasurable emotional state that often leads to a positive work attitude. A
satisfied worker is more likely to be creative, flexible, innovative, and loyal.
For the organization, job satisfaction of its workers means a work force that is motivated and
committed to high quality performance. Increased productivity the quantity and quality of output per
hour worked seems to be a byproduct of improved quality of working life. It is important to note that
the literature on the relationship between job satisfaction and productivity is neither conclusive nor
consistent.. Unhappy employees, who are motivated by fear of job loss, will not give 100 percent of
their effort for very long. Though fear is a powerful motivator, it is also a temporary one, and as soon
as the threat is lifted performance will decline.

Tangible ways in which job satisfaction benefits the organization include reduction in complaints and
grievances, absenteeism, turnover, and termination; as well as improved punctuality and worker
morale. Job satisfaction is also linked to a more healthy work force and has been found to be a good
indicator of longevity. And although only little correlation has been found between job satisfaction
and productivity, Brown (1996) notes that some employers have found that satisfying or delighting
employees is a prerequisite to satisfying or delighting customers, thus protecting the "bottom line."
No wonder Andrew Carnegie is quoted as saying: "

CREATING JOB SATISFACTION

What are the elements of a job that create job satisfaction? Organizations can help to create job
satisfaction by putting systems in place that will ensure that workers are challenged and then
rewarded for being successful. Organizations that aspire to creating a work environment that
enhances job satisfaction need to incorporate the following:

 Flexible work arrangements, possibly including telecommuting

 Training and other professional growth opportunities

 Interesting work that offers variety and challenge and allows the worker opportunities to
"put his or her signature" on the finished product

 Opportunities to use one's talents and to be creative


 Opportunities to take responsibility and direct one's own work

 A stable, secure work environment that includes job security/continuity

 An environment in which workers are supported by an accessible supervisor who


provides timely feedback as well as congenial team members

 Flexible benefits, such as child-care and exercise facilities

 Up-to-date technology

 Competitive salary and opportunities for promotion

Probably the most important point to bear in mind when considering job satisfaction is that there are
many factors that affect job satisfaction and that what makes workers happy with their jobs varies
from one worker to another and from day to day. Apart from the factors mentioned above, job
satisfaction is also influenced by the employee's personal characteristics, the manager's personal
characteristics and management style, and the nature of the work itself. Managers who want to
maintain a high level of job satisfaction in the work force must try to understand the needs of each
member of the work force.

For example, when creating work teams, managers can enhance worker satisfaction by placing
people with similar backgrounds, experiences, or needs in the same workgroup. Also, managers can
enhance job satisfaction by carefully matching workers with the type of work.

For example, a person who does not pay attention to detail would hardly make a good inspector, and
a shy worker is unlikely to be a good salesperson. As much as possible, managers should match job
tasks to employees' personalities.

Managers who are serious about the job satisfaction of workers can also take other deliberate steps to
create a stimulating work environment. One such step is job enrichment. Job enrichment is a
deliberate upgrading of responsibility, scope, and challenge in the work itself. Job enrichment usually
includes increased responsibility, recognition, and opportunities for growth, learning, and
achievement. Large companies that have used job-enrichment programs to increase employee
motivation and job satisfaction.
Good management has the potential for creating high morale, high productivity, and a sense of
purpose and meaning for the organization and its employees. Empirical findings show that job
characteristics such as pay, promotional opportunity, task clarity and significance, and skills
utilization, as well as organizational characteristics such as commitment and relationship with
supervisors and co-workers, have significant effects on job satisfaction. These job characteristics can
be carefully managed to enhance job satisfaction.

Of course, a worker who takes some responsibility for his or her job satisfaction will probably find
many more satisfying elements in the work environment. Everett (1995) suggests that employees ask
themselves the following questions:

WORKERS' ROLES IN JOB SATISFACTION

If job satisfaction is a worker benefit, surely the worker must be able to contribute to his or her own
satisfaction and well-being on the job. The following suggestions can help a worker find personal job
satisfaction:

 Seek opportunities to demonstrate skills and talents. This often leads to more challenging
work and greater responsibilities, with attendant increases in pay and other recognition.

 Develop excellent communication skills. Employers value and reward excellent reading,
listening, writing, and speaking skills.

 Know more. Acquire new job-related knowledge that helps you to perform tasks more
efficiently and effectively. This will relieve boredom and often gets one noticed.

 Demonstrate creativity and initiative. Qualities like these are valued by most
organizations and often result in recognition as well as in increased responsibilities and
rewards.

 Develop teamwork and people skills. A large part of job success is the ability to work
well with others to get the job done.

 Accept the diversity in people. Accept people with their differences and their
imperfections and learn how to give and receive criticism constructively.
 See the value in your work. Appreciating the significance of what one does can lead to
satisfaction with the work itself. This helps to give meaning to one's existence, thus
playing a vital role in job satisfaction.

 Learn to de-stress. Plan to avoid burnout by developing healthy stress-management


techniques.

ASSURING JOB SATISFACTION

Assuring job satisfaction, over the longterm, requires careful planning and effort both by
management and by workers. Managers are encouraged to consider such theories as
Herzberg's(1957) and Maslow's (1943) Creating a good blend of factors that contribute to a
stimulating, challenging, supportive, and rewarding work environment is vital. Because of the
relative prominence of pay in the reward system, it is very important that salaries be tied to job
responsibilities and that pay increases be tied to performance rather than seniority.

So, in essence, job satisfaction is a product of the events and conditions that people experience on
their jobs. Brief (1998) wrote: "If a person's work is interesting, her pay is fair, her promotional
opportunities are good, her supervisor is supportive, and her coworkers are friendly, then a
situational approach leads one to predict she is satisfied with her job" (p. 91). Very simply put, if the
pleasures associated with one's job outweigh the pains, there is some level of job satisfaction

THEORIES OF JOB SATISFACTION

AFFECT THEORY

Edwin A. Locke’s Range of Affect Theory (1976) is arguably the most famous job
satisfaction model. The main premise of this theory is that satisfaction is determined by a
discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. Further, the theory
states that how much one values a given facet of work (e.g. the degree of autonomy in a
position) moderates how satisfied/dissatisfied one becomes when expectations are/aren’t met.
When a person values a particular facet of a job, his satisfaction is more greatly impacted
both positively (when expectations are met) and negatively (when expectations are not met),
compared to one who doesn’t value that facet. To illustrate, if Employee A values autonomy
in the workplace and Employee B is indifferent about autonomy, then Employee A would be
more satisfied in a position that offers a high degree of autonomy and less satisfied in a
position with little or no autonomy compared to Employee B. This theory also states that too
much of a particular facet will produce stronger feelings of dissatisfaction the more a worker
values that facet.

DISPOSITIONAL THEORY

Another well-known job satisfaction theory is the Dispositional Theory ]. It is a very general
theory that suggests that people have innate dispositions that cause them to have tendencies
toward a certain level of satisfaction, regardless of one’s job. This approach became a notable
explanation of job satisfaction in light of evidence that job satisfaction tends to be stable over
time and across careers and jobs. Research also indicates that identical twins have similar
levels of job satisfaction.

TO HERZBERG FOLLOWING FACTORS ACTS AS MOTIVATORS:

o Achievement,

o Recognition,

o Advancement,

o Work itself,

o Possibility of growth, & Responsibility.

COMPANY PROFILE
Nicrome Shoe Industries Company main productions are work, military and casual
footwear. The company CEO- Gajendra prasath, Managing Director- A. Grishkumar.
The shoes are manufactured in the company's factory that is located in the second industrial
city of Dammam, Eastern Province, and it covers a total area of 15,000 m2.

Nicrome Shoe Industry is major supplier to most of the companies in the Kingdom.
Just to name a few are shoe industry, SABIC, Saudi Arabian Airlines, LUBREF and
others. supplies to Industry Guards. supplies to many Defense Sectors in Gulf States.
Nicrome Shoe Industry was established in 1998 making joint venture with the
American Wolverine company under the name Saudi Shoes Company. In 1994, the Saudi
owners have bought the market share of the American partner so that the company became
totally national company.

In the beginning Nicrome focused only to produce work and military footwear. In
2000, it took a step forward in its development and added a new production line to produce
“comfort shoe” brand for men. Starting from 2005, the company name has been changed to
Saudi Leather Industries Company as a specialized company in all leather industries. The
company went through three stages of expansion. The latest was in 2010, to enhance
production capacity to cover increase in demand.

Today Nicrome Shoe Industry products holds major share in Saudi market for both
work and military footwear sector. Also holds a good share in GCC market. Recently, begin
penetrate to hold share in some African markets.

The vision statement

To be the pioneer manufacturer of safety and military shoes in GCC & Arabian
countries

The mission statement

Nicrome Shoe Industries works hard to satisfy consumers’ needs by making high
quality products, provide the highest level of customer service and continues improvement in
administrative, human and technical resources.

INDUSTRY PROFILE
INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY

A shoe is an item of footwear intended to protect and comfort the human foot while
doing various activities. Shoes are also used as an item of decoration. The design of shoes has
varied enormously through time and from culture to culture, with appearance originally being
tied to function. Additionally, fashion has often dictated many design elements, such as
whether shoes have very high heels or flat ones. Contemporary footwear varies widely in
style, complexity and cost. Basic sandals may consist of only a thin sole and simple strap.
High fashion shoes may be made of very expensive materials in complex construction and
sell for thousands of dollars a pair. Other shoes are for very specific purposes, such
as boots designed specifically for mountaineering or skiing.

