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Republic of the Philippines

Department of the Education


PUBLIC TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL
HIGH SCHOOLS

mhar cueto

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING


SYSTEMS ON AUXILIARY OUTLET AND
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Module Title: Installing of Electrical
Lighting System on
Module No. 1 Auxiliary Outlets and
Lighting Fixtures
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Copyright Department of Education 2008

First Published JUNE 2008

This draft was prepared during the Competency-Based Learning


Materials Development Workshop conducted at the Marikina Hotel,
Marikina City on February 18-22, 2008 and finalized on May 23-25, 2008 at
the Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP), Tagaytay City.

This learning instrument was developed by the following personnel:

Technology Teachers:

 MR. MARINO C. CUETO


Community Vocational High School
MinSCAT Calapan City Campus,
Masipit, Calapan City

Contextual Teachers:

 MS. GINA C. DELOS SANTOS


AFG Bernardino MTS
Lias, Marilao, Bulacan

Facilitator:

 MRS. CORAZON C. ECHANO


Tech-Voc Task Force

Encoder

 MR. LEMUEL C. VALLES

Fund: Department of Education.

REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING:

Balana, Ulysses B., TLE III Electricity, Eferza Academic Publication,


2004, pp.
Handley, William, Industrial Safety Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co.;
1977, pp.
Hubert, Charles I. Preventive Maintenance of Electrical Equipment –
2nd Ed., New York: McGraw Hill Book Co.; 1974, pp.
Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers, Inc. Phillippine Electrical
Code, Part I, 2002, # 41, Monte de Piedad St., Cubao, Quezon
City, Philippines: Bookman Inc., June 2002.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
How to Use this Module ............................................................................ i
Introduction ............................................................................................ ii
Technical Terms ..................................................................................... iii
Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install electrical wiring using knob and
tube method
 Learning Experiences/Activities ....................................................... 2
 Information Sheet 1
 Job Sheet 1.1 ................................................................................... 7
 Job Sheet 1.2 ................................................................................. 10
 Job Sheet 1.3 ................................................................................. 13
Learning Outcome 2: Layout and install PVC raceway/molding
 Learning Experiences/Activities ..................................................... 17
 Information Sheet 2.1 .................................................................... 18
 Job Sheet 2.1 ................................................................................. 20

Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install rigid non-metallic conduit


Learning Experiences/Activities ............................................................. 23
 Information Sheet 3.2 .................................................................... 24
 Operation Sheet 3.1 ....................................................................... 29
 Operation Sheet 3.2 ....................................................................... 33
 Job Sheet 3.1 ................................................................................. 38
Learning Outcome 4: Layout and install flexible non-metallic conduit
Learning Experiences/Activities ............................................................. 41
 Information Sheet 4.1 .................................................................... 42
 Job Sheet 4.1 ................................................................................. 47
 Self-Check 4.1 ............................................................................... 54
Learning Outcome 5: Assemble fluorescent lighting fixtures
 Learning Experiences/Activities ..................................................... 55
 Information Sheet 5.1 .................................................................... 56
 Job Sheet 5.1 ................................................................................. 63
 Job Sheet 5.2 ................................................................................. 66
 Job Sheet 5.3 ................................................................................. 69

Learning Outcome 6: Layout and Install Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures


 Learning Experiences/Activities ..................................................... 74
 Job Sheet 6.1 ................................................................................. 75
 Job Sheet 6.2 ................................................................................. 78
Learning Outcome 7: Layout and install incandescent lamp
 Learning Experiences/Activities ..................................................... 82
 Information Sheet 7.1 .................................................................... 83
 Job Sheet 7.1 ................................................................................. 91
 Self-Check 7.1 ............................................................................... 94
Assessment Plan .................................................................................... 95
 Observation Checklist .................................................................... 98
 Observation and Questioning Checklist .......................................... 99
 Demonstration ............................................................................. 100
 Written report .............................................................................. 101
 Performance Test ......................................................................... 102
 Answer Key .................................................................................. 103
HOW TO USE THIS MODULE

Welcome to the Module “Installation of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures”. This module contains training
materials and activities for you to complete.

The unit of competency “Install Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures” contains the knowledge, skills
and attitudes required for a Building Wiring Installation course. It is one of
the specialized modules at National Certificate (NC) Level II.

You are required to go through a series of learning activities in order


to complete each of the learning outcomes of the module. In each learning
outcome there are Information Sheets, Job Sheets, Operation Sheets
and Activity Sheets. Do these activities on your own and answer the Self-
Check at the end of each learning activity.

If you have questions, do not hesitate to ask your teacher for


assistance.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

You may already have some or most of the knowledge and skills
covered in this module. If you can demonstrate competence to your teacher
in a particular skill, talk to him/her so you do not have to undergo the same
training again. If you have a qualification or Certificate of Competency from
previous trainings show it to him/her. If the skills you acquired are
consistent with the relevant to this module, they become part of the
evidence. You can present these for RPL. If you are not sure about your
competence/skills, discuss this with your teacher.

After completing this module ask your teacher to assess your


competence. Result of your assessment will be recorded in your competency
profile. All the learning activities are designed for you to complete at your
own pace.

Inside this module you will find the activities for you to complete and
relevant information sheets for each learning outcome. Each learning
outcome may have more than one learning activity.

This module is prepared to help you achieve the required competency,


in receiving and relaying information. This will be the source of information
that will enable you to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitude in Building
Wiring Installation National Certificate (NC) Level II independently at your
own pace or with minimum supervision or help from your teacher.

i
Course BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title Installation of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

INTRODUCTION:

This module contains the “know” and “do” units in Installation


of Electrical Lighting System on Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures.

It covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in installing the


lighting fixtures. Specifically, this module covers installation of knob and
tube, PVC raceway/molding, rigid non-metallic conduit, flexible non-metallic
conduit, fluorescent lighting fixtures, and incandescent lamp

This module consist of seven (7) Learning Outcomes (LO’s) that


contain learning activities for both knowledge and skills supported with
information sheets, job/operation sheets and self-check. Before attempting
to perform the manual exercises, see to it that you have already read and
understood the information/operation sheet and answered correctly the self-
check provided in every Learning Activities.

SUMMARY OF LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of this module, the students shall be able to:

LO1. Layout and install electrical wiring using knob and tube method
LO2. Layout and install PVC raceway/molding
LO3. Layout and install rigid non-metallic conduit
LO4. Layout and install flexible non-metallic conduit
LO5. Assemble fluorescent lighting fixtures
LO6. Layout and install fluorescent lighting fixtures
LO7. Layout and install incandescent lamps

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:

Refer to the assessment criteria of learning outcomes # 1-7 of this


module.

PREREQUISITES:

Basic and Common Competencies

ii
TECHNICAL TERMS

Ballast is an induction coil which produces high voltage to start the


lamp into operation.

Fluorescent tube is a circular bulb containing mercury vapor and inert


gas with phosphor coating inside.
Frame is the metal housing of the whole fixture.
Incandescent bulb is a light source with a metal filament that glows
with white heat.
Insulation is a nonconductive device covering that protects wires and
other electricity carriers.
Junction box is an enclosure used for splitting circuits into different
branches.
Knockouts are tabs that can be removed to make opening in a box for
cable and conduit connector.

Knick is small cut on wires.

Limelight comes from the incandescent light produced by a rod of lime


bathed in a flame of oxygen and hydrogen.
Non-metallic conduits are electrical materials which are manufactured
to be resistant to moisture and chemical atmosphere.
Photographic lamps as the name implies, are used in photography and
projection service.
Receptacle is an outlet that supplies power for lamp and other plug-in
devices
Screw cap is the threaded base of the bulb that secures it to a lamp.
Solid knobs are used to support or anchor wires as big as No. 8 or even
bigger.
Split knobs are used to support wires smaller than No. 8.
Support wires are wires that physically hold up the filament.
Vinyl Chloride is a toxic carcinogen which has been proven to cause
angiosarcoma, a deadly primary liver cancer.
AWG – American Wire Gauge
PEC – Philippine Electrical Code
PPE – Personal Protective Equipment
PVC – polyvinyl chloride
SPST – Single Pole Single Throw

iii
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install electrical wiring using knob


and tube method
Assessment Criteria:

1. Electrical wiring is installed in line with the job requirements.


2. Electrical wiring is installed in line with the PEC/NEC.
3. Safety procedure in installing electrical wiring is strictly followed in
line with the Occupational Safety and Health Standards.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring


1st Edition, Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six


Ed., New York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring


Troubleshooting ; National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

1
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome # 1: Layout and install electrical wiring using knob and
tube methods

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read the Information sheet 1.1  You can ask assistance from
about the principle of knob your teacher to show you and
and tube. explain further the topic you
cannot understand well.

2. Perform the job sheet 1.1 on  Perform the performance test


installing one bulb controlled by
one single pole switch in one
location.

3. Perform the job sheet 1.2 on


installing two bulbs controlled  Perform the performance test
individually by two single pole
switch in two location.

4. Perform the job sheet 1.3 on  Perform the performance test


installing one bulb controlled
by two three-way switch in
two locations.

2
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1

PRINCIPLES OF KNOB AND TUBE

The open or exposed wiring method is sometimes referred to as the


Open Wiring on Insulators. (PEC section 212) It uses cleats, knobs (split or
solid), porcelain tubes and mica tubing for the support and protection of
insulated conductors run in or on buildings. It may be used in working
either outside or inside building in dry or wet locations. It shall not be used
in the following locations:

1. Commercial Garages
2. Theaters
3. Motion Picture Studios
4. Hoist ways
5. Hazardous Locations

In the open or exposed wiring method, the wires are visible and are
supported by the knobs. These knobs may be a split or solid type. This is
shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. The Split and Solid knobs

Split knobs are used to support wires smaller than No. 8. Solid knobs
are used to support or anchor wires as big as No. 8 or even bigger. Screws or
nails may be used to fasten the knobs. When a nail is used a leather washer
should be placed between the nail head and the insulator to form cushion
and protect the insulator from breaking. See figure 2.

3
Height of Knob

Figure 2. The Solid Knob with Leather washer for Protection

Figure 3. Shows the correct and wrong ways of tying wires to the
groove of a solid knob.

In installing an electrical wiring system with the exposed knob and


tube wiring method, the distance between conductors should be maintained
at a minimum distance of 6 cm. (2 ½ inches) apart. The knobs must have a
30 cm (1 foot) distance apart. Figure 4 illustrates this provision of PEC.

30 cm. 1 Ft.

Figure 4. Spacing of Split Knobs and Conductors

Whenever wires pass through studs, rafters, floor joists or any wooden
part of a building, the wires are inserted in porcelain tubes or flexible mica
tubing. Porcelain tubes and mica tubing are also provided whenever wires
cross each other. It gives the wire extra protection from injury.

4
Figure 5. Application of Porcelain Tubes and Mica Tubing

Some advantages of the Knob and Tube wiring:

1. It is used in temporary installation, such as construction jobs.

2. It has economical when properly installed.

3. It has a lower operating temperature because of ventilation brought by


distances of the installation.

5
Safety reminders when installing knob and tube wiring

1. Apply enough pressure on the gimlet when driving it to the wood


board. Never hammer it.

2. Have the auger brace oiled regularly especially the ratchet type.

3. Have your electrician’s knife sharpened enough in order not to nick


the wire.

4. Use the appropriate screw driver for the screw.

5. Be sure that the conductors in contact with the wiring surface are
enclosed in mica tubing.

6. Be sure that your teacher has checked your work before testing.

7. Be sure that the safety switch is off before making any connection.
Apply tape on all joints/splices.

8. Do not drive the split-knobs completely before the conductors or wires


are run or inserted along the grooves of the knobs.

9. Be sure to test the insulation for short and ground circuit before
putting on the power.

6
JOB SHEET 1.1

Installing one bulb controlled by one single pole single throw (SPST) switch
in one location.

Name ________________________________________ Year/Section: _____

Date _________________________________________ Overall Rating ____

I – Materials Required

Qty Unit Description


1 pc single pole, tumbler switch, surface type
1 pc porcelain/plastic receptacle, surface type
1 pc incandescent bulb, 220v, 25w
7 mts solid wire # 14 t.w.
11 pcs porcelain/plastic split knobs with screws
1 ft mica tubing or loom
1 roll electric tape
1 pc safety switch/cut out
2 pcs fuse, 10-a, cartridge type

II- Tools Needed

Screwdrivers electrician’s knife


Pliers pull push tape rule
hammer

III – Procedure

Perform this procedure:


1. Prepare all tools and materials needed.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3.Install porcelain/plastic receptacle and porcelain cut-out/safety


switch to the desired location.

4. Fasten knobs to their proper places. Do not tighten screws. Provide


distance for the insertion of wires.

5.Provide mica tubing in every termination of connection of the wires.

6.Make connection from receptacle to safety switch and another


connection from switch to safety switch. Tighten screw of knobs.

7.Fasten the switch. Provide porcelain base under it.


8. Mount the bulbs and fuse, then test the wiring before you start.

7
Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Follow the pictorial diagram.

Safety Switch

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Verticality,
Horizontality
2. Accuracy: Dimension;(optional) Accurate function of
the elements
3. Method: Observance of the safety measures

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

8
I do hereby certify that my student has satisfactorily passed this
performance test by demonstrating their ability in installing one outlet
controlled from one location.

Conforme: Attested:

_________________ __________ _______________ _______


Student Date Teacher Date

9
JOB SHEET 1.2

Installing two bulbs controlled individually by


two single pole switch in two locations

Name ________________________________________ Year/Section: ____

Date _________________________________________ Overall Rating ____

I – Materials Required

Qty Unit Description


2 pcs single pole, tumbler switch, surface type
2 pcs porcelain/plastic receptacle, surface type
2 pcs incandescent bulb, 220v, 25w
10 mts solid wire # 14 t.w.
17 pcs porcelain/plastic split knobs with screws
3 ft mica tubing or loom
1 roll electric tape
1 pc safety switch/cut out
2 pcs fuse, 10-a, cartridge type

II – Tools Needed
Set of screwdrivers
Set of pliers
hammer
gimlet
electrician’s knife

III- Procedure

Perform this procedure:


1. Prepare all tools and materials needed.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. Install porcelain/plastic receptacle and porcelain cut out/safety


switch to desired location.

4. Fasten split knobs to proper location and distances. Do not tighten


screws. Provide clearance for insertion of wires.

5. Provide mica tubing in every connection of the wires. Follow the


figure/drawing as shown.

6.Connect the wires to where it is intended. Refer to pictorial diagram.

10
7. Fasten switches with base under it.

8. Mount the bulbs and fuses on their respective locations.

9. Connect the power and test the installation

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Follow the pictorial diagram.

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Verticality,
Horizontality
2. Accuracy: Dimension;(optional) Accurate function of
the elements
3. Method: Observance of safety measures

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2

11
Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

I do hereby certify that my student has satisfactorily passed the


performance test by demonstrating his ability in installing two outlets,
controlled individually by two single pole single throw switch in two location.

Conforme: Attested:

_________________ __________ _______________ _______


Student Date Teacher Date

12
JOB SHEET 1.3

Installing one bulb, controlled from two location by two-3-way switch

Name ________________________________________ Year/Section: _____

Date _________________________________________ Overall Rating ____

I – Materials Required

Qty Unit Description


2 pcs three-way switch, surface type
1 pc porcelain/plastic receptacle, surface type
1 pc incandescent bulb, 220v, 25w
12 mts solid wire # 14 t.w.
20 pcs porcelain/plastic split knobs with screws
3 ft mica tubing or loom
1 roll electric tape
1 pc safety switch/cut out
2 pcs fuse, 10-a, cartridge type

II – Tools Needed

Set of screwdrivers
Set of pliers
hammer
gimlet
electrician’s knife

III- Procedure

Perform this procedure:


1.Prepare all tools and materials needed.

2.Wear appropriate PPE.

3.Install porcelain/plastic receptacle and porcelain cut out/safety


switch to desired location.

4Fasten split knobs to proper location and distances. Do not tighten


screws. Provide clearance for insertion of wires.

5.Provide mica tubing in every connection of the wires. Follow the


figure/drawing as shown.

6.Connect the wires to where it is intended.Refer to pictorial diagram.

13
7.Fasten switches with base under it.

8.Mount the bulbs and fuses on their respective locations.

9.Connect the power and test the installation

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Follow the pictorial diagram.

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Verticality,
Horizontality
2. Accuracy: Dimension;(optional) Accurate function of
elements
3. Method: Observance of safety measures

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5

14
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

I do hereby certify that the student has satisfactorily passed the


performance test by demonstrating his ability in installing two outlets,
controlled individually by two single pole single throw switch in two location.

Conforme: Attested:

_________________ __________ _______________ _______


Student Date Teacher Date

15
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 2: Layout and install PVC raceway/molding

Assessment Criteria:

1. Materials, tools and equipment for installing PVC raceway are


prepared in line with the job requirements.
2. PVC raceway is installed in line with the job requirements.
3. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon completion of the job.
4. PEC provisions concerning PVC raceway installations are strictly
followed.
5. Final report is prepared upon the completion of job.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st


Edition, Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

16
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 2: Layout and install PVC raceway/molding

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read Information sheet 2.1  You can ask assistance from


about PVC raceway/molding. your teacher to explain his
topics you cannot understand
well.

2. Perform job sheet 2.1 on  Observe the demonstration of


installing PVC your teacher and check the
raceway/molding. technique while observing.

17
INFORMATION SHEET 2.1

Surface Raceway is a one piece, non-metallic, adhesive backed


latching raceway designed to aesthetically organize and route low voltage
communications cables. It features a low profile design which blends into
any environment whether it is new construction or a renovation. It is easy
to cut and trim and is also printable with a latex based paint. It provides a
complete line of fittings to manage connectivity requirements.

The fittings are available for each size raceway and color option. Single
or Dual gang, junction boxes are versatile enough for any electrical
application. Boxes are equipped with concentric knockouts for all 3 sizes of
raceway. Knockouts are provided on all four sides. Junction boxes come
with adhesive strips and #6 screws to secure the box to the base.

Different types of Surface Raceway

18
The National Electrical Code permits surface raceways in dry locations for
exposed or surface work. The raceway can be extended through dry ways,
dry partitions, and dry floors if one continuos length of raceway is used
throughout the concealed section.
The raceway cannot be used for concealed work on locations subject to
severe to corrosive vapors, or in hoist ways and hazardous location.

19
JOB SHEET 2.1

Layout and install PVC raceway/molding


Installing one bulb controlled by one single pole switch in one location.

I. Materials Required
Quantity Unit Descriptions
1 pc single pole switch (flush type)
1 pc safety switch
1 pc incandescent bulb (25 w)
1 pc receptacle
1 pc junction box
2 pcs fuse 15 A (cartridge type)
1 pc metal/plastic box
1 roll electrical tape
1 ft mica tubing or loom
2 pcs plastic molding
20 pcs wood screw (1/2)

II. Tools Needed


side cutting plier
combination plier
long nose plier
philips screw driver
standard screw driver
hammer
hacksaw

III. Procedure
1. Prepare all the materials needed
2. Wear appropriate PPE.
3. Install lamp receptacle, junction box, metal box, safety switch to
the desired location.
4. Fasten the PVC molding to its proper location following the desired
measurements.
5. Connect the wires to where it is intended. Refer to the schematic
diagrams.
6. Mount the bulb and fuses on their respective locations.
7. Connect the power and test the installation.

Schematic diagram of one bulb


controlled by a single pole switch
using PVC molding.

20
Assessment Criteria

CRITERIA Points

Accuracy of connection 15
Workmanship
- Cutting of PVC molding 15
- Measurements 5
Use of tool 5
Speed 5
Housekeeping 5
50 pts

21
BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION
Course :

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install rigid non-metallic conduit

Assessment Criteria:

1. PEC provisions in installing rigid non-metallic conduit are strictly


followed.
2. Personal safety in installing rigid non-metallic conduit is followed.
3. Tools/materials and equipments needed for installation are prepared
in line with job requirements.
4. Rigid non-metallic conduit is installed in line with the job
requirements.
5. Final report is prepared upon the completion of the job.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st


Edition, Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

22
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install rigid non-metallic conduit

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read Information sheet 3  You can ask assistance from


2. .1 about rigid non-metallic your teacher to show and
conduit explain further the topics that
you cannot understand well.

3. Perform operation sheet 3.1 on  Observe the demonstration of


bending 90°PVC elbow. your teacher and check the
technique while observing.

 Teacher supervises the student


performance.

4. Perform operation sheet 3.2  Observe the demonstration of


PVC offset bending. your teacher and check the
technique while observing.

 Teacher supervises the student


performance.

5. Perform job sheet 3.1 on how  You can ask assistance from
to install by two bulbs your teacher to show you and
controlled by two three-way explain furtherly information
switch and one SPST with two that you cannot understand
convenience outlets. well.

23
INFORMATION SHEET 3.1

Rigid Non-Metallic Conduit (PVC)

Non-metallic conduits are electrical materials which are manufactured


to be resistant to moisture and chemical atmosphere. They are also
manufactured to be flame retardant or not easily burned. They are resistant
to impact and crushing. They do not easily get out shape by the heat. These
conduits are classified according to the materials they are made of. The most
common ones are asbestos cement conduit, polyvinyl chloride, conduit and
high density polyethylene conduit.

