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21.12.

2018

HOW
TRUMP’S NEW
SANCTIONS
AGAINST IR AN
CRE AT E A
T R I PL E
T H R E AT
TO THE WEST

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INTERNATIONAL EDITION
DECEMBER 21, 2018 _ VOL.171 _ NO.19
COVER SOURCE IM AGE S: LUD OVIC MAR IN/AFP/GET T Y; L INTAO ZHANG /GET T Y; AURELIEN MEUNIER/GET T Y; IRANIAN RELIGIOUS LEADER PRESS OFFICE/ANAD OLU AGE NCY/G ET T Y

FEATURES

24
Losing
My Religion
The Republican Party relied
on evangelical Christians
for decades. But with young
people leaving in droves, a
political reckoning is afoot.

BY NINA BURLEIGH
THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS
Exvangelicals are rejecting the vitriolic
partisanship of the Trump era. The
result is a shrinking conservative bloc—
one the GOP has come to rely on.
32
COVER CREDIT The Pleasure
Photo illustration by Gluekit
for Newsweek Principals
This year’s best performances
provided much-needed helpings
of humor, hope and humanity.
For more headlines, go to
NEWSWEEK.COM BY NEWSWEEK STAFF

Photo illust rat ion b y B E N F E A R N L E Y 1


GLOBAL EDITOR IN CHIEF _ Nancy Cooper

CREATIVE DIRECTOR _ Michael Goesele

INTERNATIONAL EDITION EXECUTIVE EDITOR _ Mary Kaye Schilling

DECEMBER 21, 2018 _ VOL.171 _ NO.19 DEPUTY EDITOR (US) _ Michael Mishak

DEPUTY EDITOR (EUROPE + OPINION) _ Laura Davis

SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR _ Fred Guterl

EDITORIAL

Breaking News Editor _ Juliana Pignataro


DEPARTMENTS London Bureau Chief _ Robert Galster
Politics Editor _ Jason Le Miere
Gaming Editor _ Mo Mozuch
P. 48
Entertainment Editor _ Maria Vultaggio
In Focus News Editor _ Jon Haworth
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Robert Valencia (World)
06 Shenyang, China Associate Editors _ James Etherington-Smith,
A Dip in the Ice Hannah Osborne (Science), Dom Passantino,
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AND ABET Challenging Copy Editors _ Karin Halperin, Bruce Janicke,
Joe Westerield
The U.N. warns Violence Contributing Editor _ Owen Matthews
climate change
Contributing Editor, Opinion _ Lee Habeeb
will have dire Jodhpur, India Editorial Assistant _ Jason Pollack
consequences
before long. A lawyer
Get Out the Vote
CREATIVE
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David Brennan, Nina Burleigh, Dan Cancian,


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Sam Earle, Sean Elder*, Benjamin Fearnow,
Kashmira Gander, Ari Georgiou, Nina Godlewski,
Nicole Goodkind, Katherine Hignett, Dory Jackson,
Periscope Jessica Kwong, James LaPorta, Tim Marcin,
Cristina Maza, Anna Menta,Tom O’Connor, Ewan Palmer,
Callum Paton, Maria Perez, Tom Porter, Bill Powell,
10 World Greg Price, Nicole Rojas, Roberto Saviano*,
How Trump Zach Schonfeld, David Sim, Jeff Stein, Marc Vargas,
Janice Williams, Christina Zhao (*Contributing)
Is Waging
Cold War 2.0 VIDEO

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22 Opinion London Video News Editor _ Daniel Orton
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FROM TOP : KU RT KR IE GE R/COR BIS/GE T T Y; SHANA NOVAK/GET T Y


Justin Maiure, Simon Vella

44 Climate Change PUBLISHED BY


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2 NEWSWEEK.COM
FREEDOM.
DIGNITY.
STABILITY.
Ordinary is incredible for all of us. Today, around
1.4 million refugees have been able to reclaim their
ordinary through the Emergency Social Safety Net,
delivered by the European Union and the World
Food Programme.

Let these extraordinary times remind us all that


ordinary is incredible.

www.incredibleordinary.org
#IncredibleOrdinary

The ESSN is implemented in Turkey with the support of the Turkish Government and the Turkish Red Crescent.
Rewind

The Archives
During the anxious months leading up to the invasion of Iraq,
2002 national security adviser Condoleezza Rice was, according to
writer Evan Thomas, a “Warrior Princess.” He noted that as the first woman to
serve in the position, she put “an end to occasional outbursts of ‘locker-room
joking.’” Rice played a critical role in crafting the “intellectual framework” for
the Iraq War, which eventually resulted in a promotion: secretary of state. Her
insistences that Iraq was stockpiling weapons of mass destruction, of course,
have since been discredited.

1965
Charles de Gaulle (as painted by Georges
Rouault) had been re-elected president of
France. Reviews of the war hero’s irst term
were mixed, according to Newsweek. “The
general has achieved much…but he has
also antagonized his erstwhile allies.”
Perhaps, but his legacy is air tight: No pres-
ident has been as beloved by the French.

CLO C KWISE FRO M LE FT: NIGEL PAR RY—CP I FOR NEWSWEE K; TIM; BO B GOMEL

1969
The Knicks were at the height of their
glory days. Coach Red Holzman’s “luid,
devastating offense and imaginative
defense,” and a team that included Willis
Reed, Walt Frazier and future politician
Bill Bradley, had the team sailing to the
NBA championships in 1970 and ’73. As
L.A. Laker Jerry West put it, “I don’t think
they know just how good they are.”

4 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M bE r 21, 2018


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6 NeWSWeeK.cOm De c e m be r 21, 2018


SHENYANG, CHINA

Cold
Comfort
A swimmer loats in a pool carved out of a
frozen lake at Beiling Park on December 6.
The outside air temperature: 14 degrees
Fahrenheit. Winter swimming is believed
to improve circulation and boost health.

→ VC G

7
In Focus

ANKARA, TURKEY JODHPUR, INDIA PARIS

Raising Objections Maid in India Rebel Yell


People hold orange banners An Indian woman waits to cast her vote Demonstrators protest economic distress
aloft, in protest of violence at a local polling station on December near the Arc de Triomphe on December
against women and girls on 7. The state of Rajasthan held elections 8. Named the “Yellow Vests” for their
December 7. Part of the annual for the Legislative Assembly, contests luorescent hazard attire, thousands
international “16 Days of that were seen as a key test for Prime of protesters took to the streets for the
Activism Against Gender-Based Minister Narendra Modi. The leader fourth weekend in a row. Initially focused
Violence,” this year carried campaigned heavily for his Bharatiya on a fuel levy, which President Emmanuel
the theme “Orange the World: Janata Party, which faced a strong Macron eventually canceled, concerns
#HearMeToo.” Human rights challenge from the Indian National have broadened to France’s high taxes
groups say domestic abuse Congress. The insurgent party criticized and cost of living. Demonstrators
is widespread in Turkey, with the BJP for the country’s ongoing burned cars and blocked roads. Nearly
hundreds killed in 2018. agrarian crisis, among other issues. 1,400 were arrested nationwide.
→ ADEM ALTAN → CHANDAN KHANNA → ERIC FEFERBERG

8 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M bE r 21, 2018


CLO C KWISE FRO M LE FT: A DE M ALTAN/A FP/GET T Y; C HANDAN KHANNA/AFP/GET T Y; ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/GET T Y

NEWSWEEK.COM
9
Periscope NEWS, OPINION + ANALYSIS

SUPREME LEADER
Ali Khamenei’s
Iran has been
emboldened by
Trump’s energy
sanctions to
work with China
and Russia.

10 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M bE r 21, 2018


“One cannot create peace by simply
deciding to forget violence.” » P.22

WORLD

Snake Oil
Trump has pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal, imposing the largest energy
sanctions ever. In isolating Tehran, he may have made it stronger

The SouTh ParS gaS field in The PerSian The Trump administration’s post–nuclear deal
Gulf was an offshore discovery that, for oil- policy on Iran is straightforward: increase the eco-
men, is the stuff of dreams. The largest natural gas nomic pain on the regime until it comes back to
LE FT: PO OL /KHAMENEI.IR/ANAD OLU AGENCY/GET T Y; TOP RI G HT: JOSE A . BERNAT BACETE/GET T Y

ield in the world, it stretches across the maritime the table to renegotiate a better agreement. Crit-
border between Iran and Qatar. American economic ics of the original deal (several of whom now hold
sanctions, however, had kept it off-limits to Western key positions in the Trump administration) argue
energy companies for years. When the U.S. and other that this approach was working under the Obama
world powers negotiated the 2015 nuclear deal, that administration—until it let Tehran off the mat.
unlocked the potential bounty. The French oil giant This time, they vow, that won’t happen.
Total soon signed a deal to help develop a key por- But as the Total retreat and the Chinese advance
tion of the ield and started work last year. at South Pars illustrate, it’s not going to be easy to
Then Donald Trump was elected. His administra- get Iran to tap out. As U.S. relations with Tehran,
tion pulled out of the deal and, in late November, Beijing and Moscow continue to deteriorate, those
imposed severe economic penalties—again. three governments have banded together to try to
Facing the threat of “secondary sanctions”—U.S. stymie U.S. sanctions, which they all believe, despite
sanctions on any foreign companies doing busi- Trump administration denials, are aimed at regime
ness in Iran—Total withdrew from the South Pars, change in Iran. The intensifying economic relation-
deciding, as many European companies have, that ship between Iran, China and Russia is the latest,
access to the U.S. market remains more important most obvious signal that the U.S. is now in a de
than deals in Iran. In Total’s wake, though, came facto Cold War with those nations.
the China National Petroleum Corp., a state- Secretary of State Mike Pompeo signaled as
owned giant based in Beijing. “It’s a much in a speech in Brussels earlier
gift to China,” says a longtime Total this month. The administration’s for-
adviser not authorized to speak BY eign policy goal, he said, is to build
publicly, “and a self-inlicted wound a “new liberal order,” which includes
for the West.” BILL POWELL “lawfully exiting or renegotiating

NEWSWEEK.COM 11
Periscope WORLD

WHERE THERE’S SMOKE The South


Pars is the world’s largest natural gas ield.
New U.S. sanctions have opened the door
to the China National Petroleum Corp.

an exemption, hoping the move


might make Beijing more amenable
to an overall deal on trade.
Iran hawks in the Trump adminis-
tration, led by Pompeo and national
security adviser John Bolton, also
worry that exemptions granted to a
few Iranian banks to conduct inter-
outdated or harmful treaties, trade Tehran’s Iran Energy Exchange did national wire transfers expose an
agreements and other international two large-scale oil deals, each involv- additional weakness. The exemptions
arrangements that don’t serve our ing over 700,000 barrels of crude. are supposed to be for “humanitarian”
sovereign interests or those of our The exchange has set up a system that transactions, but Iran has used such
allies.” The Iran deal is Exhibit A enables customers to remain anon- waivers in the past to run massive
in that policy, Trump advisers say. ymous when they buy oil from Iran. sanctions-busting schemes.
But Cold War 2.0 is very different “The sales were a victory [for Iran] in To be sure, the new sanctions
from Washington’s standoff with that sanctions busters around the have had some impact: Iran’s foreign
the Soviets. Unlike the leaden state- world can now see a possible way exchange reserves are shrinking, as
dominated Soviet economy, whose around U.S. restrictions,” says Saeed is its access to hard currency. At the
weakness was a critical factor in the Ghasseminejad, an adviser on Iran same time, though, the value of Iran’s
USSR’s demise, China’s economy is to the Foundation for the Defense of currency, the rial, has increased rela-
the second largest after the U.S., and Democracies, a U.S. think tank sup- tive to the dollar, and its stock market
the country has close to world-class porting stricter Tehran sanctions. is actually up. Contrary to the Trump
capabilities in industries from tech- The Trump administration itself administration’s desire, the efforts so
nology to manufacturing to oil and is part of the reason its new sanc- far “are not sufficient to change the
gas. Today, goods made by scores of tions regime may not be as effective Iranian regime’s behavior,” says Ghas-
medium-sized Chinese exporters are as it desires. After what administra- seminejad. Privately, administration
found all over Iran. Secondary sanc- tion sources say “was intense debate,” hawks agree. They are already seek-
tions mean nothing to these compa- Trump issued waivers to eight coun- ing further sanctions and stepped-up
nies; they do no business with the U.S. tries—mainly, but not exclusively, to enforcement of those now in place.
Russia is also in the process of allies. They include Turkey—who in Bolton said in November that oil
boosting its direct investment in Iran, October released U.S. evangelical pas- sanction waivers are “temporary” and
by $50 billion in the oil and gas sector tor Andrew Brunson, as Trump had he expects allies like Japan and South
alone, with additional funding to help sought—as well as South Korea, Japan Korea to make other arrangements for
Tehran upgrade a dilapidated electric- and India, all big buyers of Iranian their crude supply. “Easier said than
ity grid and other infrastructure. The oil. After a bitter debate, the Trump done,” says a Japanese trading com-
Russian companies also “have nothing administration also granted China pany executive, noting that contracts
to lose,” says Igor Delanoe, an analyst are in place and it’s not clear where
at the Franco-Russian Observatory else Japan can go for supply; a recent
group, a Moscow-based think tank. Russia-Saudi agreement to cut produc-
From its years of laboring under tion means higher crude prices.
A LIREZA FIROUZI/GET T Y

Western economic sanctions, Iran has New U.S. sanctions Meanwhile, diplomats in the U.S.,
also gained experience in how to flout are “a gift to China Europe and East Asia expect China
them. In November, less than two
weeks after the Trump administra- and a self-inlicted and Russia to continue to invest in
Iran. And that’s no matter what the
tion’s new sanctions went into effect, wound for the West.” U.S. says.