Traditionally, shoes have been made from leather, wood or canvas, but are
increasingly made from rubber, plastics, and other petrochemical-derived materials.

Though it has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years in relation to vastly varied
terrain and climate conditions, the human foot is still vulnerable to environmental hazards
such as sharp rocks and hot ground, against which, shoes can protect.

Footwear is a human made outer covering of foot. When the human beings came into
existence, they were required to protect themselves from, cold dampness, dust, heat, and
roughness of ground while standing, walking or even running. So they originate shoes for the
protection of their feet. It is conventionally made out of leather but the aforesaid can be made
with synthetic material. The importance of footwear is highly realised in western and other
countries, so the footwear industry developed in full motion that originated companies like
Nicrome, Adidas, Puma, Reebok etc.

In recent years, there has been a temperament for the footwear sector in the
developing world to become successful in exporting to industrially advanced countries. Local
markets in developing countries for domestically produced footwear have also grown. These
latest trends have resulted in the entrenchment of relatively large scale and capital intensive
plants. Domestic enterprises with less access to technical information have thus tended to
adopt manufacturing methods similar to those in 'turn-key' factories, at the expense of
technologies more suitable to local conditions, especially at low scales of production. In
western countries especially in Europe, the footwear industry has declined in the last few
years. While in 2005, there were about 27.000 firms engaged in footwear industry; in 2008
there were only 24.000. Along with the number of firms, the direct employment has also
decreased. The only factors that remained almost steady were production value and the value
added at factor cost.

Indian footwear sector is one of the major revenue earners in country.


The footwear industry is a significant segment of the leather and
fashion industry in India. Footwear industry is basically labour
intensive and is generally seen that it is concentrated in the small
and cottage sectors.

The Indian footwear industry ranks second among the footwear producing countries
next to China.

India is the world's second largest producer of footwear; its


production estimated over 700 million pairs per annum. At about US $
300 million per year, footwear accounts for 18 percent share of total
exports of leather exports.

Various types of shoes produced and exported from India include dress
shoes, casuals, moccasins, sports shoes, horacchis, sandals,
ballerinas, and booties. Major production centres are Chennai
(Madras), Delhi, Agra, Kanpur, Mumbai (Bombay), Calcutta and
Jalandhar.
Most of the modern footwear manufacturers in India are already
supplying to well established brands in Europe and USA. The large
domestic market and the opportunity to cater to world markets makes
India an attractive destination for technology and investments. Equally relevant is it for the
footwear components industry, at this juncture, it is posed for real growth and diversification.

India is the second largest footwear manufacturer in the world, next


only to China. Nearly 58 percent of the industry, which is by and
large labour intensive and concentrated in the small and cottage
industry sectors, remains unbranded. However, as part of its effort to
play a lead role in the global trade, the Indian leather industry is
now focusing on key deliverables of innovative design, state-of-the-
art production technology and unfailing delivery schedules.

Globally, the trend towards sourcing to countries with low-cost


production continues. Overall, the Far East continues to be the key
area for footwear sourcing, but Eastern Europe (Romania and Bulgaria)
has become more important as closer proximity helps European retailers
to move faster. India and Vietnam are also considered important for
sourcing. India is especially strong in the men’s footwear segment
though the world’s major production is in ladies footwear. This not
only limits the scope for footwear exports, but also points to a huge
potential in the domestic market. Proper branding and promotion can
greatly increase the domestic demand in ladies footwear.

While leather shoes and uppers are concentated in large scale units,
the sandals and chappals are produced in household and cottage sector.
In the case of chappals and sandals, use of non-leather material is
prevalent in the domestic market.

Footwear is the product to protect human feet from effects of all biological damages.
Footwear industry is age old traditional industry in India and it has been changed structurally
into different segments like casual-wears, dress-wears and sportswear. New segment is
emerging for medical purposes as medical-wear like diabetic footwear. Many companies use
to concentrate different segment like men’s-wear, women’s-wear and children’s-wear
separately. Footwear industry has been giving considerable amount of employment to the
nation especially weaker sections and minority sections of society in India. Population
growth, exports, domestic markets are the factors of expansion of footwear industry and
creation of employment opportunities in this sector. This case study reveals the production
capacities, structure of industry, exports growth, global imports, per capita consumption and
estimates of future requirements of human resources in footwear industry in India.
Spanish cave drawings from more than 15,000 years ago show humans with animal
skins or furs wrapped around their feet. The body of a well-preserved “ice-man” nearly 5,000
years old wears leather foot coverings stuffed with straw. Shoes, in some form or another,
have been around for a very long time. The evolution of foot coverings, from the sandal to
present-day athletic shoes that are marvels of engineering, continues even today as we find
new materials with which to cover our feet.

Has the shoe really changed that much though? We are, in fact, still wearing sandals –
the oldest crafted foot covering known to us. Moccasins are still readily available in the form
of the loafer. In fact, many of the shoes we wear today can be traced back to another era.
The Cuban heel may have been named for the dance craze of the 1920s, but the shape can be
seen long before that time. Platform soles, which are one of the most recognisable features of
footwear in the 1970s and 1990s were handed down to us from 16th century chopines. Then,
high soles were a necessity to keep the feet off of the dirty streets. Today, they are worn
strictly for fashion’s sake. The poulaine, with its ridiculously long toes is not that different
from the “winkle-pickers” worn in the 1960s.

If one can deduce that basic shoe shapes have evolved only so much, it is necessary to
discover why this has happened. It is surely not due to a lack of imagination – the colours and
materials of shoes today demonstrate that. Looking at shoes from different parts of the world,
one can see undeniable similarities. While the Venetians were wearing the chopine, the
Japanese balanced on high-soled wooden shoes called geta. Though the shape is slightly
different, the idea remains the same. The Venetians had no contact with the Japanese, so it is
not a case of imitation. Even the mystical Chinese practise of footbinding has been copied
(though to a lesser extent) in our culture. Some European women and men of the past bound
their feet with tape and squashed them into too-tight shoes. In fact, a survey from the early
1990s reported that 88 percent of American women wear shoes that are too small!
As one examines the history of footwear, both in the West and in other parts of the
world, the similarities are apparent. Though the shoemakers of the past never would have
thought to pair a sandal with a platform sole, our shoe fashions of today are, for the most part,
modernised adaptations of past styles.

Middle Ages and Early Modern period

A common casual shoe in the Pyrenees during the Middle Ages were espadrilles.
These are sandals with braided jute soles and a fabric upper portion, and often includes fabric
laces that tie around the ankle. The term is French and comes from the esparto grass. The
shoes originate in the Catalonian region of Spain as early as the 13th century, and were
commonly worn by peasants in the farming communities in the area.[10]
Dutch pattens, ca. 1465. Excavated from the archeological site of Walraversijde,
near Ostend, Belgium

Many medieval shoes were made using the turnshoe method of construction, in which
the upper was turned flesh side out, and was lasted onto the sole and joined to the edge by a
seam. The shoe was then turned inside-out so that the grain was outside. Some shoes were
developed with toggled flaps or drawstrings to tighten the leather around the foot for a better
fit. Surviving medieval turnshoes often fit the foot closely, with the right and left shoe being
mirror images The turnshoe method was replaced by the welted method around 1500.

By the 15th Century, pattens became popular by both men and women in Europe.
These are commonly seen as the predecessor of the modern high-heeled shoe, while the poor
and lower classes in Europe, as well as slaves in the New World, and were barefoot. In the
15th century, the Crakow was fashionable in Europe. This style of shoe is named because it is
thought to have originated in Kraków, the capitol of Poland. The style is characterized by the
point of the shoe, known as the "polaine", which often was supported by a whalebone tied to
the knee to prevent the point getting in the way while walking. Also during the 15th
century, chopines were created in Turkey, and were usually 7-8 inches (17.7-20.3 cm) high.
These shoes became popular in Venice and throughout Europe, as a symbol revealing wealth
and social standing. During the 16th century, royalty started wearing high-heeled shoes to
make them look taller or larger than life, such as Catherine de Medici or Mary I of England.
By 1580, even men wore them, and a person with authority or wealth was often referred to as,
"well-heeled".

Eventually the modern shoe, with a sewn-on sole, was devised. Since the 17th
century, most leather shoes have used a sewn-on sole. This remains the standard for finer-
quality dress shoes today. Until around 1800, welted rand shoes were commonly made
without differentiation for the left or right foot. Such shoes are now referred to as "straights”.
Only gradually did the modern foot-specific shoe become standard.
Industrial era

A shoemaker in the Georgian era, from The Book of English Trades, 1821.

Shoemaking became more commercialized in the mid-18th century, as it expanded as


a cottage industry. Large warehouses began to stock footwear in warehouses, made by many
small manufacturers from the area.

Until the 19th century, shoemaking was a traditional handicraft, but by the century's end, the
process had been almost completely mechanized, with production occurring in large factories.
Despite the obvious economic gains of mass-production, the factory system produced shoes
without the individual differentiation that the traditional shoemaker was able to provide.