The Philippine Electrical Code provides that rigid non-metallic conduit


may be used under the following conditions:

1. Concealed in floors, walls and ceilings


2. Direct earth burial or underground
 300 mm in trench below 50mm thick concrete or equivalent
 600 mm under streets, highways, roads, alleys, driveway and
parking lots
 460 mm under driveways and parking lots of single and two family
dwelling units
 460 mm under airport runways, including adjacent areas where
trespassing is prohibited
3. In locations subject to severe corrosive influences
4. In locations where subject chemicals for which the materials are
specifically approved
5. Cinder fill
6. In wet locations, provided water is prevented from entering the
conduit
7. In dry and damp locations

The Philippine Electrical Code prohibits the use of rigid non-metallic


conduit under the following conditions:

1. Hazardous (Classified) locations


2. Support of fixtures
3. Physically damaged location
4. Ambient temperature. Where subject to ambient temperatures in
excess of 50oC unless listed otherwise
5. Insulation temperature limitations. For conductors whose insulation
temperature limitations would exceed those for which the conduit is
listed.
6. Theaters and similar locations.

24
INSTALLATION OF NON-METALLIC CONDUIT PEC REQUIREMENTS

1. TRIMMING. Rough edges or burrs at the cut ends of non-metallic


conduit shall be trimmed inside and outside
2. JOINTS. Joints between lengths of conduit and between conduit
couplings, fittings and, boxes shall be made with approved coupling
and adapter. For water proofing, PVC cement should be spread
around the surfaces to be .joined together
3. SECURING and SUPPORTS. Rigid non-metallic conduit shall be
rigidly supported as indicated below

Table 3.47.1.8 Support of Rigid Nonmetallic Conduit


(Based on Philippine Electrical Code, 2000, Part I)

Conduit Size Maximum Spacing


[mm (mm)]* Between Supports (mm)
15 (20) – 25 (32) 900
32 (40) – 50 (63) 1500
65 (75) – 80 (90) 1800
90 (100) – 125 (135) 2100
150 (160) 2400

4. EXPANSION FITTINGS. Expansion fitting for rigid nonmetallic


conduit shall be provided to compensate for thermal expansion and
contraction.
5. MINIMUM SIZE. Rigid nonmetallic conduit smaller than 15 mm (20
mm) electrical trade size shall not be used.
6. MAXIMUM. Rigid nonmetallic conduit larger than 150 mm (160 mm)
electrical trade size shall not be used.
7. BUSHING. Where conduit enters a box, fitting or other enclosure, a
bushing or adapter shall be provided to protect wires from abrasion
unless the box, fitting or enclosure design provides equivalent
protection.
8. BENDS-HOW MADE. Bends of rigid nonmetallic conduit shall be so
made that the conduit will not be damaged and that the internal
diameter of the conduit will not be effectively reduced.

Table 3.46.2.6 Radius of Conduit Bends


(Based on Philippine Electrical Code, 2000, Part I)

Size of Conduit Conductors Without Lead


(mm) Sheath
15 100
20 125
25 150
32 200
40 250
50 300
65 375

25
80 450
90 525
100 600
125 750
150 900

TYPES OF PVC CODUIT FITTINGS

PVC Coupling PVC elbow

Adapter PVC Conduit Pipe

PVC 2G box LL Access Fitting

1/2 Inch Type T PVC


1 Inch Type T Condulet
Condulet

3/4" Type LL PVC Access


PVC Conduit Clamps
Fitting

26
Identifying Different Types of Bend

The PVC or polyvinyl chloride rigid conduit is one of the most


commonly used conduits in electrical wiring installation today. Its
preparation for installation is much easier than the metallic rigid conduit. In
preparing a non-metallic rigid conduit for installation, an electrician needs
to do cutting, heating and bending. Like in metallic rigid conduit offset
bends, 90o angle bends and other bends are also made on PVC rigid conduit.
In making bends on PVC rigid conduit, the electrician should see to it that
the internal diameter of the conduit is not reduced and damaged so that the
capacity of the conduit to accommodate maximum number of conductors
will not be lessen and to facilitate easy pulling of conductors.

Since PVC conduits are somewhat easier to bend than a rigid conduit,
it likewise requires patience as in any other type of conduit. It is first pre-
heated over a fire or a heat gun to a desired softness. Little by little, it is
bent to its desired shape. When such is attained, it is then hardened by
soaking it to cold or lukewarm water or dampened with a wet rag.

1. Elbow

2. Offset bend is less than 90o


bend, it is used when the
conduit crosses an obstacle
or when the conduit is
entering an electrical box.

3. Round saddle bend is used


when the conduit run across
circular objects like pipes.

4. Square saddle bend is


similar to round saddle, it is
used when the conduit run
across rectangular obstacles.
Square saddle is just a
combination of two offset Obstacle
bends.

27
Bend Defects

1. Burned

2. Kinks or groove

Kinks

3. The diameter of the conduit


is greatly reduced due to
improper bending procedure.

28
OPERATION SHEET 3.1

Bending 90o PVC Elbow

Tools, Materials and Equipment Needed

Equipment:
 Heat gun - 1 unit
Materials:
 Pencil or Chalk - 1 pc
 PVC pipe - 1m
Tools:
 Steel meter stick/Straight edge - 1 pc
 Try square - 1 pc
 Pull and push rule - 1 pc
 Wet rug - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Respirator - 1 pc

Procedure:

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials and equipment.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

Note: The greatest danger comes from vinyl chloride, a primary


component of polyvinylchloride (PVC) and an odorless gas which
could be released using this process. Vinyl Chloride is a toxic
carcinogen which has been proven to cause angiosarcoma, a
deadly primary liver cancer. Use a good respirator and adequate
ventilation to protect yourself from this toxin.

Respirator Gloves

29
3. Draw a right angle on the floor using your try square and chalk. This
will serve as your guide when forming your conduit into 90o angle. (A
tile on the floor can serve as a guide.)

4. If you are in a room with a tiled floor, you can use it as your guide for
90o angle.

5. Draw an arc near the corner with a radius of 100 mm; this will aid
you in forming your elbow correctly.

Note: 20 mm diameter of PVC should have a radius of 100 mm as


mentioned in the previous information sheet.

100 mm

30
6. Mark off 200 mm from the end of PVC pipe. This will be the center of
your elbow bend.

7. Plug-in the heat gun and apply heat to the conduit. Apply heat
100mm on both sides of your marking. Apply heat evenly by turning
over the conduit while swaying your heat gun back and forth to avoid
kinks during bending.

8. Notice that when the conduit is softening, it will sag as shown.

31
9. If the conduit is soften, turn off the heat gun and bend the PVC to the
desired shape using your arc and 90o angle guide drawn on the floor.

10. If the desired shape is formed, damp the conduit with wet rug to
harden it immediately. (You can use your foot to hold one end of the
conduit while wiping.)

11. Perform housekeeping.

Assessment Criteria
VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Bending 90°,

2. Accuracy: Dimension, Accurate bending

3. Method: Observance of the safety measures.

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2.

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

32
OPERATION SHEET 3.2

PVC Offset Bending

Tools, Materials and Equipment Needed

Equipment:
 Heat gun - 1 unit
Materials:
 Pencil or Chalk - 1 pc
 PVC pipe - 1m
Tools:
 Steel meter stick/Straight edge - 1 pc
 Try square - 1 pc
 Pull and push rule - 1 pc
 Wet rug - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Respirator - 1 pc

Procedure:

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials and equipment.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

Respirator Gloves

3. Measure the elevation of the obstruction. In this case, let’s use this
wooden box.

33
Note: Remember, offset bent is used if the conduit crosses an
obstruction. In this case, the elevation is about 70 mm.

4. Draw the depth of elevation on the floor as shown in the figure


using your try square and chalk. This will guide you how high your
offset bend would be.

5. You should have two lines as shown in the figure.

6. Mark off 100 mm from the end of PVC pipe. This will be the center
of the first bend of the offset.

34
7. Put another mark of about 200 mm from your first marker.

8. Plug-in the heat gun and apply heat to the conduit. Apply heat
between your markers. Apply heat evenly by turning over the
conduit while swaying your heat gun back and forth to avoid kinks
during bending.

35
9. If the conduit is soften, turn off
the heat gun and bend the PVC to
the desired shape using your
guide drawn on the floor. Pull the
left portion of the conduit while
pushing the other end.

10. If the desired shape is formed,


damp the conduit with wet rug to
harden it immediately. (You can
use your foot to hold one end of
the conduit while wiping.)

11. Your bend should look like this.

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Offset Bending

2. Accuracy: Dimension, Accurate bending

3. Method: Observance of the safety measures.

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2.

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

36
JOB SHEET 3.1

Install rigid non-metallic conduit

Install two bulbs controlled by two (2) three-way switches and one
(1) SPST switch with two convenience outlet.

Please refer to the Learning Outcome No. 2. Layout and Install PVC
raceway/molding for the important PEC provisions in installing rigid non-
metallic conduit and personal safety

TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS

Equipment:
 Heat gun 1 unit
Materials:
 Pencil or Chalk 1 pc
 PVC pipe 3 pcs
 PVC adapter with lock nuts 18 pcs
 Utility box 5 pcs
 Junction box 4 pcs
 Lamp socket 2 pcs
 Safety switch 1 pc
 3 way switch 2 pcs
 SPST switch 1 pc
 1 gang plate cover 3 pcs
 2 gang plate cover 2 pcs
 Conduit clamps/straps 15 pcs
 Wood screws (1/4 x ½) 50 pcs
Tools:
 Steel meter stick/Straight edge 1 pc
 Try square 1 pc
 Pull and push rule 1 pc
 Wet rug 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves 1 pair
 Respirator 1 pc

Procedure:

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials and equipments.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

37
3. Mark on the wiring board the location of the safety switch, utility
boxes, and junction boxes.

4. Fasten the safety switch and PVC boxes with wood screws at the
desired locations.

5. Prepare the PVC conduit for installation.

a. Measure and cut each PVC pipe to desired length


b. Make an offset bend at each end of PVC conduit which will be
connected to a box.
c. Bend 90º based on the diagram.

6. Install and connect ends of PVC pipe to the electrical boxes, safety
switch.

7. Support the conduit with conduit clamps or straps.

8. Place the cover of junction box, utility box, and convenience outlet.

9. Perform good house keeping.

38
10. Have your teacher check your work.

Note: Your teacher will determine the distance of each circuit.

S3w S3w S

Line diagram of the two bulbs controlled by two (2) three-way switches
and one (1) SPST switch with two convenience outlets in different
location.

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions
5 3 1
1. Quality: Workmanship, Appearance, Offset Bending,
Bending 90º
2. Accuracy: Dimension, Accurate bending

3. Method: Observance of the safety measures.

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2.

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

39
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 4: Layout and install flexible non-metallic conduit.

Assessment Criteria:

1. PEC provisions in installing flexible non-metallic conduit are strictly


followed.
2. Uses and application of flexible non-metallic conduit are discussed
according to the PEC.
3. Electrical flexible non-metallic conduits are leveled horizontally and
vertically aligned to the structure specified in job requirements.
4. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon the completion of work
according to the established standard.
5. Tools, materials and equipments needed for the installation are
prepared in line with job requirements.
6. Flexible non-metallic conduit is installed in line with job
requirements.
7. Flexible non-metallic conduit is installed in line with the job
requirements
8. Final report is prepared upon the completion of job.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st Edition,
Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

40
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 4: Layout and install flexible non-metallic conduit.

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read Information sheet 4.1  You can ask assistance from


about the flexible metal your teacher to show you and
conduit. explain furtherly the topic you
cannot understand well.

2. Perform activity sheet 4.1 on  Teacher will supervise your


how to install conduit and activity in installing of flexible
electrical wiring from indoor nonmetallic tubing.
unit to outdoor unit using
flexible nonmetallic tubing

3. Answer the Self-check 4.1  Check your answer by using


the answer key.

41
INFORMATION SHEET 4.1

Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit

This portion of information sheet is lifted from Philippine Electrical


Code, 2000, Part I.

Definition. Liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit is a listed raceway of


circular cross section of various types as follows:

1. A smooth seamless inner core and cover bonded together and having
one or more reinforcement layers between the core and cover
designated as Type LFNC-A.

2. A smooth inner surface with integral reinforcement within the


conduit wall, designated as Type LFNC-B.

3. A corrugated internal and external surface without integral


reinforcement within the conduit wall, designated as Type LFNC-C.

This conduit is flame resistant and, with fittings, is approved for the
installation of electrical conductors.

Uses.

(a) Permitted. Listed liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit shall be


permitted to be used in exposed or concealed locations for the
following purposes. FPN: Extreme cold may cause some types of
nonmetallic conduits to become brittle and therefore more
susceptible to damage from physical contact.

(1) Where flexibility is required for installation, operation, or


maintenance.

(2) Where protection of the contained conductors is required from


vapors, liquids, or solids.

(3) For outdoor locations where listed and marked as suitable for
the purpose. FFN: For marking requirements, see Section
110.1.21

(4) For direct burial where listed and marked for the purpose.

(5) Liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit as defined in Section


3.51.2.1(2) shall be permitted to be installed in lengths longer
than 1 800 mm where secured in accordance with Section
3.51.2.6.

42
(6) As a listed manufactured prewired assembly, 15, mm (20mm)
through 25 mm (32 mm) conduit, as defined in Section 3.51
.2.1(2).

(b) Not Permitted. Liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit shall not be
used in the following:

(1) `Where subject to physical damage

(2) Where any combination of ambient and conductor temperature


is in excess of that for which the liquid tight flexible nonmetallic
conduit is approved

(3) In lengths longer than 1 800 mm, except as permitted by


Section 3.51 .2.2(a)(5) or where a longer length is approved as
essential for a required degree of flexibility.

(4) Where voltage of the contained conductors is in excess of 600


volts, nominal

Exception. As permitted in Section 6.0.2.3(a) for electric signs


over 600 volts.

Size. The electrical trade sizes of liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit
shall be in accordance with (a) or (b):

(a) 15mm (20 mm) to 100mm (110mm) inclusive

(b) 10 mm (15 mm) as permitted below

(1) For enclosing the leads of motors as permitted in Section


4.30.13.5(b) (2) In lengths not exceeding 1 800 mm as part of a
listed assembly for tap connections to lighting fixtures as
required in Section 4.10.13.4(c), or for utilization equipment (3)
for electric sign conductors in accordance with Section 6.0 .2
.3 (a)

Number of Conductors. The number of conductors permitted in a single


conduit shall be in accordance with the percentage fill specified.

Fittings. Liquid tight flexible non - metallic conduit shall be used only with
listed terminal fittings. Angle connectors shall not be used for concealed
raceway installations.

Securing and Supporting. Liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit, as


defined in Section 3.51.2.1(2), shall be securely fastened and supported
in accordance with one of the following.

43
(a) The conduit shall be securely fastened at intervals not exceeding
900 mm and within 300 mm on each side of every outlet box,
junction box, cabinet, or fitting.

(b) Securing and supporting of the conduit shall not be required where
it is fished, installed in lengths not exceeding 900 mm at
terminals where flexibility is required, or where installed in
lengths not exceeding 1 800 mm from a fixture terminal
connection for tap conductors to lighting fixtures as permitted
in Section 4.10.13.4(c)

(c) Horizontal runs of liquid tight flexible nonmetallic conduit


supported by openings through framing members at intervals
not exceeding 900 mm and securely fastened within 300 mm of
termination points shall be permitted.

3.51.2.7 Equipment Grounding. When an equipment grounding conductor


is required for the circuits installed in liquid tight flexible nonmetallic
conduit, it shall be permitted to be installed on the inside or outside of
the conduit. When installed on the outside, the length of the equipment
grounding conductor shall not exceed 1 800 mm and shall be routed
with the raceway or enclosure. Fittings and boxes shall be bonded or
grounded in accordance with Article 2.50.

Splices and Taps. Splices and taps shall be made in accordance with
Section 3.0.1 13. See Article 3.70 for rules on the installation and use
of boxes and conduit bodies.

Bends-Number in One Run. There shall not be more than the equivalent of
four quarter bends (360 degrees total) between pull points, e.g., conduit
bodies and boxes.

Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit Fittings

Coupling

Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit

44
Adapter

Liquid tight angle connector Liquid tight straight connector

45
Job Sheet 4.1

Install conduit and electrical wiring from indoor unit to outdoor unit
using flexible nonmetallic tubing.

Tools, Materials and Equipment Needed

Equipment:
o *Electric drill - 1 unit
Materials:
o Pencil or Chalk - 1 pc
o Installation plan or working drawing - 1 pc
o Flat head screw, ¾ in X 10 - 15 pcs
o *Fisher, # 6 (Tox) - 15 pcs
o Flexible nonmetallic tubing - 5m
o Mica tube, ¼ in. dia. - 1m
o Stranded wire, 2.0 mm2 TW -
o Safety switch, 30 A -
Tools:
o Pull and push rule or any measuring - 1 pc
device suited for the activity
o Steel meter stick/Straight edge - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
o Safety glass - 1 pc
o Gloves - 1 pair
o Goggles - 1 pc
o Safety shoes - 1 pair

Introduction:
In installing electrical circuit, you may use any type of approved
wiring method for the purpose. It has been a practice in this field to use
flexible nonmetallic tubing because flexibility is required for installation,
operation, and maintenance. You may use rigid nonmetallic conduit (PVC)
as taught in the previous instruction sheets.

Procedure
1. Wear appropriate PPE
2. Measure the required length of flexible nonmetallic conduit from the
outdoor unit to the indoor unit. You may use any measuring device
suited for the job or you may use the actual material by practically
tracing its path as shown in the picture.

46
3. Cut the flexible nonmetallic tubing.

4. Insert the wires first before laying out the tubing permanently.

5. Use guide wires to facilitate easy pulling of conductors. Use


galvanized iron wire, gauge 14 AWG. Insert it at one end of the
tubing until it reaches the other end of the tubing.

6. Prepare the required length of the conductor. It may be as long as


the length of the tubing plus an ample allowance at both ends for
splicing. Then mark off the conductors at both ends to distinguish
them from each other.

Note: Allowance must be at least 150 mm long at both ends measured


from the ends of the tubing.
You may use electrical tape or masking tape in marking off the
conductors

47
7. Tie the conductors securely to the guide wires.

8. Pull the guide wires at the other end of the tubing. The tubing
should be laid straight forward for easy pulling of conductors.

9. Seek assistance from other person. The conductors should be push


from the other end while being pulled from the other end.

48
10. Lay out the tubing with conductors permanently.

Wire
allowance

11. Just simply lay the electrical tubing on the path where the
refrigeration system tubing is installed.

12. Secure the flexible nonmetallic tubing wrapping it with cable tie.

13. Insert the connector.

49
14. Secure the tubing to the raceway on the indoor unit.

15. Put the lock nut and tighten it.

16. Prepare the conductor for termination. Strip off at least 5 mm of


insulation.

17. Terminate the conductors. It is indicated in the manufacturer’s


manual how to terminate the conductors.

50
18. Be sure that the connections are tightened correctly.

19. You have just finished the electrical circuit from indoor to outdoor
unit. Now, you are ready for the installation of the main power
supply. The main supply line is usually pre-wired by the
manufacturer, you have to do is to terminate it from the circuit
protection.

20. Terminate to the circuit protection.

21. Test the circuit for ground short or open wiring. If fault is found,
rectify it.

51
22. Turn on the circuit and test run the unit.

23. Perform housekeeping

Assessment Criteria

VS S NI
Dimensions

1. Quality: Quality, workmanship, appearance


2. Accuracy: Dimension, horizontality and verticality of
conduits
3. Method: Observance of the safety measures.

4. Speed: Submission on time +1, before the expected


time +2, after the expected time – 2.

Rating Scale:
VS – Very Satisfactory = 15 – 11
S – Satisfactory = 10 – 5
NI – Needs Improvement = 6 and below

52
SELF-CHECK 4.1

Direction: Label the different types of Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit


Fittings. Write your answer on a separate answer sheet.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

53
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


THE AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING
FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on the


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 5: Assemble fluorescent lighting fixtures.

Assessment Criteria:

1. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are identified and described according to


the specification.
2. Parts and function of fluorescent fixtures are explained.
3. Sizes, shapes and ratings of fluorescent lighting fixtures are identified
and described.
4. Schematic diagram of fluorescent lighting fixtures is interpreted.
5. Tools, instruments and materials are selected in line with job
requirements.
6. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are assembled in line with job
requirements.
7. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are wired according to the schematic
diagram.
8. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon the completion of the job

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st Edition,
Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

54
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 5: Assemble fluorescent lighting fixtures.

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read Information sheet 5.1  You can ask assistance from


of this module your teacher to show you and
explain further topic you can’t
understand.

2. Perform Job Sheet 5.1 in  The teacher supervises while


Assembling Open type 20 you perform the activity.
watts Fluorescent Lamp

3. Perform Job Sheet 5.2 in  The teacher supervises while


Assembling 40 watts you perform the activity.
Fluorescent fixture using 2
x 40 watt high power
factor (H.P.F.) ballast

4. Perform Job Sheet 5.3; in


Assembling two unit 40  The teacher supervises while
watts Fluorescent fixture you perform the activity.
using rapid start ballast

5. Perform Job Sheet 5.1; in  The teacher supervises while


Assembling Fluorescent you perform the activity.
lighting fixtures

55
INFORMATION SHEET 5.1

Fluorescent lighting fixtures

Fluorescent Lamp –is a form of electric discharge light source. It consists of


a glass tube containing mercury vapor at a low pressure and inert gas like
argon and krypton. The interior is coated with phosphor, which glows or
fluoresces when exposed to ultraviolet light.

