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Sindh Education Students

SESLOAF
Learning Outcome
Mathematics
Assessment Framework
Grades VI-VIII

Developed by
Provincial Education Assessment Centre (PEACe)
Bureau of Curriculum and Extension Wing Sindh Jamshoro

In Collaboration with
European Union & British Council
Karachi

1
Acknowledgements

We wish to thank the members of Sindh Education Students Learning Outcome


Assessment Framework (SESLOAF) capacity building, design and expert review workshop for
their active participation and assistance in designing, development and review of the SESLOAF
for their specific school subjects and grade levels.

Also the generous and continuing collaboration of EU is highly appreciated, as this


capacity building workshop for the design and expert review of (SESLOAF) would not have
been possible without this support. The contribution of the Team Leader Sindh Education Sector
Support Programme (SESSP) Doran Bernard and Ms. Rana Hussian, Sr. Advisor, Quality
Education SESSP for conceptualizing and taking the desired target to completion, are highly
acknowledged.
The RSU unit and particularly the leadership, Chief Programme Manager Ms. Saba
Mahmood is highly acknowledged for their support in designing the SESLOAF framework.
Furthermore, the support of Director, Bureau of Curriculum Mr. Shahani, the Coordinator
PEACE, Mr. Aftab Ali and the entire PEACE team is acknowledged.

Unaeza Alvi
The Consultant

DOCUMENT DEVELOPED OCTOBER 30TH, 2014.

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Acronym

BC British Council
BoC Bureau of Curriculum
CRQ Constructed Response Question
EU European Union
GECE Government Elementary College of Education
GoS Government of Sindh
MCQ Multiple Choice Question

NC National Curriculum Framework


PEACe Provincial Education Assessment Centre
PITE Provincial Institute of Teacher Education
RSU Reforms Support Unit
SEMIS Sindh Education Management Information System
SESSP Sindh Education Sector Support Programme
SESLOAF Sindh Education Student Learning Outcome Assessment and Feedback Framework
SLO Student Learning Outcome
STBB Sindh Textbook Board
TA Test Administrator

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Preface
The educational quality is determined by many aspects but the key indicator associated with
quality is the learning achievements and outcomes. The core to the learning achievement and
outcomes are the curriculum and assessment frameworks.

Former Ministry of Education through a revision of the existing National Curriculum


Framework 2000 and 2002 has initiated the Standards-based education reform in Pakistan. The
revision was carried out to improve and align the Pakistan National Curriculum with national and
international developments in educational standards.

This revision has resulted into the development of the National Curriculum Framework 2006,
based on the Standards-Based Education Reform. The Standards-Based Education Reform that
has been implemented by a number of countries in the world is largely driven by the approach of
setting of academic standards for what students know and can perform.

This educational reform necessitates the use of the Standards as a reference to plan, teach and
assess students on the basis of the set standards. In addition, to this it requires an alignment of the
curriculum with the assessment system and a rethinking and broadening of the current
approaches to assessment.

The complete implementation requires the development of an assessment framework aligned


with the curriculum standards, benchmarks and students learning outcomes. It also requires the
adoption of a balanced approach to assessment including benchmark, formative, summative,
performance and authentic assessments for improved students learning outcomes.

Therefore, to implement the Standards-based curriculum reform the Sindh Education


Student’s Learning Outcomes Assessment Framework“SESLOAF”, is designed to apply a
comprehensive approach to students learning outcome based assessment. The SESLOAF for the
eight subjects presents an alignment of the curriculum standards with assessment schemes,
specifications, items, tasks, marking schemes and rubrics for effective assessment and feedback
based on the students learning outcomes.

The overall purpose of SESLOAF framework is to provide a comprehensive assessment


framework aligned with the NCF to guide the overall assessment and feedback processes for
improved assessment systems and learning outcomes.

Rana Hussain

Sr. Advisor, Quality Education SESSP

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................................. 2
Preface .......................................................................................................................................................... 4
1. Rationale for SESLOAF:......................................................................................................................... 8
2. SESLOAF MATHEMATICS VI-VIII ........................................................................................................... 9
2.1 The Mathematics Curriculum 2006: ................................................................................................... 9
2.1.1 The Strands and Standards of the Mathematics Curriculum .............................................. 10
Strand 1: Numbers and Operations .................................................................................................... 10
Strand 2: Algebra ................................................................................................................................ 10
Strand 3: Measurements and Geometry ............................................................................................ 10
Strand 4: Information Handling .......................................................................................................... 10
Strand 5: Reasoning and Logical Thinking........................................................................................... 10
2.1.2 The Benchmarks of the Mathematics Curriculum .............................................................. 11
3. Student Learning Outcomes Cognitive Categorization ..................................................................... 15
4. Scheme of Assessment ....................................................................................................................... 55
6. SLO Based Items ................................................................................................................................. 61
7. Performance Assessment and Marking Rubric ................................................................................. 71
8. Reporting Results ............................................................................................................................... 72
GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................. 73
Appendix I .................................................................................................................................................. 76
Appendix II................................................................................................................................................. 77
Appendix III ............................................................................................................................................... 78
.................................................................................................................................................................... 78
.................................................................................................................................................................... 78

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Introduction
The Sindh Education Student’s Learning Outcomes Assessment Framework “SESLOAF”,
is developed in alignment with the new standards based curriculum reform for systems
improvement. The SESLOAF aims at providing a model for a standardized approach to
formative, benchmark, performance and summative assessments of students learning
outcomes and improvement.

The SESLOAF is developed through a standardized policy development process that


involves multiple consultations with multi-stakeholders. The multi-stakeholders included in
the process are policy makers, education experts, managers and advisors, education and
assessment experts, public and private sector institutions, key assessment specialists, subject
based experts, curriculum reviewers and developers, textbook developers, teachers and
teacher educators.

The following processes were adopted in the development of the Assessment Framework

Development of
SLO Mapping and Development of Specification for
Cognitive Scheme of Summatve/Benchmark/
Categorization Assessment
Performance Assessment

Expert Review and Development of SLO


Development of
Validation of Based Test Items and
Maarking Scheme
Specification for Performace
and Rubric
Assessment Assessment

Figure 1.1.Process of Developing Assessment Framework

The key stage of the development of the assessment framework was SLO categorization and
expert review and validation session for content validity of assessment specification in alignment
with the National Curriculum 2006 and revised curriculum 2011. This stage also included the
development of the slo based review of the items, agreement on key learning targets for cognitive
and skill/performance assessments.

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The conceptual map below provides the design of the students learning outcome
assessment framework. This conceptual framework forms the basis of the SESLOAF, assessment
specification, performance and authentic tasks, benchmark, formative, summative
assessments, items and tests for grade level VI-VIII. The SESLOAF provides a comprehensive
framework that allows for multiple forms of assessments to provide varied opportunities to
assess demonstrate learning, feedback and improve learning outcomes.

National Mathematics Curriculum Framework

Key Learning Strands and Standards

Key Stage Benchmarks and Students Learning Outcomes

Students Learning Outcome Based Assessment Framework

SLO Mapping, Cognitive and Topic Distribution of Students


Learning Outcome

Students Learning Outcome Based Summative, Formative and


Authentic Assessment Specifications.

Students Learning Outcome Assessment Items, authentic/performance tasks, tools and


Rubrics.Guideline/samples for Implementation, Marking, Reporting and Feedback.

Figure 1.2. The Conceptual of the Assessment Framework

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1. Rationale for SESLOAF:
The SESLOAF of Mathematics (VI-VIII) is designed to achieve the outcome of mathematical
literacy, logical reasoning and problem-solving in alignment with the New Curriculum 2006 and
Reviewed Curriculum 2011.

1.1 The SESLOAF Framework as a standardized approach to assessments outlines a


comprehensive framework form assessments using multiples forms of assessments, in order
to provide varied opportunities to the learner to demonstrate learning and assessor to
assess learning outcomes.
1.2 The assessment framework includes all those students learning outcomes that could be reliably and
validly assessed through summative, benchmark and authentic assessments.