The first steps towards mechanization were taken during the Napoleonic Wars by the
engineer, Marc Brunel. He developed machinery for the mass-production of boots for the
soldiers of the British Army. In 1812 he devised a scheme for making nailed-boot-making
machinery that automatically fastened soles to uppers by means of metallic pins or
nails. With the support of the Duke of York, the shoes were manufactured, and, due to their
strength, cheapness, and durability, were introduced for the use of the army. In the same year,
the use of screws and staples was patented by Richard Woodman. Brunel's system was
described by Sir Richard Phillips as a visitor to his factory in Battersea as follows:

By the late 19th century, the shoemaking industry had migrated to the factory and was
increasingly mechanized. Pictured, the bottoming room of the B. F. Spinney & Co. factory
in Lynn, Massachusetts, 1872.
"In another building I was shown his manufactory of shoes, which, like the other, is
full of ingenuity, and, in regard to subdivision of labour, brings this fabric on a level with the
oft-admired manufactory of pins. Every step in it is effected by the most elegant and precise
machinery; while, as each operation is performed by one hand, so each shoe passes through
twenty-five hands, who complete from the hide, as supplied by the currier, a hundred pairs of
strong and well-finished shoes per day. All the details are performed by the ingenious
application of the mechanic powers; and all the parts are characterized by precision,
uniformity, and accuracy. As each man performs but one step in the process, which implies no
knowledge of what is done by those who go before or follow him, so the persons employed
are not shoemakers, but wounded soldiers, who are able to learn their respective duties in a
few hours. The contract at which these shoes are delivered to Government is 6s. 6d. per pair,
being at least 2s. Less than what was paid previously for an unequal and cobbled article."
However, when the war ended in 1815, manual labour became much cheaper, and the
demand for military equipment subsided. As a consequence, Brunel's system was no longer
profitable and it soon ceased business.
Similar exigencies at the time of the Crimean War stimulated a renewed interest in
methods of mechanization and mass-production, which proved longer lasting. A shoemaker
in Leicester, Tomas Crick, patented the design for a riveting machine in 1853. His machine
used an iron plate to push iron rivets into the sole. The process greatly increased the speed
and efficiency of production. He also introduced the use of steam-powered rolling-
machinesfor hardening leather and cutting-machines, in the mid-1850s.

Advertisement in an 1896 issue of McClure’s for "The Regal".


The sewing machine was introduced in 1846, and provided an alternative method for
the mechanization of shoemaking. By the late 1850s, the industry was beginning to shift
towards the modern factory, mainly in the US and areas of England. A shoe stitching
machine was invented by the American Lyman Blake in 1856 and perfected by 1864.
Entering in to partnership with McKay, his device became known as the McKay stitching
machine and was quickly adopted by manufacturers throughout New England. As
bottlenecks opened up in the production line due to these innovations, more and more of
the manufacturing stages, such as pegging and finishing, became automated. By the
1890s, the process of mechanization was largely complete.

Since the mid-20th Century, advances in rubber, plastics, synthetic cloth, and
industrial adhesives have allowed manufacturers to create shoes that stray considerably
from traditional crafting techniques. Leather, which had been the primary material in
earlier styles, has remained standard in expensive dress shoes, but athletic shoes often
have little or no real leather. Soles, which were once laboriously hand-stitched on, are
now more often machine stitched or simply glued on. Many of these newer materials,
such as rubber and plastics, have made shoes less biodegradable. It is estimated that most
mass-produced shoes require 1000 years to degrade in a landfill.[26] In the late 2000s,
some shoemakers picked up on the issue and began to produce shoes made entirely
from degradable materials, such as the Nicrome Considered.

In 2007, the global shoe industry had an overall market of $107.4 billion, in terms
of revenue, and is expected to grow to $122.9 billion by the end of 2012. Shoe
manufacturers in the People's Republic of China account for 63% of production, 40.5%
of global exports and 55% of industry revenue. However, many manufacturers
in Europe dominate the higher-priced, higher value-added end of the market.

Culture and folklore

Haines Shoe House in Hallam, Pennsylvania


As an integral part of human culture and civilization, shoes have found their way into
our culture, folklore, and art. A popular 18th centurynursery rhyme is There was an Old
Woman Who Lived in a Shoe. This story tells about an old woman living in a shoe with a
lot of children. In 1948, Mahlon Haines, a shoe salesman in Hallam, Pennsylvania, built
an actual house shaped like a work boot as a form of advertisement. The Haines Shoe
House was rented to newlyweds and the elderly until his death in 1962. Since then, it has
served as anice cream parlor, a bed and breakfast, and a museum. It still stands today and
is a popular roadside attraction.

Shoes also play an important role in the fairy tales Cinderella and The Red Shoes. In
the movie adaption of the children's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a pair of red ruby
slippers play a key role in the plot. The 1985 comedy The Man with One Red
Shoe features an eccentric man wearing one normal business shoe and one red shoe that
becomes central to the plot.

Sports shoes in Hong Kong

Athletic sneaker collection has also existed as a part of urban subculture in the United
States for several decades. Recent decades have seen this trend spread to European
nations such as the Czech Republic. A Sneakerhead is a person who owns multiple pairs
of shoes as a form of collection and fashion. A contributor to the growth of sneaker
collecting is the continued worldwide popularity of the Air Jordan line of sneakers
designed by Nicrome for Basketball star Michael Jordan.

In the Holy Bible's Old Testament, the shoe is used to symbolize something that is
worthless or of little value. In the New Testament, the act of removing one's shoes
symbolizes servitude. Ancient Semitic-speaking peoples regarded the act of removing
their shoes as a mark of reverence when approaching a sacred person or place. In
the Book of Exodus, Moses was instructed to remove his shoes before approaching the
burning bush:
Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest [is] holy
ground (Exodus 3:5).

Salt Crystal Shoes, art installation at the Dead Sea by Israeli artist Sigalit Landau

The removal of the shoe also symbolizes the act of giving up a legal right.
In Hebrew custom, the widow removed the shoe of her late husband's brother to
symbolize that he had abandoned his duty. In Arab custom, the removal of one's shoe also
symbolized the dissolution of marriage.

In Arab culture, showing the sole of one's shoe is considered an insult, and to throw a
shoe and hit someone with it is considered an even greater insult. Shoes are considered to
be dirty as they frequently touch the ground, and are associated with the lowest part of
the body — the foot. As such, shoes are forbidden in mosques, and it is also considered
unmannerly to cross the legs and display the soles of one's shoes to someone when
talking to them. This insult was demonstrated in Iraq, first when Saddam Hussein's statue
was toppled in 2003, Iraqis gathered around it and struck the statue with their shoes.
[34]
Secondly, in 2008, United States President George W. Bush had a shoe thrown at him
by a journalist as a statement against the war that was brought to Iraq and the lives that it
has cost. More generally,shoe-throwing or shoeing, showing the sole of one's shoe or
using shoes to insult are forms of protest in many parts of the world. Incidents where
shoes were thrown at political figures have taken place
in Australia, India, Ireland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Pakistan, the United Kingdom,
the United States, and most notably the Arab world.

Empty shoes may also symbolize death. In Greek culture, empty shoes are the
equivalent of the American funeral wreath. For example, empty shoes placed outside of a
Greek home would tell others that the family's son has died in battle. [38] At an observation
memorializing the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, 3,000 pairs of empty
shoes were used to recognize those killed.

The Shoes on the Danube Bank is a memorial in Budapest, Hungary. Conceived by


film director Can Togay, he created it on the east bank of the Danube River with
sculptor Gyula Pauer to honor the Jews who were killed by fascist Arrow
Cross militiamen in Budapest during World War II. They were ordered to take off their
shoes, and were shot at the edge of the water so that their bodies fell into the river and
were carried away. The memorial represents their shoes left behind on the bank.

Shoe construction

See also: Shoe insert and Arch support

Parts of a shoe

The basic anatomy of a shoe is recognizable, regardless of the specific style of footwear.

A shoemaker making turnshoes at the Roscheider Hof Open Air Museum

All shoes have a sole, which is the bottom of a shoe, in contact with the ground. Soles
can be made from a variety of materials, although most modern shoes have soles made
from natural rubber, polyurethane, or polyvinyl chloride (PVC) compounds.[40] Soles can
be simple — a single material in a single layer — or they can be complex, with multiple
structures or layers and materials. When various layers are used, soles may consist of
an insole, midsole, and an outsole.

The insole is the interior bottom of a shoe, which sits directly beneath the foot under
the footbed (also known as sock liner). The purpose of insole is to attach to the lasting
margin of the upper, which is wrapped around the last during the closing of the shoe
during the lasting operation. Insoles are usually made of cellulosic paper board or
synthetic non woven insole board. Many shoes have removable and replaceable footbeds.
Extra cushioning is often added for comfort (to control the shape, moisture, or smell of
the shoe) or health reasons (to help deal with differences in the natural shape of the foot
or positioning of the foot during standing or walking).

The outsole is the layer in direct contact with the ground. Dress shoes often have
leather or resin rubber outsoles; casual or work-oriented shoes have outsoles made of
natural rubber or a synthetic material like polyurethane. The outsole may comprise a
single piece, or may be an assembly of separate pieces, often of different materials. On
some shoes, the heel of the sole has a rubber plate for durability and traction, while the
front is leather for style. Specialized shoes will often have modifications on this design:
athletic or so called cleated shoes like soccer, rugby, baseball and golf shoes have spikes
embedded in the outsole to improve traction.

The midsole is the layer in between the outsole and the insole, typically there for
shock absorption. Some types of shoes, like running shoes, have additional material for
shock absorption, usually beneath the heel of the foot, where one puts the most pressure
down. Some shoes may not have a midsole at all.