PEC Rules on Wire Dressing and Termination

Article 6.3.1.3 Live Parts. Fixtures, lamp holders, lamps, rosettes, and
receptacles shall have no live parts normally exposed to contact. Exposed
accessible terminals in lamp holders, receptacles, and switches shall not be
installed in metal fixture canopies or in open bases of portable table or floor
lamps.
All joints/splices to be done must be properly insulated with
spaghetti sleeving, wrapped with electrical tape having a similar thickness of
the conductor used.

Types of electric discharge fluorescent lamps

1. Pre-heat starting, hot-cathode –requires starter (glow switch) and is


pre-heated during starting. It uses a ballast to produce high voltage to
start the lamp into operation and to limit the flow of current.

2. Cold cathode – Requires high voltage in its operation. This lamp has
electrodes made of thimble-type iron. It is not pre-heated and does not
require a starter for starting. Special high voltage transformers operate it.
Neon and mercury lamps are classified under cold cathode lamps.

3. Instant-starting, hot-cathode –The lamp cathode in the instant-start


is not pre-heated. Sufficient voltage is applied across the cathodes to
create an instantaneous arc. As in preheat circuit; the cathodes are
heated during lamp operation by the arc. The instant-start lamp require
single-pin bases, are generally called slim line lamps.

4. Hot-cathode, rapid-start –These are similar in construction to the


preheat lamps; the basic difference is in the circuitry. This circuit
eliminates the delay inherent in preheat circuits by keeping the lamp
cathodes constantly energized (preheated). When the lamp circuit is
energized, the arc is struck immediately. No external starter is required.
Because of this similarity of operation, rapid start lamps will operate
satisfactorily in a preheat circuit. The reverse is not true, because
preheat requires more current to heat the cathode than the rapid-start
ballast provides.

56
Operation of pre-heat type fluorescent lamp

The tube filaments, starter (glow switch), and ballast are all connected
in series, which constitute a complete circuit once the switch, is closed. As a
current flow through, the gas (inert) inside the starter glows and the
electrodes are heated. Since one of the electrodes is a bi-metal, it bends and
makes contact with the other. At this instant, the circuit is metallically
complete. The filaments of the fluorescent tube are then heated and partial
ionization takes place. The bi-metals in the starter cools and the contacts
open. The magnetic field in the ballast collapses rapidly producing an
inductive kick, which establishes a current between the filaments and fires
the tube into operation.

Classifications of Fluorescent Lamp

1. Regular Fluorescent Lamp

Circular type fluorescent lamp

Open type fluorescent

Box type fluorescent lamp

57
2. Compact Fluorescent Lamp

Different types of Compact Fluorescent Lamp

Parts and functions of fluorescent lamp

1. Fluorescent tube is a circular bulb containing mercury vapor and


inert gas with phosphor coating inside.

58
Parts of Fluorescent tube

1. Ballast is an induction coil, which produces high voltage to start


the lamp into operation. It also limits the flow of current during the
operation of the lamp. Ballast consumes power, which is between
10-20% of power consumed by the lamp itself.

Induction type ballast

Electronic type ballast

Different types of Ballast

2. Starter is a glow switch that opens and closes the circuit so as to


produce a high voltage or inductive kick across the bulb at the
filament during the starting period.

59
Different types of Starter

3. Lamp holder and starter socket are the point of connection of the
fluorescent and starter.

5. Frame is the metal housing of the whole fixture.

60
Parts of fluorescent lamp starter

Starter housing

Base contact
Connecting
wire

Current moves in utilizing the rare gas as conducting means and the
rare gas produces a “glow”. The glow generates heat and causes the
bimetallic blade to expand.

When the bimetallic blade is heated, it changes shape and touches the
fixed contact. The close contacts of the two starter contacts produce an easy
path for the current to flow.

Parts and operation function of the ballast

Coil inside

Laminated iron core

Terminal block

Ballast frame

61
In common with all gaseous discharge lamps, the fluorescent must be
provided with some device for limiting the current drawn by the discharge.
Without a limiting device, the current would rise to a value that would
destroy the lamp. A device or auxiliary called ballast can best meet this
requirement.

The ballast for operating lamps on an alternating current consists of a


small choke coil woven on an iron core.

This ballast serves three important functions:

1. It preheats the electrodes to make available a large supply of the


electron.
2. It provides a surge of relatively large potential to start the arc
between the electrodes.
3. It prevents the arc current to increase beyond the limit set for each
size and lamp.

THE LIFE SPAN OF FLUORESCENT LAMP

The life of fluorescent lamp is affected not only in the fluctuation of


voltage and current but also by the number of times it is started. Electron
emission material is “sputtered off” from the electrodes continuously during
the operation of the lamp and in larger quantities each time the lamp starts.

Many fluorescent lamps have a rated average life span up to 30,000


continuous burning hours but with an average of 3 hours burning per start,
it could only last for 12,000 hours.

62
JOB SHEET 5.1

Assembling Open - type 20 watts Fluorescent Lamp

Tools, Materials Needed

Material:
 Fluorescent Lamp (20 watts) - 1 set
Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Procedures:

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. Assemble and wire a 20-w fluorescent fixture using Normal or Medium


Power Factor ballast (M.P.P)

63
Use bolt and nut in fixing the ballast to the frame

4. Mount the starter socket to the frame. Make sure it is attached


securely.

5. Mount the connection terminal socket to the frame. Make sure that it
is fixed not too loose or too tight.

6. Make the necessary connections of the fluorescent fixture by referring


to the schematic wiring diagram.

64
Schematic Diagram, Preheat Fluorescent Lamp.

7. Test the circuit for ground short or open wiring. If fault is found,
repair it.

8. Perform housekeeping

Assessment Criteria

Points
Dimensions

1. Accuracy of connections
10
2. Functionality of the fluorescent lamp
10
3. Use of tool
5

4. Speed 5

5. Housekeeping 5
35 points

65
JOB SHEET 5.2

Assembling the 40- Watt Fluorescent Fixture


Using 2 x 40 Watt High Power Factor (H.P.F.) Ballast

Tools, Materials Needed

Materials:
 Fluorescent Lamp (40 watts) - 2 set
 Fixture Frame - 1 pc
Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Procedure:

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. Mount the lamp holders and the 2 x 40 H.P.F. ballast to the


fluorescent fixture frame.

Mounting Lamp Holders and Ballast to the Fluorescent Frame

66
4. Cut the fixture wires and make the necessary joints or connection by
referring to the schematic diagram.

5. Place the cover of the fluorescent fixture housing if necessary.

6. Screw or place the starter and the fluorescent tubes.

Attaching the Starter and the Fluorescent Tubes

7. Check the wiring connections and plug in the fixture to the source to
test the assembled fixture for normal operation

8. Perform housekeeping

67
Assessment Criteria

Points
Dimensions

1. Accuracy of connections
10
2. Functionality of the fluorescent lamp
10
3. Use of tool
5

4. Speed 5

5. Housekeeping 5
35 points

68
JOB SHEET 5.3

Assembling the Two-unit 40 Watt


Fluorescent Fixture Using Rapid Start Ballast

Tools, Materials Needed

Materials:
 Fluorescent Lamp (40 watts) - 2 set
 Fixture Frame - 1 pc
Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Procedure:

1. Prepare the necessary tools and materials.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. Mount the GE rapid start ballast inside the frame (same procedure of
mounting as stated in the Activity Sheet No. 2).

4. Mount two lamp holders on each end of the metal frame.

5. Make the necessary connections of the holders and ballast as in


Figure 3.1, single lamp; Figure 3.2, double lamp.

Blue/White

Blue/White

Black/White

White
Red
Red

Figure 3.1 Single Lamp

69
Red

Black

White

Yellow

Figure 3.2 - The G.E. Rapid-Start Ballast Connection

6. Follow strictly the wire color code as indicated in the ballast


connection diagram.

Schematic Diagrams of Discharge Lamps

70
Instant start (Cold Cathode)

Connection of a Fluorescent Lamp with the Electronic Ballast

7. Test the circuit for ground short or open wiring. If fault is found,
repair it.

8. Perform housekeeping

71
Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the procedure and rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.
(Refer the procedure to the activity sheet 1 .1 and 1.2)

Assessment Criteria

Needs
Very Good Good Fair
CRITERIA Improvement
(5) (4) (3)
(2)
1. Accuracy Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp does not
(25%) but flickers light
Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are
secured, secured, not secured; loose; finished
2. Quality neat and neat and finished work is not
(25%) clean clean work is not presentable.
presentation presentation presentable
of the work. of the work.
Followed Followed Incorrect Did not follow
procedure procedure usage of the required
correctly, correctly, tools. procedures.
economical economical
3. Method use of tools use of tools
(25%) is followed; is followed;
and and
observed observed
safety while safety while
working. working.
Submitted Submitted Submitted Unable to
work two (2) work on a work two (2) finish the
4. Speed minutes given time. or more work.
(25%) ahead of minutes
time. after the
given time.

Rating: 5.0 – 4.6 = Very Good


– 3.9 = Good
– 3.0 = Fair
2.9 and below = Needs Improvement

72
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing of Electrical Lighting System on


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 6: Layout and Install Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures.

Assessment Criteria:

1. Materials, tools and instruments are prepared in accordance with the


job requirements.
2. Functionality of fluorescent lighting fixtures is checked and tested in
accordance with the plan specification.
3. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are installed in line with the job
requirements.
4. Switching control is applied in accordance with the work plan.
5. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon the completion of the job.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st Edition,
Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

73
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 6: Layout and Install Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures.

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Perform Job Sheet 6.1 on  You can ask assistance from


Installing three (3) fluorescent your teacher while performing
lamps controlled by three (3) the task.
SPST switch using Flexible
Non-metallic Conduit.

2. Perform Job Sheet 6.2  You can ask the assistance


Installing two (2) fluorescent from your teacher while
lamps controlled by two (2) performing the task.
three –way-switch and One (1)
SPST switch using Flexible
Non-metallic Conduit.

74
JOB SHEET 6.1

Install three (3) fluorescent lamp controlled by three (3) SPST switch
using Flexible Non-metallic Conduit.

Tools, Materials Needed

Materials:
 Fluorescent Lamp (20 watts) - 3 set
 Lamp socket - 3 pcs
 Utility box - 2 pcs
 Safety switch - 1 set
 SPST switch - 3 pcs
 Junction box - 5 pcs
 Adapter with lock nuts - 15 pcs
 Conduit clamps/straps - 25 pcs
 1 gang plate cover - 1 pc
 2 gang plate cover - 1 pc
 Wood screws (¼ x ½) - 50 pcs
 Electrical tape - 1 roll
Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
 Push pull tape rule - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Strictly follow the line diagram and the
teacher will determine the distance of each circuit.

S 75
S2
Line diagram of the three (3) fluorescent lamps controlled by three
(3) SPST switch using Flexible Non-metallic Conduit.
Procedure:

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. In your work area, layout all the measurement of installation based on


the given work plan. Use pencil to mark the location dimensions.

4. Install/mount all boxes to be followed by connector and adopter. If


necessary and required by the job, tighten snugly according
manufacturer’s torque specification.

5. Install/mount the conduit. Place the desired kind and size of the
support according the manufacturer’s specification.

6. Cut and bend wire ways to the desired length and bends based on the
job requirements. Avoid installing nicked conduits.

7. Fish-in conductors/wires inside conduits/wire ways based on the


required size of wire as prescribe by the PEC.

8. Cut wire according to the desired length. Always provide allowance


(6-8” for smaller size of wire) for future tapping or termination.

9. Strip wires in the boxes then connect them to the terminals of the
switches and fuse clip holder. Note: All loop termination must be
turning clockwise and be tightened snugly according to the
manufacturer’s torque specifications. Avoid excess wire termination.

10. Splice and joint wires in junction boxes based on the circuit design
operation. Joining or splicing of conductors inside conduits raceways
is strictly prohibited. Make sure that the joined wires have 6-8”
allowances from the edge of the box to the outstripped joined end of
wires.

11. Mount/Connect fluorescent lamp based on the circuit design


operation. (Line diagram)

12. Check the continuity of circuit to identify and troubleshoot possible


defects.

76
13. When installation is completed, ask your teacher to evaluate your
performance based on the assessment criteria.

Assessment Criteria

You will be evaluated based on the following:


MEASUREMENT
All dimensions will be in mm center to center with a
20 pts.
tolerance of + - 3mm.
FUNCTIONALITY 20 pts.
WORKMANSHIP
Includes bending, cutting, supporting and installing
flexible non-metallic conduit.
 Bending 20 pts
 Cutting 5 pts.
 Supporting 5 pts.
 Horizontality and verticality 5 pts.
SPEED 10 pts.
SAFETY 5 pts.
USE OF TOOLS 10 pts.
TOTAL 100%

77
JOB SHEET 6.2

Install two (2) fluorescent lamps controlled by the two (2) three –way-
switch and One (1) SPST switch using Flexible Non-metallic
Conduit.

Tools, Materials Needed

Materials:
 Fluorescent Lamp (20 watts) - 2 set
 Lamp socket - 2 pcs
 Utility box - 3 pcs
 Safety switch - 1 set
 SPST switch - 1 pcs
 Junction box - 4 pcs
 Adapter with lock nuts - 15 pcs
 Conduit clamps/straps - 25 pcs
 1 gang plate cover - 3 pcs
 Wood screws (¼ x ½) - 50 pcs
 Electrical tape - 1 roll
 Flexible non metallic conduit - 5 mts

Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
 Push pull tape rule - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Strictly follow the line diagram and your
teacher will determine the distance of each circuit.

78
S S3w S3w

Line diagram of the two (2) fluorescent lamp controlled by two (2) three –
way-switch and One (1) SPST switch using Flexible Non-metallic Conduit.

Procedure:

1. Prepare the necessary tools, materials.

2. Wear appropriate PPE.

3. In your work area, layout all the measurement of installation based on


the given work plan. Use pencil to mark the location dimensions.

4. Install/mount all boxes to be followed by connector and adopter. If


necessary and required by the job, tighten snugly according
manufacturer’s torque specification.

5. Install/mount the conduit. Place the desired kind and size of the
support according the manufacturer’s specification.

6. Cut and bend wire ways to the desired length and bends based on the
job requirements. Avoid installing nicked conduits.

7. Fish-in conductors/wires inside conduits/wire ways based on the


required size of wire as prescribe by the PEC.

8. Cut wire according to the desired length. Always provide allowance (6-
8” for smaller size of wire) for future tapping or termination.

9. Strip wires in the boxes then connect them to the terminals of the
switches and fuse clip holder. Note: All loop termination must be
turning clockwise and be tightened snugly according to the
manufacturer’s torque specifications. Avoid excess wire termination.

79
10. Splice and joint wires in junction boxes based on the circuit design
operation. Joining or splicing of conductors inside conduits raceways
is strictly prohibited. Make sure that the joined wires have 6-8”
allowances from the edge of the box to the outstripped joined end of
wires.

11. Mount/Connect fluorescent lamp based on the circuit design


operation. (Line diagram)

12. Check the continuity of circuit to identify and troubleshoot possible


defects.

Assessment Criteria

Needs
Very Good Good Fair
CRITERIA Improvement
(5) (4) (3)
(2)
1. Accuracy Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp does not
(25%) but flickers light
Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are
completely neat and not secured; loose; finished
2. Quality installed and clean; the finished work is not
(25%) energized work is work is not presentable.
presentable presentable

Followed Followed Incorrect Did not follow


procedure procedure usage of the required
correctly, correctly, tools. procedures.
observed economical
3. Method safety while use of tools
(25%) working, and followed;
perform good observed
housekeeping safety while
working.
Submitted Submitted Submitted Unable to
work two (2) work on a work two (2) finish the
4. Speed minutes given time. or more work.
(25%) ahead of minutes
time. after the
given time.

Rating: 5.0 – 4.6 = Very Good


– 3.9 = Good
– 3.0 = Fair
2.9 and below = Needs Improvement

80
Course : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION

Unit of Competency : INSTALL ELECTRICAL LIGHTING SYSTEM ON


THE AUXILIARY OUTLETS AND LIGHTING
FIXTURES

Module Title : Installing Electrical Lighting System on the


Auxiliary Outlets and Lighting Fixtures

Learning Outcome 7: Layout and install incandescent lamp

Assessment Criteria:

1. Types and sizes of incandescent lamps are identified.


2. Tools, instruments and materials are selected and identified according
to the job requirement.
3. Incandescent lamps are installed according to the plan.
4. Correct size of lamp socket are strictly followed as per job
requirements.

References:

1. Johnston, Larry et.al., Better Homes and Gardens Wiring 1st Edition,
Meredith Books; 2007,pp.

2. Mulin, R.C., Smith R.L. Electrical Wiring-Commercial, Six Ed., New


York: Delmar’s Publishing Inc.; 1984, pp.

3. Agpoa, Feleciano. Interior and Exterior Wiring Troubleshooting ;


National Bookstore: 1991

4. www.diydata.com/tool/drills/drills.php

5. www.powertoolinstitute.com

6. www.technologystudent.com

81
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 7: Layout and install incandescent lamp.

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read Information sheet 7.1 on the  You can ask assistance from
history and development of your teacher to show you and
incandescent lamp explain furtherly topics you
can’t understand well.

2. Perform Job Sheet 7.1 on the  You can ask assistance from
Installation of incandescent lamp your teacher while performing
using Rigid Non-metallic Conduit. the task

1. Answer the Self-check 1-3  Check your answer by using


the answer key.

82
Information Sheet 7.1

History and development of incandescent lamp

THE INCANDESCENT LIGHT BULB

The first incandescent electric light was made in 1800 by Humphry


Davy, an English scientist. He experimented with electricity and invented an
electric battery. When he connected wires to his battery and a piece of
carbon, the carbon glowed, producing light. This is called an electric arc.

Much later, in 1860, the English physicist Sir Joseph Wilson Swan
(1828-1914) was determined to devise a practical, long-lasting electric light.
He found that a carbon paper filament worked well, but burned up quickly.
In 1878, he demonstrated his new electric lamps in Newcastle, England.

The inventor Thomas Alba Edison (in the USA) experimented with
thousands of different filaments to find just the right materials to glow well
and be long-lasting. In 1879, Edison discovered that a carbon filament in
an oxygen-free bulb glowed but did not burn up for 40 hours. Edison
eventually produced a bulb that could glow for over 1500 hours.

Lewis Howard Latimer (1848-1928) improved the light bulb by


inventing a carbon filament (patented in 1881); Latimer was a member of
Edison's research team, which was called "Edison's Pioneers." In 1882,
Latimer developed and patented a method of manufacturing his carbon
filaments.

In 1903, Willis R. Whitney invented a treatment for the filament so


that it would not darken the inside of the bulb as it glowed. In 1910,
William David Coolidge (1873-1975) invented a tungsten filament, which
lasted even longer than the older filaments. The incandescent bulb
revolutionized the world.

PARTS OF AN INCANDESCENT BULB

Coiled tungsten filament. The metal wires that glow brightly when
electricity flows through them.

Connecting wires . The wires that carry electricity from the bulb's electrical
contact to the filament.

Electrical contacts . The metallic base of the bulb, which connects to the
electrical contacts of the lamp when the bulb is in the lamp.

Glass envelope . The thin layer of glass that surrounds the light bulb
mechanism and the inert gases.

83
Glass fuse enclosure -Glass that insulates the bulb's fuses located within
the stem of the bulb.

Mixture of inert gases at low pressures . The bulb is filled with inert (non-
reactive) gases.

Screw cap . The threaded base of the bulb that secures it to a lamp.

Support wires . Wires that physically hold up the filament.

Parts of an incandescent bulb

Edison’s first successful lamp

It is certainly true that Edison did invent the


light bulb (or at least "a" light bulb), but he was not
the first. In 1860, an English physicist and
electrician, Sir Joseph Wilson Swan, produced his
first experimental light bulb using carbonized paper
as a filament. Unfortunately, Swan did not have a
strong enough vacuum or sufficiently powerful
batteries and his prototype did not achieve complete
incandescence, so he turned his attentions to other
pursuits.

So it is reasonable to wonder why Edison received all of the credit,


while Swan was condemned to obscurity. The more cynical among us may
suggest that Edison was thrust into the limelight (see note below) because

84
many among us learn their history through films, and the vast majority of
early films were made in America by patriotic Americans.

However, none of this should detract from Edison who, working


independently, experimented with thousands of filament materials and
expended tremendous amounts of effort before discovering carbonized
thread. It is also probably fair to say that Edison did produce the first
commercially viable light bulb.

The reason why this is of interest to us here is that Edison's


experiments with light bulbs led him to discover the Edison Effect, which
ultimately led to the invention of the vacuum tube

As one final nugget of trivia, the term "limelight" comes from the
incandescent light produced by a rod of lime bathed in a flame of oxygen
and hydrogen. At the time it was invented, limelight was the brightest
source of artificial light known. One of its first uses was for lighting theater
stages, and actors and actresses were keen to position themselves "in the
limelight" so as to be seen to their best effect.

Furthermore, in 1880, Swan gave the world's first large-scale public


exhibition of electric lamps at Newcastle, England.

Edison's light bulbs employed a conducting filament mounted in a


glass bulb from which the air was evacuated leaving a vacuum. Passing
electricity through the filament caused it to heat up enough to become
incandescent and radiate light, while the vacuum prevented the filament
from oxidizing and burning up.

Operation of incandescent lamp

What makes a light bulb glow?

The thin wire, or filament, inside a light bulb resists the flow of
current through it. When electricity is passed through the bulb, the filament
becomes hot and glows brightly. To prevent the filament burning away
completely, the glass bulb filled with a mixture of inert gas (usually argon
and nitrogen). The filament in most light bulbs is made of tungsten.

