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LIMITATIONS AND ADVANTAGES OF

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ON
GENERAL EXAMINATIONS AND
SURGICAL PROCEDURES IN
OPTOMETRY
INDEPENDENT STUDY MENTORSHIP- FALL 2018
JEFFREY MO
MRS. CLICK
DISCLAIMER:

Information included in this presentation


comes from outside sources
MENTOR INTRODUCTION

Mentor: Doctor William K. Pope


Mentorship Location: Parkwood Vision Center
Certifications: O.D. from University of Houston,
Bachelors of Science from Florida University
Career of Study: Optometry
ABOUT ISM

• Mentor with adult in professional career


• Create unique and personalized study plan and instructional time
• Leave campus to visit mentorship site
• Self motivation and passion
• 1 year credit course
COURSE REQUIREMENTS OF ISM

1. Complete an in-depth mentorship/study in an area of interest (must be


approved by ISM teacher)
2. Document a minimum of 3 hours of mentorship each week (Mentorship
Activity Log)
3. Complete a Journal Entry each week documenting mentorship experiences
(ISM Journal)
4. Complete an ISM Professional Portfolio (online format/Weebly)
showcasing assignments completed during the course and the final project
5. Complete all of the required assignments (See Course Calendar and ISM
Grading Sheet)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS CONT.

6. Complete a Mid-Term Presentation (must include PowerPoint or


Prezi)
7. Develop a final product and presentation at the
collegiate/professional level that is presented to a panel of graders
at the conclusion of the semester (must include PowerPoint, visuals,
completed product, portfolio and handouts (See Product Guidelines
on ItsLearning for guidance).
The final presentation will count as the FINAL EXAM Grade for this
course. The grade is based on the Mentor’s Evaluation 50% and
Grader Evaluations 25% each of the presentation.
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

• Over reliance
• Economic Gain
• Ethics
• Increased use of technology between generations
KEY POINTS

• Increased use of robotic surgeons


• Ethics of robotics in the medical field
• Ease of robotics in examinations
• UK Robotic optometry
• Economic Benefits
RESEARCH TOPICS

• Common Cornea, Sclera and Ciliary body damages


• Previous success and limitations of artificial intelligence in another sector
• Current common use of artificial intelligence in the medical field
ETHICS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

“Functionalism is the most important part in defining intelligence. Belief in or


stress on the practical application of a thing, in particular.”
• Assumptions that make humans different from machines:
o Nothing that is programmed is intelligent
o Humans are not programmed
THE CORNEA

o Epithelium: The outer most layer whose function is to block outside


material from entering the eye and to provide a smooth surface off
moisture
o Bowman’s membrane
o Stroma: Thickest layer of the cornea, made out of collagen. Has a
unique shape to give the cornea strength, elasticity, and form
o Descemet's Membrane: A layer that protects against infection and
injuries. Easily repairs itself after being damaged.
o Endothelium: A thin layer of flat epithelial cells that lines the heart,
serous cavities, lymph vessels, and blood vessels.
SUCCESS IN OTHER FIELDS

o General Motors’ First Unimate Robotic Arms:


§ First used in 1960s
§ Assembly Lines
§ Intended to improve work safety
§ Not smart, but could perform dangerous tasks

• Low cost labor


• More profits for companies
CURRENT EVENT

• First successful robotic surgery in UK


• Non-invasive surgery
• Faster healing
• Safer
• Results
• Patient Results
PRODUCT

• Computer based artificial neural network


• Detects common symptoms
• Previous data
• Helps facilitate data
CONCLUSION

• Surgical procedures
• General examination procedure
• Limitations of human examinations
• Speed of human examinations
THANK YOU!

•Mrs. Click
•Dr. Pope
WORKS CITED

Alammar, Jay. “A Visual and Interactive Guide to the Basics of Neural Networks.” A Visual and Interactive Guide to the Basics of Neural Networks – Jay
Alammar – Visualizing Machine Learning One Concept at a Time, Github, 14 Dec. 2016, jalammar.github.io/visual-interactive-guide-basics-
neural-networks/.

Anderson, David L., et al. “Artificial Intelligence: Can a Machine Think? (Page 1).” Neurons, Synapses, Action Potentials, and Neurotransmission - The Mind
Project, National Science Foundation Grants, 2016,
www.mind.ilstu.edu/curriculum/ai_can_a_machine_think/ai_machine_think_1.php?modGUI=228&compGUI=1785&itemGUI=3093.

Beeman, Dave. “Overview of Artificial Neural Networks.” Modeling the Brain: Simplified vs.

Realistic Models, University of Colorado, 10 Sept. 2008, ecee.colorado.edu/~ecen4831/cnsweb/cns0.html.

Hofmann, Thomas, et al. “Kernel Methods in Machine Learning.” The Annals of Statistics, vol.

36, no. 3, 2008, pp. 1171–1220. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25464664.