1.3 The assessment items are designed to ascertain the important cognitive learning targets in
Mathematics, according to the Content standards of Numbers and Operations, Algebra,
Measurements and Geometry, Information handling and Reasoning and Logical thinking.

1.4 The overall framework also takes into consideration the Skills, Attitude, Values and STSE Standards
through performance and authentic assessments.

1.5 Also, the International standards of assessments are considered in the design of the assessment
framework, specification, items, tasks and tools.

1.6 The test is also aligned with agreed code of practice on fair testing and also aligned with the current
assessment and grading policy.

1.7 The current policy on assessment in Pakistan recommends the assessment of 30 % Knowledge,
Understanding and Application in summative assessments this is also taken into consideration.

This Assessment framework provides the standards, benchmarks, categorization of


SLO as per cognitive levels, Overall Scheme of Assessment for VI-VII, Assessment
specification for summative and continuous assessment, a sample of SLO based items,
marking scheme, rubrics.

Additionally, a glossary is also enclosed that includes description of student learning


outcomes, objectives, cognitive processes dimensions, authentic, formative, continuous,
summative, performance assessment, rubric, validity, reliability. The Appendix includes the
list of multi-stakeholders involved in the process, the difference between traditional and
authentic assessments, Document for Item Development, check list for identification of
learning target, checklist for assessment development and review.

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2. SESLOAF MATHEMATICS VI-VIII

2.1 The Mathematics Curriculum 2006:

The National Mathematics Curriculum 2006 and revised curriculum 2011 is based on the
goal to develop mathematical literacy and induce logical reasoning and problem-solving
among students. The entire curriculum is divided into five strands, Numbers and Operations,
Algebra, Measurements and Geometry, Information handling and Reasoning and Logical
thinking. Curriculum is based on standard and benchmarks. Students’ learning outcomes are
matched with the content and topics and aligned with the standards. The learning outcomes
emphasize the development of knowledge, conceptual understanding and to stimulate
cognition to apply knowledge practically.

The National Curriculum for Mathematics 2006 for IV-VIII has the following five Strands and
numerous topics and learning outcomes:
 Numbers and Operations
 Algebra
 Measurements and Geometry
 Information handling
 Reasoning and Logical thinking

The Benchmarks in the Mathematics Curriculum are placed at Five Developmental Levels:
I-III, IV-V, VI-VIII, IX-X, and XI-XII
In grades I-III, students are introduced to elementary numerical values and basic operations and
functions. The Mathematics Curriculum for grade IV-V begins to stimulate the logical cognition
of students and introduces them to elementary problem solving. Next, through grades VI-X,
students are provided with mathematical tools for logical reasoning, problem solving and
justifying conclusions to educate them to identify the relationship between mathematical
concepts and everyday situations. And finally in grades XI-XII, students are taught to develop
the ability to use Mathematics to extend and apply their knowledge in other fields of study.

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2.1.1 The Strands and Standards of the Mathematics Curriculum

Strand 1: Numbers and Operations


Standard 1:

Students will be able to:

 Identify numbers, ways of representing numbers and effects of operations in various situations,
 Compare fluently with fractions, decimals and percentages,
 Manipulate different types of sequence and apply operations on matrices

Strand 2: Algebra
Standard 2:

Students will be able to:

 Analyze number patterns and interpret mathematical situations by manipulating algebraic


expressions and relations.
 Model and solve contextualized problems.
 Interpret functions, calculate rate of change of functions, integrate analytically and numerically,
determine orthogonal trajectories of a family of curves and solve non-linear equations
numerically.

Strand 3: Measurements and Geometry


Standard 3:

Students will be able to:

 Identify measurable attributes of objects, construct angles and two-dimensional figures,


 Analyze characteristics and properties of geometric shapes and develop arguments about their
geometric relationships,
 Recognize trigonometric identities, analyze conic sections, draw and interpret graphs of
functions.

Strand 4: Information Handling


Standard 4:

Students will be able to collect, organize, analyze, display and interpret data/information.

Strand 5: Reasoning and Logical Thinking


Standard 5:

Students will be able to:

 Use patterns, known facts, properties and relationships to analyze mathematical situations,
 Examine real life situations by identifying, mathematically valid arguments and drawing
conclusions to enhance their mathematical thinking.

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2.1.2 The Benchmarks of the Mathematics Curriculum
The Standards for Number and Operations are further sub-divided into the following
Benchmarks for Grade Level-VI-VIII:
Benchmark 1
Identify different types of set with notations.

Benchmark 2
Verify communicative, distributive and De Morgans law w.r.t union and intersection of
sets and illustratrate them through Venn Diagram.

Benchmark 3
Identify and Compare integers, rational and irrational numbers.

Benchmark 4
Apply basic operations on integers and rational ascending and desnumbers and verify
communivcativemt , associative and distributive properties.

Benchmark 5
Arrange absolute value of integers in ascending and descending order.

Benchmark 6
Find HCF and LCM of two or more numbers using division and prime factorization.

Benchmark 7
Convert numbers from decimal system to numbers with base 2, 5 and 8.

Benchmark 8
Apply the laws of exponents to evaluate expression.

Benchmark 9
Find square and square root and cube and cube root of real number .

Benchmark 10
Solve problems on ratio, proportion, profit loss, mark up, leasing, zakat, usher, taxes,
insurance and money exchange.

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The Standards for Algebra are further sub-divided into the following Benchmarks for Grade
Level-VI-VIII:

Benchmark 1
Identify algebric expressions and basic algebric formulas.

Benchmark 2
Apply four basic operations on polynomials.

Benchmark 3
Manipulate algebric expressions using formulas.

Benchmark 4
Formulate linear equations in one and two variables.

Benchmark 5
Solving simultaneeous equations using different techniques.

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The Standards for Measurements and Geometry are further sub-divided into the following
Benchmarks for Grade Level-VI-VIII:

Benchmark 1
Draw and subdivide a line segment and an angle.

Benchmark 2
Construct triangle (given SSS, SAS, ASA, RHS), parallelogram and segments of a circle.

Benchmark 3
Apply properties of lines, angles and triangles to dvelop arguments about their
geometric relationships.

Benchmark 4
Apply appropriate formulas to calculate perimeter and area of quadrilateral, triangular
and circular regions.

Benchmark 5
Determine surface area and volume of cube, cuboid, sphere, cylinder and cone.

Benchmark 6
Find trignometric ratios of acute angles and use them to solve right angles triangles.

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The Standards for Information Handling are further sub-divided into the following
Benchmarks for Grade Level-VI-VIII:

Benchmark 1
Read, display and interpret bar an pie graphs.

Benchmark 2
Collect and organize data, construct frequency tables and histograms to display data.

Benchmark 3
Find measure of central tendency (mean, median and mode).

The Standards for Reasoning and Logical Thinking are further sub-divided into the following
Benchmarks for Grade Level-VI-VIII:

Benchmark 1
Find different ways of approaching a problem to develop logical thinking and explain
their reasoning.

Benchmark 2
Solve problems using mathematical relationships and present results in an organized
way.

Benchmark 3
Construct and communicate convincing arguments for geometric situations.

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3. Student Learning Outcomes Cognitive
Categorization
The Benchmarks have a cluster of Student Learning Outcomes. The Categorization of these
Students Learning Outcomes for Grade level VI-VIII, at 3 Cognitive Levels is presented below:

COGNITIVE LEVEL SLO CATEGORIZATIONMATHEMATICS VI


Topic and sub Students learning outcomes K U A
topic

UNIT 1 SETS
1.1 Set i) Define set. Recognize notation of a set and its √

Objects/elements.

ii) Describe tabular form of a set and demonstrate √

Through examples.

1.2 Types of Set Define √

• finite and infinite sets,

• empty/void/null set,

• singleton,

• equal and equivalent sets,

• subset and superset of a set,

• proper and improper subsets of a set,

And demonstrate through examples.

UNIT 2 WHOLE NUMBERS


2.1 Natural and i) Differentiate between natural and whole numbers. √
Whole Numbers

ii) Identify natural and whole numbers, and their √

notations.