85
Elements used in the manufacturing incandescent lamp

1. Lead-in wire
2. Glass
3. Argon gas
4. Inert gas
5. Coiled tungsten
6. Brass
7. Mica
8. Copper
9. Nitrogen

Classifications of Incandescent Lamp

1. Large lamps are those normally used for interior and exterior general
and task lighting. (See figure next page)

86
2. Miniature lamps are generally used in automotive, aircraft, and
appliance applications.

3. Photographic lamps as the name implies, are used in photography


and projection service.

87
Kinds of High Intensity discharge lamp

1. Mercury lamp is an electric discharge lamp in which the major


portion of the radiation is produced by the excitation of mercury
atoms.

2. Metal halide lamp is an electric discharge lamp in which the light is


produced by the radiation from an excited mixture of a metallic vapor
(mercury) and the products of the dissociation of halides (for example,
halides of thallium, indium, sodium).

88
3. High-pressured sodium lamp is an electric discharged lamp in which
the radiation is produced by an excitation of sodium vapor in which
the partial pressure of the vapor during operation is of the order of 104
N/m2.

The Incandescent Filament Lamp

Construction

This lamp consist simply of a tungsten filament inside a gas-filled,


sealed glass envelop. Current passing through the high-resistance filament
heats it to incandescence, producing light. Gradual evaporation of the
filament causes the familiar blackening of the bulbs and eventual filament
rupture and lamp failure.

89
90
JOB SHEET 7.1

Installation of the incandescent lamp using the Rigid Non-metallic


Conduit

Materials:
 Incandescent Lamp (25 watts) - 2 set
 Lamp socket - 2 pcs
 Utility box - 3 pcs
 Safety switch - 1 set
 SPST switch - 1 pcs
 Junction box - 4 pcs
 Adapter with lock nuts - 15 pcs
 Conduit clamps/straps - 25 pcs
 1 gang plate cover - 3 pcs
 Wood screws (¼ x ½) - 50 pcs
 Electrical tape - 1 roll
 Rigid non metallic conduit 0-
Tools:
 Philip Screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat Screw driver - 1 pc
 Side cutting pliers - 1 pc
 Long nose pliers - 1 pc
 Push pull tape rule - 1 pc
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria. Strictly follow the line diagram and the
teacher will determine the distance of each circuit.

91
S S3w S3w

Line diagram of two (2) incandescent lamp controlled by two (2) three –
way-switch and One (1) SPST switch using Flexible Non-metallic Conduit.

Procedure:

1. Prepare necessary tools and materials.


2. Wear appropriate PPE.
3. Layout all the measurements of installation, based on work plan.
4. Mount all boxes and receptacles together with their connectors/
adaptors to their desired locations.
5. Cut or bend wires ways to their desired lengths.
6. Fish-in conductors inside conduit/wire ways.
7. Splice and joint wires in the junction’s box based on the circuit
design operation.
8. Connect incandescent lamp based on the circuit design.
9. Check the continuity of the circuit.
10. Ask the assistance of your teacher to evaluate your work.

Assessment Criteria

Needs
Very Good Good Fair
CRITERIA Improvement
(5) (4) (3)
(2)
1. Accuracy Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp lights Lamp does not
(25%) but flickers light
Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are Wirings are
completely neat and not secured; loose; finished
2. Quality installed and clean; the finished work is not
(25%) energized work is work is not presentable.
presentable presentable

92
Followed Followed Incorrect Did not follow
procedure procedure usage of the required
correctly, correctly, tools. procedures.
observed economical
3. Method safety while use of tools
(25%) working, and is followed;
perform good observed
housekeeping safety while
working.
Submitted Submitted Submitted Unable to
work two (2) work on a work two (2) finish the
4. Speed minutes given time. or more work.
(25%) ahead of minutes
time. after the
given time.

Rating: 5.0 – 4.6 = Very Good


– 3.9 = Good
– 3.0 = Fair
2.9 and below = Needs Improvement

93
SELF-CHECK 7.1

Directions: Answer the following questions by writing your answers on a


separate answer sheet.

Test I. Identification: Identify what is being referred by the following


statements.
1. It is used in photography and projection services.

2. These are generally used in automotive, aircraft, and


appliance applications.
3. These are normally used for interior and exterior general
and task lightings.
4. The metal wires that glow brightly when electricity flows
through them.
5. The wires that carry electricity from the bulb's electrical
contact to the filament.
6. The metallic base of the bulb which connects to the
electrical contacts of the lamp when the bulb is in the
lamp.
7. It is the thin layer of glass that surrounds the light bulb
mechanism and the inert gases.
8. A glass that insulates the bulb's fuses which is located in
the stem of the bulb.
9. It is the threaded base of the bulb that secures it to a
lamp.
10. It is a wire that physically hold up the filament.

TEST II: Enumeration

1. Enumerate the nine elements used in manufacturing incandescent


lamp.
2. Enumerate the (8) different parts of the light bulb.
3. Enumerate the three different connections for an incandescent lamp.

94
ASSESSMENT PLAN

Evidence Checklist

Competency standard:
Unit of competency:
Title of Module
Ways in which evidence will be collected:

Third party Report


[tick the column]

Demonstration
Questioning
Observation

Portfolio

Written
The evidence must show that the student …
 Get from assessment criteria of the module (CBC)
LO1. Lay out and install electrical wiring using
knob and tube method
1. Electrical wiring is installed in line with the job
requirements.
2. Electrical wiring is installed in line with the PEC.
3. Safety procedures in installing electrical wiring
are strictly followed in line with the Occupational
Safety and Health Standards.
LO2. Lay out and install PVC raceway/molding
1. Materials, tools and equipment for installing PVC
raceway are prepared in line with the job
requirements.
2. PVC raceway is installed in line with the job
requirements.
3. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon the
completion of the job.

4. PEC provisions concerning PVC raceway


installations are strictly followed.

5. Final report is prepared upon the completion of


job.

LO 3 Lay out and Install rigid non-metallic


conduit
1. PEC provisions in installing rigid non-metallic
conduit are strictly followed.
2. Personal safety in installing rigid non-metallic
conduit is followed
3. Tools/equipments needed for the installation are
prepared in line with the job requirements.

95

4. Rigid non-metallic conduit is installed in line with


the job requirements.

5. Rigid non-metallic conduit is installed in line with


the job requirements

6. Final report is prepared upon the completion of


job.
LO 4 Lay out and Install flexible non-metallic
conduit
1. PEC provisions in installing flexible non-metallic
conduit are strictly followed.
2. Uses and application of flexible non-metallic
conduit are discussed according to the PEC.
3. Electrical flexible non-metallic conduit are leveled
horizontally and vertically aligned to the
structure in line with the job requirements.
4. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon
completion of work according to the established
standard.
5. Tools/equipments needed for the installation are
prepared in line with the job requirements.
6. Flexible non-metallic conduit is installed in line
with the job requirements.
7. Flexible non-metallic conduit is installed in line
with the job requirements
8. Final report is prepared upon the completion of
job.
LO 5 Assemble fluorescent lighting fixtures
1. Parts of fluorescent lighting fixtures are identified
and described according to the specification.
2. Sizes, shapes and ratings of fluorescent lighting
fixtures are identified and described.
3. Schematic diagram of fluorescent lighting fixtures
is interpreted.
4. Tools, instruments and materials are selected in
line with the job requirements.
5. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are assembled in
line with the job requirements.
6. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are wired according to the
schematic diagram.
7. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon
completion of the job.
LO 6 Lay out and Install fluorescent lighting
fixtures
1. Materials, tools and instruments are prepared in
accordance with job the requirements.
2. Functionality of fluorescent lighting fixtures is
checked and tested in accordance with the plan
specification.

96
3. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are installed in line
with the job requirements.
4. Switching control is applied in accordance with
the work plan.
5. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon the
completion of the job.
LO 7 Lay out and Install incandescent lamps
1. Types and sizes of incandescent lamps are
identified.
2. Tools, instrument and materials are selected and
identified according to the job requirement.
3. Incandescent lamps are installed according to the
plan.
4. Diameter of hole is appropriately fitted to the
incandescent lamps.
NOTE: *Critical aspects of competency

Prepared by: Date:

Checked by: Date:

97
Observation Checklist

Student name:
Teacher name:
Name of School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student [insert description of activity being observed].
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Put a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of the
activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Complete the feedback section of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If completed, check
the box.













Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?
Teacher’s feedback:

Teacher’s signature: Date:

98
Observation and Questioning Checklist

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of the
School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student [insert description of activity being observed].
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Place a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of
the activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Ask the student using the questions in the attached list to confirm his/her
underpinning knowledge.
5. Put a check in the box to show that the student has answered the questions
correctly.
6. Complete the feedback sections of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If completed, check
the box.







Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?
Feedback to student:

Teacher signature: Date:

99
Demonstration

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Unit of competency:
Competency standards:
Date of assessment:
Time of assessment:
Instructions for demonstration
Given the necessary materials the student must be able to:

Materials and equipment:

 to show if the skill is


demonstrated
During the demonstration, the student can: Yes No N/A

  
  
  
  
The student’s demonstration was:
Satisfactory  Not Satisfactory 

100
Written report

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Task:
Your task is to:
 [insert description of task]

Submission date:
Use the checklist below as a the basis for judging whether the student’s
report meets the required competency standards.
The student’s report…. If met, check the box

Generally did the student’s report meet the Yes No


standard?
Comments:

Student’s
Date:
signature:
Teacher’s
Date:
signature:

101
PERFORMANCE TEST

Student's Name Date


Competency: Test Attempt
1st 2nd 3rd

Directions: OVERALL EVALUATION


Level
Achieved
Ask your teacher to PERFORMANCE LEVEL
assess your performance
4 - Can perform this skill without direct
in the following critical supervision and with initiative and adaptability
task and performance to problem situations.
criteria below
3 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily without
direct assistance or supervision.
You will be rated based
on the overall evaluation 2 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily but
at the right side. requires some assistance and/or supervision.

1 - Can perform parts of this skill satisfactorily,


but requires considerable assistance and/or
supervision.

Teacher will put his or her initial at level achieved.

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
For acceptable achievement, check YES; for Yes No N/A
unacceptable achievement, check NO; for unachieved
skill, check N/A.

102
ANSWER KEY 4.1

1. Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit


2. Coupling
3. Adapter
4. Liquidtight angle connector
5. Liquidtight straight connector

ANSWER KEY 7.1

Test – I - Identification

1. Photographic lamps
2. Miniature lamps
3. Large lamps
4. Coiled tungsten filament
5. Connecting wires
6. Glass envelope
7. Glass fuse enclosure
8. Glass fuse enclosure
9. Screw cap
10. Support wires

TEST II: Enumeration

1. Elements used in manufacturing Incandescent bulb


 Lead-in wire
 Glass
 Argon gas
 Inert gas
 Coiled tungsten
 Brass
 Mica
 Copper
 Nitrogen
2. Enumerate the (8) different parts of light bulb.
 Glass envelope
 Mixture of inert gasses at low pressure
 Coiled tungsten
 Support wire
 Glass fuse enclosure
 Connecting wire
 Electrical contact
 Screw cap
3. Enumerate the three different connections for incandescent lamp.
 Series connection
 Parallel connection
 Series-parallel connection

103
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Education
PUBLIC TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL
HIGH SCHOOLS

mhar cueto

Unit of Competency: INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND


FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS

Module Title: INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR


Module No.: 2 AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT
INTERRUPTING OUTLETS
ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Copyright Department of Education 2008

First Published JUNE 2008

This draft was prepared during the Competency-Based Learning Materials


Development Workshop conducted at the Marikina Hotel, Marikina City on
February 18-22, 2008 and finalized on May 23-25, 2008 at the Development
Academy of the Philippines (DAP), Tagaytay City.

This learning instrument was developed by the following personnel:

Technology Teacher:

Mr. Rommel M. Medida


AFG Bernardino Memorial Trade School
Lias, Marilao, Bulacan

Contextual Teacher:

Ms. Gina C. delos Santos


A.F.G.Bernardino Memorial Trade School
Lias Marilao, Bulacan

Facilitator:

Dr. Corazon L. Echano


TechVoc Task Force

Encoders:

Mr. Lemuel C. Valles

Fund: Department of Education

REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines


Incorporated. Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate, 2nd
Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
5. www.doityourself.com/stry/typeselectricbox-cached
6. www.ehow.com/how_2222734_install-gfci-receptacle.html
7. rona.ca/content/installing.gfci-ground_fault_circuit_interrupter
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

How to Use this Module ................................................................................... i


Introduction .................................................................................................... ii
Technical Terms ............................................................................................. iii
Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install electrical boxes on wood, metal studs
and concrete walls
 Learning Experiences/Activities ............................................................. 2
 Information Sheet 1.1 ............................................................................ 3
 Self-Check 1.1 ....................................................................................... 9
 Operation Sheet 1.1 ............................................................................. 11
 Job Sheet 1.1 ...................................................................................... 14
Learning Outcome 2: Select wiring devices
 Learning Experiences/Activities ........................................................... 18
 Information Sheet 2.1 .......................................................................... 19
 Self-Check 2.1 ..................................................................................... 22
Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install wiring devices
 Learning Experiences/Activities ........................................................... 24
 Information Sheet 3.1 .......................................................................... 25
 Job Sheet 3.1 ...................................................................................... 26
Assessment Plan ........................................................................................... 28
Observation Checklist ................................................................................... 29
Observation and Questioning Checklist ......................................................... 30
Demonstration .............................................................................................. 31
Written Report .............................................................................................. 32
Performance Test .......................................................................................... 33
Answer Key 1.1 ............................................................................................. 34
Answer Key 2.1 ............................................................................................. 35
HOW TO USE THIS MODULE

Welcome to the Module “Installation of wiring devices for floor and


ground fault current interrupting outlets”. This module contains training
materials and activities for you to complete.

The unit of competency “Install wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets” contains the knowledge, skills and attitudes
required for Building Wiring Installation course required to obtain the
National Certificate (NC) level II.

You are required to go through a series of learning activities in order to


complete each of the learning outcomes of the module. In each learning outcome
there are Information Sheets, Job Sheets, Operation Sheets and Activity
Sheets. Do these activities on your own and answer the Self-Check at the end of
each learning activity.

If you have questions, do not hesitate to ask your teacher for assistance.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

You may already have some basic knowledge and skills covered in this
module. If you can demonstrate competence to your teacher in a particular
skill, talk to your teacher so you do not have to undergo the same training
again. If you have a qualification or Certificate of Competency from previous
trainings show it to him/her. If the skills you acquired are consistent with and
relevant to this module, they become part of the evidence. You can present
these for RPL. If you are not sure about your competence skills, discuss this
with your teacher.

After completing this module, ask your teacher to assess your competence.
Result of your assessment will be recorded in your competency profile. All the
learning activities are designed for you to complete at your own pace.

In this module, you will find the activities for you to accomplish and relevant
information sheets for each learning outcome. Each learning outcome may have
more than one learning activity.

This module is prepared to help you achieve the required competency in


receiving and relaying information. This will be the source of information that
will enable you to acquire the knowledge and skills in Building Wiring
Installation NC II independently at your own pace with minimum supervision
from your teacher.

Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS
i
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND


GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING
OUTLETS

Module Title: Installing wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets

INTRODUCTION:

This module contains information and suggested learning activities in the


installation of wiring devices for floor and ground fault current interrupting
outlets. It includes instructions and procedure on how to install and select
electrical boxes.

This module consists of three (3) learning outcomes. Each learning outcome
contains learning activities supported by instruction sheets. Before you perform
the instructions, read the information sheets and answer the self-check and
activities provided to ascertain to yourself and your teacher that you have
acquired the knowledge necessary to perform the skill portion of the particular
learning outcome.

Upon completing this module, report to your teacher for assessment to check
your achievement of knowledge and skills requirements of this module. If you
pass the assessment, you will be given a certificate of completion.

SUMMARY OF LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of the module, the students shall be able to:

LO1 Layout and install electrical boxes on wood, metal studs and concrete
walls
LO2 Select wiring devices
LO3 Layout and install wiring devices

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Refer to the assessment criteria of learning outcomes 1-3 of this module.

PREREQUISITES

Basic and Common Competency

Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS
ii
TECHNICAL TERMS

Amperage (Amps) is a measure of electrical current flow.

Circuit breaker or fuse is used to protect against over-current and short circuit
conditions that may result in potential fire hazards and explosion.

Contactor is an electric power switch, not operated manually and designed for
frequent operation.

Electrical Faults is a partial or total failure in an electrical conductor or


appliance.

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter is used against shock and electrocution.


GFCI device will de-energize a circuit when it senses a difference in the amount
of electricity passing through the device and returning through the device, or a
"leak" of current from the circuit.

Handy box is surface mounted box and has rounded corners for safety.

Ground/grounding is a conducting connection, whether intentional or


accidental by which an electric circuit or equipment is connected to the earth,
or to some conducting body of relatively large extent that serves in place of the
earth.

Over current is any current in excess of the rated current or ampacity of a


conductor which may result in risk of fire or shock from insulation damaged
from heat generated by over current condition.

Outlet is a contact device installed along a circuit for the connection of an


attachment plug and flexible cord to supply power to portable equipment and
electrical appliances. It is also known as receptacles.

Receptacle is a contacting device installed at an outlet for connection externally


by means of a plug and flexible cord

Short circuit is an abnormal electrical path.

Switch is a device for making, breaking, or rearranging the connections of an


electric circuit.

Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS
iii
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND


GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING
OUTLETS

Module Title: Installing wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install electrical boxes on wood, metal studs
and concrete walls

Assessment Criteria

1. Boxes are selected according to the capacity rating listed in the PEC.
2. Electrical boxes are installed according to the job requirements and to the
PEC standards
3. Electrical boxes are identified and selected as per job requirements.
4. Boxes are knocked out in line with the job requirements.
5. Boxes are mounted vertically/ horizontally aligned.
6. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon completion of the job.
7. Final report is prepared upon the completion of job.

References:

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines Incorporated.


Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate, 2nd
Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
5. Johnston, Larry et al. Better Homes and Gardens Wiring. 1st Edition.
Meredith Brooks. 2007.
6. www.doityourself.com/stry/typeselectricbox-cached

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 1
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install electrical boxes on wood, metal


studs and concrete walls

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read the attached Information  You can ask the assistance of


Sheet 1.1 on: your teacher explain further the
 PEC provisions on installing topics you cannot understand
box
 Types of electrical box

2. Answer Self-Check 1.1  Try to answer the Self-Check


without looking at the information
sheet

3. Compare your answer to Answer


Key 1.1.

4. Perform Operation Sheet 1.1 on  Observe the demonstration of


installing box in finished space. your teacher and check the
technique while performing the
operation.

5. Perform Job Sheet 1.1 on  The teacher supervises while you


installing electrical boxes in perform the activity.
wiring board. 


6. When you are ready, you can
proceed to L.O. 2.

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 2
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1

PEC PROVISION IN INSTALLING ELECTRICAL BOXES


Electrical box’s primary function is to house electrical connections. Those
connections might be to a switch, a receptacle, the leads of a light fixture, or
other sets of wire.
Electrical codes require that all wire connections or cable splices be inside
an approved metal or plastic box. And every box must be accessible – you
cannot bury inside a wall.This protects your home from the danger of fire and
make it easier to inspect and upgrade your wiring in the future.
Codes govern how many connections you are allowed to make within a
box, depending on its size. If you must make more connections, you have to use
a larger box.
Boxes for switches and receptacles serve as workhorses in any electrical
installation. Some of the metal ones can be ganged in to double, triple, or larger
multiples by removing one side and linking them together.

CHOOSING THE CORRECT BOX SIZE

Type of Box Size in inches Maximum number of wires allowed


in box
(length x width 14 gauge 12 gauge 10 gauge
x depth
Switch/ 3x2x1½ 3 3 3
Receptacle 3x2x2 5 4 4
3x2x2¼ 5 4 4
3x2x2½ 6 5 5
3x2x2¾ 7 6 5
3x2x3½ 9 8 7

Utility 4x2⅛x1½ 5 4 4
4x2⅛x1⅞ 6 5 5
4x2⅛x2⅛ 7 6 5

Fixture/ 4x1¼ round or 6 5 5


Junction octagonal
4x1½ round or 7 6 6
Octagonal
4x2⅛ round or 10 9 8
Octagonal
4x1¼ square 9 8 7
4x1½ square 10 9 8
4x2⅛ square 15 13 12

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 3
Boxes should be installed so that the outside edges are flushed with the
finishing material. Presumably, you know what materials you will be using, but
make sure that you know the thickness of any paneling, wallboard, or
combinations. (For 3/8-inch drywall plus ¼-inch paneling, for example the box
should stick out 5/8-inch from the front of the framing.) The code allows boxes
to be as deep as ½ inch behind the surface of noncombustible materials, such
as gypsum wallboard, brick, or concrete block. This may cause a problem;
however lining up the receptacle and cover plate, so have the outside edges
flush with the finishing material in all cases.

Mounting Boxes

There are a great many different types of electrical boxes, but basically there
are only two ways of attaching them to walls and ceilings. The easiest method,
used almost universally in new construction is to nail the box directly to the
framing of the new work before any finishing materials are attached to walls or
ceilings.

The most convenient boxes are equipped with mounting brackets welded to
the box itself. Simply nail through the bracket into the front or sides of the
studs or joist bottoms with 1-inch roofing nails. Other boxes are nailed with 8d
(8-penny) nails into the sides of the studs through projections in the top or
bottom, or through holes predrilled in the boxes themselves. Some boxes,
usually plastic ones, come with nails already attached through in-line
projections.