The heel is the bottom rear part of a shoe. Its function is to support the heel of the
foot. They are often made of the same material as the sole of the shoe. This part can be
high for fashion or to make the person look taller, or flat for a more practical and
comfortable use.[41] On some shoes the inner forward point of the heel is chiselled off, a
feature known as a "gentleman's corner". This piece of design is intended to alleviate the
problem of the points catching the bottom of trousers and was first observed in the 1930s.

The upper helps hold the shoe onto the foot. In the simplest cases, such as sandals or
flip-flops, this may be nothing more than a few straps for holding the sole in place.
Closed footwear, such as boots, trainers and most men's shoes, will have a more complex
upper. This part is often decorated or is made in a certain style to look attractive. The
upper is connected to the sole by a strip of leather, rubber, or plastic that is stitched
between it and the sole, known as a welt.

Most uppers have a mechanism, such as laces, straps with buckles, zippers, elastic,
velcro straps, buttons, or snaps, for tightening the upper on the foot. Uppers with laces
usually have a tongue that helps seal the laced opening and protect the foot from abrasion
by the laces. Uppers with laces also have eyelets or hooks to make it easier to tighten and
loosen the laces and to prevent the lace from tearing through the upper material.
An aglet is the protective wrapping on the end of the lace.

The vamp is the front part of the shoe, starting behind the toe, extending around the
eyelets and tongue and towards back part of the shoe.

The medial is the part of the shoe closest to a person's center of symmetry, and
the lateral is on the opposite side, away from their center of symmetry. This can be in
reference to either the outsole or the vamp. Most shoes have shoelaces on the upper,
connecting the medial and lateral parts after one puts their shoes on and aiding in keeping
their shoes on their feet. In 1968, Puma SE introduced the first pair of sneakers
with Velcro straps in lieu of shoelaces, and these became popular by the 1980s, especially
among children and the elderly.

The toe box is the part that covers and protects the toes. People with toe deformities,
or individuals who experience toe swelling (such as long distance runners) usually
require a larger toe box.[45]

sport of roller skating. Similarly, ice skates have a metal blade attached to the bottom for
locomotion across ice. Skate shoes have also been designed to provide a comfortable,
flexible and durable shoe for the sport of skateboarding.[58] Climbing shoes are rubber-
soled, tight-fitting shoes designed to fit in the small cracks and crevices for rock
climbing. Cycling shoes are similarly designed with rubber soles and a tight fit, but also
are equipped with a metal or plastic cleat to interface withclipless pedals, as well as a stiff
sole to maximize power transfer and support the foot.

Boot

A pair of steel-toed safety boots


Main article: Boot

A boot is a special type of shoe which covers the foot and the ankle and extends up
the leg, sometimes as far as the knee or even the hip. Most boots have a heel that is
clearly distinguishable from the rest of the sole, even if the two are made of one piece.
They are typically made of leather or rubber, although they may be made from a variety
of different materials. Boots are worn both for their functionality — protecting the foot
and leg from water, snow, mud or hazards or providing additional ankle support for
strenuous activities — as well as for reasons of style and fashion.

Cowboy boots are a specific style of riding boot which combines function with
fashion. They became popular among cowboys in the western United States during the
19th century. Traditional cowboy boots have a Cuban heel, rounded to pointed toe, high
shaft, and, traditionally, no lacing. They are normally made from cowhide leather but may
be made from more exotic skins such as ostrich, anaconda, or elephant skins.

Hiking boots are designed to provide extra ankle and arch support, as well as extra
padding for comfort during hiking. They are constructed to provide comfort for miles of
walking over rough terrains, and protect the hiker's feet against water, mud, rocks, and
other wilderness obstacles. These boots support the ankle to avoid twisting but do not
restrict the ankle's movement too much. They are fairly stiff to support the foot. A
properly fitted boot and/or friction-reducing patches applied to troublesome areas ensures
protection against blisters and other discomforts associated with long hikes on rugged
terrain.

During wet or snowy weather, snow boots are worn to keep the foot warm and dry.
They are typically made of rubber or other water-resistant material, have multiple layers
of insulation, and a high heel to keep snow out. Boots may also be attached
to snowshoes to increase the distribution of weight over a larger surface area for walking
in snow. Ski boots are a specialized snow boot which are used in alpine or cross-country
skiing and designed to provide a way to attach the skier to his/her skis using ski bindings.
The ski/boot/binding combination is used to effectively transmit control inputs from the
skier's legs to the snow. Ice skates are another specialized boot with a metal blade
attached to the bottom which is used to propel the wearer across a sheet of ice. Inline
skates are similar to ice skates but with a set of three to four wheels in lieu of the blade,
which are designed to mimic ice skating on solid surfaces such as wood or concrete.
Boots are designed to withstand heavy wear to protect the wearer and provide good
traction. They are generally made from sturdy leather uppers and non-leather outsoles.
They may be used for uniforms of the police or military, as well as for protection in
industrial settings such as mining and construction. Protective features may include steel-
tipped toesand soles or ankle guards.

Dress and casual

Dress shoes are characterized by smooth and supple leather uppers, leather soles, and
narrow sleek figure. Casual shoes are characterized by sturdy leather uppers, non-leather
outsoles, and wide profile.

Some designs of dress shoes can be worn by either gender. The majority of dress
shoes have an upper covering, commonly made of leather, enclosing most of the lower
foot, but not covering the ankles. This upper part of the shoe is often made without
apertures or openings, but may also be made with openings or even itself consist of a
series of straps, e.g. an open toe featured in women's shoes. Shoes with uppers made high
to cover the ankles are also available; a shoe with the upper rising above the ankle is
usually considered a boot but certain styles may be referred to as high-topped shoes
or high-tops. Usually, a high-topped shoe is secured by laces or zippers, although some
styles have elastic inserts to ease slipping the shoe on.

Men's

Women's
High heel sandals

There is a large variety of shoes available for women, in addition to most of the men's
styles being more accepted as unisex. Some broad categories are:

 High-heeled footwear is footwear that raises the heels, typically 2 inches (5 cm) or
more above the toes, commonly worn by women for formal occasions or social
outings. Variants include kitten heels (typically 1½-2 inches high) and stilletto
heels (with a very narrow heel post) and wedge heels (with a wedge-shaped sole
rather than a heel post).

 Mules are shoes or slippers with no fitting around the heel (i.e. they are backless)

 Slingbacks are shoes which are secured by a strap behind the heel, rather than over
the top of the foot.

 Ballet flats, known in the UK as ballerinas, ballet pumps or skimmers, are shoes
with a very low heel and a relatively short vamp, exposing much of the instep. They
are popular for warm-weather wear, and may be seen as more comfortable than shoes
with a higher heel.

 Court shoes, known in the United States as pumps, are typically high-heeled, slip-on
dress shoes.
Women's high heel pump

Unisex

 Clog

 Platform shoe: shoe with very thick soles and heels

 Sandals: open shoes consisting of a sole and various straps, leaving much of the foot
exposed to air. They are thus popular for warm-weather wear, because they let the
foot be cooler than a closed-toed shoe would.

 Saddle shoe: leather shoe with a contrasting saddle-shaped band over the instep,
typically white uppers with black "saddle".

 Slip-on shoe: a dress or casual shoe without shoelaces or fasteners; often with tassels,
buckles, or coin-holders (penny loafers).

 Boat shoes, also known as "deck shoes": similar to a loafer, but more casual. Laces
are usually simple leather with no frills. Typically made of leather and featuring a soft
white sole to avoid marring or scratching a boat deck. The first boat shoe was
invented in 1935 by Paul A. Sperry.
Slippers: For indoor use, commonly worn with pajamas
CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
 Report of National Commission on Employee (2002), Government of India, made
recommendations in the area of Employee Job Satisfaction which include social
security, extending the application of the Provident Fund, gratuity and unemployment
insurance etc. Shobha, Mishra & Manju Bhagat, in their “Principles for Successful
Implementation of Employee Job Satisfaction”, stated that Employee absenteeism in
Indian industries can be reduced to a great extent by provision of good housing, health
and family care, canteen, educational and training facilities and provision of Job
Satisfaction activities.

 A. Sabarirajan, T. Meharajan, B.Arun (2001) analyzed the study on employee Job


Satisfaction in industry. The study shows that 15% of the employees are employees
are satisfied with their Job Satisfaction.39 % of the employees is average with their
Job Satisfaction. 16% of them are in highly dissatisfied level. This study throws light
on the impact of Job Satisfaction on QWL among the employees of district.” While
describing the Job Satisfaction in , A.J.Todd (1933) was analyzed that the Employee
Job Satisfaction is the voluntary efforts of the employers to establish, within the
existing industrial system, working and sometimes living and cultural conditions of
the employees beyond what is required by law, the custom of the industry and the
conditions of the market.

 V. V. Gir+i National Employee Institute(1999-2000), a fully funded autonomous


body of the Ministry of Employee, it was conducted action-oriented research and
provides training to grass root level workers in the trade union movement, both in the
urban and rural areas, and also to officers dealing with industrial relations, personal
management, EmployeeJob Satisfaction, etc.

 In the view of K.K. Chaudhuri, in his “Human Resources: A Relook to the


Workplace”, states that HR policies are being made flexible. From leaves to
compensations, perks to office facilities, many companies are willing to customize
policies to suit different employee segments.

 Conventions and Recommendations of ILO (1949) sets forth a fundamental


principle at its 26th conference held in Philadelphia recommended some of the
measures in the area of Job Satisfaction which includes adequate protection for life
and health of workers in all occupations, provision for child Job Satisfaction and
maternity protection, provision of adequate nutrition, housing and facilities for
recreation and culture, the assurance of equality of educational and vocational
opportunity etc.