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iii) Represent √

• a given list of whole numbers,

• whole numbers <(or >) a given whole number,

• whole numbers ≥ (or ≤ ) a given whole number,

• whole numbers >but <a given whole number,

• whole numbers ≥ but ≤ a given whole number,

• sum of two or more given whole numbers,

On the number line.

2.2 Addition and i) Add and subtract two given whole numbers. √
Subtraction of

Whole Numbers
ii) Verify commutative and associative law (under √

Addition) of whole numbers.

iii) Recognize ‘0’ as additive identity. √

2.3 Multiplication i) Multiply and divide two given whole numbers. √


and Division

of Whole
ii) Verify commutative and associative law (under √
Numbers
Multiplication) of whole numbers.

iii) Recognize ‘1’ as multiplicative identity. √

2.4 Multiplication I) Verify distributive law of multiplication over √


and Addition
Addition.
(Subtraction) of
Whole
ii) Verify distributive law of multiplication over √
Numbers
Subtraction (with positive difference).

UNIT 3 FACTORS AND MULTIPLES

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3.1 Factors and I) Define a factor as a number which divides the √
Multiples
Dividend completely leaving no remainder.

ii) Define a multiple as a dividend into which a factor √

Can divide.

iii) Define even numbers as the numbers which are √

Multiples of 2.

iv) Define odd numbers as the numbers which are not √

Multiples of 2.

v) Define prime numbers as numbers which have only √

Two factors (i.e., 1 and itself).

vi) Define composite numbers as numbers which have √

More than two factors.

vii) Know that 1 is neither prime nor composite as it has √


only one factor which is 1 itself.

viii) Know that 1 is a factor of every number. √

ix) Know that 2 is the only even prime number whereas √

All other prime numbers are odd.

3.2 Tests for Test by inspection whether the numbers 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, √


Divisibility
8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15 and 25 can divide a given

Number.

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3.3 Factorization i) Define prime factorization as the process of √

Factorizing a number into its prime factors.

ii) Recognize index notation. √

iii) Factorize a given number and express its factors in √

The index notation.

3.4 HCF I) Define HCF as the greatest number which is a √

Common factor of two or more numbers.

ii) Find HCF of two or more than two numbers by √

• prime factorization,

• Long division method.

3.5 LCM I) Define LCM as the smallest number which is a √

Common multiple of two or more numbers.

ii) Find LCM of two or more numbers by √

• prime factorization,

• Division method.

3.6 Applications Solve real life problems related to HCF and LCM. √
of HCF and

LCM

UNIT 4 INTEGERS
4.1 Integers I) Know that √

• the natural numbers 1,2,3,L, are also called

positive integers and the corresponding negative

numbers −1,− 2,− 3,L, are called negative

integers,

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• ‘0’ is an integer which is neither positive nor negative.

ii) Recognize integers. √

4.2 Ordering of I) Represent integers on number line. √


Integers

ii) Know that on the number line any number lying √

• to the right of zero is positive,

• to the left of zero is negative,

• to the right of another number is greater,

• To the left of another number is smaller.

iii) Know that every positive integer is greater than a √

Negative integer.

iv) Know that every negative integer is less than a √

Positive integer.

v) Arrange a given list of integers in ascending and √

Descending order.

4.3 Absolute or i) Define absolute or numerical value of a number as its √


Numerical
distance from zero on the number line and is always
Value of an
Positive.
Integer

ii) Arrange the absolute or numerical values of the √

Given integers in ascending and descending order.

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4.4 Addition of i) Use number line to display: √
Integers
• sum of two or more given negative integers,

• difference of two given positive integers,

• Sum of two given integers.

ii) Add two integers (with like signs) in the following √

three steps:

a) Take absolute values of given integers,

b) Add the absolute values,

c) Give the result the common sign.

iii) Add two integers (with unlike signs) in the following √

three steps:

a) Take absolute values of given integers,

b) Subtract the smaller absolute value from the larger,

c) Give the result the sign of the integer with the

Larger absolute value.

4.5 Subtraction of i) Recognize subtraction as the inverse process of √


Integers
Addition.

ii) Subtract one integer from the other by changing the √ √

sign of the integer being subtracted and adding

According to the rules for addition of integers.

4.6 Multiplication Recognize that √


of Integers
• the product of two integers of like signs is a

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positive integer,

• the product of two integers of unlike signs is a √

Negative integer.

4.7 Division of I) Recognize that division is the inverse process of √


Integers
Multiplication.

ii) Recognize that on dividing one integer by another √

• if both the integers have like signs the quotient is

positive,

• if both the integers have unlike signs the quotient

Is negative.

iii) Know that division of an integer by ‘0’ is not possible. √

UNIT 5 SIMPLIFICATIONS
5.1 BODMAS I) Know that the following four kinds of brackets √
Rule
• vinculum,

• ( ) parentheses or curved brackets or round

brackets,

• { } braces or curly brackets,

• [ ] square brackets or box brackets,

are used to group two or more numbers together with

operations.

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ii) Know the order of preference as, , ( ), { } and [ ], √

To remove (simplify) them from an expression.

iii) Recognize BODMAS rule to follow the order in √

which the operations, to simplify mathematical

Expressions are performed.

iv) Simplify mathematical expressions involving √

fractions and decimals grouped with brackets using

BODMAS rule.

v) Solve real life problems involving fractions and √

Decimals.

UNIT 6 RATIO AND PROPORTION


6.1 Ratio i) Define ratio as a relation which one quantity bears to √

another quantity of the same kind with regard to their

Magnitudes.

ii) Know that of the two quantities forming a ratio, the √

first one is called antecedent and the second one

Consequent.

iii) Know that a ratio has no units. √

iv) Calculate ratio of two numbers. √

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v) Reduce given ratio into lowest (equivalent) form. √

vi) Describe the relationship between ratio and fraction. √

6.2 Proportion i) Know that an equality of two ratios constitutes a √

proportion, e.g., a : b :: c : d , where a, d are known as

Extremes and b, c are called the means.

ii) Find proportion (direct and inverse). √

iii) Solve real life problems involving direct and inverse √

Proportion.

UNIT 7 FINANCIAL ARITHMETIC


7.1 Percentage i) Recognize percentage as a fraction with denominator √

of 100.

ii) Convert a percentage to a fraction by expressing it as √

A fraction with denominator 100 and then simplify.

iii) Convert a fraction to a percentage by multiplying it √

with 100%.

iv) Convert a percentage to a decimal by expressing it as √

A fraction with denominator 100 and then as a decimal.

v) Convert a decimal to a percentage by expressing it as √

a fraction with denominator 100 then as a

Percentage.

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vi) Solve real life problems involving percentage. √

7.2 Profit, Loss i) Define


and Discount
• selling price and cost price, √

• profit, loss and discount, √

• Profit percentage and loss percentage. √

ii) Solve real life problems involving profit, loss and √

discount.

UNIT 8 INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA


8.1 Algebra i) Explain the term algebra as an extension of √

arithmetic in which letters replace the numbers.

ii) Know that √

• a sentence is a set of words making a complete

grammatical structure and conveying full

meaning.

• sentences that are either true or false are known

as statements.

• a statement must be either true or false but not

both.

• a sentence that does not include enough

information required to decide whether it is true

or false is known as open statement (e.g.,

Δ + 2 = 9).

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• A number that makes an open statement true is said to
satisfy the statement (e.g. Δ = 7 makes the statement Δ +
2 = 9 true).

• use English alphabet x in the open statement

Δ + 2 = 9 to modify it to x + 2 = 9.

iii) Define variables as letters used to denote numbers in √

Algebra.

iv) Know that any numeral, variable or combination of √

numerals and variables connected by one or more of

the symbols ‘ + ’ and ‘–’ is known as an algebraic

Expression (e.g., x + 2y).