Occasionally a box must be located away from the framing members. This is
often true of ceiling fixtures, and sometimes wall fixtures, when exact placement
is more desirable than it is for a switch or outlet. In new work, use wood cleats,
metal mounting straps, or adjustable bar hangers, which are nailed into the
studs or joists on each end. The box can then be slid and locked in place at the
optimum location.

Old Work

When you are working with existing walls or ceiling, box mounting, like
everything else in old work, is a little more difficult. When the proper location of
the box is determined, a hole is cut into the wallboard or paneling to accept the
new box. Make a paper or cardboard template of the box by laying it face down
and tracing around it. (Some box manufacturers supply a template with the
box). Trace around the template onto the wall to mark the rough opening. If
only one or two boxes are involved, it may be simply just to hold the box itself to
the wall and trace around it.

If the walls consist of gypsum wallboard or paneling, drill holes about ½ inch
in diameter at the corners of the box opening and cut out the opening with a

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 4
keyhole saw. When the walls are made of real plaster, chisel away some of the
plaster near the center of the box first . If there is metal or gypsum lath behind
the plaster, proceed as above for regular walls, but use a fine-toothed blade,
such as a hacksaw blade, to avoid damaging the plaster. In homes built prior to
World War II, you will probably find the wooden lath behind the plaster. If so,
chip away a little more until you expose a couple of pieces of wood lath. Then
adjust the box location, if necessary, so that the top and bottom, of the boxes
will fall in the middle of the lath strips. The lath strips are about 1 ½ inches
wide. Cut out the opening as above with a fine-toothed blade. Then chip away
about 3/8 inch more plaster above and below the opening to allow direct
mounting of the box to the wooden lath with No. 5 wood screws.

Special Mounting Devices

For all other walls, special mounting devices will be needed. There are
several types, many of which are attached to the boxes themselves. Some have
clamp like devices that hug the back of the wallboard when the attached screws
are turned. Boxes without mounting devices can be attached to wallboards or
thin paneling with “Madison clips,” which are slipped between the box and wall
on both sides, then bent back over the insides of the boxes. (The longer length
at top and bottom keeps the clips from falling out.) On thick paneling, boxes
can be screwed directly to the wood.

Ceiling boxes in old work should be mounted from above where possible, as
in an attic, using adjustable bar hangers.

Installing wiring in wood framing

Receptacle and ceiling box installation. Choose boxes that are easy to
install so that they will be flush with the finished wall surface. The most
common type of boxes used in residential occupancies are the non-metallic pre-
nailed “Nail-on” type. Position the switch and receptacle boxes at uniform
heights.

Drilling holes in the studs. Drill holes at the center of the studs, so that the
edges are not less than one and one-fourth (1+1/4) inches from the edge. If the
hole is closer to the edge of the stud or if you have to make a notch instead of a
hole (where wiring must go through corner framing, for example), then the NM
cable must be protected from nails by installing a protective metal plate.

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 5
Figure 1. Installing wiring in wood framing
Types of Electrical Box

1. Wall boxes
 used for housing switches and receptacles.
 made of metal or plastic and have the capability to be mounted to a wall
or stud
 the holes in the side of the box where the conduit enters the box are
called knockouts. In metal boxes, conduit can also be secured to the
holes.
 one type is a Four-Inch Square box that is only 1 ½” or 2” deep for places
too shallow to mount a standard box.

a. Handy box is surface mounted and has rounded corners for safety.

Figure 2. Examples of handy box

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 6
b. Drywall box has expandable arms and can be mounted on a drywall.

Figure 3. Examples of dry wall box

c. Plastic box is best for new installation and often has a nail built-in for
quick attachment to the stud.

Figure 4. Examples of plastic box

d. Gem box is commonly made box, usually in 2” wide, 3” high and 2


1/2” deep and made of metal. Deeper boxes are available.

Figure 5. Example of gem box

2. Ceiling Box

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 7
 Also known as a junction box or splice box
 Used to anchor ceiling fixtures and serves as a junction box where wires can
meet and run to other areas of the room.
 They are either 4” octagonal or round shaped, and either 1-1/2” or 2-1/8”
deep.
 They may also include adjustable mounting hangers that attach to rafters in
the ceiling and allow the box to be placed anywhere between.
 Hangers also provide the short nipple or threaded rod that secures lighting
fixtures.

Figure 6. Examples of ceiling box

3. Weatherproof Box

 Also known as an outdoor box.


 Used for exterior switches or receptacles.
 Thicker than interior boxes and has a rubber gasket between the cover
and the box to keep out water.
 Covers are screw-on or snap-on.

Figure 7. Example of weather proof box

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 8
Wall Plates

 Also known as faceplates or covers.


 A flat metal, plastic or wooden piece that covers the openings in the wall
made by receptacles and switches.
 The openings in the cover match the type and number or receptacles or
switches being covered. Blank covers are also available.

Figure 8. Example of wall plates

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 9
SELF-CHECK 1.1

A. Direction: Read each statement carefully and identify the item/s being
asked. Write your answer on the separate sheet of paper.

1. It is made of metal or plastic and has the capability to


be mounted on a wall or stud.

2. It is used for exterior switches or receptacle.

3. It is also known as faceplates or covers.

4. It is also known as a junction box or splice box.

5. It is commonly made box, usually in 2” wide, 3” high


and 2 1/2” deep and made of metal.

6. It is best for new installation and often has a nail built-


in for quick attachment to the stud.

7. It has expandable arms and can be mounted on


drywall.

8. It is a surface mounted box and has rounded corners


for safety.

9. How many inches is required by the code in mounting


boxes behind the surface of non-combustible
materials?

10. It is the easiest method in mounting boxes.

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 10
OPERATION SHEET 1.1

INSTALLING BOX IN FINISHED SPACE

Supplies and Materials

 Boxes as fitting
 Utility box
 Fastening devices
 Laboratory board

Tools and Equipment

 Gimlet
 Utility knife
 Keyhole saw
 Screwdrivers
- Philips screwdriver
- flat
 Push-pull tape rule
 Claw hammer
 Ladder

Safety Rules and Practices During laboratory Work

1. Observe proper handling of tools and equipments


2. Always check the materials to be installed for damages.

Procedure

1. Prepare all necessary tools and equipment needed as listed above.


2. Wear appropriate PPE.
3. Determine the box location

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 11
4. Drill a small hole on the wall.
Note .Always observe the proper measurement and allowable distances in
installing boxes
5. Held the box against the surface and trace around center it on the hole you
have marked.

6. Cut the traced outline with the use of keyhole saw.

7. Insert the box into the wall and tighten it firmly in place with the screw.

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 12
8. Check the verticality and horizontality of the installed electrical box.
9. Perform good housekeeping.

Assessment Criteria

Horizontality and Verticality of Mounted Box 10 pts.


Knocked out of box 10 pts.
Proper use of PPE 5 pts.
Proper handling of tools 5 pts.
Speed 5 pts.
TOTAL 35 pts.
Note: For every error committed there will be one point deduction.

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 13
JOB SHEET 1.1

INSTALLATION OF ELECTRICAL BOXES IN WIRING BOARD

Supplies and Materials

 Safety box
 Utility box
 Junction box
 Fastening device
 Laboratory board

Tools and Equipment

 Gimlet
 Utility knife
 Keyhole saw
 Screwdrivers
- Philips screwdriver
- flat
 Push-pull tape rule
 Claw hammer
 Ladder
Plan / Working Drawing

35cm 35cm 15cm


20cm


30cm

25cm

30cm

15cm

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 14
Procedure

1. Prepare all necessary tools and equipment needed as listed above.


2. Read and interpret the working drawing.
3. Wear appropriate PPE.

4. Determine the exact location of the box considering the allowable distances
or measurements required by the PEC whether it is to be installed in wood,
metal studs or concrete walls. (Note: Refer to wiring plan.)
5. Install boxes in place as designed.
6. Check the horizontality and verticality of the mounted boxes.
7. Perform good housekeeping.

Safety Rules and Practices During Laboratory Work

1. Observe proper handling of tools and equipments


2. Always check the materials to be installed for damages.

Evaluation:

The students will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

MEASUREMENTS
All dimensions will be in mm center to center with a tolerance of + -
20 pts.
3mm.

WORKMANSHIP 50 pts.
Horizontality and verticality 25
Methods of supporting 15

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 15
- properly installed 10
- not properly installed 5
- no support 0

SAFETY 10 pts.
Used appropriate PPE 10
Not appropriate used of PPE 5
No PPE 0

HANDLING OF TOOLS 10 pts.


Proper handling of toolset all the time 10
Used tools for some time 5
Improper use of tools 0
SPEED 10 pts.
Before the allotted time 10
Within the allotted time 8
10 minutes overtime 6
15 minutes overtime 4
Unfinished 2
TOTAL 100%

LO 1. LAYOUT AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL BOXES ON WOOD, METAL STUDS AND CONCRETE WALLS Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 16
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND


GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING
OUTLETS

Module Title: Installing wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets

Learning Outcome 2: Select wiring devices

Assessment Criteria

1. Wiring devices are selected according to the job requirements.


2. Wiring devices are inspected for damage according to the manufacturer’s
specification.

References:

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines Incorporated.


Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate, 2nd
Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
5. www.ehow.com
6. rona.ca/content/installing.gfci

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 17
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 2: Select wiring devices

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read the attached information ● You can ask the assistance of


sheet 2. your teacher to explain further
topics you cannot understand.
 Kinds of wiring devices
 How to select wiring devices
 Ground Fault Current
Interrupter Protected Outlet

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 18
INFORMATION SHEET 2.1

TYPE OF WIRING DEVICES

INTRODUCTION

A device, based from the National Electrical Code (NEC) definition, is a unit
of an electrical system that is intended to carry, but not to utilize electric
energy. This covers a wide assortment of system components that include,
however not limited to the following:

 Switch
 Relays
 Contactors
 Receptacles
 Conductors

How to select wiring devices?

1. Select a known industry manufacturer.


2. Look for a multi- year product warranty.
3. Make sure that there is an easy and clear way to contact the manufacturers
support.
4. Check for a connected equipment damage warranty.
5. Always ask for manufacturer’s manual.
6. Select wiring devices which are well-made and durable.
7. Select materials that easy to use and install.
8. Select wiring devices according to the job requirements.

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) Information

Outdoor receptacles as well as those in kitchens, bathrooms, and anywhere


else near water should be the ground fault circuit interrupting type (GFCI)

A GFCI is a ground fault circuit interrupter. It is a modestly priced electrical


device that, when installed in residential electrical circuits. Two-thirds of about
300 electrocutions happening each year in and around the home could has
been avoided with this GFCI device.

The GFCI is designed to guard people and pets from severe and sometimes
fatal electrical shock. A GFCI detects ground faults and interrupts the flow of
electric current. Picture a hair dryer (blow dryer) that is accidentally knocked off
of a bathroom counter and into a bathtub filled with water. The GFCI will stop
the flow of electricity within milliseconds - of the hair dryer hitting the surface of
the water. If someone was in the bath tub, a painful shock may still be felt but
the GFCI will prevent their electrocution or serious injury.
.

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 19
How a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter works

The GFCI continually measures electricity flowing within a circuit to detect any
loss of current. If the current passing through the circuit fluctuates a minute
amount from that returning (to complete the circuit) , the GFCI instantaneously
switches the power off to the affected circuit. The GFCI interrupts power within
milliseconds to prevent a lethal dose of electricity.

A Classic Example of the GFCI at Work. Your toaster is old and has a
loose bare wire inside it touching the outer metal housing. If the toaster is
plugged in, the housing is charged with electricity. You are cleaning the kitchen
and moving counter top items around. When you touch the toaster housing with
one hand while the other hand is touching a grounded metal object, like a
kitchen faucet, you will receive a life threatening shock! If the toaster was
plugged into a GFCI protected outlet, the power will be turning off before a fatal
shock is delivered through your body.

Types of Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters

Receptacle GFCI. This GFCI is used in place of a regular wall outlet or


"duplex receptacle". This GFCI is normally found throughout the house in
places like bathrooms, kitchens, garages, outdoor areas and other locations
where damp conditions do or could exist. The receptacle GFCI fits into the
standard outlet box and protects you against ground faults when an electrical
product is connected to the GFCI protected outlet. Modern homes use
receptacle-type GFCls that protect other electrical outlets connected on the
branch circuit.

Temporary/Portable GFCI. When permanent GFCls are not practical,


temporary GFCls are used. Temporary GFCIs contain the GFCI circuitry in an
enclosure with plug prongs at the back and receptacle plugs in front. It can be
plugged into an unprotected outlet, then the electrical appliance/device is
plugged into the temporary GFCI. Portable GFCIs is simply an extension cord
combined with a GFCI. It adds flexibility in using receptacles that are not

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 20
protected by GFCls. Extension cords with GFCI protection incorporated are
great for use when permanent or portable GFCI protection is unavailable.

Circuit Breaker GFCI: Residences equipped with circuit breakers can have
circuit breaker GFCI protection installed in the panel box to give protection for
specific circuits. The circuit breaker GFCI serves two functions. The circuit
breaker GFCI will shut off power to the circuit in the instance of a ground fault
plus the GFCI protected circuit breaker will turn power off if a short circuit or
overload is detected.

Figure 9. Types of GFCI

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 21
SELF-CHECK 2.1

A. Direction: Enumerate the following:

1-5 – The different types of wiring devices.


6-13 – Steps in selecting wiring devices.
14-16 – Types of GFCI

B. Direction: Given the list of wiring devices below, select what type of wiring
device is appropriate to following format given. Write your
answer on a separate sheet of paper.

Wiring Device Type

1. Flat cord

2. Outlet

3. Magnetic

4. Rotary

5. Cable

6. GFCI

7. Polarized

8. Toggle

LO 2. SELECT WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 22
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND


GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING
OUTLETS

Module Title: Installing wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets

Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install wiring devices

Assessment Criteria

1. Wiring devices are installed according to the latest edition of Philippine


Electrical Code and National Electrical Code.
2. Wiring devices are installed according to the job requirements.
3. Devices for floor and ground fault interrupting current in-line are wired.
4. Working drawing circuit is checked for operation based on the established
procedure.
5. Safety procedures in installing Wiring devices are strictly observed according
to the OHS guidelines and procedures.

References:

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines Incorporated.


Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate, 2nd
Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
5. www.ehow.com/how_2222734_install-gfci-receptacle
6. rona.ca/content/installing.gfci-ground_fault_circuit_interrupter

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 23
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 3: Layout and install wiring devices

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Perform job sheet 2 on installing  You can ask the assistance of your
wiring devices. teacher in case the will be any
problem while performing the
 GFCI receptacle installation.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 24
INFORMATION SHEET 3.1

NEC PROVISIONS ON INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES

This section has been revised to require to include some important concepts
in the installation of wiring devices. GFCI protection for receptacles installed
within 6 feet of laundry sinks, wet bar sinks and utility sinks in dwelling units.
This requirement previously applied only to receptacles installed in countertop
surfaces within 6 feet of wet bar sinks.
SECTION

 Revising is made to stress the text to require all 15 and 20A, 125V
receptacles within 6 ft of the dwelling unit laundry or utility sink have to
be GFCI protected. This is because irons, hair dryers and similar items
with ungrounded polarized and non polarized cord caps are commonly
used in this area and present the same shock hazard found in other areas
where the NEC currently requires GFCI protection.
 The GFCI protection requirement for commercial kitchens was clarified by
adding a definition of a kitchen. New requirement expands the GFCI
protection requirements for 15 or 20A, 125V receptacles to include
receptacles located outdoors that are accessible to the public. And new
requirement expands the GFCI protection requirements for the required
15 or 20A, 125V receptacle for heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration
equipment [210.63].
 Since that there have been at least three electrocutions reported over a
three-year period from boat hoists, a new subsection was added. The rule
specifies that GFCI protection is required for "outlets" that supply boat
hoists, not just "receptacle outlet." This will ensure GFCI protection
regardless of whether the unit's cord- and plug-connected or hard-wired.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 25
JOB SHEET 3.1

INSTALLATION OF WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT


CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS

Materials and Tools

 GFCI outlet
 Screwdrivers
 Electrical tape
 Wire strippers
 Wire nuts (connectors)
 12/2 NM (non-metallic) cable also called Romex

Instrument
Multi tester

Procedure

1. Prepare all tools and materials needed.


2. Wear appropriate PPE
3. Turn off the power at the circuit-breaker box.
4. Remove the outlet cover plate and the screws holding the outlet in place
(Figure A).
5. Test the outlet with the circuit tester to be sure the power is off.
6. Disconnect the wires from the outlet.
7. Separate the wires from the box into two pairs. One set of wires will be the
"line," or power supply. The other set will be the "load," which carries power
to additional outlets on the same circuit. A GFCI outlet, properly installed,
will protect all the outlets on the "load" side.
8. Make sure that the wires are completely separated from one another (Figure
B), then turn on the power back at the circuit-breaker box.
9. Use the circuit tester to determine which set of wires carries the power.
Turn off the power.
10. Connect the power-supply wires to the terminals marked "line" and the
load wires to the terminals marked "load." Connect the white wires to the
silver screws and the black wires to the brass or gold screws (Figure C). The
outlet may also indicate appropriate color connections.
11. Connect the bare ground wire to the green screw.
12. Put the outlet back into the box. Screw it into place, then attach the cover
plate.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 26
13. Turn the power back on at the circuit-breaker box.

Figure A Figure B Figure C

reset botton

▬ ▬
●█ █ ●
load side (to another outlet) ▬ ▬ line side

ground line

GFCI OUTLET

Safety rules and practices during laboratory work

1. Observe proper handling of tools and equipments


2. Always check the materials to be installed for damages.
3. Shut off power supply before undertaking job or install

Assessment Criteria

Accuracy of Installation 25 pts.


Splicing and Joining 5 pts.
Mounting of Boxes 5 pts.
Proper use of PPE 5 pts.
Proper Handling of Tools and Measuring Instrument 5 pts.
Good Housekeeping 5 pts.
TOTAL 50 pts.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 27
ASSESSMENT PLAN

Course Title : BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION


Unit of : INSTALL WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND
Competency FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS
Module Title : Installing wiring devices for floor and ground fault
current interrupting outlets

Assessment Methods

Demonstration

Work Sample
Questioning*
Observation

Written
Assessment Criteria

Test*
Oral
LO 1. Install electrical boxes on wood, metal studs
and concrete walls
1. Boxes are selected according to capacity rating listed
x
in the PEC
2. Electrical boxes are installed according to job
x
requirements and PEC standards
3. Electrical boxes are identified and selected as per job
x
requirements
4. Boxes are knocked out in line with job
x
5. requirements.
6. Boxes are mounted vertically/ horizontally aligned. x
7. Workplace is cleaned and made safe upon completion
x
of the job.
8. Final report is prepared upon completion of job. x
LO 2. Select wiring devices
1. Wiring devices are inspected for damage according to
x
manufacturer’s specification.
2. Wiring devices are selected according to the job
x
requirements
LO 3. Install wiring devices
1. Wiring devices are installed according to the latest
edition of Philippine Electrical Code and National x
Electrical Code.
2. Wiring devices are installed according to the job
x
requirements.
3. Devices for floor and ground fault interrupting
x
current in-line are wired
4. Working drawing circuit is checked for operation
based one established procedure
5. Safety procedures in installing wiring devices are
strictly observed according to OHS guidelines and x
procedures.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 28
Observation Checklist

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student [insert description of activity being observed].
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Put a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of the
activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Complete the feedback section of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If yes completed
check the box













Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?
Teacher’s Feedback:

Teacher’s signature: Date:

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 29
Observation and Questioning Checklist

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of the
School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student [insert description of activity being observed].
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Put a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of the
activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Ask the student using the questions in the attached list to confirm his/her
underpinning knowledge
5. Put a check in the box to show that the student has answered the questions
correctly.
6. Complete the feedback section of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If completed, check
the box







Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 30
Demonstration

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Unit of competency:
Competency standards:
Date of assessment:
Time of assessment:
Instructions for demonstration
Given the necessary materials the student must be able to:

Materials and equipment:

 to show if a skill is
demonstrated
During the demonstration the student can: Yes No N/A

  
  
  
  
The student’s demonstration was:
Satisfactory  Not Satisfactory 

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 31
Written report

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Task:
Your task is to:
 [insert description of task]

Submission date:
Use the checklist below as the basis for judging whether the student’s
report meets the required competency standards.
The student’s report…. If met, check the
box






Generally did the student’s report meet the Yes No
standard?
Comments:

Student’s
Date:
signature:
Teacher’s
Date:
signature:

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 32
PERFORMANCE TEST

Student's Name Date

Competency: Test Attempt


1st 2nd 3rd

Directions: OVERALL EVALUATION


Level
Achieved
Ask teacher to assess PERFORMANCE LEVELS
your performance in the
4 - Can perform this skill without supervision
following critical tasks and with initiative and adaptability to problem
and performance criteria situations.
below
3 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily without
assistance or supervision.
You will be rated based
on the overall evaluation 2 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily but
at the right side. requires some assistance and/or supervision.

1 - Can perform parts of this skill satisfactorily,


but requires considerable assistance and/or
supervision.

Teacher will put his/ her initial level achieved.

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
For acceptable achievement, check Yes; for Yes No N/A
unacceptable achievement check NO; and for
unachieved skill, check N/A.