 A Study done by P.R. China in 2003, Great expectations are being placed on firms
to act with increasing social responsibility, which is adding a new dimension to the
role of management and the vision of companies. They argue that social Job
Satisfaction activities are strategic investments for firm. They can create intangible
assets that help companies overcome entry barriers, facilitate globalization, and
outcompete local rivals. They are simple contribution, topic contribution,
collaboration with non-profit organizations or government organizations, and
establishment of corporation charity fund.
 Future research on corporate citizenship would be strengthened in philanthropic
strategy and management.

CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
A Research design is simply the framework or plan for a study. The design may be a specific
presentation of the various steps in the process of Research. For this descriptive design was
used. Descriptive research includes survey and fact finding enquiries of different kinds. The
major purpose of descriptive research is description of the state of affairs, as it exists at
present. In this method the researcher has no control over the variables. He / She can only
report what has happened and what is happening.

RESEARCH DESIGN
The methodology adapted to collecting information from a sample size of 100
respondents by using simple random sampling technique, in order to analyze and interpret the
respondent’s opinions and views with respect to the Job Satisfaction provided by NICROME
LEATHER PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI

DATA COLLECTION
The entire study is based on both the primary data and Secondary data.
PRIMARY DATA:
For collecting the primary data, the questionnaire method was employed. Each respondent
was given a questionnaire and they answered it and returned back in two weeks’ time.
 Questionnaire: A Questionnaire has been prepared and distributed among the
respondents (employees) for both executives and non-executives.
 Interview: Personal Interview and interaction with the respondents (employees).
 Observation: by observing the working environment.

SECONDARY DATA
For secondary data the researcher depends on various company records, websites and
journals etc. The secondary data is that which have been already collected by someone or else
which have been passed through statistical data can be categorized into two broad categories
named published and unpublished statistics.

PILOT SURVEY:
Pilot survey was conducted with the employees of the organization is helped the researcher to
have incite to the strength and weakness of questionnaires. The resold pilot survey suggestion
obtained from experience employees uncertain changes were made the questionnaires pilot
survey also enable the researcher would take time and administrator the questionnaires.

SAMPLING DESIGN

The total number of employees working in “NICROME LEATHER PROCESSING


INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI. ” is 110. The total number of questionnaires issued to the
employees is 60 but only questionnaires were used for the study.

DATA SOURCES
Primary data was collected by the questionnaire based marked survey. Secondary data was
obtained from journals, magazines newspapers, books and the internet.

RESEARCH INSTRUMENT
For doing the survey research, structured questionnaire with both open ended and close end
equations were used.

DATAANALYSIS:
The mode of survey was personal interview with the respondents during the filling up of the
questionnaire.

SAMPLING TECHNIQUES:
The sampling used for this study was probability sampling. Since the study is only meant
for certain specific categories within the total population, a stratified random
sample was used. Three groups of categories have been taken into account viz.
students professionals and general public.

SAMPLE SIZE
A sample size of 100 respondents is used for the study.

TOOLS OF THE STUDY


HYPOTHESIS STUDY
Percentage analysis and chi-square are used for analyzing the data collected.
Percentages are obtained when ratios are multiplied by 150

No. of respondents
Percentage of respondents = ---------------------------- X 100
Total No.of respondents
CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS:
Chi-square test = (O-E)2/E
Degrees of freedom = V = (r-1) (C-1)
Where O = Observed Frequency
E = Expected Frequency
R = Number of rows
C = Number of columns
Level of significance = 5%.

OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY


 The study has been designed with the following objects

 To know awareness about the concept of “Employee job satisfaction”

 To know employees Job Satisfaction strategies in this company of employees.

 To give suggestions to improve the labor job satisfaction in the company. Ensure
continuous development of human Resources.

 To maintain good relationship between the management and workers.


 To find out various job satisfaction

 Facilities provided at the Company.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY


 The study "Employee job satisfaction” provided by NICROME LEATHER
PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI has thrown light to the Job Satisfaction
of employee who marks in the organization.
 This study wills help the top management to improve their labor Job Satisfaction in
favorable for employees of NICROME LEATHER PROCESSING INDUSTRY
AT CHENNAI.
 The Study covers the whole organization is taken into consideration and the survey is
conducted among the workers through the Questionnaire and also present study is
restricted to NICROME LEATHER PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI
and data is analyzed based on the information provided by employees of the
NICROME LEATHER PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI

LIMITATION OF THE STUDY:

 As the study revolves around the reward system of the organization and in spite of
keeping serious and sincere efforts there are several limitations. There are as follows.

 The information is collected by 110 employees only.

 The investigation access to the staff was limited due to the shift system.

 Information received from the respondents neither may not be accurate. So the
received information will not give a true and fair view of the actual position.

 Due to time constraint, the research work has been undertaken within the stipulated
time of 3 weeks

 Due to time limitation, sample size for the project study is limited to only 110
laborers.
CHAPTER IV
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
TABLE 4.1
AGE OF THE RESPONDENT

Age
Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative
cy Percent Percent
Below-20 12 12.0 12.0 12.0
20-30 50 50.0 50.0 62.0
30-40 25 25.0 25.0 87.0
Valid
40-50 9 9.0 9.0 96.0
50 and above 4 4.0 4.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyze that the 12% of the respondent are aged between below
20 years, 50% of the respondent are aged between 20-30 years, 25% of the respondent are
aged between 30-40 years, 09% of the respondent are aged between 40-50 years, 4% of the
respondent are aged between 50 years and above.
CHART 4.1
AGE OF THE RESPONDENT

Age
TABLE 4.2
GENDER OF THE RESPONDENT

Gender
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Male 56 56.0 56.0 56.0
Female 43 43.0 43.0 99.0
Valid
Others 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 56 % of the respondent are male and 43% of the
respondent are female.

CHART 4.2
GENDER OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.3
EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

Educationalqualification
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid SSLC/ITI 15 15.0 15.0 15.0
HSC / DIPLOMA 36 36.0 36.0 51.0
Graduate / BE 39 39.0 39.0 90.0
Post graduate ME 10 10.0 10.0 100.0
/M.TECH
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 15% of the respondent are qualified that
SSLC/ITI , 36% of the respondent are qualified that HSC / DIPLOMA , 39 % of the
respondent are qualified that Graduate / BE , 10% of the respondent are qualified that Post
graduate ME /M.TECH.

CHART 4.3
EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
TABLE 4.4
MONTHLY SALARY OF THE RESPONDENT

Monthlysalary
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Below 20000 38 38.0 38.0 38.0
20000-30000 17 17.0 17.0 55.0
30000-40000 30 30.0 30.0 85.0
40000-50000 12 12.0 12.0 97.0
50000 & 3 3.0 3.0 100.0
above
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 38 % of the respondents monthly income is
below 20000, 17% of the respondents monthly income is 20000-30000, 30% of the
respondents monthly income is 30000-40000, 12% of the respondents monthly income is
40000-50000 and 03% of the respondents monthly income is 50000 and above.

CHART 4.4
MONTHLY SALARY OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.5
EXPERIENCE OF THE EMPLOYEE

Experience
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Below 5 45 45.0 45.0 45.0
5-10 29 29.0 29.0 74.0
10-15 25 25.0 25.0 99.0
Valid 20 and 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
above
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 45 % of the respondent are says that they have on
working the below 5 years experience, 29% of the respondent are says that they have on
working the below 5-10 years experience, 25 of the respondent are says that they have on
working the below 10-15 years experience, 01 % of the respondent are says that they have on
working the below 20 years and above experience in this company.

CHART 4.5
EXPERIENCE OF THE EMPLOYEE
TABLE 4.6
AWARENESS TOWARDS THE STATUTORY AND NON-STATUTORY EMPLOYEE
JOB SATISFACTION MEASURES IN THIS COMPANY

Awareness
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Yes 79 79.0 79.0 79.0
Valid No 21 21.0 21.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 79 % of the respondent are satisfied with the
Awareness towards the statutory and non-statutory employee Job Satisfaction
measures in this company and 21% of the respondent are not satisfied.

CHART 3.6
AWARENESS TOWARDS THE STATUTORY AND NON-STATUTORY EMPLOYEE
JOB SATISFACTION MEASURES IN THIS COMPANY
TABLE 4.7
ADEQUATE CANTEEN FACILITIES HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY

Adequatecanteenfacilities
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 2 2.0 2.0 2.0
disagree
Disagree 10 10.0 10.0 12.0
Valid Neutral 31 31.0 31.0 43.0
Agree 55 55.0 55.0 98.0
Strongly agree 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 02% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the canteen facilities has been provided by the company, 10% of the respondent were
disagreed, 31% of the respondent are said that neutral and 55% of the respondent are agree
with the canteen facilities has been provided by the company, 2 % of the respondent are were
strongly agree.

CHART 4.7
ADEQUATE CANTEEN FACILITIES HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY
TABLE 4.8
SUFFICIENT TRANSPORT AND PARKING FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE

Transportandparkingfacilities
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 5 5.0 5.0 5.0
disagree
Disagree 11 11.0 11.0 16.0
Valid Neutral 22 22.0 22.0 38.0
Agree 54 54.0 54.0 92.0
Strongly agree 8 8.0 8.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 05% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Sufficient Transport and parking facilities are available by the company, 11% of the
respondent were disagreed, 22% of the respondent are said that neutral and 54% of the
respondent are agree with the parking facilities has been provided by the company, 8 % of the
respondent are were strongly agree.