8.2 Algebraic i) Know that x, 2y and 5 are called the terms of the √
Expression
expression x + 2y + 5.

ii) Know that the symbol or number appearing as √

multiple of a variable used in algebraic term is called

Its coefficient (e.g. in 2y, 2 is the coefficient of y).

iii) Know that the number, appearing in algebraic √

expression, independent of a variable is called a

constant term (e.g. in x + 2y + 5, number 5 is a

Constant term).

iv) Differentiate between like and unlike terms. √

v) Know that √

• like terms can be combined to give a single term,

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• addition or subtraction cannot be performed with

unlike terms.

vi) Add and subtract given algebraic expressions. √

vii) Simplify algebraic expressions grouped with √


brackets.

viii) Evaluate and simplify an algebraic expression when √

the values of variables involved are given.

UNIT 9 LINEAR EQUATIONS


9.1 Algebraic i) Define an algebraic equation. √
Equations

ii) Differentiate between equation and an expression. √

9.2 Linear i) Define linear equation in one variable. √


Equations

ii) Construct linear expression and linear equation in √

one variable.

iii) Solve simple linear equations involving fractional √

and decimal coefficients like 3


1

1 x+5=x−.

iv) Solve real life problems involving linear equations. √

UNIT 10 GEOMETRY

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10.1 Line i) Add measures of two or more line segments. √
Segments

ii) Subtract measure of a line segment from a longer one. √

iii) Draw a right bisector of a given line segment using √

compasses.

iv) Draw a perpendicular to a given line from a point on √

It uses compasses.

v) Draw a perpendicular to a given line, from a point √

outside the line, using compasses.

10.2 Construction Use compasses to √


of Angles
• construct an angle equal in measure of a given

angle,

• construct an angle twice in measure of a given √

angle,

• bisect a given angle, √

• divide a given angle into four equal angles, √

• construct the following angles: √

60 ,30 ,15 ,90 , 45 ,(22 ) ,75 , (67 ) ,120 ,150 2


1

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165o ,135o , 105o .

10.3 Construction i) Construct a triangle when three sides (SSS) are √


of Triangles
given.

Caution: Sum of two sides should be greater than the


third side.

ii) Construct a triangle when two sides and their √

included angle (SAS) are given.

iii) Construct a triangle when two angles and the √

included side (ASA) are given.

iv) Construct a triangle when hypotenuse and one side √

(RHS) for a right angled triangle are given.

UNIT 11 PERIMETER AND AREA


11.1 Perimeter i) Find perimeter and area of a square and a rectangle. √
and Area

ii) Find area of path (inside or outside) of a rectangle or √

square.

iii) Solve real life problems related to perimeter and area √

of a square and rectangle.

iv) Recognize altitude of a geometric figure as the √

measure of the shortest distance between the base

and its top.

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v) Find area of a parallelogram when altitude and base √

are given.

vi) Define trapezium and find its area when altitude and √

measures of the parallel sides are given.

vii) Find area of a triangle when measures of the altitude √

and base are given.

UNIT 12 THREE DIMENSIONAL SOLIDS


12.1 Volume and i) Identify 3D figure (cube, cuboid, sphere, cylinder √
Surface Area
And cone) with respect to their faces, edges and vertices.

ii) Define and recognize units of surface area and volume. √

iii) Find surface area and volume of cube and cuboid. √

iv) Solve real life problems involving volume and √

surface area.

UNIT 13 INFORMATION HANDLING


13.1 Types of i) Define data and data collection. √
Data
ii) Distinguish between grouped and ungrouped data. √

13.2 Bar Graph Draw horizontal and vertical bar graphs. √

13.3 Pie Graph Read a pie graph. √

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COGNITIVE LEVEL SLO CATEGORIZATIONMATHEMATICS VII

Topic and sub Students learning outcomes K U A


topic

UNIT 1 SETS
1.1 Set i) Express a set in √

•descriptive form,

•set builder form,

•tabular form.

1.2 Operations on i) Define union, intersection and difference of two sets. √


Sets

ii) Find √

•union of two or more sets,

•intersection of two or more sets,

•difference of two sets.

iii) Define and identify disjoint and overlapping sets. √

iv) Define a universal set and complement of a set. √

v) Verify different properties involving union of sets, √

intersection of sets, difference of sets and

complement of a set, e.g., A∩A′ =φ.

30 | P a g e
1.3 Venn i) Represent sets through Venn diagram. √
Diagram

ii) Perform operations of union, intersection, difference √

and complement on two sets A and B when

•A is subset of B,

•B is subset of A,

•A and B are disjoint sets,

•A and B are overlapping sets,

through Venn diagram.

UNIT 2 RATIONAL NUMBERS


2.1 Rational i) Define a rational number as a number that can be √
Numbers
expressed in the form q

p , where p and q are integers

and q >0 .

ii) Represent rational numbers on number line. √

2.2 Operations on i) Add two or more rational numbers. √


Rational

Numbers ii) Subtract a rational number from another. √

iii) Find additive inverse of a rational number. √

iv) Multiply two or more rational numbers. √

v) Divide a rational number by a non-zero rational √

number.

31 | P a g e
vi) Find multiplicative inverse of a rational number. √

vii) Find reciprocal of a rational number. √

viii) Verify commutative property of rational numbers √

with respect to addition and multiplication.

ix) Verify associative property of rational numbers with √

respect to addition and multiplication.

x) Verify distributive property of rational numbers with √

respect to multiplication over addition/ subtraction.

xi) Compare two rational numbers. √

xii) Arrange rational numbers in ascending or √

descending order.

UNIT 3 DECIMALS
3.1 Conversion of Convert decimals to rational numbers √
Decimals to

Rational Numbers

3.2 Terminating i) Define terminating decimals as decimals having a √


and
finite number of digits after the decimal point.
Nonterminating

Decimals

ii) Define recurring decimals as non-terminating √

decimals in which a single digit or a block of digits

repeats itself infinite number of times after decimal

point (e.g. 0 285714285714285714K 7

2 = ⋅).

32 | P a g e
iii) Use the following rule to find whether a given √

rational number is terminating or not.

Rule: If the denominator of a rational number in

standard form has no prime factor other than 2, 5 or

2 and 5, then and only then the rational number is a

terminating decimal.

iv) Express a given rational number as a decimal and √

indicate whether it is terminating or recurring.

3.3 Approximate Get an approximate value of a number, called √


Value
rounding off, to a desired number of decimal places

UNIT 4 EXPONENTS
4.1 i) Identify base, exponent and value. √
Exponents/Indices

4.2 Laws of ii) Use rational numbers to deduce laws of exponents. √


Exponents/Indices
 Product Law:
when bases are same but exponents are different:
𝑎𝑚 × 𝑎𝑛 = 𝑎𝑚+𝑛 ,
when bases are different but exponents are same:

 𝑎𝑛 × 𝑏 𝑛 = (𝑎𝑏)𝑛 ,

 Quotient Law:
when bases are same but exponents are different:
𝑎𝑚 + 𝑎𝑛 = 𝑎𝑚−𝑛 ,

when bases are different but exponents are same:

 Quotient Law:
when bases are same but exponents are different:
𝑎𝑚 + 𝑎𝑛 = 𝑎𝑚−𝑛 ,

when bases are different but exponents are same:


𝑎
𝑎𝑛 + 𝑏 𝑛 = (𝑏 )𝑛 ,

33 | P a g e
 Power law: (𝑎𝑚 )𝑛 = 𝑎𝑚𝑛 ,

 For zero exponent: 𝑎0 = 1.


1
 exponent as negative integer: 𝑎−𝑚 = 𝑎𝑚,

iii) Demonstrate the concept of power of integer that is (𝑎)𝑛 √


when n is even or odd integer.

iv) Apply laws of exponents to evaluate expressions. √

UNIT 5 SQUARE ROOT OF POSITIVE NUMBER


5.1 Perfect i) Define a perfect square. √
Squares

ii) Test whether a number is a perfect square or not. √

iii) Identify and apply the following properties of perfect √

square of a number.

•The square of an even number is even.

•The square of an odd number is odd.

•The square of a proper fraction is less than itself.

•The square of a decimal less than 1 is smaller

than the decimal.

5.2 Square Roots i) Define square root of a natural number and √

recognize its notation.