12 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M bE r 21, 2018


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

J A PA N

Japan Inc. boosting R&D 48,208 3.4%

Patents filed by
spending to put itself
R&D expenditure
Japan (2017) as % of GPD (2016)

ahead of the curve 18.9


trillion
JPY
4.5%
With Japanese companies across the board expanding their budgets
R&D expenditure Rise in total R&D spending by
for R&D, the Land of the Rising Sun is ready to rise again, developing (2017) major Japanese firms (2017 - 2018)
products for an ever-changing world.
In a bid to position itself at the In October, DIC announced that look back, but look forward, says
forefront of innovation once again it had commenced full-scale R&D President and CEO, Kaoru Ino.
and to ward off competition from of compounds used as materials “Our management vision is
regional rivals like South Korea and for stereolithography 3D printing, the same as our brand slogan: to
China, Japan is boosting investment leveraging on its distinctive polymer advance through constant innova-
in R&D across the board, from the designing and compounding tech- tion,” he explains. “This is a unique
nation’s biggest conglomerates like nologies. In addition to conducting vision within our industry, and that
Toyota, Honda, Panasonic and Sony, R&D in Japan, DIC has established uniqueness is created through the
to smaller, lesser known B2B firms a dedicated research department on maintenance of the DIC spirit.”
in specialized industries. the site of the Fine Chemicals Tech- Perhaps a perfect encapsulation
A survey released earlier this nical Center Korea, and in August of this fierce commitment to rein- “Throughout the years,
year by Nikkei about R&D activi- invested in a Japanese biotech firm, vention was the group’s move to re- we have evolved and
ties for fiscal 2018, which started as it looks to strengthen its foothold name the business in 2008, coincid- diversified our business
in April, concludes that total R&D in biotechnologies. ing with its centenary celebrations.
spending by major Japanese com- A Japanese company with a top For many businesses lucky enough to adapt to new
panies is set to rise 4.5 percent global share in printing inks and to reach such a significant milestone, necessities. As a result,
on the previous year, which will organic pigments, DIC celebrated the occasion would inevitably be we are now offering a
be the ninth consecutive year of its 110th anniversary this year, and greeted with over-sentimentality. variety of products”
growth. These Japanese compa- has established a broad portfolio in Not for this company. Rebranding it-
nies are aggressively investing in an array of sectors spanning more self from Dainippon Ink & Chemicals Kaoru Ino, President and CEO,
innovative technologies, ranging than 60 countries worldwide. You to DIC Corporation was all about
DIC Corporation
from AI and robotics, to biotech, could say it’s been a colorful past moving with the times.
compound materials and chemi- century or so; one that has been “Since we were already well
cals – technologies which they see characterized by continual innova- known in the market, we no longer was a purely strategic one.
as key to future competiveness. tion to provide products that re- wanted our customers to identify Mr. Ino explains: “Throughout
One such company that has spond to the changing needs and us as a manufacturer limited to the the years, we have evolved and di-
been boosting spending on R&D tastes of society. ink production, so we changed our versified our business to adapt to
and innovation is DIC Corporation, With such a vibrant history be- name,” says Mr. Ino. Indeed, with new necessities. As a result, we are
a world-leading manufacturer of hind it, it could have easily been a DIC Corporation’s core market of now offering a variety of products.”
printing inks and organic pigments, temptation for DIC Corporation to traditional printing inks having seen And this diversification process
which in recent years has diversified dwell on previous successes in the a marked reduction in demand, the has not just been limited to prod-
into fine chemicals, polymers, com- ink business. However, the compa- company’s decision to broaden its uct areas, but new industries too,
pounds and application materials. ny’s philosophy has never been to palette, commercially speaking, with the group today cementing a
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

major presence in international sec- a proper state and developing them in size, upgrading equipment and
tors including automobiles, electron- at a higher level of quality. That is lightweight requirements of equip-
ics, foods and housing. It is within what distinguishes Japanese people ment parts are not only seen in
these markets that “the commercial- as a nation,” he says. the semiconductor industry but
ization of natural colors” has become For Naotaka Kondo, President of also in other industries, so we are
a unique purpose for the company. Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd. – whose main looking towards more expansion
With DIC Corporation now business is graphite, a type of carbon of this product.”
advancing into the digital era, it is that is used in a range of industries, C/C is also being used in aster-
adapting its portfolio further still to such as in the production of semi- oid probes developed by the Japan
offer solutions for monitors and dis- conductors – the underlying value of Aerospace Exploration Agency
plays, whilst at the same time closely “Since our inception, monozukuri is assessing the needs of and plasma testing equipment for
monitoring the newest trends of the we have embraced the society, taking time to think about nuclear fusion reactors.
market in order to provide the col- pioneering spirit of future needs, and truly listening to Sumitomo Electric, a global
ors required by its clients across its manufacturing unique the customer. leader in the manufacture of elec-
product range. “We follow trends that are hap- tric wire and optical fiber cables
Japan Inc. may be investing more and innovative carbon pening around us and propose what which is also developing photo-
in R&D to ward off competition products specialized for could be helpful or what could be voltaic solar panels for energy
from China and South Korea, but highly functional fields” necessary in the near future. This generation, is another company
there is one thing that has always creates a win-win situation between that has been dedicating more
given Japan its competitive edge Naotaka Kondo, President, us as a manufacturer and the cus- investment in R&D to stay ahead
– monozukuri. Monozukuri is the Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd. tomers that use and apply our prod- of the curve.
unique essence of Japanese manu- ucts in their daily lives,” he says. Last year, its R&D expendi-
facturing which revolves around a “Since our inception, we have ture amounted to 117.7 billion yen
sincere dedication to craftsmanship, honesty, diligence and unity. That embraced the pioneering spirit of ($ 1.04 billion). For this year, it
perfection and innovation. unique mindset is exported abroad manufacturing completely unique has raised its R&D budget to 125
“Japanese people have a unique by Japanese corporations.” products, and continued to take on billion yen.
mentality that upholds attention Masahiro Nakajima, Chairman challenges in the pursuit of unique “This dedication to R&D al-
to detail and customer satisfac- and CEO of Morita Holdings Cor- and innovative carbon products spe- lowed us to create new busi-
tion above all else. This devotion to poration, agrees that the nation’s cialized for highly functional fields.” nesses, such as a concentrator
craftsmanship has made our prod- manufacturing prowess is also deep- Toyo Tanso was the first com- photovoltaic (CPV) system that
ucts reliable and trustworthy,” says ly rooted in the character of Japa- pany in the world to successfully has twice the conversion efficien-
Hiromichi Tatsuno, President of the nese people. “Japanese people have mass produce large-size isotropic cy of standard crystalline silicon
Tatsuno Corporation. a deep interest, not just in making graphite in 1974, and its carbon photovoltaic,” says Osamu Inoue,
“Japanese society promotes things, but also in preserving them in products and technology have con- president and COO.
tinued to evolve with the needs of “While developing new business-
the times. Its products can be found es is a crucial goal of our R&D, we
in everything from automobiles and also focus on enhancing the quality
home appliances to cutting-edge of our existing businesses. We are
products in fields such as aerospace also developing advanced optical
and medical care. The company’s fiber products. We have developed
operations span the globe, and in ultra-high density optical fiber cable,
the U.S. it has been servicing the and we are currently developing
semiconductor industry for over even more advanced products soon
25 years. to be commercialized.”
Toyo Tanso is also investing As Japanese companies such
heavily in R&D to remain at the as DIC, Toyo Tanso and Sumitomo
forefront of the graphite industry continue to invest more in R&D to
by providing innovative materi- develop new products with the
als and solutions to help both the spirit of monozukuri, the Land of
company and its customers to stay the Rising Sun is ready to rise again,
ahead of their competition. It has putting itself at the forefront of in-
recently developed a diverse range novation for a changing world.
of composite materials such as C/C
carbon fibre, which is lighter and
easier to handle than graphite.
“In the semiconductor indus-
try, manufacturing equipment for #TheWorldfolio
semiconductors is becoming bigger #JapanTheWorldfolio
in size to increase the volume of
production. According to this trend,
our graphite products, which are PRODUCED BY
used in manufacturing equipment THE WORLDFOLIO
for semiconductors, are also get- Antoine Azoulay – Country Director
ting heavier and bigger in size,” Alexandre Marland – Editorial Director
explains Mr. Kondo. Sean Mapleden – Chief Market Analyst
“Therefore, semiconductor Daiki Hijikata – Market Analyst
customers are adopting lighter Marta Z. de Castro – Coordinator
C/C composite products. Trends Sonal Malkani – Interpreter
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

“Our company has been


providing the automotive
Energy co-existence: industry with fueling and
measuring technologies for

the sustainable future more than 100 years”

of fueling solutions Hiromichi Tatsuno,


President, Tatsuno Corporation

Thanks to its commitment to R&D, Tatsuno Corporation, a pioneer in the fuel dispenser field, has been providing innovative
technologies in LPG, CNG, LNG and hydrogen to prepare the automotive industry for the age of sustainability.
Fossil fuel-powered vehicles have future of cars. I fully believe and sustainable development of energy firms, pledged to build
ruled the roads for a century, but that EVs will be in demand, but the right energy mix. EV tech- 80 hydrogen fuelling stations
over the coming decades, the it doesn’t mean that electric nology is an innovation for the by 2022.
number of vehicles running on vehicles or battery-driven cars future and we are fully aware Looking to the future for fuel
alternative energy sources will will completely replace the tra- of its consequences. However, I pump manufacturers like Tatsuno,
grow as nations around the globe ditional engine,” says Hiromichi am sure that it will not destroy hydrogen fuelling stations repre-
scramble to drastically reduce car- Tatsuno, President of Tatsuno our business.” sents a major opportunity in the
bon emissions. Corporation, a century-old man- Tatsuno’s business may not face of disruption from EVs. The
Electronic vehicles (EVs) have ufacturer of fuel pumps for the be destroyed, but Mr. Tatsuno company is supporting the pro-
been hailed as the primary suc- Japanese market, as well as mar- and others in the fuel industry liferation of hydrogen-powered
cessor to fossil-fuel powered cars and has already developed
cars. According to a study by HYDROGEN NX, a hydrogen dis-
consultancy firm McKinsey, last penser for fuel cell vehicles that
year, global sales of new EVs is widely used in Japan. For more
passed a million units for the than a century, Tatsuno has inno-
first time; and under the current vated with the times, and the HY-
growth trajectory, “EV produc- DROGEN NX is the latest example
ers could almost quadruple that of the company’s innovations for
achievement by 2020, moving a changing world.
4.5 million units, around 5 per- “We are investing heavily in
cent of the overall global light- hydrogen and we now export
vehicle market”. dispensers to the U.S. and China.
But 5 percent is a tiny por- Tatsuno has innovated with the times and displays its innovations at There are about 100 hydrogen
tion and many industry insiders the showroom in its Yokohama plant stations in Japan of which Tat-
are not entirely convinced that kets in Europe, Asia and Africa. are aware they will certainly suno owns a 50-percent share,”
EVs will be able to completely “If the EV change is real, we see disruption over the years by says Mr. Tatsuno.
replace vehicles powered by the will need to see at least 300 the growth of EVs and hybrid “Hydrogen started out as a
traditional internal combustion million of them within the next vehicles. Another green alterna- huge cost but we’ve been able to
engine. Rather than a draco- five to six years. If the number tive being championed in Japan cut it down over time. Without
nian move to eradicate fossil-fuel remains below that, it would rep- is hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. lowering it, we can’t achieve a
powered cars completely, some resent rather little change in com- Giants like Toyota and Honda are future where hydrogen is widely
propose a healthy mix of both parison to the two billion-plus car all already developing and intro- used in society. We’ll continue to
traditionally and alternatively market we are projected to have. ducing hydrogen fuel cell cars invest in our R&D facilities and
fuelled vehicles on our roads. “I am not saying that gasoline to the market; while earlier this production facilities, because
“Everyone investing in EVs is the only source to rely upon. year, an alliance of 11 Japanese we want to further develop the
is preaching for the righteous What I fight for is the sensible firms, including automakers and hydrogen business.”