ASSESSMENT PLAN Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 33
ANSWER KEY 1.1

A. Direction: Read each statement carefully and identify the item/s being asked
by writing your answer on the space provided.

Wall box 1. It is made of metal or plastic and have the capability to


be mounted to a wall or stud.

Weatherproof box 2. Used for exterior switches or receptacle.

Wall plate 3. Also known as faceplates or covers.

Ceiling box 4. Also known as a junction box or splice box.

Gem box 5. It is commonly made box, usually 2” wide, 3” high and 2


1/2” deep and made of metal.

Plastic box 6. Is is best for new installation and often has a nail built-
in for quick attachment to the stud.

Dry wall box 7. It has expandable arms and can be mounted on drywall.

Handy box 8. A surface mounted box and has rounded corners for
safety.

½ inch 9. How many inch that the code does not allow to deep
boxes behind the surface of non-combustible materials?

Nail the box 10. It is the easiest method in mounting boxes.

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INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 34
ANSWER KEY 2.1

A. Direction: Enumerate the following:

1-5 – What are the different types of wiring devices?


6-13 – How to select wiring devices?
14-16 – Types of GFCI

1. Relay
2. Receptacle
3. Switch
4. Conductors
5. Contactors

6. Select a known industry manufacturer.


7. Look for a multi- year product warranty.
8. Make sure that there is a easy and clear way to contact the manufacturer support.
9. Check for a connected equipment damage warranty.
10.Always ask for manufacturer’s manual.
11.Select wiring devices which are well-made and durable.
12.Ease of use and installation
13.Select wiring devices according to job requirements

14.Receptacle GFCI
15.Portable GFCI
16.Circuit breaker GFCI

B. Direction: Given the list of wiring devices below, select what type of wiring
devices they belong following the format given. Write your
answer on a separate sheet of paper.

Wiring Device Types

1. Flat cord Conductor

2. Outlet Receptacle

3. Magnetic Contactor

4. Rotary Switch

5. Cable Conductor

6. GFCI Receptacle

7. Polarized Relay

8. Toggle Switch

LO 3. LAYOUT AND INSTALL WIRING DEVICES Page


INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 35
LO 3. LAYOUT AND INSTALL WIRING DEVICES Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 36
ANSWER KEY Page
INSTALLING WIRING DEVICES FOR FLOOR AND GROUND FAULT CURRENT INTERRUPTING OUTLETS 37
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Education
PUBLIC TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL
HIGH SCHOOLS

Unit of Competency: INSTALL ELECTRICAL PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR


LIGHTING AND GROUNDING

Module No. 3 Module Title: INSTALLING ELECTRICAL PROTECTION


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Copyright Department of Education 2008

First Published JUNE 2008

This draft was prepared during the Competency-Based Learning


Materials Development Workshop conducted at the Marikina Hotel,
Marikina City on February 18-22, 2008 and finalized on May 23-25,
2008 at the Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP), Tagaytay
City.

This learning instrument was developed by the following personnel:

Technology Teacher:

Mr. Marino C. Cueto


Community Vocational High School
MinSCAT Calapan Campus
Masipit, Calapan City

Contextual Teacher:

Ms. Gina C. delos Santos


A.F.G. Bernardino Memorial Trade School
Lias, Marilao, Bulacan

Facilitators:

Dr. Corazon Echano


TechVoc Task Force

Encoder:

MR. LEMUEL C. VALLES

Fund: Department of Education

REFERENCES AND FURTHER READINGS

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines


Incorporated. Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and
Estimate, 2nd Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III;
Adriana Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Copyright: Department of Education 2009

This module was based on Competency-based Curriculum- Contextual


Learning Matrix (CBC-CLM) refined during the Writeshop on the Refinement,
Enrichment of Competency-Based Curriculum and Contextual Learning Matrix of ARTS
and TRADES Specializations at Marikina Hotel, Marikina City on April 20-25, 2009.

This learning instrument was refined and enriched by the following educators:

TECHNOLOGY TEACHERS

RODRIGO S. CASTILLO FORTUNATO C. MESINA


Bauan Technical High School Angeles City National Trade School
Bauan, Batangas Angeles City

ROMMEL M, MEDIDA
AFG Bernardino Memorial Trade School FRANCOISE E. FRANCO
Marilao Bulacan Rodriguez Vocational High School
Nagtahan, Manila
HECTOR M. VALLARTA
San Pedro Relocation Center National SAMUEL T. ARANZA
High School San Pedro Relocation Center Nat’l HS
San Pedro, Laguna San Pedro, Laguna

CONTEXTUAL TEACHERS
Science:
MYLA V. COMBALICER
Manuel S. Enverga Memorial College LOIDA A. RABANG
of Arts and Trades (MSEMCAT) Ilocos Norte Regional School of Fisheries
Mauban, Quezon La Paz, Laoag City

Mathematics:
LORENZO Y. BALDOVINO JR. FRANCISCO P. BOGTONG
San Pedro Relocation Ctr National HS AJ Villegas Vocational HS
San Pedro, Laguna Tondo, Manila

English:
ANGELITO A. DINA F. PADERANGA GINA C. DELOS
ESPEDIDO AFG Bernardino SANTOS
San Pedro Relocation Memorial Trade School A.F.G. Bernardino
Center National HS Marilao, Bulacan Memorial Trade School
San Pedro, Laguna Lias, Marilao, Bulacan

FACILITATORS

Dr. VICTORIO N. Dr. CORAZON L. Dr. ORLANDO E.


MEDRANO ECHANO MANUEL
Tech-Voc Task Force Tech - Voc Task Force Tech - Voc Task Force

ENCODER

FLORELYN B. MORADA
Dept. of Education
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Copyright: Department of Education 2009

This module was based on Competency-based Curriculum-


Contextual Learning Matrix (CBC-CLM) refined during the Writeshop on
the Finalization and Packaging of Competency-Based Curriculum and
Contextual Learning Matrix of ARTS and TRADES Specializations
Specializations at Marikina Hotel, Marikina City on May 4-9, 2009.

This learning instrument was finalized and packed by the


following educators:

TECHNOLOGY TEACHER

RODRIGO S. CASTILLO
Bauan Technical High School
Bauan, Batangas

ENGLISH EDITOR

ANGELITO A. ESPEDIDO
San Pedro Relocation Center National HS
San Pedro, Laguna

FACILITATORS

Dr. VICTORIO N. Dr. CORAZON L. Dr. ORLANDO E.


MEDRANO ECHANO MANUEL
Tech - Voc Task Force Tech - Voc Task Force Tech - Voc Task Force

ENCODER

LEONARDO L. FELICIANO
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

How to Use this Module ................................................................................... i

Introduction .................................................................................................... ii

Technical Terms ............................................................................................. iii

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install fuse panel ......................................... 1


 Learning Experiences/Activities ............................................................. 2
 Information Sheet 1.1 ............................................................................ 3
 Information Sheet 1.2 .......................................................................... 23
 Operation Sheet 1.1 ............................................................................. 25
 Self-Check 1.1 ..................................................................................... 27

Learning Outcome 2 ...................................................................................... 29


 Learning Experiences/Activities ........................................................... 30
 Information Sheet 2.1 .......................................................................... 31
 Operation Sheet 2.1 ............................................................................. 48
 Self-Check 2.1 ..................................................................................... 52

Assessment Plan ........................................................................................... 55

Observation checklist .................................................................................... 57

Observation and Questioning checklist ......................................................... 58

Demonstration .............................................................................................. 59

Written Report .............................................................................................. 60

Performance test ........................................................................................... 61

Answer Key 1.1 ............................................................................................. 62

Answer Key 2.1 ............................................................................................. 63

5
HOW TO USE THIS MODULE

Welcome to the module “Installing Electrical Protection System for


Lighting and Grounding”. This module contains training materials and
activities for you to complete.

The unit of competency ―Install Electrical Protection” contains the


knowledge, skills and attitudes required for Building Wiring Installation
course needed to obtain the National Certificate (NC) II level.

You are required to go through a series of learning activities in order to


complete each of the learning outcomes of the module. In each learning
outcome there are Information Sheets, Job Sheets, Operation Sheets
and Activity Sheets. Accomplish these activities on your own and answer
the Self-Check at the end of each learning activity.

If you have questions, do not hesitate to ask your teacher for assistance.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

You may already have some basic knowledge and skills covered in this
module. If you can demonstrate competence to your teacher in a particular
skill, talk to him/her so you do not have to undergo the same training again.
If you have a qualification or Certificate of Competency from previous
trainings, show it to him/her. If the skills you acquired are consistent with
and relevant to this module, they become part of the evidence. You can
present these for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). If you are not sure
about your competence/skills, discuss this with your teacher.

After completing this module, ask your teacher to assess your


competence. Result of your assessment will be recorded in your competency
profile. All the learning activities are designed for you to complete at your
own pace.

In this module, you will find the activities for you to complete and
relevant information sheets for each learning outcome. Each learning
outcome may have more than one learning activity.

This module is prepared to help you achieve the required competency in


receiving and relaying information. This will be the source of information
that will enable you to acquire the knowledge and skills in Building Wiring
Installation NC II independently at your own pace with minimum
supervision from your teacher.

6
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II
INSTALL ELECTRICAL PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR
Unit of Competency:
LIGHTING AND GROUNDING
Module Title: Installing Electrical Protection

INTRODUCTION:

This module contains the ―know‖ and ―do‖ units in installing electrical
protection.

It covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in installing


electrical protection system needed before starting work. Tools are inspected
and prepared. Proper checking must also be done before commencing work
so that lubrications and auxiliary parts are per enterprise specifications.
Proper storing must also be practiced.

This module consist of two (2) Learning Outcomes (LO’s) that contains
learning activities for both knowledge and skills supported with information
sheets, job/operation sheets and self-check. Before attempting to perform
the manual exercises, see to it that you have already read and understood
the information/operation sheet and answered correctly the self-check
provided in every Learning Activities.

SUMMARY OF LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of the module, you should be able to:

LO1. lay out and install fuse panel; and

LO2. lay out and install panel board.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Refer to the assessment criteria of learning outcomes 1-3 of this module.

PREREQUISITES

Basic and Common Competency

7
TECHNICAL TERMS

Amperage rating is a maximum current-carrying capacity of a device.

Blade-type cartridge fuse is a fuse with flat contact blades on a cylindrical


case.

Cabinet is an enclosure designed either for surface or flush mounting and


provided with a frame, mat, or trim in which a swinging door of doors may
be hung.

Circuit breaker is an automatic over-current device that trips on overloads,


shorts and resettable.

Concentric knockout is a several removable metal ring that allows the


entrance of various standard sizes of connectors into a cabinet.

Disconnecting is a method by which the conductor of a circuit can be


disconnected from their source of supply.

Dustproof is constructed that dust will not interface with its successful
operation.

Dust-tight is constructed that dust will not enter the enclosing case.

Eccentric knockout is a knockout that is removed from the box in sections


to form larger holes.

Edison-base plug fuse is a fuse with base that fits the same socket as a
regular based incandescent bulb.

Fault current is a current that flows from one conductor to ground or


another conductor because of an abnormal connection or arc between the
two.

Oil circuit breaker is a load interrupter in which the interrupting contacts


operate submerged in a transformer oil.

8
Overcurrent protection is a weak link in the circuit that limits the
amperage to a specified amount.

Overload is larger than normal current flowing within the normal current
path.

Rainproof is constructed, protected, or treated as to prevent the rain from


interfering with successful operation of the apparatus.

Rain tight is a constructed or protected exposure to a beating rain which


will not result to the entrance of the water.

Short circuit is larger than the normal current flowing outside the normal
current path.

Type “S” plug fuse is a fuse with special size-limiting characteristics for
each amperage range.

Voltage rating is the maximum voltage at which a device is designed to


operate.

ACRONYMS

NEC - National Electrical Code

NEMA – National Electrical Manufacturers’ Association

OHSA – Occupational Health Safety Act.

PEC – Philippine Electrical Code

9
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL ELECTRICAL PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR


LIGHTING AND GROUNDING

Module Title: Installing Electrical Protection

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and install fuse panel

Assessment Criteria

1. Tools and materials for installing fuse panel are selected in line with the job
requirements
2. Fuse panel is installed according to the job requirement.
3. Safety procedures are strictly followed according to the Occcupation Health
Safety Act (OHSA) standards.
4. Electrical conductors on fuse panel are properly harnessed in line with the
established standards.
5. Work place is cleaned upon the completion of the job.

References:

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines


Incorporated. Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate, 2nd
Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. www.epa.gov/rtp/new-bldg/environmental/0910updf
5. www.omnicontrols.com/
6. www.wikihow.com/
7. www.acmehowto.com/howto/maintenance/electrical/

10
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 1: Layout and Install Fuse Panel

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read the attached Information  You can ask the assistance of your
Sheet 1.1 about fuse panel. teacher to explain topics you
cannot understand.

2. Read the attached Information  You can ask the assistance of your
Sheet 1.2 about planning and teacher to explain topics you
preparing for installing of fuse cannot understand.
panel.


3. Perform Operation Sheet 1.1 on
installing safety switch.


4. Answer Self-Check 1.1

11
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1

FUSE PANEL

Philippine Electrical Code (PEC) provision for circuit protection

Conductors-Maximum ampacity and size

a. General –Branch circuit conductors shall have an ampacity of not less


than the rating of the branch circuit and not less than the maximum
load to be served. Cable assemblies with neutral conductors smaller
than the ungrounded conductors shall be marked.

b. Household ranges and cooking appliances .Branch circuit


conductors supplying household ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter
cooking units and other household cooking appliances shall have an
ampacity not less than the rating of the branch circuit and not less
than the maximum load to be served. For ranges of 8 ¾ Kw or more
rating, the minimum branch circuit rating shall be 40 amperes.

c. Other loads .Branch circuit conductors supplying loads other than


cooking appliances as covered shall have an ampacity sufficient for
the loads served and shall not be smaller than 2.0 mm2.

Fuses
A fuse is the simplest circuit protection device. Its name is derived
from the Latin word "fusus," meaning "to melt." Fuses have been used
almost from the beginning of the use of electricity. The earliest type of fuse
was simply a bare wire between two connections. The wire was smaller than
the conductor it was protecting. Therefore, it would melt before the
conductor it was protecting was harmed.

Some "copper fuse link" types are still in use but most fuses don’t
longer use copper as its element (the part of the fuse that melts). After
changing from copper to other metals, tubes or enclosures were developed to
hold the melting metal. The enclosed fuse made possible the addition of filler
material which helps to contain the arc that occurs when the element melts.
For many low power uses, the finer material is not required. A simple glass
tube is used. The use of a glass tube gives the added advantage of being able
to see when a fuse is open. Fuses of this type are commonly found in
automobile lighting circuits. Figure 2-1 shows several fuses and the symbols
used on schematics.

12
Figure 1-1.—Typical fuses and schematic symbols.

Principles and Operation of Fuses

A fuse is basically a short length of metal ribbon made of alloy with a


low melting point of a size that will carry a specified current indefinitely, but
which will melt when a larger current flow due to either overload or short
circuit. When the ribbon inside the fuse melts, the fuse may blow. When it
blows, the circuit is open just as if a wire had been cut or a switch opened at
the fuse location.

Types of Fuses According to Construction:

1. Plug type
2. Ferrule type
3. Knife blade type
4. Screw type

According to the National Electrical Code (NEC), all cartridge fuses


must be marked to show:

1. Ampere rating
2. Voltage rating
3. Interrupting rating when over 10,000 amperes
4. Current-limiting type
5. Trade name or name of manufacturer

13
Important Ratings when Choosing Replacement fuses:

1. Voltage rating. The rating must match or exceed the voltage rating
of the circuit.
2. Ampere rating. The rating of fuse should match the full load current
rating of the equipment or ampacity of conductor as closely as
possible.
3. Interrupting capacity. The total current in which the fuse can
interrupt without being damaged.

NEC requirements to be observed by an electrician when installing plug


fuses, fuse holder, and adapters:

1. They shall not be used in circuits exceeding 125 volts between


conductors, except on systems having grounded neutral with no
conductors having more than 150 volts to ground. This situation in
the 120/208-volt system in the commercial building covered in this
text, or in the case of 120/240-volt, single-phase system.

2. They shall have ampere ratings of 0 to 30 amperes.

3. They shall have a hexagonal configuration for ratings of 15 amperes


and below.

4. The screw shell must be connected to the load side of the circuit.

5. Edison-base plug fuses may be used only as replacements in existing


installations where there is no evidence of over fusing or tampering.

6. All new installations shall use fuse holders requiring Type S plug
fuses or fuse holders with a type s adapter inserted to accept Type S
fuses only.

7. Type S plug fuses are classified as 0 to 15 amperes; 16 to 20 amperes;


and 21 to 30 amperes.

14
Types “S” Fuses and Adapter

Types of Fuses According to the manner of operation

1. Dual-element, Time-delay Fuse

The dual-element, time-delay fuse, provides a time delay in the low-


overload range to eliminate unnecessary opening of the circuit because of
harmless overloads. However, this type of fuse is extremely responsive in
opening in short circuits. This fuse has two fusible elements connected in
series. Depending upon the magnitude of the current flow, one element is
designed to open when the current reaches a value of approximately 500%
of the fuse rating. The short-circuit element opens when a short circuit or
heavy overload occurs. That is, the element opens at current values of
approximately 500% or more of the fuse rating.

15
Fig. 1 Cutaway view of dual-element, time-delay fuse. On overloads, the
spring-loaded trigger assembly opens. On short circuits or heavy ground
faults, the fuse elements in the short-circuit section open. The fuse
elements are generally made of copper.

The thermal element is also designed to open at approximately 140


degrees Celsius, as well as on damaging overloads. In addition, the thermal
element will open whenever a loose connection or a poor contact in the
fuseholder causes heat to develop. As a result, a true dual-element fuse also
offers thermal protection to the equipment in which it is installed.

Dual-element fuses are suitable for use on motor circuits and other
circuits having high-inrush characteristics. This type of fuse can be used as
well for mains, feeders, subfeeders, and branch circuits. Dual-element fuses
may be used to provide back-up protection for circuit breakers, bus duct,
and other circuit components that lack an adequate interrupting rating,
bracing, or withstand rating. (Dual-element time-delay fuse will hold five
times it’s rating for 10 seconds)

2. Dual-element, time-delay, current-limiting fuse

The dual-element, time-delay, current limiting fuse, operates in the same


manner as the standard dual-element, time-delay fuse. The only difference
between the fuses is that, this fuse has a faster response to the short-circuit
range and thus more current limiting. The short-circuit element in the
current-limiting fuse can be silver or copper surrounded by quartz sand arc-
quenching filler. Silver-link fuses are more current-limiting than copper-link
fuses.

16
Fig. 2 Cutaway view of a dual-element, time-delay, current limiting fuse. On
overloads, the spring-loaded trigger assembly opens. On short circuits or heavy
ground faults, the fuse elements in the short-circuit section open. The fuse
elements are generally made of silver.

3. Current-limiting fuse (Non-time delay)

The straight current-limiting fuse, has an extremely fast


response in both the low-overload and short-circuit ranges. When
compared to other type of fuses, this type of fuse has the lowest
energy let-through values. Current limiting fuses are use to provide
better protection to mains, feeders, and subfeeders, circuit breakers,
bus duct, switchboards, and other circuit components that lack an
adequate interrupting rating, bracing, or withstand rating. Current-
limiting fuse elements can be made of silver or copper surrounded by
quartz sand arc-quenching filler. Silver-link fuses are more current
limiting than copper-link fuses.

Fig. 3 Cutaway view of a current-limiting, fastacting, single-element fuse.

A standard current-limiting fuse does not have spring-load or ―loaded


link‖ overload assembly found in dual-element fuses.

To be classified as ―current limiting‖, the code states that when a fuse


or breaker is subjected to heavy (high magnitude) fault currents, the fuse or
breaker must reduce the fault current flowing into the circuit to a value less
than the fault current that could have flowed into the circuit had there been
no fuse or breaker in the circuit.

When used in motor circuits, or other circuits having high current-


inrush characteristics, the current-limiting non-time delay fuses must be
sized at a much higher rating than actual load. That is, for motor with a full-
load current rating of 10 amperes, a 30- or 40 ampere current-limiting fuse

17
may be required to start the motor. In this case, the fuse is considered to be
the motor branch-circuit short-circuit protection. (Non-time delay fuse will
hold five times its rating for1/4 to 2 seconds; not ideal to loads which
requires more than 2 seconds to accelerate)

Characteristics of the Overload Currents:

 They are greater than the normal current flow.


 They are placed within the normal conducting current path.
 If allowed to continue, they will cause overheating of the equipment,
conductors, and the insulation of the conductors.

Characteristics of Short-circuit and Ground – Fault

1. They flow ―outside‖ of the normal current path.


2. They may be greater than the normal current flow.
3. They may be less than the normal current flow.

CLASSIFICATION OF FUSES

Class H

Class H fuses were also called NEC or code fuses. Most low cost,
common, standard nonrenewable one-time fuses are Class H fuses.
Renewable- type fuses are also classified under the Class H classification.
Neither the interrupting rating nor the notation Class H appears on the label
of Class H fuse. This type of fuse is tested by the Underwriters Laboratories
on circuits that deliver 10,000 amperes AC. Class H fuses are available with
ratings ranging from 1 ampere to 600 amperes in both 250-volt AC and 600-
volt AC types. Class H fuses are not current limiting.