34 | P a g e
ii) Find square root, by division method and √

factorization method, of

•natural number,

•fraction,

•decimal,

which are perfect squares.

iii) Solve real life problems involving square roots. √

UNIT 6 DIRECT AND INVERSE VARIATION


6.1 Continued i) Define continued ratio and recall direct and inverse √
Ratio
proportion.

ii) Solve real life problems (involving direct and inverse √

proportion) using unitary method and proportion

method

6.2 Time, Work i) Solve real life problems related to time and work √
and Distance
using proportion.

ii) Find relation (i.e. speed) between time and distance. √

iii) Convert units of speed (kilometer per hour into √

meter per second and vice versa).

iv) Solve variation related problems involving time and √

distance

UNIT 7 FINANCIAL ARITHMETIC


7.1 Taxes i) Explain property tax and general sales tax. √

ii) Solve tax-related problem √

35 | P a g e
7.2 Profit and i) Explain profit and markup. √
Markup
ii) Find the rate of profit/ markup per annum. √

iii) Solve real life problems involving profit/ markup √

7.3 Zakat and i) Define zakat and ushr. √


Ushr
ii) Solve problems related to zakat and ushr. √

UNIT 8 ALGEBRAIC EXPRESSIONS


8.1 Algebraic i) Define a constant as a symbol having a fixed √
Expressions
numerical value.

ii) Recall variable as a quantity which can take various √

numerical values

iii) Recall literal as an unknown number represented by √

an alphabet.

iv) Recall algebraic expression as a combination of √

constants and variables connected by the signs of

fundamental operations.

v) Define polynomial as an algebraic expression in √

which the powers of variables are all whole numbers.

vi) Identify a monomial, a binomial and a trinomial as a √

polynomial having one term, two terms and three

terms respectively.

8.2 Operations i) Add two or more polynomials. √


with

Polynomials

36 | P a g e
ii) Subtract a polynomial from another polynomial. √

iii) Find the product of √

•monomial with monomial,

•monomial with binomial/trinomial,

•binomials with binomial/trinomial.

iv) Simplify algebraic expressions involving addition, √

subtraction and multiplication.

8.3 Algebraic Recognize and verify the algebraic identities: √


Identities
 (x+a)(x+b)=x2+(a+b)x+ab,
 (a + b)2 = (a + b) (a + b) = a2 + 2ab + b2,
 (a-b)2 = (a -b)(a -b) = a2 -2ab+b2,
 a2-b2=(a-b)(a+b).

8.4 Factorization i) Factorize an algebraic expression (using algebraic √


of Algebraic
identities).
Expressions
ii) Factorize an algebraic expression (making groups). √

UNIT 9 LINEAR EQUATIONS


9.1 Linear i) Define a linear equation in one variable. √
Equation

9.2 Solution of i) Demonstrate different techniques to solve linear √


Linear Equation
equation.

ii) Solve linear equations of the type: √

 ax + b = c,
𝑎𝑥+𝑏 𝑚
 𝑐𝑥+𝑑
=𝑛

iii) Solve real life problems involving linear equations. √

37 | P a g e
UNIT 10 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOMETRY
10.1 Properties of i) Define adjacent, complementary and supplementary √
Angles
angles.

ii) Define vertically opposite angles. √

iii) Calculate unknown angles involving adjacent angles, √

complementary angles, supplementary angles and

vertically opposite angles.

iv) Calculate unknown angle of a triangle. √

10.2 Congruent i) Identify congruent and similar figures. √


and Similar
ii) Recognize the symbol of congruency. √
Figures

iii) Apply the properties for two figures to be congruent √

or similar.

10.3 Congruent Apply following properties for congruency between √


Triangles
two triangles.

•SSS ≅SSS ,

•SAS ≅SAS ,

•ASA ≅ASA,

•RHS ≅RHS .

10.4 Circle i) Describe a circle and its centre, radius, diameter, √

chord, arc, major and minor arcs, semicircle and

segment of the circle.

ii) Draw a semicircle and demonstrate the property; the √

angle in a semicircle is a right angle.

38 | P a g e
iii) Draw a segment of a circle and demonstrate the √

property; the angles in the same segment of a circle

are equal

UNIT 11 PRACTICAL GEOMETRY


11.1 Line i) Divide a line segment into a given number of equal √
Segment
segments.

ii) Divide a line segment internally in a given ratio. √

11.2 Triangles i) Construct a triangle when perimeter and ratio among √

the lengths of sides are given.

ii) Construct an equilateral triangle when √

•base is given,

•altitude is given.

iii) Construct an isosceles triangle when √

•base and a base angle are given,

•vertical angle and altitude are given,

•altitude and a base angle are given.

11.3 i) Construct a parallelogram when √


Parallelogram
•two adjacent sides and their included angle are

given,

•two adjacent sides and a diagonal are given.

ii) Verify practically that the sum of √

•measures of angles of a triangle is180o .

•measures of angles of a quadrilateral is 360o .

39 | P a g e
UNIT 12 CIRCUMFERENCE, AREA AND VOLUME
12.1 i) Express π as the ratio between the circumference and √
Circumference
the diameter of a circle.
and Area of

Circle ii) Find the circumference of a circle using formula. √

iii) Find the area of a circular region using formula. √

12.2 Surface Area i) Find the surface area of a cylinder using formula. √
and Volume

of Cylinder
ii) Find the volume of a cylindrical region using √

formula.

iii) Solve real life problems involving √

•circumference and area of a circle,

•surface area and volume of a cylinder

UNIT 13 INFORMATION HANDLING


13.1 Frequency i) Demonstrate data presentation. √
Distribution

ii) Define frequency distribution (i.e. frequency, lower √

class limit, upper class limit, class interval).

13.2 Pie Graph Interpret and draw pie graph. √

40 | P a g e
COGNITIVE LEVEL SLO CATEGORIZATIONMATHEMATICS VIII

Topic and sub Students learning outcomes K U A


topic

UNIT 1 OPERATIONS ON SETS


1.1 Sets i) Recognize set of √

•natural numbers (N),

•whole numbers (W),

•integers (Z),

•rational numbers (Q),

•even numbers (E),

•odd numbers (O),

•prime numbers (P).

ii) Find a subset of a set. √

iii) Define proper (⊂) and improper (⊆) subsets of a set. √

iv) Find power set P(A) of a set A. √

1.2 Operations on i) Verify commutative and associative laws with √


Sets
respect to union and intersection.

ii) Verify the distributive laws. √

iii) State and verify De Morgan’s laws. √

1.3 Venn i) Demonstrate union and intersection of three √


Diagram
overlapping sets through Venn diagram.

41 | P a g e
ii) Verify associative and distributive laws through √

Venn diagram.

UNIT 2 REAL NUMBERS


2.1 Irrational i) Define an irrational number. √
Numbers

ii) Recognize rational and irrational numbers. √

iii) Define real numbers. √

iv) Demonstrate non-terminating /non-repeating (or √

non-periodic) decimals.

2.2 Squares i) Find perfect square of a number. √

ii) Establish patterns for the squares of natural numbers √

(e.g., 42 =1+2+3+4+3+2+1).

2.3 Square Roots i) Find square root of √

 a natural number (e.g. 16, 625, 1600),


9 36 49
 a common fraction (e.g. 16 , 49 , 64 )
 a decimal (e.g. 0.01, 1.21,0.64),
given in perfect square form, by prime factorization
and division method.

ii) Find square root of a number which is not a perfect √

square (e.g., the numbers 2, 3, 2.5).

iii) Use the following rule to determine the number of √

digits in the square root of a perfect square.

42 | P a g e
Rule: Let n be the number of digits in the perfect

square then its square root contains


2

n digits if n is even,
2

n+1 digits if n is odd.

iv) Solve real life problems involving square roots. √

2.4 Cubes and i) Recognize cubes and perfect cubes. √ √


Cube Roots
ii) Find cube roots of a number which are perfect √

cubes.

iii) Recognize properties of cubes of numbers. √

UNIT 3 NUMBER SYSTEMS


3.1 Number i) Recognize base of a number system. √
System

ii) Define number system with base 2, 5, 8 and 10. √

iii) Explain √

•binary number system (system with base 2),

•number system with base 5,

•octal number system (system with base 8),

•decimal number system (system with base 10).