INNOVATION FOR
A CHANGING WORLD
tatsuno-corporation.com
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Cutting-edge equipment for


the future of fire-fighting
Morita has been pioneering fire-fighting technology
for more than 110 years and is currently developing
a groundbreaking fire-truck which can extinguish fire
MiracleN7 Habot-mini
without using water.
The MiracleN7 is Morita’s innovative fire fighting vehicle. It is de-
In a natural disaster-prone country signed to extinguish fires without using water by creating nitrogen-
like Japan, the nation’s fire and enriched air at disaster sites, including fire scenes.
safety equipment manufacturers
are constantly trying to innovate water in an area with poor access mine what could be the next step
and come up with new ways to to water resources.” for the company’s future.”
tackle fire and rescue issues in In the aftermath of the Great Earlier this year the company
treacherous circumstances, such East Japan earthquake in 2011 also unveiled the “MVF21”, the lat-
as in the aftermath of earthquakes. and resultant nuclear disaster at est in its series of MVF fire trucks,
One such company that has the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear multi-purpose fire-fighting vehicles
been doing that for over a century Power Station, Mr. Nakajima says that are currently deployed in mu-
is Morita. Founded in 1907, Morita that water could not be used at all nicipalities around Japan for fire-
was responsible for the development because of the tsunami. Again the fighting, rescue, and storage of
of Japan’s first gasoline-powered fire company took what it had learned material and equipment.
pump in 1910 and its first fire truck from the disaster to develop a revo- This latest “MVF21” model
in 1917. Since then, the company has lutionary fire-fighting vehicle that is equipped with a 21-meter
continued to develop state of the art “Our slogan is ‘Protecting doesn’t require water, known as aerial platform and basket ca-
fire-fighting technology, working as Human Life and Mother the MiracleN7. pable of carrying a maximum
a leading manufacturer of fire trucks Earth.’ We want to feel This MiracleN7 removes oxy- load of 400kg, the first of its
for more than 110 years. gen contained in the air to extin- kind in Japan. The basket was
Some of the company’s most the pulse of society to guish fire, and provides a glimpse co-developed by Morita and its
important innovations have come determine what could of the technology which could consolidated subsidiary Bronto
about from lessons learned in the be the next step for the be used in the fire trucks of the Skylift of Finland in a process
wake of Japan’s biggest natural company’s future” future. Morita also developed a that utilized the best of each
disasters. The Great Hanshin-Awaji miniature model based around company’s technology. Also fit-
Earthquake in 1995 was one of the Masahiro Nakajima, the MiracleN7 called the “Habot- ted with a compressed air foam
biggest-ever recorded earthquakes mini”, which won the prestigious system (CAFS) in order to fight
Chairman & CEO,
in Japan and killed more than German Design Award in 2017. fires using relatively little water,
6,400 people. However the worst Morita Holdings Corporation “The MiracleN7 is used in Aomo- “MVF21” has a 900-liter water
of the damage was not caused by water in a timely fashion,” recalls ri, which has nuclear power-related tank and ample storage space.
the earthquake itself, but in the Morita CEO, Masahiro Nakajima. facilities. Throughout all these di- As it continues to develop
fires that ensued in the aftermath. “That was one of the most tragic saster episodes, our company has next-generation fire and rescue
“We witnessed what happened points of that event. The company adapted to the needs and necessi- vehicles like the MiracleN7 and
and realized that the fire trucks could took that as a lesson and returned ties that can occur from unforeseen “MVF21”, 111-year-old Morita is
not cover the full scale of the fire. to the R&D office to research fur- events, whether they are natural or readying for the challenges of
The fire hydrants were broken at the ther preventive measures against artificial,” adds Mr. Nakajima. the next century – putting itself
time, and vehicles only had a limited natural disasters. Shortly after, we “Morita pays special attention at the forefront of the future of
amount of water in their reservoirs. created a vehicle that could carry to what is happening. We want to fire-fighting with its innovative
They could not get a new source of out effective fire control with less feel the pulse of society to deter- and award-winning technology.

PROTECTING HUMAN LIFE


AND MOTHER EARTH

MVF21
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Hidden champions: the secret behind


Japan’s manufacturing success
While some of Japan’s best-known manufacturers have lost ground to regional rivals in recent years, it is the
country’s chukenkigyo – strong, medium-sized companies – that continue to fly the national flag, enjoying outsize
global market shares in niche areas.
global industry depends. in terms of function, but beauty. changed something, they wouldn’t
Smaller in size, greater in cor- This is our sense of manufactur- be able to trust us, and they
porate flexibility and highly spe- ing. This means that even for wouldn’t be able to maintain quality
cialized in precise products, these something as simple as a cup, we for their customers. This commit-
‘hidden champions’ have built will try to make it more beautiful ment to quality is very important
upon Japan’s historical manu- while retaining its function. and is why everyone returns to the
facturing expertise to transform “Secondly, in Japan, every step Japanese market.”
themselves into qualitative and of the supply chain is here. This Replication of manufacturing
innovative powerhouses. means we can create long-term processes is perfectly okay, clari-
Here, The Worldfolio presents quality control. The ‘five Ms’ we fies Mr. Nagai, but only if the in-
“We will leverage on our some of these so-called hidden have are very important to this: tention is there to learn from it in
company’s technology champions, pioneers of high- man, machine, method, mate- order to improve on what’s come
to expand into new performing technologies and so- rial and measurement. However, before. After all, innovation rarely
markets” lutions on which their worldwide some countries often require just occurs without replication in the
clients rely. one ‘M’ – money – so they can copy first instance.
easily and can sell at a tenth of “Copying is okay,” he says.
Niroh Utsumi, President, Components manufacturer the price. That’s fantastic, but is “For example, Japan started
ITO Corporation diversifies it sustainable? off copying the U.S.! We copied
Nabell Corporation started as a “For example one of our custom- their methods 60 years ago.
To begin to understand the signifi- leading manufacturer of high- qual- ers uses our bellows and fully un- While copying teaches you about
cance of chukenkigyo – Japan’s ity camera bellows. As the com- derstands our specifications. They know-how, it does not teach you
‘strong’ small, medium-sized en- pany grew and markets changed, went through 10 years’ worth of about know-why, and that’s a big
terprises (SMEs) – to the coun- it saw an opportunity to apply its endurance testing with it. If we difference. But Japanese compa-
try’s overall economy, one solitary expertise in new industries. Today,
statistic will generally suffice. the company has a specialty in the
That is: 97 percent of all Japa- design and manufacture of “func-
nese businesses are comprised tional covers” for applications in a
of either SMEs, or their slightly wide range of industrial fields. With
bigger cousins, LMEs (large, me- offices and manufacturing in Ja-
dium-sized enterprises). pan, Korea, China and in the United
Chukenkigyo, in short, provide States and through leadership and
Japan’s economic backbone. devotion to innovation, Nabell has
Though it was huge Japanese poised its products in many major
corporations such as Sony, Sharp markets including optical, medical,
and Panasonic that took over the machine tool, material handling,
world of consumer products in semi-conductor, amusement, and
the 1980s and 1990s – iconic many others.
brands that to this day remain In gearing up for the fourth-
synonymous with the famous industrial revolution, one charac-
‘Made in Japan’ trademark and terized by a fusion of new tech-
its reputation for high-quality – nologies that is blurring the lines
these days chukenkigyo are per- between the physical, digital, and
haps a more pertinent symbol of biological spheres, Nabell’s latest
Japan’s great manufacturing and diversification is into the robot-
technological prowess. ics industry, providing bellows
Indeed, whereas some of the technology that enables these
country’s largest manufacturers high-tech automated machines
have in recent years lost market to function.
share to regional rivals, it is Ja- Asked about what makes
pan’s smaller, lesser-known manu- Japanese monozukuri special
facturing firms that continue to compared to the manufacturing
dominate niches upon which sectors of other regional rivals,
Nabell president Norio Nagai
explains: “Firstly, we have, since
ancient times, an eye for preci-
sion and accuracy. We make our
products very precisely not only
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

strategy aims to improve qual- Chemicals


ity standards as opposed to our A leader in the Japanese chemical
competitors’ approach to reduce industry – the country’s second
costs while reducing quality. The largest manufacturing segment
wire harnesses that we manu- behind transportation machin-
facture with great care involve ery – Katayama Chemical de-
90-percent handmade work. This velops, manufactures, and sells
silent knowledge cannot be found reagents, chemical products, spe-
in any manual, and this spirit of cial synthesized medicines, xeno-
“Year after year, our “As our clients come wabi-sabi is at the heart of our diagnostic products, and medical
products. It is not easy to appre- raw materials.
customers trust us for from a variety of ciate this silent knowledge while Founded in 1908, Katayama
the efforts we make to industries, our research competitors are just highlighting Chemical established a joint ven-
respond to their needs” is tailored to the cost competitiveness, but we ture with American water firm
individual requirements want to explain that know-how Ecolab four years ago that has
Akihiko Yoneda, President and of each customer” is what really matters to deliver since become the “number one
CEO, Banshu Electric Co. Ltd. reliable products.” water treatment company in the
Along with Banshu Electric’s world,” says the company’s presi-
Yasuhiro Nomura, President, main business area, which pro- dent, Yasuhiro Nomura. “We be-
nies and Japanese people have a Katayama Chemicals vides wire harness solutions lieve this made us become a ‘glocal’
critical eye. We copy from oth- in the automotive, motorcycle business. To us ‘glocal’ means ‘think
ers, but we also learn from oth- For Banshu Electric, it is impor- and construction industries, the globally act locally’.”
ers. While other countries may tant to incorporate the Japanese company also provides plastic As well as ‘glocality’, Kataya-
make a fantastic product, we will spirit of wabi-sabi – a world view and rubber parts, mostly for mo- ma Chemical is a business firmly
try to make a better version. This centered on the acceptance of torcycles. Mr. Yoneda says that focused on sustainability, given
is innovation.” transience and imperfection– when while the traditional monozukuri both the nature of its products,
implementing the manufacturing craftmanship that defines Bans- and the nature of Japan – a
Electrics process of monozukuri, explains hu Electric’s products will live on, country synonymous with envi-
Akihiko Yoneda, president and Mr. Yoneda. the company is now adapting ronmental action being as it is
CEO of Banshu Electric, a leader “Wabi-sabi allows us to focus to technological innovation to the birthplace of the Kyoto Pro-
in the manufacture of wire har- on appreciating something for complement its processes. tocol (the international agree-
nesses for the automotive indus- what it is, rather than focusing on “Regarding the Fourth Indus- ment committing countries to
try, agrees that while Japanese what something could be. In that trial Revolution, I think that we limit greenhouse gas emissions).
manufacturers cannot compete sense, we focus on the unique- will see some changes in the Our main policy is how to save
with China or South Korea on ness of Japanese monozukuri’s scenario of our products, but the resources of earth,” explains
price, those same competitors characteristic for its high qual- the wire harness business will Mr. Nomura. “We have a lot of ex-
cannot match Japan on quality. ity, rather than focusing on low not die, we will still need them perience in the seawater cooling
“Quality is our main advantage prices. Our customers choose us in the future. Automation is the treatment and we supply these
and those other countries cannot because we make efforts to re- trend nowadays, but we want to chemicals. These chemicals have
compete with our quality stan- spond to their needs to keep that preserve the high precision that been checked by the Japanese Fish
dards,” he says. “As an original level of high quality and because we are able to provide through Association and verified for their
equipment manufacturer provid- of that they keep trusting us year our craftsmanship process, so we environmental safety.
ing solutions for large companies after year. will gradually adopt this technol- Taking the example of sea wa-
on demand, we need to deliver high “At Banshu Electric we de- ogy, but without reducing our ter, Katayama Chemical has de-
quality for customers.” liver high-quality products. Our high precision standards.” veloped a product that prevents
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