CHART 4.8
SUFFICIENT TRANSPORT AND PARKING FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE
TABLE 4.9
QUALITY OF UNIFORM AND ID CARD PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY

Quality
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 9 9.0 9.0 9.0
disagree
Disagree 13 13.0 13.0 22.0
Valid Neutral 20 20.0 20.0 42.0
Agree 44 44.0 44.0 86.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 09% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the quality of uniform and id card provided by the company, 13% of the respondent were
disagreed, 20 % of the respondent are said that neutral and 44% of the respondent are agree
with the quality of uniform and id card provided by the company, 14% of the respondent are
were strongly agree.

CHART 4.9
QUALITY OF UNIFORM AND ID CARD PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY
TABLE 4.10
SUFFICIENT REST ROOM/WASH ROOMS/RECREATIONAL FACILITIES ARE
PROVIDED

Restroomfacilities
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 8 8.0 8.0 8.0
disagree
Disagree 16 16.0 16.0 24.0
Neutral 15 15.0 15.0 39.0
Agree 51 51.0 51.0 90.0
Strongly agree 10 10.0 10.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 08% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the rest room/wash rooms/Recreational provided by the company, 16% of the respondent
were disagree the rest room/wash rooms/Recreational facilities, 15% of the respondent are
said that neutral and 51% of the respondent are agree with rest room/wash
rooms/Recreational provided by the company, 10% of the respondent are were strongly agree.

CHART 4.10
SUFFICIENT REST ROOM/WASH ROOMS/RECREATIONAL FACILITIES ARE
PROVIDED
TABLE 4.11
ADEQUATE EMPLOYEE COUNSELING IS PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY

Employeecounseling
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 1 1.0 1.0 1.0
disagree
Disagree 14 14.0 14.0 15.0
Valid Neutral 24 24.0 24.0 39.0
Agree 52 52.0 52.0 91.0
Strongly agree 9 9.0 9.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 01% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Employee counseling provided by the company, 14% of the respondent were disagreed,
24% of the respondent are said that neutral and 52% of the respondent are says that they
agree and 09% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree the Employee counselling
provided by the company.

CHART 4.11
ADEQUATE EMPLOYEE COUNSELING IS PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY
TABLE 4.12
ATTITUDE OF THE EMPLOYEES TOWARDS JOB SATISFACTION FACILITIES
ADOPTED BY THE ORGANIZATION

Jobsatisfactionfacilities
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 10 10.0 10.0 10.0
disagree
Disagree 6 6.0 6.0 16.0
Neutral 20 20.0 20.0 36.0
Agree 59 59.0 59.0 95.0
Strongly agree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 10% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the employees towards Job Satisfaction provided by the company, 06% of the respondent
were disagreed, 20% of the respondent are said that neutral and 59% of the respondent are
says that they agree and 05% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree the
employees towards Job Satisfaction provided by the company.

CHART 4.12
ATTITUDE OF THE EMPLOYEES TOWARDS JOB SATISFACTION FACILITIES
ADOPTED BY THE ORGANIZATION
TABLE 4.13
SAFETY FACILITIES AND STANDARDS ADOPTED IN COMPANY ARE
ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY TO EMPLOYEES AND THUS PREVENTING
THE ACCIDENT

Preventingtheaccident
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 12 12.0 12.0 19.0
Valid Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 42.0
Agree 41 41.0 41.0 83.0
Strongly agree 17 17.0 17.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Safety facilities and standards adopted provided by the company, 12% of the respondent
were disagreed, 23% of the respondent are said that neutral that Safety facilities and
standards adopted and 41% of the respondent are says that they agree and 17% of the
respondent are says that they strongly agree the Safety facilities and standards adopted
.provided by the company.

CHART 4.13
SAFETY FACILITIES AND STANDARDS ADOPTED IN COMPANY ARE
ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY TO EMPLOYEES AND THUS PREVENTING
THE ACCIDENT

TABLE 4.14
SUFFICIENT PROVISION OF SAFETY EQUIPMENTS (GLASSES, MASKS,
HELMETS, SHOES ETC) PROVIDED TO THE EMPLOYEES DURING WORK

Sufficientprovision
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 12 12.0 12.0 12.0
disagree
Disagree 14 14.0 14.0 26.0
Neutral 30 30.0 30.0 56.0
Valid
Agree 30 30.0 30.0 86.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 12% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the safety equipments provided by the company, 14% of the respondent were disagreed, 30%
of the respondent are said that neutral that safety equipments provided and 30% of the
respondent are says that they agree and 14% of the respondent are says that they strongly
agree that safety equipments provided by the company.

CHART 4.14
SUFFICIENT PROVISION OF SAFETY EQUIPMENTS (GLASSES, MASKS,
HELMETS, SHOES ETC) PROVIDED TO THE EMPLOYEES DURING WORK
TABLE 4.15
SATISFACTORY WORKING CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO VENTILATION,
LIGHTING, TEMPERATURE, SEATING ARRANGEMENT, SPACING OF
MACHINERY AND CLEANLINESS INSIDE WORKING PREMISES ARE
PROVIDED

Workingpremises
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 5 5.0 5.0 5.0
disagree
Disagree 10 10.0 10.0 15.0
Neutral 24 24.0 24.0 39.0
Agree 44 44.0 44.0 83.0
Strongly agree 17 17.0 17.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 05% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Working conditions provided by the company, 10% of the respondent were disagreed,
24% of the respondent are said that neutral and 44% of the respondent are says that they
agree and 17% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree .

CHART 4.15
SATISFACTORY WORKING CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO VENTILATION,
LIGHTING, TEMPERATURE, SEATING ARRANGEMENT, SPACING OF
MACHINERY AND CLEANLINESS INSIDE WORKING PREMISES ARE
PROVIDED
TABLE 4.16
I AM VERY MUCH INVOLVED PERSONALLY IN MY JOB

Involvedpersonally
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
disagree
Disagree 7 7.0 7.0 13.0
Valid Neutral 28 28.0 28.0 41.0
Agree 45 45.0 45.0 86.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0
INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 06% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the very much involved personally in my job, 07% of the respondent were disagreed, 28% of
the respondent are said that neutral and 45 % of the respondent are says that they agree with
very much involved personally in my job and 14% of the respondent are says that they
strongly agree with very much involved personally in my job.

CHART 4.16
I AM VERY MUCH INVOLVED PERSONALLY IN MY JOB
TABLE 4.17
I LIKE THE NATURE WORKS THAT I DO

Natureworks
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 9 9.0 9.0 16.0
Valid Neutral 19 19.0 19.0 35.0
Agree 59 59.0 59.0 94.0
Strongly agree 6 6.0 6.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the I like the nature works that i do , 09% of the respondent were disagreed, 19% of the
respondent are said that neutral and 59% of the respondent are says that they agree with I like
the nature works that i do and 06% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree with I
like the nature works that i do.

CHART 4.17
I LIKE THE NATURE WORKS THAT I DO
TABLE 4.18
MY WORK GIVES ME A SENSE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT

Senseofaccomplishment
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 11 11.0 11.0 11.0
disagree
Disagree 13 13.0 13.0 24.0
Valid Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 51.0
Agree 44 44.0 44.0 95.0
Strongly agree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 11% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the work gives me a sense of Accomplishment, 13% of the respondent were disagreed, 27%
of the respondent are said that neutral and 44% of the respondent are says that they agree
with and 05% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree.

CHART 4.18
MY WORK GIVES ME A SENSE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT
TABLE 4.19
I AM PROUD TO SAY THAT I WORKS AT SEARS

Worksatsears
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 15 15.0 15.0 15.0
disagree
Disagree 18 18.0 18.0 33.0
Valid Neutral 49 49.0 49.0 82.0
Agree 16 16.0 16.0 98.0
Strongly agree 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 15% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the I am proud to say that i works at sears , 18% of the respondent were disagreed, 49% of
the respondent are said that neutral and 16% of the respondent are says that they agree with
and 02% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree

CHART 3.19
I AM PROUD TO SAY THAT I WORKS AT SEARS
TABLE 4.20
THE AMOUNT OF WORK I AM EXPECTED SO DO INFLUENCE MY OVERALL
ATTITUDE ABOUT THE JOB POSITIVELY

Overallattitude
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 9 9.0 9.0 16.0
Valid Neutral 29 29.0 29.0 45.0
Agree 46 46.0 46.0 91.0
Strongly agree 9 9.0 9.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the influence my overall attitude about the job positively, 09% of the respondent were
disagreed, 29% of the respondent are said that neutral and 46% of the respondent are says
that they agree with influence my overall attitude about the job positively and 09% of the
respondent are says that they strongly agree.

CHART 4.20
THE AMOUNT OF WORK I AM EXPECTED SO DO INFLUENCE MY OVERALL
ATTITUDE ABOUT THE JOB POSITIVELY
TABLE 4.21
MY PHYSICAL WORKING CONDITION INFLUENCE MY GENERAL ATTITUDE
OF JOB SATISFACTION

Generalattitude
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 5 5.0 5.0 5.0
disagree
Disagree 4 4.0 4.0 9.0
Neutral 30 30.0 30.0 39.0
Agree 52 52.0 52.0 91.0
Strongly agree 9 9.0 9.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 05% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the my general attitude of job satisfaction , 04% of the respondent were disagreed, 30% of
the respondent are said that neutral and 52% of the respondent are says that they agree with
my general attitude of job satisfaction and 09% of the respondent are says that they strongly
agree with my general attitude of job satisfaction..