A higher quality nonrenewable one-time fuse such as the class K5


fuse, which has 50, 000- ampere interrupting rating. It is easy to identify
this high grade fuse for the Class K5 and its interrupting rating are marked
in the label.

Fig. 4 Class H cartridge fuse. Illustration shows renewable-type


fuse in which the blown link may be replaced.

18
Class K

Class K fuses have grouped into three categories: K1, K5, and K9, A
through D. These fuses may be UL listed with interrupting ratings in RMS
symmetrical amperes in values of 50,000, 100,000, or 200,000 amperes.
For each K rating UL has assigned a maximum level of peak let-through
current (Ip) and energy as given by I2t.

Class K fuses have varying degrees of current-limiting ability,


depending upon the K rating. Class K1 fuses have the greatest current-
limiting ability and Class K9 fuses the least current-limiting ability. Checks
of various fuse manufacturers’ literatures reveal that Class K9 fuses are no
longer being manufactured.

Class K fuses may be classified as time delay fuses as well. In this


case, UL requires that the fuses have a minimum time of delay of 10
seconds at 500% of the rated current. Class K fuses are available in ratings
ranging from 1/10 ampere to 600 amperes at 250- or 600-volts AC. Class K
fuses has the same dimensions as Class H fuses.

19
Fig. 5 Class H, K5, K1, and RK5 Fuses
Class J

Class J fuses are current limiting and marked as A and B. They are
listed by UL with an interrupting rating of 200,000 RMS symmetrical
amperes. Some have especial listing identified by the letters ―SP,‖ and have
an interrupting rating of 300,000 RMS symmetrical amperes. Certain Class
J fuses are also considered to be dual-element, time delay, and are marked
―time-delay‖. Class J fuses are physically smaller than Class H fuses.
Therefore, when a fuse holder is installed to accept a Class J fuse, it will be
impossible to install a Class H fuse in the fuse holder. The Underwriters
Laboratories has assigned maximum values of I2t and Ip that are slightly
less than those for Class K1 fuses. Both fastacting, current-limiting Class J
fuses are available in ratings ranging from 1ampere to 600 volts AC.

20
Fig. 6 Class J current limiting fuses.
Class L
Class L fuses A, B, and C, are listed by UL in sizes ranging from 601
amperes to 6000 amperes at 600 volts ac. These fuses have specified
maximum values of I2t and Ip. They are current-limiting fuses and have an
interrupting rating of 200,000 RMS symmetrical amperes. These bolt-type
fuses are used in bolted pressure contact switches. Class L fuses are
available in fast acting, current-limiting time and a time-delay, current-
limiting type. Both types of Class L meet UL requirements. Some Class L
fuses have a special interrupting rating of 300,000 symmetrical amperes.
The fuse’s label will indicate the part number followed by the letters ―SP‖.

21
22
Fig. 7 Class L fuses. All Class L fuses are rated 600 volts. Listed is 601 to 6000
ampere rating. The smallest switch for Class L fuses is 800 amperes. Class L
fuses that have fuse elements rated at 600 amperes and less are available.
These special ampere-rated fuses are physically the same size as the 800
ampere size

Class T

Class T fuses are current-limiting fuses. These fuses are UL listed with
an interrupting capacity of 200,000 RMS symmetrical amperes. Class T
fuses are physically smaller than Class H or Class J fuses. The
configuration of this type of fuse limits its use to fuse holders and switches
that will reject all other types of fuses.

Class T fuses rated 600 volts have electrical characteristics similar to


those of Class J fuses and are tested in similar manner by Underwriters
Laboratories. Class T fuses rated at 300 volts have lower peak let-through
currents and I2t values than comparable Class J fuses. Many series rated
panel boards are listed by Underwriters Laboratories with Class T mains.
Because Class T fuses do not have lot of time delay, they are sized according
to the non-time delay fuse.

UL presently lists the 600-volts Class T fuses in sizes from 1ampere to


800 amperes. UL lists the 300-volts Class T fuses in sizes from 1 ampere to
1,200 amperes. Common applications for Class T fuses for mains, feeders
and branch circuits.

Class t 300-volt fuses may be used on 120/240-volt single-phase,


208/120-volt three-phase four-wire wye, and 240-volt three phase three
wire delta systems. The NEC permits 300-volts Class T fuses to be installed
in single-phase line-to-neutral circuits supplied from three-phase four-wire
solidly grounded neutral systems where the line-to neutral voltage does not
exceed 300 volts. The NEC does not permit the use of 300-volt Class T fuses
for line-to-line or line-to-line-to-line applications on 480/277-volt three-
phase four wire wye, 480-volt three-phase three-wire, and any of the
systems where Class T 300-volt fuses are permitted.

23
Fig. 8 Class T current-limiting, fast acting fuse; 200,000-ampere interrupting
rating. Links are made if silver. Has very little time delay. Good for the protection
of circuit breakers and on circuits that do not have high inrush loads (such as
motors, transformers). Size at 300% for motors and other high inrush loads.

Class G

Class G fuses are cartridge fuses with small physical dimensions.


They are used in circuits of 300-volts or less to the ground. Class G fuses
are available in sizes ranging from 0 ampere to 60 amperes and are UL listed
at an interrupting capacity of 100,000 RMS symmetrical amperes. To
prevent overfusing, Class G fuses are size limiting within the four categories
assigned to their ampere ratings. Therefore, a fuse holder designed to
accept a 15-ampere Type SC will not accept a 20-ampere Type SC fuse; and
a fuse holder designed to accept 20-ampere Type SC fuse will no accept a
30-ampere Type SC fuse; and so on for the four categories.
Class G fuses are current limiting. They may be used for the
protection of ballasts, electric heat, and similar loads. They are UL listed for
branch circuit protection.

Fig. 9 Class G fuses

24
Class R

Class R fuse is another recent development in the UL standards listing


of fuses. This fuse is nonrenewable cartridge type and has an interrupting
rating of 200,000 RMS symmetrical amperes. The peak let-through current
(Ip) and the total clearing energy (It) values are specified for the individual
case sizes. The values of I2t and Ip are specified by UL based on short-
circuit tests at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 amperes.

Class R fuses are divided into two subclasses: Class RK1 and
ClassRK5. The Class RK1 Fuse has characteristics similar to those of the
Class K5 fuse. These fuses must be marked either Class RK1 or RK5. In
addition, they are marked to be current-limiting.

Some Class RK1 fuses have a special interrupting rating of 300,000


RMS symmetrical amperes. The fuse’s label will indicate the part number
followed by the letters ―SP‖.

The ferrule-type Class R fuse has a rating range of 1/10 ampere to 60


amperes and can be distinguished by the annular ring on one end of the
case. The knife-blade type Class R fuse has a rating range of 61amperes to
600 amperes and has a slot in the blade on one end. When a fuse holder is
designed to accept a Class R fuse, it will be impossible to install standard
Class H or Class K fuse. The requirements for non interchangeable
cartridge fuses and fuse holders are covered in NEC. However, the Class R
fuse can be installed in older style fuse clips on existing installations. As a
result, the Class R may be called a one-way rejection fuse.

Electrical equipment manufacturers will provide the necessary


rejection-type fuse holders in their equipment, which then tested with a
Class R fuse at short- circuit current values such as 50,000, 100,000, or
200,000 amperes. Each piece of equipment will be marked accordingly.

Fig. 10 Class R cartridge fuses (may be RK1 or RK5).

25
Class CC

Class CC fuses are primarily used for control circuit protection of


motor control circuits, ballasts, small transformers, and so on. They are UL
listed as branch circuit fuses. Class CC fuses are rated at 600-volts or less
and have 200,000-ampere interrupting rating in sizes from 1/10 ampere
through 30 amperes. These fuses measure 11/2‖ x 13/32‖ and can be
recognized by a ―button‖ on one end of the fuse. This ―button‖ is unique to
Class CC fuses. When a fuseblock or fuseholder that has the matching
Class CC rejection feature is installed, it is impossible to insert any other 1
½‖ x 13/32‖ fuses. Only a class fuse will fit into these special fuseblocks
and fuseholders. A Class CC fuse can be installed in a standard fuseholder.

Fig. 11 Class CC fuse with rejection feature

26
27
Parts of Fusible Load Center

28
Types of Safety switch enclosures

a. NEMA 1 (indoor)

Note: NEMA 1 safety switch enclosures may be easily identified


because of the presence of concentric knockouts on the top of the
enclosures.

b. NEMA 3R (rainproof)

Note: NEMA 3R safety switch enclosures may be easily identified by


the presence of a hub plate on the top of the safety switch.

29
c. NEMA 4X (watertight, corrosion resistant)

Note: NEMA 4X enclosures are generally constructed of stainless steel.

Testing Fuses

As mentioned at the beginning of this module, the Occupational Safety


and Health Act (OSHA) clearly states that electrical equipment must not be
worked on when it is energized. There have been too many injuries to those
intentionally working on the equipment ―hot‖ or thinking the power is off,
only to find out that it is still energized. If the equipment is to be worked on
―hot‖ then proper training and protective gear (rubber blankets, insulated
tools, goggles, rubber gloves, etc.) need to be used. A second person should
be present when working electrical equipment ―hot‖ OSHA has specific ―lock-
out‖ and ―tag-out‖ rules for working on energized electrical equipment.

When power is turned on. On ―live‖ circuits, extreme caution must


be exercised when checking fuses. There are many different voltage
readings that can be taken, such as line-to-line, line-to-ground, line-to-
neutral, etc.

Using a voltmeter, the first step is to make sure that the scale is set
highest voltage settings, then change to a lower scale after assuring that it is
within the range of the voltmeter. For example, when testing what you
believe to be a 120V circuit, it is wise to first use the 600V scale, then try
the 300V scale, and then use the 150V scale, just to be sure.

Taking a voltage reading across the bottom (load side) of fuses either
fuse-to-fuse, fuse-to-neutral, or fuse-to-ground can show voltage reading
because even though a fuse is open, there can be ―feed back‖ through the
load. You might come to a wrong conclusion. Taking a voltage reading from
the line side of the fuse to the load side of a fuse will show ―open-circuit

30
voltage‖ which way cause the fuse to blow while load is still connected. This
may also be the result of a wrong conclusion.

Reading from line-to load side of a good fuse shows zero voltage or else
an extremely small voltage across the fuse.

Always read carefully the instructions furnished with electrical test


equipment such as voltmeters, ohmmeters, etc.

When the power is turned off. This is the safest way to test fuses.
Remove the fuse from the switch, and then take a resistance reading across
the fuse using an ohmmeter. A good fuse will show zero to very minimal
resistance. An open (blown) fuse will generally show a very high resistance
reading.

Advantages of Fuse over a circuit breaker:

1. It is reliable (It can stay in position for a long period and can act when
needed.)
2. The cost is cheaper
3. It does not require periodic maintenance

Ratings Available for Fuse switches in both 250 and 600 volts

15 20 30 60 100 200 400 600


800 1200 1600 2000 2500 3000 5000 6000

Standard ampere Rating for Fuses and Nonadjustable circuit Breakers

15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 60 70 80 90
100 110 125 150 175 200 225 250 300 350 400 450
500 600 700 800 1000 1200 1600 2000 2500 3000 4000 5000
6000

31
INFORMATION SHEET 1.2

Planning and preparing for installing of Fuse Panel

Procedure:

1. Obtain the technical working drawing (electrical plan) from the teacher
then examine the nature of the work. (See sample below.)

2. After taking the plan, list down the needed materials, PPE’s, tools and
equipment needed in performing the task.

3. Upon listing, use the requisition form for the materials and the
borrowers slip to secure your materials, tools, equipment and PPE’s
from the supply and tool room. (see sample below)

4. After securing the needed materials, tools, equipment and PPE’s, ask
your teacher where to execute the working plan.

5. Place your materials, tools, equipment, and PPE’s in the most


convenient location to make the installation easy. Ask your teacher if
you could start the installation.

6. Start your installation once it is approved by your teacher.

Note: NEC Requirements are to be observed by an electrician when


installing plug fuses, fuse holder, and adapters:

1. They shall not be used in circuits exceeding 125 volts between


conductors, except on systems having grounded neutral with no
conductors having more than 150 volts to ground. This situation in
the 120/208-volt system in the commercial building covered in this
module, or in the case of 120/240-volt, single-phase system.

2. They shall have ampere ratings of 0 to 30 amperes.

3. They shall have a hexagonal configuration for ratings of 15 amperes


and below.

4. The screw shell must be connected to the load side of the circuit.

5. Edison-base plug fuses may be used only as replacements in existing


installations where there is no evidence of overusing or tampering.

6. All new installations shall use fuse holders requiring Type S plug
fuses or fuse holders with a type s adapter inserted to accept Type S
fuses only.

32
7. Type S plug fuses are classified 0 to 15 amperes; 16 to 20 amperes; 21
to 30 amperes.

B1 B2

300mm

300mm

S S

400mm 300mm

Line diagram of two (2) bulbs controlled by two (2) SPST switch
with one (1) convenience outlet in different location.

33
OPERATION SHEET 1.1

Install Safety Switch

PEC Provision refer to information sheet 3.1

Requirement for fuses of less than 600 volts


Note: Refer to NEC Article 240

a. Plug fuses shall not be used in circuit exceeding 125 volts between
conductors.

b. Fuses shall be marked with amperage rating.

c. Plug fuses shall be classified 0 to 30 amperes.

d. Edison-base plug fuses shall only be used for replacement in existing


installation where there is no evidence of over fusing or tampering.

e. Type ―S‖ fuses (fustats) shall be classified at not over 125 volts.
Note: Refer to NEC article 240.

f. Type ―S‖ fuses shall be classified as 0 to 15, 16 to 20, and 21 to 30


amperes.

g. Different ampere classes of type ―S‖ fuses are not interchangeable.

h. Cartridge fuses shall be marked with their ampere rating, voltage


rating, and the name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Procedure in Installing Safety Switch

1. Determine exact installation location based on the plan provided.

2. Install a mounting screw for the top mounting hole.

3. Hang switch box/panel board. (Note: The hole in the upper middle
back of the housing should slip over the screw head.)

4. Check the horizontal and vertical alignment of the switch box using
the bar level.

5. Locate holes for the remaining two mounting screws.

6. Install the lower two mounting screws. (Note: Be sure that the box is
leveled horizontally and vertically).

34
7. Open the desired knockout holes in top and bottom of switch
housing.

8. Install conduit connector/adapter in each knockout hole.

9. Cut wire entries at about 10‖ – 12" termination length of the wires.

10. Strip back one end of each piece of wire about 5/8 inch.

11. Install the feeder wire through the conduit connector in the top of
the switch housing and connect to terminals on the line side.

12. Firmly tighten terminals to manufacturer’s torque specifications.


(Caution: Loose connection is a chief cause of electrical problems.)

13. Install wires through the conduit connector at the bottom of the
switch housing, and connect to load side terminals. (Note: Install
the wire neatly, taking care to prevent the wires from rubbing
against any metal edge.)

14. Firmly tighten terminals according to the manufacturer’s torque


specifications.

15. Determine length of ground wire by measuring from top of box to


ground terminal.

16. Cut a piece of wire to the measured length.

17. Strip backs the lower end of the ground wire, then install in the
ground terminal and tighten.

18. Install ground wire through bottom hole in switch housing.

19. Form the ground wire neatly so that it will not touch any moving
part of the switch.

20. Strip back upper end of ground wire; install ground wire in switch
terminal and tighten.

21. Insert the fuses into the fuse clip. (Note: Fuse clips must fit tightly
on each fuse.

22. If finished, clean your work area, and return equipment, tools and
materials to proper storage.

35
SELF-CHECK 1.1

Direction: Answer the following questions by writing your answers in a


sheet of paper.

TEST I: Identify the following.

1. Its name was derived from the Latin word "fusus," meaning
"to melt."

2. The Electrical equipment that carries or transfers current


but does not use it.
3. The Current that flows from one conductor to ground or
another conductor because of an abnormal connection or arc
between the two.
4. The Weak link in the circuit that limits the amperage to a
specified amount.
5. Larger than normal current flowing within the normal
current paths
6. Larger than normal current flowing outside the normal
current path.

7. Maximum voltages at which a device is designed to operate.


8. Maximum available short-circuits current that an over-
current device can safely interrupt without damage to itself.
9. Several removable metal rings that allow for the entrance of
various standard sizes of connectors into a cabinet.
10. A method by which the conductors of a circuit can be
disconnected from their source of supply.

TEST II: Enumeration.

1 – 3 The classifications/types of breakers according to mounting


method.

4 - 6 The different kinds of fuses according to manner of operation.

7 – 9 The important ratings when replacing fuses.

36
TEST – III Label the parts of the fuse load center illustrated below

37
Program/Course: BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II

Unit of Competency: INSTALL ELECTRICAL PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR


LIGHTING AND GROUNDING

Module Title: Installing Electrical Protection

Learning Outcome 2: Layout and install Panel Board

Assessment Criteria

1. Tools and materials for installing panel board are prepared in line with
the job requirements
2. Panel boards are installed according to the job requirements.
3. Electrical conductors are properly harnessed in line with the established
standards
4. Safety procedures are strictly followed according to the OSHS
standards
5. Panel board is knocked out in line with the job requirements.
6. Workplace is cleaned upon the completion of the job.

References

1. Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines


Incorporated. Philippine Electrical Code of 1992.
2. Max B. Fajardo Jr. & Leo R. Fajardo. Electrical Layout and Estimate,
2nd Edition.
3. Azares, Efren F. and Recana, Cirilo B. Practical Electricity III; Adriana
Publishing: 1999.
4. Roland E. Palmquist. Audel House Wiring, 7th Edition.
5. www.geocities.com/cindulkar/notes7.html
6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circuit_breaker
7. http://www.tpub.com/neets/book3/8i.htm

38
LEARNING EXPERIENCES/ACTIVITIES

Learning Outcome 2: Layout and Install Panel Board

Learning Activities Special Instructions

1. Read the attached Information  You can ask the assistance of your
Sheet 2.1 teacher to explain topics you
cannot understand.

5. Perform Operation Sheet 3.2 on  Perform the operation sheet with


installing wire receptacle circuit to close supervision of teacher.
load center.


6. Answer Self – Check 3.2

39
INFORMATION SHEET 2.1

Layout and install Panel Board

Philippine Electrical Code (PEC) provision for circuit protection

Conductors-Maximum Ampacity and Size

a) General. Branch circuit conductors shall have an ampacity of not


less than the rating of the branch circuit and of not less than the
maximum load to be served. Cable assemblies with neutral
conductors smaller than the ungrounded conductors shall be also
marked.

b) Household ranges and cooking appliances. Branch circuit


conductors supplying household ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter
cooking units and other household cooking appliances, shall have an
ampacity of not less than the rating of the branch circuit and not less
than the maximum load to be served. For ranges of 8 ¾ Kw or more
rating, the minimum branch circuit rating shall be 40 amperes.

c) Other loads. Branch circuit conductors supplying loads other than


cooking appliances as covered shall have an ampacity sufficient for
the loads served and shall not be smaller than 2.0 mm2.

Switchgear in a broad sense covers a wide range of equipment


connected with switching and protection. A circuit breaker is a switching i.e.
current interrupting or making device in switchgear. The basic requirements
of switching in power system practice are two-fold:

1. to permit apparatus and circuits to be conveniently put into or taken


out of service;

2. and, to permit appropriate and safe isolation of apparatus and circuits


automatically in a pre-determined time period when they develop faults.

Circuit Breaker is an automatically-operated electrical switch designed


to protect an electrical circuit from damage caused by overload or short
circuit. Unlike a fuse, which operates once and then has to be replaced, a
circuit breaker can be reset (either manually or automatically) to resume
normal operation. Circuit breakers are made in varying sizes, from small
devices that protect an individual household appliance up to large
switchgear designed to protect high voltage circuits feeding an entire city.

40
Typical circuit breakers and schematic symbols.

Small circuit breakers are either installed directly in equipment, or are


arranged in a breaker panel.

Photo of the inside part of a circuit breaker

The 10 ampere rail mounted thermal-magnetic miniature circuit


breaker is the most common style in modern domestic consumer units and
commercial electrical distribution boards throughout Europe. The design
includes the following components:

1. Actuator lever is used to manually trip and reset the circuit breaker. It
also indicates the status of the circuit breaker (On or Off/tripped).
Most breakers are designed so they can still trip even if the lever is

41
held or locked in the on position. This is sometimes referred to as "free
trip" or "positive trip" operation.

2. Actuator mechanism. It forces the contacts together or apart.

3. Contacts. It allows current to flow when touching and break the flow
of current when moved apart.

4. Terminal connection

5. Bimetallic strip

6. Calibration screw. It allows the manufacturer to precisely adjust the


trip current of the device after assembly.

7. Solenoid

8. Arc divider / extinguisher

Principles and Operation of Circuit Breakers

Circuit breakers operate using one or both of the two principles:

1. Thermal operation relies on the extra heat produced by high current


warming a bimetal strip which bends to strip the operating contacts.

2. Magnetic operation is due to the magnetic field set up by a coil


carrying the current which attracts an iron part to trip the breaker
when the current becomes large enough.

The Advantages of the Circuit Breaker over the Fuse:

1. The circuit breaker acts as a switch aside from its being an over
current protective device.

2. When there is over current, the circuit breaker trips (cut)


automatically and after correcting the fault, it becomes readily
available for switch on. Unlike the fuses which has to be discarded
and replace after it is busted.

3. Circuit breaker can be with multiple poles and can be installed with 1,
2, or 3 poles which will simultaneously protect and switch one to
three lines. The fuse on the other hand is a single pole put into a
single wire and can protect only one single electric line.