isms, therefore averting environ- up a strong corporate culture generation of synthetic natural gas.
mental contamination. to allow the company to deal ITO Corporation has developed an
“While we accept industries have with changing environments, award-winning PA System initially
to use the resources of the earth, and contributing to society. to act as a lifeline in earthquakes
our job is to supply the chemicals With a mission to “use energy to and other disasters.
that help these companies reduce create a beautiful, inhabitable “We developed this system in
their negative impact on the earth,” Earth”, ITO Corporation looks to response to earthquakes because
says Mr. Nomura. achieve its goal trough maximis- it allows gas to be used even after
ing the potential of numerous an earthquake,” explains company
Energy Manufacturing award-winning R&D capabili- president, Niroh Utsumi. “In mar-
“While copying teaches Another company that embod- ties and production technology keting it to other countries, we
you about know-how, it ies the very spirit of chukenkigyo in order to create environmen- emphasise two points. The first
does not teach you about is ITO Corporation, an expert in tally-friendly, high-quality, low- point is that it can be used after
know-why. To innovate, gas supplying equipment. In- cost products. an earthquake as it allows the gas
both are needed” deed, the company’s manifes- With the pressing need that the supply to be restored.
tation of Japanese manufactur- world faces today to sustain its “This appeals to countries
ing culture even extends to its natural environment, the future of where there are frequent earth-
Norio Nagai, President,
name, which it changed in 2014 energy has become an extremely quakes. The second point that is
Nabell Corporation to reflect the values of innova- important topic. Through the emphasised is that the system can
tion technology and origination manufacture of essential products be used to supply gas when the
pollution by industry. Whereas (ITO) – characteristics often as- for the energy sector, including gas infrastructure is undergoing
before power plants would use sociated with monozukuri. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and maintenance. In many countries
chlorine to kill micro-organisms Like Katayama Chemical, the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), ITO around the world, if gas infra-
within sea water that prevented company’s major focus is also Corporation endeavours to shape structure is undergoing mainte-
their cooling systems form work- centred on sustainability. Since the future in a sustainable way. nance, the gas just stops and they
ing properly, the company for- its inception in 1953, ITO Cor- Over the years the name ITO have to tell the customers that
mulated an ecologically-friendly poration has maintained a com- Corporation has become synony- there is no gas for one week. This
water treatment product that pany philosophy of conserving mous with innovation in this seg- system will allow gas suppliers to
stops the growth of microorgan- a quality-first outlook, building ment, having pioneered the first avoid this scenario.”

A clear vision for the future of ophthalmology


Universal View has developed groundbreaking technologies such as its ‘pinhole’ contact
lens, and wants international partners to help bring its innovative products to the enormous
potential global market.
our eyesight and eliminate the use like us, our strategy is to partner with there is only one design and it fits
of glasses.” larger firms and wisely utilize them almost everyone suffering from pres-
Myopia, more commonly known to increase our brand recognition byopia or close-sightedness.”
as short-sightedness, affected 1.45 overseas,” adds Mr. Suzuki. “This pinhole contact lens will help
billion, or 27 percent of the world’s Currently there are three common Japan’s aging populating. As you age,
population in 2010. That figure is options for a person with myopia: you lose your vision, and there are no
“With pinhole lenses, there estimated to grow to 5 billion peo- glasses, contact lenses or laser sur- contact lenses designed to help you
is only one design and ple by 2050, according to a study gery. But Universal View has worked as you get older. When it comes to
it fits almost everyone published by the American Acad- on a new emerging fourth solution: the large players in the market, they
emy of Ophthalmology. Mr. Suzuki orthokeratology lenses called Breath don’t have any designs targeting the
suffering from presbyopia points out that the growing use of O correct®, which are worn at night aging population. Since we are creat-
or close-sightedness” technology such a smart phones is a and correct vision during sleep. ing a whole new market, we have no
major cause of the increase. “What the orthokeratology lenses direct competitors,” he adds.
Taro Suzuki, “The rise of digital technology do is when you wear it at night; it “It is scheduled to enter the Japa-
President, Universal View and smartphones is increasing the pulls the focal point to the end of nese and European market in 2020.
amount of screens present in our the retina and changes the shape of Once we gain approval in Japan and
Taro Suzuki, President of Universal daily lives and the amount of myo- it, so that in the morning, when you CE marking, we will partner with
View, a company focused on devel- pic children will go up. We want to remove the lens, your eyesight will global firms to penetrate overseas
oping ophthalmic medical devices create innovative products that can already have been corrected during markets at once. The pinhole con-
such as next-generation contact enter the global market and provide the night,” explains Mr. Suzuki. tact lens will be an introduction to
lenses, is passionate about vision a solution to this issue,” he says. One of the company’s latest inno- the smart contact lens, which will be
and even more passionate about To bring its innovative products vations is the world’s first ‘pinhole’ a combination of pinhole technology
improving it. global, the company is looking for contact lenses, which have enormous and connectivity.”
“Did you know that 83 percent of investors and international partners. advantages over regular lenses, as Mr. Suzuki truly believes that the
the information we absorb comes It is already working with Toray In- explained by Mr. Suzuki: “If you look pinhole contact lens can change live
from our vision?” he says. “Our vision dustries, a Japanese multinational fo- through this pinhole, you can see sand wants international investors,
represents the greatest proportion cused on organic synthetic chemistry, things more clearly. Whereas normal partners and distributors to come
of how we understand the world. As polymer chemistry and biochemistry; contact lenses enhance the depth of on board to help this revolutionary
the most crucial sense available to while INCJ Ltd (Japanese Govern- focus, this pinhole technology actu- product reach the potential billions
humans, Universal View’s goal is to ment Fund) is its major shareholder. ally deepens it, effectively allowing of poor eyesight sufferers across
create innovative ways to enhance “When it comes to small start-ups you to see better. With pinhole lenses, the globe.
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Satake: the ‘perfect


mixer’ for a cocktail
of Asian industries
Just shy of its 100th anniversary, Satake has used a century of
operations to create a highly successful blend of experience
and innovation in order to become Japan’s number one
industrial mixing company. Satake’s car environment simulation test chamber.
Since its establishment in 1920, such a laboratory was crucial to to address these concerns is im-
Satake has cemented its place as our expansion, as mixing technol- portant to us, so we do a test for
“Our ability to provide
one of Asia’s top manufacturers of ogy supports almost every type of every customer and develop the the most appropriate
mixers, as well as also becoming a industry and company.” most appropriate method based and efficient high-level
pioneer in environmental testing Indeed, while the concept of on their requirements.” mixing technology is the
equipment technology. mixing is simple – the process of Having started out as a mixer most important concern
For almost a century, SATAKE combing two or more different manufacturer, Satake has addi-
has continuously maintained the qualities to form one substance tionally moved into the area of
for us”
top share in Japan’s mixing sec- or mass – depending on the size of environment testing equipment; Mitsutoshi Nishioka,
tor – a specialist industry that the job, the materials involved, and technology that performs per- President of Satake
provides services and apparatus the type of industry that requires formance testing of industrial says the Satake president, proudly
for diverse fields such as food, it, then mixing can be a specialist products at a high accuracy. underlining that its “3D floating
medicine and chemistry – and job requiring sophisticated equip- “The objective was to add a iPS cell differentiation induction
has continued to exhibit success ment. And this is where Satake technical essence, making our bioreactor is one of the only animal
in various production scenarios has come into its own, providing products more profitable and cell reactors worldwide”.
across the world, establishing mixing solutions for almost every more unique. That’s why we se- Looking forward to the compa-
bases in Korea, China, Taiwan, sector you can think of: from paints lected to develop both mixing ny’s centenary in just over a year’s
Malaysia and Thailand. and water treatment to breweries machines and environment test- time, Mr. Nishioka state’s that the
President of Satake, Mitsutoshi and energy generation. Satake’s ing machines. Bio-reactors are an ideal anniversary gift would be to
Nishioka, attributes much of the largest business share, however, extension of these technologies, further establish Satake’s top mar-
company’s modern-day achieve- can be found in the chemical and too” says Mr. Nishioka, referring to ket position, with perhaps another
ments and impressive expansion fine chemical field. Satake’s third major business line. new business venture [for example, a
to its laboratory specializing in “In these areas, the most im- In the field of bio-reactors, Sa- newly developed item, highly precise
mixing technology, the first one portant matter we are requested take offers a range of solutions from wet process classifier] or two pro-
in Asia, which was initially estab- to look into is the balance between small-scale laboratory equipment viding the perfect icing on the cake.
lished back in 1987. safety and quality. Our ability to and pilot machines to large-scale “If I had to talk about an objec-
“Since then, we have expanded provide the most appropriate and production machines in order to tive for 2020, we would like to be
– including joint ventures – in Asia efficient high-level mixing technol- undertake the optimum commercial the number one in Asia for mixer
and developed our business into ogy is the most important concern production and industrialization in technology and environment test-
South East Asia as well,” he says. for us,” explains Mr. Nishioka. the field of cell cultures. ing equipment,” he says. “As we are
“Our basic philosophy is that unless “Other areas such as the food “Technologically speaking, it is developing a reactor for iPS animal
we have expertise in a specific field, industry, water treatment, or gar- easy to get into the bioreactor cells it would also be good if we could
we cannot lead the joint venture or bage recycling, have asked us for market, but there are giants in the launch an in-house venture or allow
establish overseas business locally. many types of mixing techniques. industry that we cannot copy or another company to use this technol-
That’s why we specialize in mix- We develop different technologies replicate. That’s why we put anoth- ogy. That would be a wonderful way
ing technology. Therefore, making for each industry’s needs. How er essence into these technologies,” to bring in our 100th anniversary.”
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

State-of-the art rubber products for


safety and disaster mitigation
Shibata is looking to expand its offering of high-quality rubber products in the U.S.
and beyond.
Established in 1923, Shibata Indus- and California on the west coast, ural disasters such typhoons,
trial is a manufacturer of special- along Texas and the gulf coast earthquakes, volcanic eruptions,
ized rubber materials that started onto Florida, North Carolina, New tsunamis and heavy flooding.
out as a shoemaker. Today the com- Jersey, Philadelphia, New York And it is as a result of oper-
pany stills makes a range of safety and Maine on the east coast, even ating in this environment that
boots with high-quality rubber for including Hawaii and Alaska – and Shibata has gained unrivalled
several industries, but it is also a the company is looking to further experience in developing rubber-
leading manufacturer of rubber- expand its footprint in the Ameri- based products used in the most “There are still natural
based marine, civil engineering and cas, Europe and across the world. state-of-the-art disaster mitiga-
disaster mitigation products. “Our marine-related products tions systems. disasters all over the
In the marine industry, Shibata’s have great potential in developing The company’s investments in world, so we would like
rubber fenders, which it has been countries such as in Africa and innovation and R&D have enabled to provide comprehensive
developing since 1960, are used in India. This is because countries it to develop hybrid materials such
the safe berthing of ships and ma- that are starting to develop eco- as ‘Rubber Steel’. Debris barriers solutions to these areas
rine vessels across the globe. The nomically need to set up their in- in Japan are usually made from affected by disasters”
ShibataFenderTeam Group, orga- frastructure,” says Atsuki Shibata, concrete, which become worn and
nized within Shibata Industrial and president and CEO. damaged after being subjected to Atsuki Shibata,
“There is also a repeated erosion over time. CEO, Shibata Industrial Co., Ltd.
great deal of poten- Shibata’s answer to the prob- and rubber-metal flood protection
tial for our products in lem was the development of Rub- doors used in buildings, subway
developed countries, ber Steel, which is attached to the stations and public facilities.
such as in Europe, the surface of the concrete barrier sur- “We are looking into expand-
United States and Sin- face to prevent wear and damage, ing the market for our disaster
gapore. This is due to and this extends the service life of mitigation products and safety
container ships and the structure and reduces the fre- boots overseas,” says Mr. Shibata.
the logistic environ- quency of repair and maintenance, “We have heavy rains and
ments surrounding and subsequent running costs. A flooding throughout Japan. There
them, as well as the truly original Shibata innovation, was also a big earthquake in Hok-
tendency for cruise Rubber Steel is now widely used kaido that caused the electricity
ships increasing in as a disaster prevention product supply to stop. We are now mak-
headquartered in Germany with size. In order to respond to these in concrete structures at rivers, ing proposals to ensure lifeline
offices in the Americas, Europe and large ships, improving port en- streams, canals, waterways, dams to these areas as well as other
Asia, brings together a dedicated vironments is one of their tasks. and coastal areas. products for their safety and di-
team of true fender experts deliv- Consequently, there is great po- Other Shibata innovations in- saster mitigation.
ering safety critical fender systems tential for our marine-related clude a bridge restrainer system “We actively work to contrib-
that protect people, ships and port products in both developed and developed to reduce the impact ute to society domestically. There
infrastructure. developing countries.” of earthquake disasters, structure are still natural disasters all over
More than a dozen port opera- Shibata’s second focus is ex- protection materials for soil and the world such as in the Philip-
tors in the U.S. already depend panding the use of its disaster water conservation projects, and pines so we would like to provide
on ShibataFenderTeam’s fender mitigation products worldwide. waterproofing equipment against comprehensive solutions to these
systems – from Washington State Japan is a country prone to nat- flood disasters, such as its metal areas affected by disasters.”
Periscope