CHART 4.21
MY PHYSICAL WORKING CONDITION INFLUENCE MY GENERAL ATTITUDE
OF JOB SATISFACTION
TABLE 4.22
THE WAY MY BOSS TREATED ME AND SUPERVISED ME INFLUENCED
MYOVERALL ATTITUDE ABOUT MY JOB

Supervised
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 12 12.0 12.0 12.0
disagree
Disagree 2 2.0 2.0 14.0
Neutral 25 25.0 25.0 39.0
Agree 40 40.0 40.0 79.0
Strongly agree 21 21.0 21.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 12% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the supervised me influenced my overall attitude, 02% of the respondent were disagreed,
25% of the respondent are said that neutral and 40% of the respondent are says that they
agree with supervised me influenced my overall attitude of job satisfaction and 21% of the
respondent are says that they strongly agree with supervised me influenced my overall
attitude of job satisfaction...

CHART 4.22
THE WAY MY BOSS TREATED ME AND SUPERVISED ME INFLUENCED
MYOVERALL ATTITUDE ABOUT MY JOB
TABLE 4.23
I FEEL THIS COMPANY HAS BRIGHT PROSPECTS

Brightprospects
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Valid Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 7 7.0 7.0 14.0
Neutral 26 26.0 26.0 40.0
Agree 46 46.0 46.0 86.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the I feel this company has bright prospects , 07% of the respondent were disagreed, 26% of
the respondent are said that neutral and 46% of the respondent are says that they agree and 14
% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree .

CHART 4.23
I FEEL THIS COMPANY HAS BRIGHT PROSPECTS
TABLE 4.24
SEAR IS MAKING THE CHANGE NECESSARY TO COMPLETE EFFECTIVELY

Completeeffectively
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Disagree 4 4.0 4.0 4.0
Neutral 24 24.0 24.0 28.0
Agree 57 57.0 57.0 85.0
Valid Strongly 15 15.0 15.0 100.0
agree
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 04% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the change necessary to complete effectively, 24% of the respondent are said that neutral and
57% of the respondent are says that they agree and 15% of the respondent are says that they
strongly agree.

CHART 4.24
SEAR IS MAKING THE CHANGE NECESSARY TO COMPLETE EFFECTIVELY
TABLE 4.25
UNDERSTAND OUR BUSINESS STRATEGY

Businessstrategy
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 5 5.0 5.0 5.0
disagree
Disagree 4 4.0 4.0 9.0
Valid Neutral 25 25.0 25.0 34.0
Agree 52 52.0 52.0 86.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 05% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Understand our business strategy , 04% of the respondent were disagreed, 25% of the
respondent are said that neutral with Understand our business strategy and 52% of the
respondent are says that they agree and 14 % of the respondent are says that they strongly
agree

CHART 4.25
UNDERSTAND OUR BUSINESS STRATEGY
TABLE 4.26
WE AND UNDERSTAND THE LINK BETWEEN MY JOB AND COMPANY
STRATEGY

Companystrategy
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 5 5.0 5.0 12.0
Valid Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 35.0
Agree 57 57.0 57.0 92.0
Strongly agree 8 8.0 8.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyse that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Understand our business strategy, 05% of the respondent were disagreed, 23% of the
respondent are said that neutral with Understand our business strategy and 57% of the
respondent are says that they agree and 08% of the respondent are says that they strongly
agree.

CHART 4.26
WE AND UNDERSTAND THE LINK BETWEEN MY JOB AND COMPANY
STRATEGY
TABLE 4.27
FACTOR CONTROLLED BY THE MANAGEMENT
1) Wage group

2) Promotional opportunities

3) Transfer policy
4) Duration of work time

Factorcontrolled
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y Percent Percent
Strongly 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
disagree
Disagree 14 14.0 14.0 21.0
Valid Neutral 24 24.0 24.0 45.0
Agree 50 50.0 50.0 95.0
Strongly agree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table that can be analyze that the 07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Factor controlled by the management , 14% of the respondent were disagreed, 24% of the
respondent are said that neutral with and 50% of the respondent are says that they agree and
05% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree.

CHART 4.27
FACTOR CONTROLLED BY THE MANAGEMENT
CHI-SQUARE TEST
Case Processing Summary
Cases
Valid Missing Total
N Percent N Percent N Percent
Gender * 100 100.0% 0 0.0% 100 100.0%
Experience

Gender * Experience Crosstabulation


Count
Experience Total
Below 5 5-10 10-15 20 and
above
Gender Male 25 13 17 1 56
Female 20 16 7 0 43
Others 0 0 1 0 1
Total 45 29 25 1 100

Chi-Square Tests
Value df Asymp. Sig.
(2-sided)
a
Pearson Chi-Square 7.396 6 .286
Likelihood Ratio 7.641 6 .266
Linear-by-Linear .546 1 .460
Association
N of Valid Cases 100
a. 6 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The
minimum expected count is .01.

Symmetric Measures
Value Approx.
Sig.
Nominal by Contingency .262 .286
Nominal Coefficient
N of Valid Cases 100

ONE SAMPLE TEST

One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Std. Error
Deviation Mean
Monthlysala 100 2.2500 1.17529 .11753
ry

One-Sample Test
Test Value = 0
t df Sig. (2- Mean 95% Confidence Interval of
tailed) Difference the Difference
Lower Upper
Monthlysala 19.144 99 .000 2.25000 2.0168 2.4832
ry

CORRELATION METHOD

Case Processing Summary


Cases
Valid Missing Total
N Percent N Percent N Percent
Transportandparkingfa 100 100.0% 0 0.0% 100 100.0%
cilities *
Adequatecanteenfaciliti
es

Transportandparkingfacilities * Adequatecanteenfacilities Crosstabulation


Count
Adequatecanteenfacilities Total
Strongly Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly
disagree agree
Strongly 0 2 1 2 0 5
disagree
Transportandparki Disagree 0 2 5 4 0 11
ngfacilities Neutral 1 3 4 13 1 22
Agree 1 0 20 33 0 54
Strongly agree 0 3 1 3 1 8
Total 2 10 31 55 2 100

Symmetric Measures
Value Asymp. Std. Approx. Approx.
Errora Tb Sig.
Nominal by Phi .549 .018
Nominal Cramer's V .274 .018
Interval by .146 .113 1.458 .148c
Pearson's R
Interval
Spearman .110 .113 1.097 .275c
Ordinal by Ordinal
Correlation
N of Valid Cases 100
a. Not assuming the null hypothesis.
b. Using the asymptotic standard error assuming the null hypothesis.
c. Based on normal approximation.

ONE WAY ANOVA TEST

ANOVA
Involvedpersonally
Sum of df Mean F Sig.
Squares Square
Between 21.679 4 5.420 6.344 .000
Groups
Within Groups 81.161 95 .854
Total 102.840 99

Multiple Comparisons
Dependent Variable: Involvedpersonally
Tukey HSD
(I) Natureworks (J) Natureworks Mean Std. Sig. 95% Confidence Interval
Difference (I- Error Lower Upper

J) Bound Bound
Disagree .25397 .46580 .982 -1.0414 1.5493
Strongly Neutral 1.51128* .40867 .003 .3748 2.6477
disagree Agree .41404 .36950 .795 -.6135 1.4416
Strongly agree .80952 .51423 .517 -.6205 2.2395
Strongly -.25397 .46580 .982 -1.5493 1.0414
disagree
Disagree Neutral 1.25731* .37402 .010 .2172 2.2974
Agree .16008 .33077 .989 -.7597 1.0799
Strongly agree .55556 .48715 .785 -.7991 1.9103
Strongly -1.51128* .40867 .003 -2.6477 -.3748
disagree
Neutral Disagree -1.25731* .37402 .010 -2.2974 -.2172
Agree -1.09723* .24381 .000 -1.7752 -.4192
Strongly agree -.70175 .43284 .488 -1.9054 .5019
Strongly -.41404 .36950 .795 -1.4416 .6135
disagree
Agree Disagree -.16008 .33077 .989 -1.0799 .7597
Neutral 1.09723* .24381 .000 .4192 1.7752
Strongly agree .39548 .39607 .855 -.7059 1.4969
Strongly -.80952 .51423 .517 -2.2395 .6205
disagree
Strongly agree Disagree -.55556 .48715 .785 -1.9103 .7991
Neutral .70175 .43284 .488 -.5019 1.9054
Agree -.39548 .39607 .855 -1.4969 .7059
*. The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level.

Involvedpersonally
a,b
Tukey HSD
Natureworks N Subset for alpha =
0.05
1 2
Neutral 19 2.6316
Strongly agree 6 3.3333 3.3333
Agree 59 3.7288 3.7288
Disagree 9 3.8889
Strongly 7 4.1429
disagree
Sig. .064 .285
Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are
displayed.
a. Uses Harmonic Mean Sample Size = 10.200.
b. The group sizes are unequal. The harmonic
mean of the group sizes is used. Type I error
levels are not guaranteed.