3.2 Conversions i) Convert a number from decimal system to a system √

with base 2, 5 and 8, and vice versa.

ii) Add, subtract and multiply numbers with base 2, 5 √

and 8.

43 | P a g e
iii) Add, subtract and multiply numbers with different √

bases.

UNIT 4 FINANCIAL ARITHMETIC


4.1 Compound i) Define compound proportion. √
Proportion

ii) Solve real life problems involving compound √

proportion, partnership and inheritance.

4.2 Banking i) Define commercial bank deposits, types of a bank √

4.2.1 Types of a account (PLS savings bank account, current deposit


Bank Account
account, PLS term deposit account and foreign

currency account).

ii) Describe negotiable instruments like cheque, √

demand draft and pay order.

iii) Explain on-line banking, transactions through ATM √


4.2.2 On-line
banking (Auto Teller Machine), debit card and credit card

(Visa and Master).

4.2.3 Conversion iv) Convert Pakistani currency to well-known √


of international currencies.
Currencies

v) Calculate √
4.2.4 Profit/ •the profit/ markup,
Markup
•the principal amount,

44 | P a g e
•the profit/ markup rate,

•the period.

vi) Explain √
4.2.5 Types of •Overdraft (OD),
Finance
•Running Finance (RF),

•Demand Finance (DF),

•Leasing.

vii) Solve real life problems related to banking and

finance.

4.3 Percentage i) Find percentage profit and percentage loss. √

4.3.1 Profit and ii) Find percentage discount. √


Loss


4.3.2 Discount
iii) Solve problems involving successive transactions.

4.4 Insurance i) Define insurance. √

ii) Solve real life problems regarding life and vehicle √

insurance.

4.5 Income Tax i) Explain income tax, exempt income and taxable √

income.

ii) Solve simple real life problems related to individual √

45 | P a g e
income tax assessee.

UNIT 5 POLYNOMIALS
5.1 Algebraic i) Recall constant, variable, literal and algebraic √
Expression
expression.

5.2 Polynomial i) Define √

•polynomial,

•degree of a polynomial,

•coefficients of a polynomial.

ii) Recognize polynomial in one, two and more variables. √

iii) Recognize polynomials of various degrees (e.g., √

linear, quadratic, cubic and biquadratic polynomials).

5.3 Operations on i) Add, subtract and multiply polynomials. √


Polynomials

ii) Divide a polynomial by a linear polynomial. √

UNIT 6 FACTORIZATION, SIMULTANEOUS EQUATIONS


6.1 Basic Recall the formulas: √
Algebraic  (a+b)2=a2+2ab+b2
Formulas  (a-b)2=a2-2ab+b2
 a2-b2=(a-b)(a+b)
and apply them to solve problems like:
 Evaluate (1.02)2, (98)2 and (0.98)2
1 1 √
 Find 𝑥 2 + 𝑥 2 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑥 4 + 𝑥 4 when the value of
1
x± 𝑥 is given.

6.2 Factorization Factorize expressions of the following types: √

 ka + kb + kc,
 ac+ad+bc+bd,
 a2±2ab+b2
 a2-b2,

46 | P a g e
 a2±2ab+b2 – c2.

6.3 Manipulation Recognize the formulas:


of Algebraic
 (a +b)3 = a3 + 3a2b + 3ab2 +b3 , √
expressions
 (a -b)3 = a3 -3a2b + 3ab2 =b3, √

And apply them to solve the problems like:


1 1 1
 Find 𝑥 3 + 𝑥 3 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑥 3 − 𝑥 3 when the value of x± 𝑥is √
given

6.4 Simultaneous i) Recognize simultaneous linear equations in one and √


Linear
two variables.
Equations
ii) Give the concept of formation of linear equation in √

two variables.

iii) Know that: √

•a single linear equation in two unknowns is

satisfied by as many pair of values as required.

•two linear equations in two unknowns have only

one solution (i.e., one pair of values).

6.5 Solution of i) Solve simultaneous linear equations using √


Simultaneous
•method of equating the coefficients,
Linear Equations
•method of elimination by substitution,

•method of cross multiplication.

ii) Solve real life problems involving two simultaneous √

linear equations in two variables.

6.6 Elimination i) Eliminate a variable from two equations by: √

•Substitution,

47 | P a g e
•application of formulae.

UNIT 7 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOMETRY


7.1 Parallel Lines i) Define parallel lines. √

ii) Demonstrate through figures the following √

properties of parallel lines.

•Two lines which are parallel to the same given

line are parallel to each other.

•If three parallel lines are intersected by two

transversals in such a way that the two intercepts

on one transversal are equal to each other, the

two intercepts on the second transversal are also

equal.

•A line through the midpoint of the side of a

triangle parallel to another side bisects the third

side (an application of above property).

iii) Draw a transversal to intersect two parallel lines and √

demonstrate corresponding angles, alternate interior

angles, vertically opposite angles and interior angles

on the same side of transversal.

48 | P a g e
iv) Describe the following relations between the pairs √

of angles when a transversal intersects two parallel

lines.

•Pairs of corresponding angles are equal.

•Pairs of alternate interior angles are equal.

•Pair of interior angles on the same side of

transversal is supplementary,

and demonstrate them through figures.

7.2 Polygons i) Define a polygon. √

ii) Demonstrate the following properties of a √

parallelogram.

•Opposite sides of a parallelogram are equal.

•Opposite angles of a parallelogram are equal.

•Diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other.

iii) Define regular pentagon, hexagon and octagon. √

7.3 Circle i) Demonstrate a point lying in the interior and √

exterior of a circle.

ii) Describe the terms; sector, secant and chord of a √

circle, concyclic points, tangent to a circle and

concentric circles.

UNIT 8 PRACTICAL GEOMETRY


8.1 Construction i) Define and depict two converging (non-parallel) √
of
lines and find the angle between them without
Quadrilaterals
producing the lines.

49 | P a g e
ii) Bisect the angle between the two converging lines √

without producing them.

iii) Construct a square √

•when its diagonal is given.

•when the difference between its diagonal and

side is given.

•when the sum of its diagonal and side is given.

iv) Construct a rectangle √

•when two sides are given.

•when the diagonal and a side are given.

v) Construct a rhombus √

•when one side and the base angle are given.

•when one side and a diagonal are given.

vi) Construct a parallelogram √

•when two diagonals and the angle between them

is given.

•when two adjacent sides and the angle included

between them is given.

vii) Construct a kite √

•when two unequal sides and a diagonal are given.

viii) Construct a regular pentagon √

•when a side is given.

50 | P a g e
ix) Construct a regular hexagon √

•when a side is given.

8.2 Construction Construct a right angled triangle


of a Right
•when hypotenuse and one side are given. √
Angled Triangle
•when hypotenuse and the vertical height from its √

vertex to the hypotenuse are given.

UNIT 9 AREAS AND VOLUMES


9.1 Pythagoras i) State the Pythagoras theorem and give its informal √
Theorem
proof.

ii) Solve right angled triangles using Pythagoras √

theorem.

9.2 Hero’s State and apply Hero’s formula to find the areas of √
Formula
triangular and quadrilateral regions.

9.3 Surface Area i) Find the surface area and volume of a sphere. √
and Volume
ii) Find the surface area and volume of a cone. √

iii) Solve real life problems involving surface area and √

volume of sphere and cone.

UNIT 10 DEMONSTRATIVE GEOMETRY


10.1 i) Define demonstrative geometry. √
Demonstrative
geometry
ii) Describe the basics of reasoning. √
10.1.1 Reasoning

10.1.2 Axioms,
iii) Describe the types of assumptions (axioms and √
Postulates
postulates).
and Theorem
iv) Describe parts of a proposition. √

v) Describe the meanings of a geometrical theorem, √

51 | P a g e
corollary and converse of a theorem.