4. Circuit breaker position is easier to detect. It is closed, tripped or open


right at the handle.

42
5. The fuse, on the other hand, is not easily detected because the melted
fusible element is within the fuse casing.

6. Circuit breaker can be manually tripped so that in many cases it also


acts as the circuit switch.

Functions of fuses and circuit breakers in electrical circuits:

1. it protects electrical circuits from damage by too much current;


2. serves as protection of conductors;
3. serves as protection of electrical loads/equipment;
4. serves as current limiter to the circuit;
5. acts as safety valve for electrical circuits; and
6. serves as disconnecting means

Types of circuit breaker and their operating principle

Thermal trip

- If current flow exceeds the rated limit of the breaker, the bimetallic
strip heats and bends.

- As the strip bends, the latching mechanism is tripped and the


contacts open.

Electromagnetic trip

- As the current flows through the breaker, it creates a magnetic field


within the coil. During sustained overload condition, the magnetic
field interferes and draws the core into the coil.

- The metal trip bar is attracted to the core forcing the latch to move,
thus opening the contacts.

43
Standard ampere rating for fuses and nonadjustable circuit breakers

15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 60 70 80
90 100 110 125 150 160 175 200 225 250 300
350 400 450 500 600 700 800 1000 1200 2000 2500
3000 4000 5000 6000

Circuiting guidelines

There are many ways of doing the circuitry but there is no optimum or
perfect way of doing it. There are certain guidelines promulgated by the
National Electrical Code (NEC) for flexible, economical and convenient
layout. They are as follows:

1. The code requires sufficient circuitry to supply residential load of 30


watts per square meter in buildings excluding porches, garages and
basements.

2. The requirements of 30 watts per square meter works out to 80 sq. m.


per 20 amps. Circuit (2,400w) or 60 sq. m. for 15 amps. Circuit
(1,800w).

3. Good practice suggests that a load should not exceed 1,600 watts for
a 20 amp. Circuit or 1,200 watts for 15 amp. Circuit, thus,

a. For a 15 amp. Circuit, -1,200w max. Load –40 sq. m. maximum


area.
b. For a 20 amp. Circuit, -1,600 w. max. Load –53 sq. m.
maximum area.

4. The NEC requires a minimum of 20 amp. Appliance circuit to feed all


small appliance outlets in the kitchen, pantry, dining and family
room.

44
5. The general-purpose branch circuit should be 20 amps. Wired with
no.12 AWG being the minimum size of conductor wires for
convenience outlet.

6. Circuit load on a 15 amp. Circuit should be limited to the values given


on table of branch circuit requirements.

TABLE OF BRANCH CIRCUIT REQUIREMENTS

Branch Circuit Size


15 Amp. 20Amp. 30 Amp. 40Amp. 50Amp.
Minimum size conductors No. 14 12 10 8 6
Minimum size taps No. 14 14 14 12 12
Overcurrent device rating 15 amp. 20 30 40 50
Lampholder permitted Any type Any type H. Duty H. Duty H. Duty
Receptacle rating
15 Amp. 50 or 20 30 40 or 50 50
permitted
Maximum load 15 20 30 40 50

7. As specified by the NEC, plug outlets (convenience receptacles) must


be counted in computing the load if it is not included in the load for
general lighting circuit, thus, for 9 and 12 amperes loading on 15
amps. and 20 amps. Circuits respectively, we have:

a. 15 amp. Circuit 91.5 = 6 outlets.


b. 20 amp. Circuit 121.5 = 8 outlets.

8. Convenience receptacles should be planned properly so that failure of


a single circuit will not deprive the entire area of power supply. In
terms of reliability of service, the circuit must be alternate to provide
each area part of the different circuits.

9. All kitchen outlets must be fed from at least two of these circuits.

10. The NEC further stipulates, ―all receptacles are potential appliance
and at least two circuits should be supplied to serve them‖.

11. Certain outlets in the room should be designed as appliance outlet


such as:

a. All kitchen receptacles


b. Dining room receptacles
c. One in the living room

45
12. The National Electrical Code (NEC) requires that at least one 20
amp. Circuit supplies the laundry outlets.

13. If air conditioner is anticipated, provide a separate circuit for this


appliance.

Classifications/types of breakers according to mounting method

1. Din rail type mounted circuit breakers

46
2. Bolt mounted type circuit breakers

3. Plug-in type circuit breakers

The name of the circuit breaker is taken from the medium or manner
of extinguishing the arc produced when the circuit breaker’s contacts
opened.

1. Air blast type circuit breaker –uses dry and compressed air in
extinguishing the arc.

47
2. Air circuit breaker –interruption occurs in free air
3. Oil type circuit breaker –uses a special oil to extinguish the arc.
4. Gas type circuit breaker –uses SF6 (sulphur hexaflouride) gas to
extinguish the arc.
5. Vacuum type circuit breaker –uses vacuum container.

Circuit Breaker Features. In addition to the relatively simple thermal-


magnetic breakers described above, there are many other features available
in molded-case breakers:

1. Solid-State Tripping. With adjustable long-time, short-time, and


instantaneous trip points and adjustable time delays, it provides easily
adjustable precise settings and stable repeatability, facilitating
coordination with other over current protection in the system, so that the
device nearest the fault opens first.

2. High Interrupting Capacity. As serving agency system increase the


current available under fault conditions, it is important to select properly
rated equipment, including circuit breakers. Those capable of
interrupting more than 5,000 amperes are marked up to 2,000 000
amperes.

3. Current-Limiting Breakers. These are made both with integral fuses


and without fuses which will interrupt within one-half cycle, limiting the
fault current that will flow to downstream equipment.

4. Ground Fault Interruption. This is built-in as an integral part of the


circuit breaker.

5. Remote Operation. Shunt trips are commonly used to open a circuit


breaker from a remote point or to open it automatically as in a ground-
fault protection system. Also available are motor operated breakers,
which can be opened and closed remotely.

6. 100% Rated. The loading of a circuit breaker is limited to 80% when the
load is continuous (3 h or more) unless listed for 100% loading will be so
marked. Two or more of these features may be combined in one circuit
breaker, depending on the requirements of the application.

Standard Ratings.

Both fuses and breakers are available in standard ratings of 15, 20,
25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 125, 150, 175, and 200
amperes, and of course larger sizes (up to 6000 amp) for use where
required. Additional standard ratings for fuses only are 1, 3, 6, and 10
amperes, mainly for the protection of small motor circuits.

48
Determining Proper Rating of Over Current Device.

The fuse must blow, or the breaker open, when the current flowing
through it exceeds the number of amperes that is safe for the wire in the
circuit. The larger the wire, the greater the number of amperes it can safely
carry.

The code specifies the ampacity (the maximum number of amperes)


that can be safely carried by each size and type of wire. The ampacity of any
size and kind of copper or aluminum wire can be found in NEC. The
ampacity of the wire determines the maximum ampere rating of the fuse or
the breaker that may be used to protect the circuit.

These may aid you to memorize the ampacity of the smaller sizes of
Type TW copper wire usually used in residential and farm wiring.

These ampacities are:


No. 14 15 amp
No. 12 20 amp
No. 10 30 amp
No. 8 40 amp
No. 6 55 amp

The ampacities shown are for wires in conduit, in cable, or buried


directly in the earth. If installed in free air, the ampacities are higher.
Strictly speaking, the ampacity of No. 14, No. 12, and No. 10 is greater than
shown above because the figures given actually represent the maximum
permitted over current protection. The difference is significant only when
applying derating factors for continuous loads, for more than three
conductors in a raceway, or for ambient temperatures over 30 deg. (86 deg.
F).

Important Ratings when Choosing Replacement Circuit Breakers

1. Rated voltage, Rated normal current. Values are used to designate it


and which is related to the operating conditions of the circuit
breaker.

2. Rated breaking capacity. It is expressed in Maximum Voltage


Ampere (MVA) capacity as the product of the rated breaking current
in kilo-amperes and the corresponding rated voltage in kV.

3. Rated frequency. The frequency of the electrical system in which the


circuit breaker is to be connected.

4. Rated short time current. Effective value of current in which the


circuit breaker must carry for a stated time. This requirement is
needed since the fault current, which has to be cleared by another
circuit breaker, may have to flow through it.

49
Characteristics of Overload Currents:

1. They are greater than the normal current flow.


2. They are contained within the normal conducting current path.
3. If allowed to continue, they will cause overheating of the equipment,
conductors and the insulation of the conductors.

Characteristics of Short-circuit and Ground – Fault

1. They flow ―outside‖ of the normal current path.


2. They may be greater than the normal current flow.
3. They may be less than the normal current flow.

Advantages of Fuse Over Circuit Breaker

Despite the disadvantages of the fuse over the circuit breaker, fuse
has also some advantages over circuit breaker, such as:

1. Major advantage of the fuse over circuit breaker is reliability and


stability. The fuse can stay on its position for years and act when
called on to act as designed.

2. Cost of the fuse is very much lower than that of the circuit breaker.

3. Circuit Breaker have several moving parts, which require


maintenance and periodic testing to be in good condition.

Parts of a Breaker Load Center

50
COMMON PANEL BUS CONFIGURATION

51
E. Three-phase MLO

Types of Load Center and Enclosures

52
53
Load center accessories and their uses
a. Lug is used for termination of conductors.

b. Grounded (neutral) bar is used for


termination of circuit

c. Ground bar is used for termination of


equipment grounding conductors.

d. Flush locks is used for locking of cabinet


doors to allow entrance of qualified
personnel only,

e. Padlock attachment is used to lock


breakers in the ―off‖ or ―on‖ position.

f. Closure plate is used to fill empty breaker


spaces where ―breakouts‖ have been
removed.

g. Lock off is used to lock breakers in the


―off‖ position for equipment maintenance
or servicing

h. Handle tie is used to mechanically tie two


or more breaker handles together to assure
common tripping.

i. Conduit hubs is used to allow entrance of


conduits to rain-proof enclosures.

54
Procedures in installing load center or breaker panel

1. Before mounting panel, open the desired number and size of


knockout holes for the conduit entry.

2. Install the desired size of conduit connector and tighten snugly.

3. Mount panel board in designated location.

4. Connect one piece of bare ground wire to the ground bar, allowing
other end to hang from bottom of panel. (Note: under actual
installation, the lower end of the ground wire would terminate at
the grounding electrode.)

5. Strip back one end of each piece of insulated wire approximately


5/8-3/4‖.

6. Install one piece of wire through the connector to the neutral bar
connector; arrange the wire neatly to lay back corner of the panel;
then insert wire in neutral bar terminal and tighten snugly. (Note:
the neutral conductor should lay in the back corner of the panel to
leave adequate room for the other wires and breakers. It should also
be identified by white or gray tape.)

7. Install the remaining two wires through the connector, and insert
wires in the main breaker connectors.

8. Plug the breakers into the panel bus, plug breakers on both right
and left side, start at the top specifications. The main breaker
should be placed on the upper most left side of the panel board.
(Note: arrange wire neatly, allowing room for the branch-circuit
conductors.)

9. Install wiring. (Note: extend all wires into the panel far enough to
reach the neutral or ground bar, especially the green wire after
arranging it in the back corner of panel down to the bar.)

10. Tag or mark by numbers each group of wires that goes to a specific
breaker.

11. Fold back out of the way all branch circuit wires inside the panel to
provide clear working space inside panel.

12. Trim out panel board.

a. Work in with the green wires one at a time, arranging them


against back of panel in corners and making right angle bends
to the ground bar terminals.

55
b. Cut strip and insert wires into terminals then tighten snugly.
(Note: This method places this group of wires at the back of the
panel, out of the way of neutral and circuit wires. Also, it gives
the technician an organized procedure for doing the work
neatly.)

c. Work on with the white neutral wires one at a time, laying the
wires near the green wires in the back spaces and corners of the
panel and making bends to the neutral or ground bar.

d. Cut, strips, and insert wires into terminals, then tighten snugly.

e. Work on with the colored circuit wires.

 Work on with the wires one at a time to the left two-pole


breaker, forming the wire to lay neatly toward the back and
side of panel; make right angle bends to bring wire
horizontally toward proper breaker terminal; make
additional right angle bends to bring wires outward and
then into breaker.

Note: This procedure makes it easy for you to trace wires, there are
enough wire lengths to pull out and check loads with a clamp-on
ammeter, and produces a neat, professional-looking good.

13. Carefully dismantle the assembly and store parts in proper places.

14. Clean work area, and return equipment, tools and materials to
proper storage.

56
OPERATION SHEET 2.1

Installing wire receptacle circuit to a load center

Requirements for circuit breakers of less than 600 volts


Note: Refer to the NEC Article 240

a. Circuit breakers shall be capable of being manually tripped and set.

Note: When used as switches in 120 volt and 277 volt fluorescent
lighting circuits, breakers shall be approved for such switching duty.

b. Circuit breakers shall have a visible ―off‖ and ―on‖ indication.

c. The breaker shall be designed so that any change of its trip point
(ampere rating) or time required for operation will require dismantling
or the breaking of a seal.

d. Circuit breakers shall be marked with their ampere rating with


durability and visibility by the removal of a trim or cover.

e. Every circuit breaker, having an interrupting rating other than 5,000


amperes shall have its interrupting rating shown on the circuit
breaker.

Tools, Materials, Equipment

Equipment:
 Portable electric drill - 1 unit
Materials:
 Load center - 1 set
 Flexible Non-metallic conduit - 5 meters
 Convenience outlet - 3 sets
 Wood screw (assorted sizes) - 20 pcs
 Conduit connector - 7 pcs
 Plastic clamp/straps - 50 pcs
 Wire stranded # 12 - 30 miters
(assorted color)
 Utility box - 3 pcs
 Electrical tape - 1 roll
Tools:
 Steel meter stick/Straight edge - 1 pc
 Try square - 1 pc
 Pull and push rule - 1 pc
 Philips screw driver - 1 pc
 Flat screw driver - 1 pc

57
Personal Protective Equipment:
 Gloves - 1 pair
 Goggles - 1 pc
 Hard hat - 1 pc

Instruction: When you are ready to perform this task, ask your teacher to
observe the process and to rate your performance using the
assessment criteria.

Procedure:

1. Mark and layout boxes according to working drawing. (Note: Be


sure to check the NEC for installation of cable.

2. Mount device boxes for ½‖ sheetrock.

3. Mount load center for flush installation.

4. Drill studs according to the cable layout, PEC and NEC.

5. Route cable through studs, and support properly.

6. Install conduit connector in the bottom of load center and install


cable. (See figure below

58
7. Strip cables in the boxes. (Note: be sure that at least 6‖ of
conductor leaves the face of the box.)

8. In boxes 1 and 2, twist grounds together and install a green wire


nut, leaving enough pigtails to terminate the green for the
receptacle grounding terminal.

9. Strip ½‖ of insulation from neutral (white) conductors and twist in a


6‖ pigtail, then install a red wire nut over the joint.

10. Terminate all conductors according to how your teacher


demonstrated it. (Note: methods may vary due to local codes.)

11. Install conduit connector at the top of the load center and terminate
to 10/3 with ground as the feeder conductors.

12. Double check to make sure all terminations are tight.

13. Clean work area, and return equipment and materials to proper
storage.

14. Upon the completion of work, have your teacher evaluate your
work.

15. Carefully dismantle the assembly and store parts in proper places.

59
Assessment criteria

ALLOTTED POINTS
WORKMANSHIP
POINTS EARNED

1.Lighting circuit operation 10


2. Power circuit operation 10
3. Dimension 5
4. Horizontality and verticality 5
5. Fastening of fixtures 5
6. Bends and corner 10
7. Splices and joints 5
8. Wiring termination 5
9. Fastening of fuse 5
10. Techniques 10
11. Speed 10
12. Grounding 5
13. Entries 5
14. Cleanliness of workplace 5
15. Wiring arrangement 5
REMARKS: 100

Teacher ‘s Comments: ____________________________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

60
SELF – CHECK 2.1

Direction: Answer the following tests by writing your answers in a separate


answer sheet.

TEST I: Identification.

1. Label the parts of the breaker load center illustrated below

61
TEST – II Matching type

Direction: Match common load center accessories at the right with their
uses at the left. Write the correct letters on the blank.

a. Used for termination.

b. Used for termination of circuit


grounded.

c. Used for terminating of equipment


grounding conductors.
d. Used for locking of cabinet doors
to allow entrance of qualified
personnel only.

e. Used to lock breakers in the ―off‖


or ―on‖ position.

f. Used to fill empty breaker spaces


where ―breakouts‖ have been
removed.

g. Used to lock breakers in the ―off‖


position for equipment
maintenance or serving.
h. Used to mechanically tie two or
more breaker handles together to
assure common tripping.
i. Used to allow entrance of conduits
to rainproof enclosures.

62
ASSESSMENT PLAN

Evidence Checklist

Competency standard:
Unit of competency:
Title of Module

Third party Report


Ways in which evidence will be collected:
[tick the column]

Demonstration
Questioning
Observation

Portfolio

Written
The evidence must show that the candidate …
Learning Outcome 1: Lay Out and Stall Fuse
Panel
1. Tools and materials for installing fuse
panel are selected in line with the job
requirements
2. Fuse panel is installed according to job
requirement.

3. Safety procedures are strictly followed


according to OSHA standards

4. Electrical conductors on fuse panel are


properly harnessed in line with
established standards

5. Workplace is cleaned upon completion of


the job

L.O 2: Lay out and Install Panel board

1. Tools and materials for installing panel


board are selected in line with the job
requirements.

2. Panel board is installed according to the


job requirements.

3. Safety procedures are folowed according


to the OHSA standards.

63
4. Electrical conductors are properly
harnessed in line with established
standards.

5. Panel board is knocked out in line with


the job requirements.

6. Work place is cleaned upon the


completion of the job

NOTE: *Critical aspects of competency

Prepared by: Date:


Checked by: Date:

64
Observation Checklist

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of the
School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student on how to install electrical protection system.
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Put a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of the
activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Complete the feedback section of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If completed, check
the box













Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?
Teacher’s Feedback:

Teacher’s signature: Date:

65
Observation and Questioning Checklist

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of the
School:
Competency
standards
Unit of
competency:
Instructions for the teacher:
1. Observe the student how to install electrical protection system.
2. Describe the assessment activity and the date on when it was undertaken.
3. Place a check in the box to show that the student has completed each area of
the activity according to the standard expected in the enterprise.
4. Ask the student using the questions in the attached list to confirm his/her
underpinning knowledge.
5. Put a check in the box to show that the student has answered the questions
correctly.
6. Complete the feedback sections of the form.
Date of observation
Description of assessment
activity
Location of assessment
activity
The student can: If completed, check
the box.







Did the student’s overall performance meet the Yes No
standard?
Feedback to student:

Teacher signature: Date:

66
Demonstration

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Unit of competency:
Competency standards:
Date of assessment:
Time of assessment:
Instructions for demonstration
Given the necessary materials the student must be able to:

Materials and equipment:

 to show if the skill is


demonstrated
During the demonstration, the student can: Yes No N/A

  
  
  
  
The student’s demonstration was:
Satisfactory  Not Satisfactory 

67
Written report

Student’s name:
Teacher’s name:
Name of School:
Competency
standards
Unit of competency:
Task:
Your task is to:

Submission date:
Use the checklist below as a the basis for judging whether the
student’s report meets the required competency standards.
The student’s report can: If completed, check
the box.

Generally did the student’s report meet the Yes No


standard?
Comments:

Student’s
Date:
signature:
Teacher’s
Date:
signature:

68
PERFORMANCE TEST

Student's Name Date


Competency: Test Attempt
1st 2nd 3rd

Directions: OVERALL EVALUATION


Level
Achieved
Ask your teacher to PERFORMANCE LEVEL
assess your performance
4 - Can perform this skill without direct
in the following critical supervision and with initiative and adaptability
task and performance to problem situations.
criteria below
3 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily without
direct assistance or supervision.
You will be rated based
on the overall evaluation 2 - Can perform this skill satisfactorily but
at the right side. requires some assistance and/or supervision.

1 - Can perform parts of this skill satisfactorily,


but requires considerable assistance and/or
supervision.

Teacher will put his or her initial at level achieved.

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

For acceptable achievement, Check YES; for


unacceptable achievement, check NO; and for YES NO N/A
unachieved skill, check N/A

69
ANSWER KEY 1.1

TEST I: Identification

1. Fuse
2. Device
3. Fault current
4. Over-current protection
5. Overload
6. Short circuit
7. Voltage rating
8. Interrupting rating
9. Concentric knockout
10. Disconnecting means

TEST II: Enumeration

1. Classifications/types of breakers according to mounting method.

 Din rail type mounted circuit breakers


 Bolt mounted type circuit breakers
 Plug-in type circuit breakers

2. Kinds of fuses according to manner of operation.

 Dual-element, time delay fuse


 Dual-element, time-delay, current limiting fuse
 Current limiting fuse (non-time delay)

3. The important ratings when replacing fuses.

 Voltage rating
 Ampere rating
 Interrupting capacity

TEST – III Label the parts of the fuse load center

a. grounded neutral bar


b. grounded bar
c. main fuse pullout
d. line lugs
e. plug fuse sockets
f. pull out

70
ANSWER KEY 2.1

TEST I: Identification
Parts of the breaker load center illustrated below
a. main breaker
b. grounded bar neutral
c. main circuit breaker
d. bus bar
TEST II: Matching type.

1. a
2. f
3. i
4. b
5. g
6. d
7. e
8. h

71