O P I N ION

The Pact of Forgetting


A new generation in Spain seems ready to deal with
the atrocities of its fascist dictator, Francisco Franco

In a packed MadrId cIneMa simply impossible. For decades, vic-


in late November, a group of tims’ groups and historical memory
Spanish teenagers sat rapt as they lis- associations have battled this oblivion.
tened to stories of their country that Spain’s struggle with its past has
they’d never heard. Stories of children gained a new urgency in recent days
torn from their mothers at birth, of and months. Since Prime Minister
innocent people executed and bur- Pedro Sánchez vowed to remove
ied in mass graves, of torture and of the former dictator’s body from his
successive generations fighting for enormous mausoleum at the “Valley
justice and recognition before their of the Fallen” outside Madrid, debate
plight is forgotten forever. has raged over where exactly his
The young people had come to remains should rest. Meanwhile, a
watch our ilm The Silence of Others, series of campaigns and court cases
which follows survivors of crimes of have seen survivors of the Franco
Spain’s 40-year dictatorship under regime pressing for recognition and
General Francisco Franco and their gaining public support.
struggle for justice in the face of The ilm follows the progress of
Spain’s collective amnesia over a dic- an international lawsuit using uni-
tatorship that terrorized the country versal jurisdiction to investigate
from the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) these crimes against humanity, led
until the general’s death in 1975. by Argentine Judge María Servini.
To this day, young people are taught Among the profiles of survivors:
painfully little about that period in María Martín, whose mother was
schools. In 1977, in the aftermath executed in 1936 for allegedly being
of the dictator’s death, Spain’s gov- a “red”; Chato Galante, an activist
ernment approved an Amnesty Law tortured during the 1970s by notori-
that freed political prisoners but also ous state enforcer Antonio González
ensured that myriad crimes of the Pacheco (known as “Billy the Kid”);
dictatorship would never be investi- and María Bueno, whose newborn this journey seven years ago. Back
gated—what became known as the child was taken from her in 1981, then, anyone advocating for justice
“Pact of Forgetting.” The hope was that following a pattern of child thefts. for Franco’s victims was discouraged
in ignoring the past Spain could build The latter, known as Spain’s “stolen from “stirring up bones,” as former
a democratic future, with old wounds babies” scandal, had Prime Minister José María Aznar put
quietly healing of their own accord. its roots in Franco’s it. But taking the ilm to festivals all
But one cannot create peace by early eugenics theories. bY over the world, we were overwhelmed
simply deciding to forget violence. The response to the by the emotional response from audi-
ALMUDENA CARRACEDO
And for thousands of survivors, film has been dramat- ences, who were tremendously moved
@AlmuDocu
with loved ones still in mass graves, ically different from and supportive of the survivors’ cause.
or with torturers or other perpe- what we imagine d ROBERT BAHAR And, to our surprise, Spaniards in the
trators still at large, forgetting was when we set out on @robertbahar audience were too. As we talked with

22 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M bE r 21, 2018


REMAINS OF THE DAY In some accounts,
Franco, inset, killed up to 2 million
people, many buried in mass graves. At
left, a man relocates his grandfather’s
bones, inally identiied, to a new grave.

Additionally, seven out of 10 people


thought the state should support
the reinterment of the more than
100,000 victims of the regime bur-
ied in mass graves, and three-quarters
believed the state should fund a free,
voluntary DNA database to help those
who feared they had been the victims
of infant abduction.
All signs show that a large portion
of Spain is ready for change and
that these questions are now on the
table. Just last month, parliament
voted unanimously to begin the
process toward a national law that
would deliver many of the demands
of families affected by the practice
of infant theft, including the much-
needed public database. In the past,
motions like this have been drowned
in waves of “whataboutery.”
But this time feels different. In a
screening last month, two teenagers’
questions summed it up. One asked,
“Why do you think today’s politicians
them, we began to see more support around the issues raised by our film won’t do anything about this? Do
for victims and survivors—across a in Spain, the country where it mat- you think they are waiting for sur-
broader political spectrum—than we tered most. The poll results were vivors to die, so that they can turn
had expected. heartening: Two-thirds of those sur- the page?” Another, visibly moved,
FROM TO P: C ELE STINO ARC E/NUR PHOTO/GET T Y; AFP/GET T Y

About a month after The Silence of veyed now believe there should be a said, “What can we, the new gen-
Others opened in Spanish theaters in change in the law, that perpetrators of erations, do to continue with your
November, screenings are continu- crimes against humanity during the struggle?” That gave us hope. Among
ing to sell out. (The film will come Franco era should be brought to jus- other things, it is evidence of a new
to U.S. theaters in spring 2019.) A tice; only 15 percent opposed this idea. willingness to enact justice before
short video based on the film has time runs out.
gone viral—viewed nearly 3 million
times. One Spanish magazine called → Almudena Carracedo and Robert
it “the most necessary documentary A pattern of child thefts, Bahar are the Emmy-winning directors
in 80 years.” Spain’s “stolen babies” of The Silence of Others, winner of 16
Ahead of the premiere, one of the
film’s production funders, the Ber-
scandal, had its roots film awards, including the Berlinale
Panorama Audience Award. It is nomi-
tha Foundation, provided support in Franco’s early nated for best European documentary
for a survey; it asked about attitudes eugenics theories. at the European Film Awards.

NEWSWEEK.COM 23
THE GOP RELIED ON EVANGELICALS FOR DECADES. BUT WITH YOUNG PEOPLE LEAVING THE

LOSING

illustration by ALEX FINE

24
RE
CHURCH IN DROVES, A POLITICAL RECKONING IS AFOOT. MEET THE ‘EXVANGELICALS’

MY
ELIGION
DE C E M BE R 21, 2018
by NINA BURLEIGH

EWSWEEK.COM 25
F RO M L E F T: H U LTO N A RC H I V E /G E T T Y; JA B I N B OTS F O R D/ T H E WAS H I N GTO N P O ST/G E T T Y; H U LTO N A RC H I V E /G E T T Y
lex Camire left the out that the bomber was a white nationalist, he
church a few months didn’t apologize or even say anything,” Desautels
before his pastor recalls. “And the adults seemed to be all ine with
announced from the pulpit that the election of it. That planted the seed.”
Donald Trump was “a miracle of the Lord.” Later, as an Army infantryman in Iraq, Desautels,
The 29-year-old Connecticut social worker had now 39, moved further from the church. “I was in
been raised in the evangelical tradition; his parents the land of Father Abraham,” he says. “I had this
were married in it. But Camire’s faith had started weird spiritual moment when I realized that these
to fail a decade earlier when his church deemed his families had lived in this neighborhood for longer
mother’s alcoholism—and his parents’ subsequent than America had been a nation, and here we were
divorce—a sin. Later, a secular college education telling them what to do.” He cut ties completely
taught him that “the world”—the community out- with his church after his sister came out as gay and DEVIL'S BARGAIN
Clockwise from top:
side the church—wasn’t going to drag him into felt she had to apologize to their parents. Evangelist Billy Graham
a cesspool of sex and drugs, as he’d been taught Blake Chastain, 35, entered Indiana Wesleyan delivers a sermon in North
from childhood. His pastor’s outspoken support of University the week of 9/11, with hopes of gradu- Carolina 1962; Trump
speaks at a National Day
Trump convinced him he’d made the right decision. ating from the seminary. Instead, he began to fall of Prayer event in the Rose
Californian Jason Desautels similarly began to away from the church when he couldn’t reconcile Garden in 2017; Senator
doubt his faith as a teen. In the week after the Okla- what he was learning in Bible study with his profes- Goldwater, who warned
that if preachers got hold
homa City bombing, his church’s minister railed sor’s support for the Iraq War. “Conservative Chris- of the GOP, it would be “a
against “sand people” and Muslims. “When it came tianity,” he says, “was at odds with the teachings in terrible damn problem.”

26 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


POLITICS

the Bible.” He left and started writing and produc- And the cracks are already showing.
ing his own podcast. Its name: Exvangelical. In the 2018 midterms, exit polls showed, white
All three men are on the front lines of a growing evangelicals backed Republicans by 75 to 22 percent,
movement among millennials that is reshaping the while the rest of the voting population favored Dem-
evangelical church and the nation’s political land- ocrats 66 to 32 percent. But evangelicals were slightly
scape. Since the 1970s, white evangelicals have less likely to support House Republicans in 2018
formed the backbone of the Republican base. But as than they were to support Trump in 2016—which
younger members reject the vitriolic partisanship may have contributed to the Democrats’ pickup
of the Trump era and leave the church, that base is of House seats. Trump’s support actually declined
getting smaller and older. The numbers are stark: more among white evangelical men than women.
Twenty years ago, just 46 percent of white evangeli- The 11-point gender gap between evangelical men
cal Protestants were older than 50; now, 62 percent and women from 2016 shrank to 6 in the midterms.
are above 50. The median age of white evangelicals To be sure, evangelical Christians have been
is 55. Only 10 percent of Americans under 30 iden- rewarded for their support of Trump after endur-
tify as white evangelicals. The exodus of youth is so ing eight years wandering in Barack Obama’s
swift that demographers now predict that evangel- political desert. They have two new conservative
icals will likely cease being a major political force Supreme Court justices, and there have been
in presidential elections by 2024. nine self-professed evangelical Cabinet members,

2024 COULD BE “THE FIRST AMERICAN


ELECTION IN WHICH WHITE CHRISTIAN VOTERS

DO NOT CONSTITUTE A MAJORITY.”

NEWSWEEK.COM 27
POL I T I C S

plus a lurry of laws and executive orders clamping evangelical-Republican partnership, they’ve kept
down on gender roles, abortion and LGBTQ rights. casting ballots. In 2016, they were a key group for
But experts say this may represent the last bounty Trump; the thrice-married, foul-mouthed mogul
for a waning political power. Unlike their parents, with a history of sexual assault allegations won
the younger generation is not animated by the more than 80 percent of the evangelical vote—
culture wars; many are pushing for social justice besting even George W. Bush, a born-again Chris-
for migrants and LGBTQ people and campaigning tian who spoke openly about his faith.
against mass incarceration—positions more in line But demographic trends are steadily diluting their
with the Democratic Party. outsize clout. Researcher Robert Jones, author of The
The result is a shrinking conservative bloc, some- End of White Christian America, has tracked what
thing that could weaken white Christian political he calls a “stair-steps downward trajectory of white
power—and, consequently, a Republican Party that Christian presence in the electorate.” In 1992, when
has staked its future on its alliance with the religious Bill Clinton was elected, 73 percent of the electorate
right. It’s a conundrum that the father of modern was white and Christian. By 2012, that number was
GOP conservatism, Barry Goldwater, predicted in 53 percent. “If current trends hold steady, 2024 will
1994: “Mark my word, if and when these preachers be a watershed year—the irst American election
KEEPING THE FAITH
get control of the party, and they’re sure trying to do in which white Christian voters do not constitute From top: Students
so, it’s going to be a terrible damn problem.” a majority of voters,” Jones, who heads the Public protest a California law
requiring anti-abortion
Religion Research Institute (PRRI), tells Newsweek.
pregnancy centers to
The End of the Alliance? Until a decade ago, white evangelicals were the provide information on
the asso Ciation of the religious right exception, their numbers holding steady. But their abortion; Members of
the First Baptist Church
and the Republican Party has its roots in the 1954 ranks are now dwindling, driven largely by the
of Luverne, Alabama;
Supreme Court ruling Brown vs. the Board of Edu- youth exodus. According to Jones, white evangel- Falwell Jr. speaking at
cation of Topeka, after which white Southerners icals constituted 21 percent of the U.S. population that year's Republican
National Convention.
began to flee public schools following forced when Obama was elected in 2008. Eight years later,
desegregation. They opened so-called segregation in 2016, that number dropped to 17 percent. Today,
academies: religious schools that were tax-exempt. they make up 15 percent of Americans.
When the IRS came after evangelical colleges like Concerned about the shrinking numbers and the
Bob Jones University, which oficially prohibited prospect of a lackluster turnout in the midterms,
interracial dating, the schools were faced with los- Trump rallied about 100 evangelical supporters in
ing their tax-exempt status. the White House this past summer. If Republicans
That would have meant financial doom. But a lose control of Congress, he told them, Democrats
Republican activist named Paul Weyrich—with “will overturn everything that we’ve done, and they’ll
patronage from Western segregationist beer billion- do it quickly and violently.” He pushed pastors to
aire Joseph Coors—forged alliances with Southern use the power of their pulpits to get more people to
religious leaders like Jerry Falwell and successfully the polls. “I hate to say it,” Trump said, “if you were a
lobbied to soften IRS enforcement. The Moral Major- stock, you’d be, like, you’re very plateaued.”
ity was born, and, in 1980, it announced itself as a White evangelical political organizers got the
political force by helping put Ronald Reagan in the message. Ralph Reed’s Faith & Freedom Coalition
White House. Republican strategists used the issues of pledged to spend $18 million to microtarget 125
abortion and gay marriage to cement the union and million conservative voters before the midterms.
drive right-leaning Christians into the voting booth. Other faith groups engaged in a get-out-the-vote
The relationship remained strong for decades, drive across the country. An organization associated
with evangelicals becoming a reliable bloc of with former Arkansas Governor (and Baptist pastor)
GOP support. Since 2000, they have regularly Mike Huckabee, called My Faith Votes, spent $3.5
made up about a quarter of voters—outper- million aimed at getting evangelicals to the mid-
forming their much smaller percentage of the terms polls and threw in a Facebook Live session
population. And, despite prognostications from with Duck Dynasty’s Phil Robertson for good mea-
political scientists about the imminent death of the sure. The Colorado-based Dr. James Dobson Family