10.2 Theorems Prove the following theorems along with corollaries and √

apply them to solve appropriate problems.

i) If a straight line stands on another straight line, the

sum of measures of two angles so formed is equal to

two right angles.

ii) If the sum of measures of two adjacent angles is √

equal to two right angles, the external arms of the

angles are in a straight line.

iii) If two lines intersect each other, then the opposite √

vertical angles are congruent.

iv) In any correspondence of two triangles, if two sides √

and included angle of one triangle are congruent to

the corresponding sides and included angle of the

other, the two triangles are congruent.

v) If two sides of a triangle are congruent, then the √

angles opposite to these sides are congruent.

vi) An exterior angle of a triangle is greater in measure √

than either of its opposite interior angles.

vii) If a transversal intersects two lines such that the pair √

of alternate angles are congruent then the lines are

parallel.

viii) If a transversal intersects two parallel lines the √

alternate angles so formed are congruent.

ix) The sum of measures of the three angles of a √

triangle is180o .

52 | P a g e
UNIT 11 INTRODUCTION TO TRIGONOMETRY
11.1 i) Define trigonometry. √
Trigonometry
ii) Define trigonometric ratios of an acute angle. √

11.2 iii) Find trigonometric ratios of acute angles (30o , 60o √


Trigonometric
and 45o ).
Ratios of

Acute Angles
iv) Define trigonometric ratios of complementary √

angles.

v) Solve right angled triangles using trigonometric √

ratios.

vi) Solve real life problems to find heights (avoid √

naming angle of elevation).

UNIT 12 INFORMATION HANDLING


12.1 Frequency i) Define frequency, frequency distribution. √
Distribution
ii) Construct frequency table. √

iii) Construct a histogram representing frequency table. √

12.2 Measures of i) Describe measures of central tendency. √


Central Tendency

ii) Calculate mean (average), weighted mean, median √

and mode for ungrouped data.

53 | P a g e
iii) Solve real life problems involving mean (average), √

weighted mean, median and mode.

54 | P a g e
4. Scheme of Assessment
Number of SLO per Topic and Cognitive Level for Class VI
Topic Name of the topic Number Number Number of Number Total
# of sub of SLOs SLOs of SLOs Number of
topics SLOs
K U A
1. SETS 2 1 7 0 8

2. WHOLE NUMBERS 4 3 3 10 16

3. FACTORS AND 6 12 7 1 20
MULTIPLES

4. INTEGERS 7 17 11 5 33

5. SIMPLIFICATIONS 1 5 1 2 8

6. RATIO AND 2 4 4 1 9
PROPORTION

7. FINANCIAL 2 3 5 2 10
ARITHMETIC

8. INTRODUCTION TO 2 13 3 2 18
ALGEBRA

9. LINEAR EQUATIONS 2 2 1 3 6

10. GEOMETRY 3 0 2 12 14

11. PERIMETER AND AREA 1 2 4

12. THREE DIMENSIONAL 1 0 3 1 4


SOLIDS

13. INFORMATION 3 1 3 0 4
HANDLING

Total 36 63 54 40 157

55 | P a g e
Number of SLO per Topic and Cognitive Level for Class VII

Topic Name of the topic Number Number Number of Number Total


# of sub of SLOs SLOs of SLOs Number of
topics SLOs
K U A
1. Sets 3 2 7 6 15

2. Rational numbers 2 6 4 4 14

3. Decimals 3 2 2 2 6

4. Exponents 2 1 6 1 8

5. Square roots of positive 2 2 8 1 11


numbers

6. Direct and inverse variation 2 1 2 3 6

7. Financial arithmetic 3 1 2 4 7

8. Algebraic expressions 4 5 8 5 18

9. Linear equations 2 1 2 2 5

10. Fundamental of geometry 3 5 3 6 14

11. Practical geometry 3 0 2 10 12

12. Circumference ,area and 2 1 6 3 10


volume

13. Information handling 2 1 1 1 3

Total 33 28 53 48 129

56 | P a g e
Number of SLO Per Topic and Cognitive Level for Class VIII

Topic Name of the topic Number Number Number of Number Total


# of sub of SLOs SLOs of SLOs Number of
topics SLOs
K U A
14. Operations on sets 3 10 0 5 15

15. Real numbers 4 4 10 1 15

16. Number systems 2 2 7 0 9

17. Financial arithmetic 5 4 14 4 22

18. Polynomials 3 6 2 0 8

19. Factorization , simultaneous 6 6 17 1 24


equations

20. Fundamentals of geometry 3 3 11 2 16

21. Practical geometry 2 0 2 14 16

22. Areas and volumes 3 0 3 3 6

23. Demonstrative geometry 2 5 0 10 15

24. Introduction to 2 3 1 2 6
trigonometry

25. Information handling 2 2 3 1 6

Total 37 45 70 43 158

57 | P a g e
Class VI -Mathematics MCQ’s = 70 Marks
5. Distribution of SLO’s for Summative Assessment CRQ’s = 30 Marks
100 Marks

Standard Units Number of Total Summative Assessment Number of Number of CRQs/visual


SLO Per Level Number of 50% of the Overall Selected Organizers
SLOs Assessments. Response in the Paper.
(Number, Level and the Key /MCQs Number of Marks
SLOs per topic and sub-topics) in the Paper. 30%
K U A K U A T Number of
Marks 70%
Standard-I 1. Sets 104 5 10 5 20 14 6
2. Whole numbers
Numbers &
3. Factor & multiple
Operations 4. Integers
5. Simplification
6. Ratio and Proportion 45 38 21

Standard-II 7. Financial Arithmetic 24 2 3 1 6 5 2


8. Introduction to algebra
Algebra
9. Linear Equationd 15 4 5

Standard-III 10. Geometry 25 3 5 0 8 6 2


Measurements 11. Perimeter and Area
12. Three dimensional solids 2 9 14
& Geometry
Standard-IV 4 1 1 0 2 2 0
Information 13. Information Handling
Handling 1 3 0

157 11 18 6 35 25 10
63 54 40 35% 57% 18%

58
Distribution of SLO’s for Summative Assessment Class VII - Mathematics 70 Marks 30 Marks

Standard Units Number of Total Summative Assessment Number of Number of CRQs/visual


SLO Per Level Number of 50% of the Overall Selected Organizers
SLOs Assessments. Response in the Paper.
(Number, Level and the Key /MCQs Number of Marks
SLOs per topic and sub-topics) in the Paper. 30%
K U A K U A T Number of
Marks 70%
Standard-I 1. Sets
Numbers & 2. Rational numbers
3. Decimals
Operations
4. Financial Arithmetic

Standard-II 5. Exponents
Algebra 6. Square Root of Positive
Numbers
7. Direct and Inverse
Variation
8. Algebric Expression
9. Linear Equations

Standard-III 10. Fundamentals of


Measurements Geometry
11. Practical Geometry
& Geometry
12. Circumference, Area and
Volume

Standard-IV
Information 13. Information Handling
Handling

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Distribution of SLO’s for Summative Assessment Class VIII - Mathematics 70 Marks 30 Marks

Standard Units Number of Total Summative Assessment Number of Number of CRQs/visual


SLO Per Level Number of 50% of the Overall Selected Organizers
SLOs Assessments. Response in the Paper.
(Number, Level and the Key /MCQs Number of Marks
SLOs per topic and sub-topics) in the Paper. 30%
K U A K U A T Number of
Marks 70%
Standard-I 1. Operation on Sets
Numbers & 2. Real numbers
3. Number System
Operations
4. Financial Arithmetic

Standard-II 5. Polynomials
Algebra 6. Factorization
Simultaneous Equations

Standard-III 7. Fundamentals of Geometry


8. Practical Geometry
Measurements
9. Area and Volume
& Geometry 10. Demonstrative Geometry
11. Information to
Trigonometry

Standard-IV
Information 12. Information Handling
Handling

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6. SLO Based Items

Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty


Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Sets VI Define type of Sets U

Please tick on type of


item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay
1. If x=(3,9,6), Find all proper sub-sets of x.
2. Exibit the following in tabular form:
A= Set of Natural numbers between 2 & 7
B= Set of Odd numbers less than 10
C= Set of Colours of the Rainbow

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Sets VI Define Sets. Recognize K


Notation of Sets and its
Elemants

Please tick on type of 1. Do the following statements represent Sets? If yes then
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay write in Set notation
A) Odd numbers less than 9
B) Clever students of a school
C) Two beautiful flowers
D) The first 4 days of a week
2. Prove that the following 2 Sets are equal:
A= (even numbers less than 4)
B= (even prime numbers)

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Natural VI Differentiate between U


and Natural and Whole
Whole numbers
Numbers

Please tick on type of 1. Fill in the blanks to make statement True:


item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay i) The smallest natural number is .
ii) The smallest whole number is .
iii) The smallest even number of 3 digits is .
2. Answer the following questions:
i) Is every natural number, a whole number?
ii) Is every whole number a natural number? If not
please explain.
iii) Write the whole number which precedes 1000.