CHAPTER V
FINDING, SUGESSTION AND CONCLUSION
FINDING
 Majority of the respondent are12% of the respondent are aged between below 20
years, 50% of the respondent are aged between 20-30 years, 25% of the
respondent are aged between 30-40 years
 Majority of the respondent are56 % of the respondent are male
 Majority of the respondent are15% of the respondent are qualified that SSLC/ITI ,
36% of the respondent are qualified that HSC / DIPLOMA , 39 % of the
respondent are qualified that Graduate / BE

 Majority of the respondent are38 % of the respondents monthly income is below


20000, 17% of the respondents monthly income is 20000-30000, 30% of the
respondents monthly income is 30000-40000

 Majority of the respondent are45 % of the respondent are says that they have on
working the below 5 years experience, 29% of the respondent are says that they
have on working the below 5-10 years experience, 25 of the respondent are says
that they have on working the below 10-15 years experience.

 Majority of the respondent are79 % of the respondent are satisfied with the
Awareness towards the statutory and non-statutory employee Job Satisfaction
measures in this company

 Majority of the respondent 31% of the respondent are said that neutral and 55% of
the respondent are agree with the canteen facilities has been provided by the
company

 Majority of the respondent 22% of the respondent are said that neutral and 54% of
the respondent are agree with the parking facilities has been provided by the
company

 Majority of the respondent 20 % of the respondent are said that neutral and 44%
of the respondent are agree with the quality of uniform and id card provided by
the company, 14% of the respondent are were strongly agree.

 Majority of the respondent 51% of the respondent are agree with rest room/wash
rooms/Recreational provided by the company

 Majority of the respondent is and 52% of the respondent are says that they agree
and 09% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree the Employee
counselling provided by the company

 Majority of the respondent 20% of the respondent are said that neutral and 59% of
the respondent are says that they agree
 Majority of the respondent are 23% of the respondent are said that neutral that
Safety facilities and standards adopted and 41% of the respondent are says that
they agree

 Majority of the respondent is 30% of the respondent are says that they agree and
14% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree that safety equipments
provided by the company.

 Majority of the respondent are 24% of the respondent are said that neutral and
44% of the respondent are says that they agree and 17% of the respondent are says
that they strongly agree.
 Majority of the respondent are 45 % of the respondent are says that they agree
with very much involved personally in my job
 Majority of the respondent is 59% of the respondent are says that they agree with I
like the nature works that i do and 06% of the respondent are says that they
strongly agree with I like the nature works that i do.

 Majority of the respondent are 27% of the respondent are said that neutral and
44% of the respondent are says that they agree.
 Majority of the respondent 18% of the respondent were disagreed, 49% of the
respondent are said that neutral.

 Majority of the respondent are 46% of the respondent are says that they agree with
influence my overall attitude about the job positively and 09% of the respondent
are says that they strongly agree.

 Majority of the respondent are 52% of the respondent are says that they agree
with my general attitude of job satisfaction

 Majority of the respondent are 40% of the respondent are says that they agree with
supervised me influenced my overall attitude of job satisfaction and 21% of the
respondent are says that they strongly agree with supervised me influenced my
overall attitude of job satisfaction

 Majority of the respondent are 46% of the respondent are says that they agree and
14 % of the respondent are says that they strongly agree .
 Majority of the respondent 24% of the respondent are said that neutral and 57% of
the respondent are says that they agree
 Majority of the respondent are 25% of the respondent are said that neutral with
Understand our business strategy and 52% of the respondent are says that they
agree

 Majority of the respondent are 23% of the respondent are said that neutral with
Understand our business strategy and 57% of the respondent are says that they
agree and 08% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree.

 Majority of the respondent are07% of the respondent are strongly disagree with
the Factor controlled by the management, 14% of the respondent were disagreed,
24% of the respondent are said that neutral with and 50% of the respondent are
says that they agree and 05% of the respondent are says that they strongly agree.

SUGGESTIONS

The employees are very satisfied with intramural facilities. In some areas like extramural
facilities there is need of further development in these facilities provided to the employees. In
some areas like non- statutory facilities, there is need of make improvement in these facilities.
Presently the Job Satisfaction activities are limited to canteen, transport and incentives. Staffs
are not aware of any other existing schemes. So, the management should make the staffs
aware of all the Job Satisfaction schemes. Proper functioning of the existing Job Satisfaction
schemes is enough to motivate the staffs. Curtailing of existing Job Satisfaction schemes will
boost the disappointment of staffs. Management can discuss with staff to improve the Job
Satisfaction schemes Improvement of cleanliness and facilities of canteen are needed.
Improvement of Job Satisfaction activities help to improve the financial set up of the staffs’.
They may help them to improve the standard of living. Introduction of better increment
schemes. Recreation facilities to be improved in order to make staffs more active Staffs in the
organization are average aged, so it will really affect the Job Satisfaction activities of the
organization

CONCLUSION
From the study on labor Job Satisfaction certain points have been identified that some
employees are satisfied and some are not satisfied with the present Job Satisfaction.
But as far as the Job Satisfaction are concerned the organization management is following the
statutory provisions which are reflected in the “Factories Act 1948”, the existing Job
Satisfaction benefits are effective, which directly motivate the employees in the organization.
Hence taking the global reality, the management may review the problems with a soft mind.
In future, the management can well think of improving the present Job Satisfaction by
consulting with employees. Urgent provisions are to be made regarding the transport, rewards
for results, and canteen facilities as general wellbeing of the workers important. Job
Satisfaction refers to the physical, mental, moral, and emotional wellbeing of an individual.
Human resource is the asset of an organization, so they need proper attention

BIBLOGRAPHY
 Venugopal P., Bhaskar T. and Usha P., Employee Job Satisfaction Activities with
Respective Measures in Industrial Sector-A Study on Industrial Cluster AtChittor
District”, International Journal of Research in Commerce, It and Management, 1(6), 78-
84 (2011)
 Babu K.V.S.N Jawahar, Valli S. KaleshaMasthan and Bhupathi C., Recent Trends In
Factories Job Satisfaction, ACADEMICIA: An International Multidisciplinary Research
Journal, 2(12), 252-261 (2012)
 Balakumar R., A Study on Employee Job SatisfactionIn Mas Linea Leather Company,
MADURAI, and Report Submitted to the SRM School of Management (2010)
 Maheswara Reddy, Human resource management practices in organized retailing - a
study of select retailers, International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research. December
(2011)
 Tiwari Pankaj, Impact of selected HRM practices on perceived employee performance,
Global management Journal, (2011)
 PaulrajanRajkumar, Employability Skills in MADURAI Retail Market, ACTA
UniversitatisDanubius, (2011)
 Gupta K. Shashi, Joshy Rosy, Human Resource Management, Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi. (2010)
 Kahn W.A. ‘Psychological conditions of personal engagement and disengagement at
work, Academy of Management Journal, (1990)
 Maslach C. Schaufelli W.B. and Leiter M.P., ‘Job burnout, Annual Review of Psychology,
52, 397-422 (2001)
 DasamRagupathi., the Financial and Human resource Management Strategies to Develop
the Organization, Research, Journal Management Sciences, 2(10), 6-9 (2013
ANNEXURE
A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES JOB SATISFACTION AT NICROME LEATHER
PROCESSING INDUSTRY AT CHENNAI
1. Age (years)
a) Below – 20 years

b) 20-30 years

c) 30-40 years

d) 40-50 years

e) 50 years and above

2. Gender
a. Male

b. Female

c. others

3. Educational qualification
a) SSLC/ITI

b) HSC/DIPLOMA

c) Graduate/BE

d) Post graduate ME/M.TECH

4. Monthly salary
a) Below 20000
b) 20000-30000

c) 30000-40000

d) 40000-50000

e) 50000& above

5. Experience of the employee (years)


a) Below 5years

b) 5-10 years

c) 10-15 years

d) 15-20 years

e) 20 years and above

6. Awareness towards the statutory and non-statutory employee Job Satisfaction


measures in this company?
a. Yes

b. No

7. Adequate Canteen facility has been provided by the company


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

8.. Sufficient Transport and parking facilities are available


f) Strongly disagree

g) Disagree

h) Neutral
i) Agree

j) Strongly agree

09. Quality of Uniform and ID card provided by the company


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

10. Sufficient rest room/wash rooms/Recreational facilities are provided


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

11. Adequate Employee counseling is provided by the company


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

12. Attitude of the employees towards Job Satisfaction facilities adopted by the organization
a) Strongly disagree
b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

13. Safety facilities and standards adopted in Company are ensuring adequate safety to
employees and thus preventing the accident?
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

14. Suffieient Provision of safety equipments (glasses, Masks, helmets, shoes etc) provided to
the employees during work
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

15. Satisfactory of Working conditions of the Company with respect to Ventilation, Lighting,
Temperature, Seating arrangement, Spacing of machinery and Cleanliness inside working
premises are provided
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral
d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

16. I am very much involved personally in my job.


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

17. I like the nature work that i do


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

18. My work gives me a sense of Accomplishment


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

19. I am proud to say that I work at sears


a) Strongly disagree
b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

20. The amount of work i am expected so do influence my overall attitude about the job
positively
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

21. My physical working condition influence my general attitude of job satisfaction


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

22. The way my boss treated me and supervised me influenced my overall attitude about my
job
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral
d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

23. I feel this company has bright prospects


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

24. Sear is making the change necessary to complete effectively


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

25. I understand our business strategy


a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree

c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

26. I we and understand the link between my job and company strategy
a) Strongly disagree

b) Disagree
c) Neutral

d) Agree

e) Strongly agree

27. Factor controlled by the management


Factor SA DA N A SDA
Wage group
Promotional opportunities
Transfer policy
Duration of work time