28 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


“EVANGELICAL LEADERS…
ARE BLATANTLY POWER HUNGRY AND WILLING
TO MAKE…ALLIANCES,
PROVIDING A THEOLOGY THAT
SUPPORTS WHITE NATIONALISM.”

And in many ways, this shotgun marriage between


Trump and white evangelicals happened under some
duress and is a desperate bargain that you make at
the end of life. That is what we’re really seeing here.”

Disaffected Youth
to understand what ’s happening among
evangelicals, researchers study the results of PRRI’s
FROM TO P: TOM WILL IAM S/C Q RO LL CAL L/GE T T Y; MIC HAEL S. WILLI AMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST/GET T Y; JOHN MO ORE/GET T Y

annual, wide-ranging, 80,000-interview American


Values Atlas poll. In the most recent survey, from 2017,
40 percent of individuals under 30 claim “no religious
afiliation” (sometimes called “the nones”). “White
evangelicals are a big part of that decline,” Jones says.
Respondents cited not believing in the doc-
trines and, surprisingly, politics. “They cite parti-
sanship,” Jones says. “That’s a big turnoff for young
Americans. And so is negative treatment of gay
and lesbian people.”
Institute ran a national “Pray. Engage. Vote.” initia- Polls ind that upward of 80 percent of young
tive in the lead-up to the midterms. people now support same-sex marriage. That num-
The result: White evangelicals made up 26 per- ber includes young Republicans and evangelicals
cent of voters in the November elections, with under 30. “Even people like me, a white male with
three-quarters of them casting ballots for Republi- a lot of societal privilege, can see that evangelical
can House candidates. But that performance will be leaders are completely happy to join forces with
increasingly dificult to replicate, Jones says. white nationalist politicians and leaders and to give
For an analogy, he uses Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s them the beneit of the doubt while they are attack-
landmark “stages of grief ” experienced by the dying ing marginalized communities,” says Chastain.
and their loved ones to describe what’s happening “And that’s just blatantly hypocritical.”
to evangelicals and American politics. First comes He and other exvangelicals in his social networks
denial, then anger, followed by bargaining, depres- are also turned off by the Trump alliance. “The fact
sion and acceptance. is that leaders like [Dallas megachurch leader and
“We are past denial. People see the writing on the Trump supporter] Robert Jeffress and Jerry Falwell
wall in terms of demographic change. And that is also Jr. are blatantly power hungry and willing to make
why we see immigration taking over and becoming these alliances, providing a theology that supports
the lagship issue. That and a wall symbolize the resis- white nationalism.”
tance to this demographic change,” Jones says. “I think Some major evangelical leaders and thinkers, not
we are somewhere between anger and bargaining. surprisingly, reject this assessment.

NEWSWEEK.COM 29
POL I T I C S

Ed Stetzer, a political scientist and pastor based at evangelicals, my message is typically ‘Seek first the
Wheaton College, knows all about the predictions of kingdom of God. Political idolatry will kill us. Let’s
researchers like Jones, and he is aware of the views remember what is transcendently important.’ But
of young people. But he sees evangelical youth attri- when I talk to younger evangelicals, I am dealing
tion as a kind of demographic sowing of wild oats, with the opposite problem and saying one cannot
in which the young are predictably disaffected—but simply withdraw from political life in overreaction
only temporarily. He is sure they will return to the to some dispiriting actions that have taken place.”
fold when they are a little older. His name for the Evangelical youth are not susceptible to the
phenomenon is “generational cohort replacement.” “Make America great again” slogan, Moore says,
Stetzer says the young who move away from the because they’ve never lived in an America in which
fold essentially replace themselves in the church as their brand of fervent Christianity was ascendant.
an older, and more likely to vote, category. “The 18- “Young evangelicals do not feel as if they are losing
to 29-year-olds are really secular now,” he says. “But anything in terms of American culture,” he says.

FRO M TOP: PEDRO PARD O/AFP/GET T Y; RONEN TIVONY/NURPHOTO/GET T Y; MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GET T Y


what we find is that people grow in their religiosity. “They came of age at a time when following Christ
So the 60-year-olds of today are kind of as religious seemed countercultural to them anyway. They
as the 60-year-olds in the 1970s.” never expected a nominally Christian culture in
Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist which being a church member would be the equiv-
Convention, has faith in the future of evangelical alent of being a good American.”
youth as well. Moore did not vote for Trump: He Christopher Maloney, 32, was raised evangeli-
called the candidate a “Bronze Age warlord” for his cal, stepped away from his faith and has released a
attitude toward women. Trump, in turn, tweeted
that Moore was “a nasty guy.”
Moore understands that American young people
generally are more tolerant on sexuality and mar-
riage but says, “In my wing of evangelicalism, there
is virtually no difference between young and old” on
those matters. He denied that congregations are gray-
ing. He sees “really vibrant churches filled with young
people exploding all over the country” and says he
talks regularly with young people about the chal-
lenges of mingling faith with politics and secular life.
“With Generation X, millennial and Generation Z
evangelicals, there is a deep suspicion of any cynical
use of religion for worldly purpose,” Moore says. “So
one has to motivate them differently than one would,
say, the kind of television evangelist demographic
that many secular people think of when they think
of evangelicalism. When I am in a group of older

“WE HAD BEGUN EDGING TOWARD THE DOORS,


AND WHEN EVANGELICALS
EMBRACED TRUMP,
WE BOLTED OUTSIDE.”

30 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


documentary film on the exvangelical movement the sort of abuse they face when they remain in the
called In God We Trump. He disagrees with Moore that evangelical communities,” he says.
young evangelicals like him will come back to the fold. Moore voiced a similar view. “Many churches
“People around my age and younger were already assumed sexual assault and sexual abuse were hap-
deconstructing their evangelical faith in large num- pening in other places but would never happen in
bers before Trump came along,” he says. “What the the safe spaces of the church, and that simply is not
2016 election did was accelerate what was already true,” he says. “One of the things we have seen over
happening. We had begun edging toward the doors, the past year is an ampliied voice for evangelical
and when evangelicals embraced Trump we bolted women and girls who have survived sexual abuse
outside. To be honest, I don’t see a return of younger and assault, and that has been a welcome develop-
generations to the church as we know it.” ment in evangelical church life.”
They aren’t interested, he says, in going to a cen-
tral place to worship anymore, particularly when ‘Stoke the Fear,’ Lose the Future
those fellow churchgoers are Trump supporters. to maintain the evangeliC al allianCe,
“Millennials largely live by Christian ethics without Republicans must keep evangelicals voting at higher
any formal doctrine or dogma,” he says. “We just rates than the rest of the population. And the party
don’t need a religious structure to tell us how to has a two-pronged strategy, says political scientist
be kind to one another.” Paul Djupe, who, along with Ryan Claassen, just
And then there’s the #MeToo movement, which published The Evangelical Crackup? The Future of
rocked churches much as it has the rest of society, the Evangelical-Republican Coalition.
explaining in part why, according to Pew Research “One is to reinforce [evangelicals’] identity as
Center polling, Trump’s support among white Republicans by emphasizing the threat that tra-
evangelical women dropped from 73 percent to 67 ditionally Democratic groups present to them.
percent between 2017 and 2018. This serves to insulate them from other sources of
The disaffected ranks include women like information, so they dismiss out of hand what the
HOPE IN HELL
Dawne Marx, a 53-year-old Texas mother of ive, mainstream media says and what Democrats say,
“All of a sudden there's who walked away from her church community in because it is a challenge to their identity. And two,
children in cages and this 2016 after decades of voting with the evangelical they have to really mobilize that sense of fear and
crass, crude man,” says a
lapsed evangelical about
fold. “I was a single-issue voter, a pro-life voter,” threat because that gets them to the polls.”
Trump, below. Above: she tells Newsweek. “It was so nice and tidy. I didn’t But running on “fear and threat,” while appeal-
Mexican children protest have to think about anything else.” ing to the older, white base, could have repercus-
U.S. immigration policies
in June. Left: Protesting
Then she saw the images of family separations sions that might cost them at the polls if they
Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a at the Mexican border and listened as the presi- alienate the one demographic with which they
reactionary conservative dent casually dismissed the Saudi killing of jour- might find common ground—Hispanics. Some
opposed by many
evangelical faith leaders.
nalist Jamal Khashoggi: denominations at the heart of evangelicalism are
“All of a sudden there is Trump. And children seeing growth among Latinos while other demo-
wrapped up in aluminum blankets in cages and this graphic groups are leaving. The Southern Baptist
crass, crude man, on a daily basis, saying things like, Convention, for example, began to decline a decade
‘OK, so a journalist got chopped up.’ And he’s saying, ago after more than 200 years of growth, losing a
‘We have a $100 billion contract, and there are a lot of million members since its peak membership of 16.3
jobs on the line.’ It’s like: They chopped somebody up!” million in 2003—numbers that are countered only
Marx, who used to be a registered Republican, by an increase in its Hispanic membership.
spent the month before the midterms volunteering “If Republicans decided they needed to grow their
on phone banks for Texas Senate candidate Beto base, the obvious choice would be to go to socially
O’Rourke, the Democrat who lost to Republican conservative Latinos,” Djupe says. “That will mean
incumbent Ted Cruz, an evangelical pastor’s son. some compromises on other issues, like the size of
Chastain has encountered hundreds of angry government and the safety net, that Republicans
young evangelical women through his social net- won’t go along with. So, with a shrinking and increas-
work and podcast. “Women do not need to tolerate ingly fragile coalition, they have to stoke the fear.”

NEWSWEEK.COM 31
FRO M LEFT: MARY CYBULSKI /20TH CENTURY FOX; MIKE MARSLAND/CONTOUR/GET T Y
THE
PLEASURE
This year’s BEST PERFORMANCES provided large helpings of

32 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


CLASS OF 2018
Both Mahershala Ali
and Melissa McCarthy
have been nominated for
Golden Globe awards for
their work in, respectively,
Green Book and Can
You Ever Forgive Me?

h u m o r , h o p e a n d h u m a n i t y, j u s t w h e n w e n e e d e d t h e m m o s t

P R I N C I PA L S
NEWSWEEK.COM 33
N o good roles for minorities and women?
This year put a signiicant dent in that maxim.
Our list of the best performances is as diverse—in race, gender,
age—as any in memory. In a fraught year, these artists provided
catharsis, vicarious diversion and (this being entertainment)
B RYA N
CRANSTON
NETWORK ON BROADWAY

deep pleasure. You can ind nearly all of the performances on There’s a scene in the Broadway
streaming platforms or in theaters. The holidays are the perfect stage adaptation of the 1976 ilm
time to catch up—for amusement, naturally, but also to prepare Network that should be required
for the awards season, an onslaught currently in progress. With- RICHARD MADDEN viewing for every acting student:
out further ado, our 31 reasons to celebrate in 2018. when Bryan Cranston’s mentally
BODYGUARD ( Netflix )
unraveling news anchor Howard
→ FILM → TELEVISION → THEATER → VIDEO Whether you binged the Beale builds to his mad-as-hell mo-
six-part series because you’d ment—a transformation that segues
heard it was the biggest hit from baflement to avenging angel
drama in the U.K. in a decade
or because the title’s body- in ive or so minutes. But there’s a
guard, David Budd, is played little of everything in Cranston’s
by Game of Thrones’s Robb Beale, a role that allows the actor
Stark (or, rather, the actor who to showcase his ambidextrous gift
played him), you were treated for comedy and drama (the former
to a tension-packed tale of
political corruption. Richard showcased on the sitcom Malcolm
Madden makes the most of in the Middle; the latter on Breaking
Budd, a sketchily drawn mili- Bad, for which he won four Emmys).
tary vet turned secret service The key here, says the actor, is
agent; it’s easy to overplay vulnerability. “You have to be will-
trauma and stress, but the
actor handles the role artfully— ing to show it. The truth is, when
and relentlessly. —MKS vulnerability is shown, you’re only
in danger of humiliation if you’re
in middle school or high school. A
Tessa Thompson & YALITZA APARICIO decent person—and most people
Lakeith Stanfield ROMA
are decent—wants to protect you.”
If there’s a downside to such a titan-
The New York Film Critics ic performance, it’s that you mourn
SORRY TO BOTHER YOU
Circle has already bestowed every second he’s not onstage. —AM
best director and ilm on
The talented and busy Ms. Tessa Thompson Oscar-winner Alfonso Cua-
ron’s moving memory piece,
co-starred in the sci-fi movie Annihilation and get ready for more awards
and was back for Season 2 of Westworld and to rain down. The story, set
in Mexico City in the ’70s,
another round playing Michael B. Jordan’s centers on Cleo, an indigenous
baby mama in Creed 2; Lakeith Stanfield maid (based on Cuaron’s
returned as the stoned heart of Atlanta in childhood nanny) working for
an upper-middle-class family
the show’s outstanding second season. But as they—and the city—im-
in Boots Riley’s dystopian satire—a surreal plode. Yalitza Aparicio, 24, is
a nonprofessional actress
evisceration of racism and economic (she teaches preschool), and
inequality—Thompson’s luminous humanity perhaps that accounts for
provides the perfect setting for Stanfield’s the astonishing naturalism of
her performance. Then again,
trippy cartoonishness. Together, they create a such shimmering soulfulness
beautiful perversion. —Mary Kaye Schilling can’t be taught. —ANNA MENTA

34 NEWSWEEK.COM
BEST PERFORMANCES
C LO CKWISE FROM TOP: GAR ETH C AT TER MO LE/C ONTOUR/GET T Y; NICOLE RIVELLI/AMAZON PRIME; MAT T D OYLE/CONTOUR/GET T Y; ANNAPURNA PICTURES

Rachel
Brosnahan
THE MARVELOUS
MRS. MAISEL
( Amazon Prime )

Season 2 has Rachel


Brosnahan’s aspiring stand-
up comic Midge talking even
faster, if that’s possible, and
delivering, hands down, the
most joyous performance
currently streaming. The
recent Emmy winner has the
retro glam appropriate to her
character’s time (the hat- and
glove-wearing 1950s) and a
ballsy electricity that allows
her to transcend it. Midge
is still inding her way as a
comedian, but underestimate
her at your peril. —MKS

DE C E M BE R 21, 2018 NEWSWEEK.COM 35


Ethan Hawke
FIRST REFORMED

If you had informed a young heart-


throb, fresh off Reality Bites and
Before Sunrise, that at 47 he would
experience a career revival depicting
a Protestant minister haunted by the
specter of a climate apocalypse, it
wouldn’t compute. Yet when Ethan
Hawke received the script for First
Reformed—the brainchild of Taxi
Driver screenwriter Paul Schrad-
er—he did not hesitate. “By Page 3,
I thought I had to play this part,”
Hawke told Newsweek in August. A
singular and uncompromising film,
First Reformed succeeds, in large part,
due to Hawke’s tenable torment as
the Reverend Toller and his commit-
ment in trusting the film’s unset-
tling, supernatural twists. “When I
asked Paul about the ending of the
movie,” Hawke said, “he had this
fantastic answer, which was ‘A great
movie starts as you walk out of the
theater.’” —ZAch Schonfeld

BILL HADER
BARRY ( HBO )

The Saturday Night Live grad won this year’s Emmy for best actor playing Barry
Berkman, an Afghanistan vet turned hit man. Bill Hader co-created the comedy with
Alec Berg, and he muscled up and deepened his voice to transform himself into the
title character. But that’s just icing: What makes Barry, and the series, irresistible is
the actor’s ability to pull off two opposing tones: the daffy and the truly dark. —MKS

36 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


BEST PERFORMANCES

Melissa McCarthy

CAN YOU EVER


FORGIVE ME?

Yes, the actress known for com-


edy blockbusters like Spy can
do drama. And, yes, Melissa
McCarthy is already sick of that
narrative. “There’s no difference
FROM L EFT: MAT T W INKELMEYE R/CONTOUR/GET T Y; C ORE Y NICKOLS/ PIZZA HUT/CONTOUR/GET T Y; WARNER BROS. PICTURES; YSANNE SLIDE/MOVIESTORE COL L ECTI ON LTD/ALAMY

in how I prepare or fall in love


with the character,” says the
actress. In this case, she fell for
a real person: Lee Israel, a writ-
er who, when her career dried
up in the ’90s, forged letters
“written” by famous authors.
There’s no reason to root for
the rude and antisocial Israel—
except in McCarthy’s hands.
“Lee was a prickly pear, to say
the least. But I don’t know any
human being who hasn’t felt
undervalued and lonely,” she
says. “I’ve played a lot of asser-
tive women, and Lee’s the irst
who cocoons within herself. It
was a very different energy, to
keep it in instead of out.” —AM

Letitia Wright

BLACK PANTHER

No other superhero ilm has


claimed this much cultural
clout, or the possibility of a
AW KWA F I NA best picture nomination, or so
many award-winning actors—
including Chadwick Boseman,
CRAZY RICH ASIANS
Michael B. Jordan and Lupita
Nyong’o. And there’s not a weak
performance in the bunch. But
The summer blockbuster was notable it was Letitia Wright who stole
for its corrective to Hollywood racism, our hearts. As Shuri, the snarky
which generally sidelines Asian characters tech whiz sister of King T’Challa,
the Guyanese-born British
to subservient roles. A straightforward actress blew up every scene.
adaptation of Kevin Kwan’s 2013 best- Looking forward to more: In
October, Marvel released a
selling rom-com, the movie may not surprise Shuri spinoff comic. —AM
audiences, but what it lacks in subtlety it
makes up for in scene-stealing supporting
roles—and none more than raspy-voiced
rapper Awkwafina, who mines gold out
of Singaporean socialite Peik Lin. —aM
BEST PERFORMANCES

Julia Roberts
& Stephan James Jameela Jamil
THE GOOD PLACE (NBC)
HOMECOMING (Amazon Prime)
HASAN MINHAJ There isn’t a weak link in Mike
Shur’s perfectly cast sitcom
about the afterlife, but one
PATRIOT ACT (Netflix) Both actors have delivered outstanding of the show’s particular plea-
You can see the DNA of fellow performances apart (Julia Roberts in the sures is watching the face of
former Daily Show corre- film Ben Is Back, Stephan James in If Beale Jameela Jamil’s British so-
spondents John Oliver and cialite, Tahani al-Jamil. If her
Street Could Talk), but their chemistry in Sam passive-aggressive insults
Samantha Bee in this latest
comedy news show, while Esmail’s Amazon mystery—adapted from and insufferable name-drop-
ping weren’t so hilarious, we’d
also noting how it’s shattering a popular podcast—is notable: a poignant
the late-night political com- happily watch an episode
edy mold: The pacing comic flirtation between a middle-aged white devoted to her silent reac-
Hasan Minhaj eliminates caseworker and her young, black military vet tions: imperious complacency,
the desk-couch setup in snooty repugnance and ex-
patient that felt uniquely post-racial. Roberts treme baflement. Her impec-
favor of a diamond-shaped
stage before a phalanx of is aging into a more interesting actress—one cable comic timing implied
screens. (“Like Michael years of TV credits, but the
who uses rather than overuses that blinding
Bay directed a PowerPoint 32-year-old, London-raised
presentation,” he joked in smile—and James is a powerhouse in the Jamil had never acted before
the irst episode.) But it’s making. Here, they generate lonely warmth casting director Allison Jones
the POV that’s truly radical— discovered her; her expe-
in Esmail’s cold, sinister universe. —MKS rience had been limited to
that of an Indian-American
and Muslim who speaks hosting morning TV and radio
to every American. —AM shows. “I lied to Allison and
said I had stage experience,”
says Jamil. “I was referring to
my 9-year-old self playing
CHILDISH GAMBINO Titania in A Midsummer
& HIRO MURAI Night’s Dream.” In lieu of act-
ing lessons, Jamil’s strategy
“THIS IS AMERICA” was to copy “absolutely ev-
erything” co-star Ted Danson
Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in does, she says. “When we’re
the U.S.A.” was once miscon- running away from a sinkhole
strued by Reagan America as in [Season 1] Episode 5, I
a lag-waving patriotic anthem. looked at Ted, saw what his
Childish Gambino’s deeply face was doing and copied
cynical and violent “This Is that.” There are worse ways
America”—in which the artist to learn. Jamil drew from
strikes a Jim Crow–era stance real-life inspiration as well. “I
while shooting a black man—is used to DJ high-fashion par-
not likely to suffer the same ties and met a lot of Tahanis,”
fate. Gambino is the alter ego she says. “There was one in
of Donald Glover, who, with particular, and she deinitely
director Murai, creates FX’s knows because she unfriend-
Atlanta. The video is, all at ed me on Facebook.” Taking a
once, an acerbic meditation on cue from her character, Jamil
gun violence, a choreographed adds, “I’m not sorry!” —AM
dance homage and an unset-
tling entry in the Afro-surre-
alism movement (see: Boots
Riley’s Sorry to Bother You
and, of course, Atlanta). —ZS

38 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


FROM LEFT: C AR A HOW E/NE TFLIX; ROBBY KL EIN/C ONTOUR/GET T Y; ANDREW ECCLES/NBC; NETFLIX

JOHN
LEGUIZAMO
LATIN HISTORY FOR MORONS
( Netflix )

Because it’s so refreshing to see


American history told minus the
white imperative. John Leguizamo,
the feverish instructor behind these
stringent and uproarious lessons,
uses the conceit of helping his son
prepare for a school assignment
on Latin heroes. He soon realizes
that, having been raised on U.S.
textbooks, he’s as clueless as his
kid. And so begins a 90-minute
tour de force exploration of not
just Latin history but American
identity, sprinkled with Leguizamo’s
priceless one-liners. His descrip-
tion of Spanish conquistadors
among the Aztecs: “NBA players at
a Kardashian pool party.” —MKS

NEWSWEEK.COM 39
FROM L EFT: JASON BELL /SID GENTL E FILMS; GREIG FRASER /A NNAPU RNA PICTURES; MA ARTEN DE BOER/CONTOUR/GET T Y; ALEX BAILEY/20TH CENTURY FOX
SANDRA OH &
JODIE COMER
KILLING EVE ( BBC America )

Thank British creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge


for the most addictive TV show of the year,
and for the oddest of couples: bored, desk-
bound MI5 security oficer Eve (Sandra Oh)
and heartless Russian assassin Villanelle
(Jodie Comer). Waller-Bridge has a way
with highly sexed, scabrously funny female
sociopaths (see Fleabag), and she’s hit pay
dirt with Comer. The British actress creates
a delicious confection: the predatory
gooball, one with a taste for luxury and
casual child cruelty. And Oh—she of the
gymnastic eyebrows and dry verbal parry—
is her perfect earthy foil. A married woman
who inds her G-spot stalking a serial killer,
Eve is at once repulsed and enchanted
by her seductive prey. Or is she the prey?
Season 2 can’t come soon enough. —MKS

40 NEWSWEEK.COM
BEST PERFORMANCES

Paul Dano & Zoe Kazan


RAMI MALEK
WILDLIFE
BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY
It was a big year for actors
turned ilmmakers: Bradley
Cooper’s A Star Is Born, Jonah Freddie Mercury’s 1985 Live Aid performance
Hill’s Mid90s (both warmly
received) and Paul Dano’s ac- is Rami Malek’s first memory of Queen. “He
claimed Wildlife, an anguished could capture people in a way that made you
period piece co-written with
his real-life partner, actress feel as if he was singing and gyrating directly
Zoe Kazan. The 1960s-era ilm, towards you,” the actor tells Newsweek. “He
a superb adaptation of Richard had something you can’t create.” Anyone
Ford’s 1990 novel, stars Jake
Gyllenhaal as a screwup hus- who has seen Bohemian Rhapsody would
band and father who accepts beg to differ. While the film frequently
a dangerous job ighting forest
ires—and those lames are the strays from the facts (Mercury did not, for
least of his problems. Dano’s instance, receive his HIV diagnosis as early
instincts are exceptional, and as 1985), Malek succeeds, thrillingly, in
he directs Carey Mulligan—as
the abandoned wife unhinged embodying the paradox of the rock superstar,
by grief and rage—in arguably an intensely private man who could transfix
the best performance of
her very ine career. —ZS fans with otherworldly charisma.—ZS

Christian Bale
Regina King
VICE
IF BEALE STREET
COULD TALK
With its satirical grip
on semi-recent tragedy, Regina King will lead HBO’s
upcoming adaptation of
Adam McKay’s balls-out Watchmen by D.C. Comics, but
follow-up to The Big Short she’s been a superhero of act-
ing for some time. She’s best
is likely to divide critics as known for her TV work (Seven
sharply as George W. Bush’s Seconds, The Leftovers, Amer-
administration divided the ican Crime), so it’s good to see
this indomitable actress show-
country, but Christian Bale cased in a feature—Barry Jen-
won’t regret saying yes to kins’s emotionally transixing
adaptation of the 1974 James
gaining 40 pounds and Baldwin novel. As the mother
donning a bald cap to play to one of two young lovers torn
Dick Cheney. The actor nails apart by racist policies, King
embodies the ilm’s dignity and
the former veep’s physical resilience in the face of tragedy,
mannerisms—the clenched and provides it with its most
shattering moment.—MKS
jaw, the percussive grunt—
and serves as an able
interpreter of the staid D.C.
lifer’s relentless drive and
puzzling rise to power. —ZS

DE C E M BE R 21, 2018 NEWSWEEK.COM 41


BEST PERFORMANCES

Adam Driver &


John David Washington
BLACKKKLANSMAN
OLIVIA COLMAN

Spike Lee’s scathingly funny work of THE FAVOURITE


political art—based on the memoir of Ron
Director Yorgos Lanthimos’s
Stallworth, the first black detective hired wildly entertaining and profane
by the Colorado Springs Police Department farce about Britain’s Queen
in the ’70s—is his best film in years. The Anne contains three exceptional
female performances: Emma
fiery Ron, played by John David Washington Stone and Rachel Weisz play
(Denzel’s son), teams up with the slow- women maliciously jockeying
to be the “favourite” of the
burning Flip, a Jewish cop played by Adam dizzy, morose and mutable Anne,
Driver, to infiltrate the KKK. In doing so, played by Olivia Colman. The
they create the best black-and-white buddy latter will soon be taking on an-
other monarch, the middle-aged
heat since 48 Hours. Spinoff? —MKS Queen Elizabeth II on The Crown,
but she won’t be having this
much fun. Colman, one of Brit-
ain’s busiest actresses, always
delivers an inspired performance,
but here she is sublime. —MKS

MAHERSHALA ALI JODIE


W H I T TA K E R
THE GREEN BOOK
DR. WHO ( BBC America )
After winning an Oscar for Barry
Jenkins’s Moonlight in 2016, The heavily male Who-verse gave
Mahershala Ali was “searching
for the project that spoke to me.” Jodie Whittaker, the 13th actor
He chose Green Book, the true to play the doctor and the first
story of Don Shirley, a celebrated woman, a predictably hard time
Jamaican-American concert pia- when casting was announced.
nist who toured the Deep South Apparently, despite all the
in 1962 with an Italian-American
driver, Tony Vallelonga (Viggo various forms the alien Time
Mortensen). Ali has heard the Lord has taken (most recently
criticism—that it’s a feel-good Peter Capaldi) and all the laws
drama about racism created of physics the good doctor can
by white men (Peter Farrelly break, not having a penis was the
directed and co-wrote the ilm
with Vallelonga's son). “Whether one thing fans could not fathom.
the writer is white or black, I’m But Whittaker, best known for
SEE THE REST OF THE WINNERS → Go to Newseek.com always open to play a complex playing the grieving mother on
for the 17 additional performances we didn’t black character,” he says. “It’s not Broadchurch, proved she’s more
have room for here, including Willem Dafoe, a Barry Jenkins movie, but I’m
Saoirse Ronan, Glenn Close, Nic Cage, Carla than up to the part, deftly hon-
proud to introduce Shirley. I take
Gugino and a minor actor named Matt Damon my work extraordinary seriously, oring the character’s spirit while
playing Justice Brett Kavanaugh. and this challenged me more adding her own goofy, frenetic,
than any other job.” —AM galvanizing charm. —MKS

42 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE R 21, 2018


Viola Davis
WIDOWS

Has Viola Davis ever


delivered a less than
commanding performance?
The answer is no, and in
this heist ilm by Steve
McQueen, she’ll also make
you gasp. Flipping between
intense grief and a focused
resolve, Davis leads a
FROM L EFT: DAVID LEE/FO CUS FE ATUR ES; ATSUSHI NISHIJ IMA/20TH CENTURY FOX; BEN BLACKALL/BBC STUDIOS; MARTHA GALVAN/BAFTA LA/CONTOUR/GET T Y

crew of four women, each


desperate in her own way,
to commit a high-stakes
robbery. This ain’t no
Ocean’s 8; it’s that ilm’s
violent, grim opposite. —AM

NEWSWEEK.COM 43
Horizons SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY + HEALTH

44 NEWSWEEK.COM
CLIMATE CHANGE

Trumped-Up
Charges
Julia Olsen is suing the U.S. over climate change.
Her plaintifs are mostly children

In 2040, the year JulIa Olsen’s yOungest plaIn-


tiff turns 33 years old, a recent report from the
United Nations warns that climate change could start
having dire consequences for many people. Olsen’s suit
against the federal government on behalf of children
who would have to live in that future world is now await-
ing trial in the U.S. District Court in Eugene, Oregon.
Juliana v. United States—named after the oldest plain-
tiff, 22-year-old Kelsey Juliana—alleges that the federal
government has failed to take action to curb emissions of
greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, putting the future
of Olsen’s 21 plaintiffs at risk. One told the lawyer she and
her family had to move from their home on the Navajo
Nation reservation in Cameron, Arizona, because the
natural springs were drying up. Others described their
experiences with ish kills, looding from hurricanes and
changes in resource availability.
Many of the plaintiffs arranged their school schedules
so they could be in Eugene for the trial, says Olsen. “Levi,
our youngest, who’s 11, is being home-schooled. His fam-
ily is planning on being in Eugene for much of the trial
because Levi really wants to attend.” The Trump adminis-
tration, however, has so far succeeded
in delaying the trial. Most recently, U.S.
District Judge Ann Aiken approved in
SHANA NOVAK/GET T Y

BY
late November a Trump administra-
NINA GODLEWSKI tion appeal to pause the case, pending
@ninagodlewski review by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of

DE C E M BE r 21, 2018 NEWSWEEK.COM 45


Horizons CLIMATE CHANGE

FIGHT THE POWER we’re trying to deal with this huge


Clockwise from
systemic problem by challenging one
below: Olsen and
plaintiffs; a coal- small piece of it, weren’t effective.
burning power plant;
a protest by Our
Is there a precedent for this
Children’s Trust
approach?
This case is pioneering in terms
of bringing a constitutional case
regarding climate change, but where
it’s not pioneering is bringing a con-
stitutional claim against a systemic
government problem and asking the
court to intervene and be a check on
the political branches of government.
For example, Brown v. Board of Edu-
cation was a series of cases [from 1952
to 1954]. There were five trials in the
lower courts, which ultimately led to
the Supreme Court’s decision. And
those young people were challenging
the systemic discrimination in the

C LO CKWISE FROM TOP : C OURTE SY OF ROBIN LOZNAK/OUR CHILDREN’S TRUST [2]; JAMES JORDAN PHOTO GRAPHY/GET T Y
public school systems. They weren’t
challenging one act; it was many dif-
ferent things. And the court looked
Appeals. Newsweek spoke with Olsen grassroots environmental organiza- at “Is this system constitutional?” and
as she was awaiting a trial date. tions. In the early 2000s, I brought one found that it wasn’t.
of the first cases under the National The Juliana plaintiffs are challeng-
Have you changed your approach Environmental Policy Act and the ing the fossil fuel energy system that
since iling the suit in 2015? Clean Air Act that forced government the government continues to perpet-
What has changed is the Trump agencies to address climate change uate, support and facilitate.
administration continues to double in their environmental impact state-
down on fossil fuels as the core com- ments. It was about a couple of power Is your goal to win the case or
ponent of our energy system, advanc- plants being built in Mexico for the change the system?
ing efforts to lock in fossil fuels as purpose of providing energy to the U.S. Oh, it is absolutely to win. I’m a litiga-
our source of energy. The other thing That was the moment I began thinking tor. I’m not an organizer.
that’s different is how the Depart- these project-by-project cases, where
ment of Justice has conducted itself Why is this case important?
in the litigation. They continue to file The matter pending before the
motions for stays and petitions for Supreme Court is about the Con-
review to the appellate courts before stitution and climate change and
the trial court has an opportunity to whether these young people can go
make important decisions in the case. “The Department to trial. But it’s also about our democ-
They’ve gone to great lengths to avoid
going to trial in a way I’ve never seen of Justice has gone racy and civic engagement, and these
young people saying, “We’re harmed,
before in litigation. to great lengths to and we deserve a right to be heard.”

Before you took on this case, what


avoid trial in a way What is fundamentally at stake is:
Will our judicial system allow these
kind of law were you working in? I’ve never seen young people to present the evidence
I was primarily repre s enting before in litigation.” in their case?

46 NEWSWEEK.COM DE C E M BE r 21, 2018


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P A R T ING SHOT

Saoirse Ronan
The 24-year-old IrIsh acTress doesn’T jusT resemble meryl sTreep; Mary is presented as a strategic
she appears to be echoing her career, juggling accents and racking up thinker and leader, which is very
Oscar nominations. There are three so far: for 2007’s Atonement, 2015’s Brook- different from previous ilms.
lyn and 2017’s Lady Bird (she won a Golden Globe for the latter). In her latest She’s been painted as this very
ilm, Mary Queen of Scots—written by House of Cards creator Beau Willimon— emotional girl whose Catholicism
Ronan plays the doomed queen, beheaded by her cousin, Elizabeth I (played informed every decision she made.
by Margot Robbie), in 1587. The movie is based on historian John Guy’s radical According to John Guy, that wasn’t
reinterpretation of Mary’s life, My Heart Is My Own, and Ronan plays her as a really the case. She was Catholic, and
strategic, armor-wearing warrior rather than a lighty beauty buffeted by fate. she practiced Catholicism at a time
Despite years of correspondence with Elizabeth, the two never met, though the when Scotland was newly reformed—
ilm—which has a distinctly feminist slant—imagines such a scene. “They wrote Protestantism had taken over—but
letters to each other and arranged to meet many times,” says Ronan. “But the men she used religion to her advantage.
around them knew it would harm their own chances of gaining power if these It was a way to present herself as a
two got together—for good reason. They probably would have joined forces.” martyr, to gain some sway, I guess,
which I thought was really clever.

This Mary also feels very modern.


“I know if Mary Beau does political intrigue brilliantly,
and he paced this like a thriller.
had gotten Period dramas can be stale and stuffy,
into a room and this has incredible amounts of
with Elizabeth, passion, betrayal and deiance—all
of which existed but isn’t necessarily
she would stressed in these types of ilms.
have made
her love her.” It’s sad that Elizabeth and Mary
were kept apart. They were the
only people who could truly
understand the other’s position.
Yes! They were different; Bess was
more rigid in how she ruled and
dealt with people. Mary had a sense
of fun; she enjoyed sex and parties
and had best friends. But she was
also very maternal, and she did
produce an heir, which threatened
Elizabeth’s advisers. But I know
for sure if Mary had gotten into a
room with Bess, she would have
made her love her. Mary was very
good at that.” —Mary Kaye Schilling

48 De c e m be r 21, 2018
Tinalbarka wants to be a lawyer.
She and her family fled violence in Mali.

We stand together
#WithRefugees
PHOTO: © UNHCR / A . DRAGA J

www.refugeeday.org
Elegance is an attitude

Kate Winslet

Record collection