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Factors VI i) Define factor as a K


and number which divides
Multiples the dividend
completely, leaving no
remainder.

ii) Define even, odd,


prime and complex
numbers.
Please tick on type of
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay
1) Express each of the following odd numbers as the sum of three
odd prime numbers:
i) 19
ii) 35
iii) 91

2) Tell whether the following statements are True or False:


i) The sum of two odd numbers is also odd.
ii) 6 is the smallest even composite number
iii) The sum of two even numbers is even.
iv) Every prime number is odd.

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub-topic Level Process Level
Benchmark
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Test for VI Test by inspection U


Divisibility whether the numbers;
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11,
12, 15, can divide a
given number.

Please tick on type of


item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations HCF VI Find HCF of two or more U


than two numbers by:

 Prime
Factorization
 Long Division
Please tick on type of
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay
1) Find the HCF of the following:
i) 2x2x3x3x3x5x5
ii) 2x3x3x5x5
2) Find HCF of 27, 36 and 45 by factorization
3) Find the greatest length of a measure of tape which can be
used to measure exactly 360cm and 840cm.

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations LCM VI Find LCM of two or U


more numbers by:

 Prime
Factorization
 Division method
Please tick on type of 1) Find the least number which, when divided by 12, 15 and 20
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay leaves 3 as a remainder in each case.
2) If the LCM of 60 and 80 is 240, find their HCF.
3) Find the least number divisible by 15, 20 and 25.
4) A) Find the product of:
i) 12, 18
ii) 15, 25
B) Find the product of their LCM and HCF

C) What did you notice?

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Integers VI 1) Arrange a given U


list of integers
in ascending
and descending
order.
2) Subtract one
integer from
another.
Please tick on type of
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay
1) Compare the following by using ‘<’ or ‘>’ in between.
i) 5, -8
ii) -2, 0
iii) 3, 10
iv) -1, -6
2) The temperature of a city was 4at midnight, find the new
temperature if it falls by:
i) 1
ii) 7
iii) 15
3) The sum of 2 integers is 25. One of them is -10, find the other.

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Integers VI The product of two U


integers of unlike signs
is negative.

Please tick on type of 1) State which of the following statements are True or False.
item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay i) -12 + 15 = 15+(-12)
ii) 3 + (-5) is an integer
iii) 5 + (-5) is a positive integer
iv) 0 x (2+3) = 0 + 3
v) (-32)x0 = 0
2) At noon on a certain day in Khairpur, the temperature rose to 11
above zero. At midnight the temperature fell to 5 below zero.
Find the change in Temperature?

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Standard/ Strand/ Topic/ Grade SLO Cognitive Difficulty
Competency/ Sub- Level Process Level
Benchmark topic
(K/U/A)

Numbers and Operations Ratio VI Calculate Ratio of two U


numbers.

Please tick on type of


item: MCQ/CRQ/Essay
1) Find the ratio of, 60cm and 3 meters.
2) Mr Bilal has monthly income of Rs.72000 and expenditure of
Rs.63000 per month. Find the ratio of his savings to his income.

Marking Key/Rubric

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7. Performance Assessment and Marking Rubric

71
8. Reporting Results

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GLOSSARY

Assessment: This is a process of the collection and synthesis of data and evidences on students’
learning, by using a variety of methods.
Cognitive Processes: The cognitive processes also referred to as ‘cognition’ encompasses all
information processing at the conscious and sub-conscious levels. The Latin root of cognition is
cognoscene, which translates into "to conceptualize," "to recognize," and "to know." According to
Bloom’s taxonomy this processing of information may be at six level from simple recall, retrieval of
knowledge to understanding, application, analysis, evaluation and create. In SESLOAF Framework three
cognitive processes will be considered.
Knowledge: Information processing that requires remembering, recognition, retrieval and recall
of knowledge.
Understanding: Information processing that requires construction of meaning from oral, written
or graphic text/communication. It involves Interpreting, exemplifying, summarizing, inferring,
explaining
Application: Carrying out a procedure, comparing, executing, implementing, evaluating, and
creating.
Summative Assessment:Summative Assessment (Assessment of learning) is assessment for
accountability purposes and for determining a student's level of performance after a certain
period of time, on a specific task or at the conclusion of a unit of teaching and learning. This
is formal way of testing students in order to find out what they have learnt. The information
gained from this kind of assessment is used for giving marks, reporting the grades, awarding
certificates, promoting to the next classes, evaluating teachers’ performance, making school
accountable, selection of students for further studies and professions and helping policy
makers to take certain decisions for future educational planning and improvement.
Formative Assessment: Formative Assessment (also called assessment for learning) is an
integral part of day- to- day teaching and learning processes. The information gained from
formative assessment activities can be used for shaping the teaching and learning processes. This
information helps the teachers know how students are progressing and where they are having
trouble, which leads toward making the necessary instructional adjustments, such as teaching the
concept again, trying alternative instructional approaches, or offering more opportunities for
practice. Hence formative assessment can lead to more opportunities for learning and improved

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student achievements.
Continuous Assessment: Continuous assessments are regular assessment conducted at the
classroom level to assess student learning outcomes frequently and regularly as opposed to one
time annual examination. The results could be used for immediate improvement of the teaching
and learning process and also accountability purposes.
Benchmark Assessment: These are continuous and regular assessment conducted to assess the
achievement of benchmarks and standards.
Performance Assessment: Performance assessment is a form of assessment that comprises
of the application and assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes, values and work habits
through the performance of tasks in a given situation that are both meaningful and engaging to
students.
Authentic Assessment:

Task, Problem, or Project is Authentic if it:

1. Is realistic: The task or tasks replicate the ways in which a person’s knowledge and
abilities are “tested” in real –world situations.
2. Requires Judgment and Innovation: The student has to use knowledge and skills
wisely and effectively to solve unstructured problems, such as when a plan must be
designed, and the solution involves more than following a set routine or procedure or
plugging in knowledge.
3. Ask the students to “do” the subject: Instead of reciting, restating, or replicating
through demonstration what he or she was taught or what is already known, the
student has to carry out exploration and work within the discipline of science, history,
or any other subject.

Validity: Validity is the extent to which a test measures what it claims to measure.
Reliability:Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure. A test is considered reliable if we
get the same result repeatedly.
Specification: An Assessment Specification is a two-way chart which illustrates the topics to be
assessed in the tests, the cognitive levels for each of the topics and the number of test items. It
has the topics on one axis and the SLOs on the other axis. The specification table gives the
outlines the complete content areas and also the learning outcome at each level of the cognitive
domain. Hence, it is recommended that a Table of Specifications be developed before the test is
developed to guide complete content converge and to ensure test validity.

Benchmark:Components of the standards. These are statements that identify what students
know and can do at the end of a particular developmental and grade levels. These may also
represent students’ learning outcomes for a particular grade cluster or course.

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Content Standard: Content standards are general statements that describe what students are
expected to know and be able to do. It is a statement of the knowledge or understanding we
would expect students to have.

Curriculum Mapping: These are strategies to interpret the curriculum and develop an alignment
of SLOs, teaching and learning and planning and evaluation with standards.

Evaluation : Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of students’ work on the basis of
established criteria, by using collected information (assessment) for making informed decisions
about continued instruction, programs, and activities.

Performance Standard: Performance Standards are descriptions via tasks of what it is students
should know and be able to do to demonstrate competence. It is a description of specific use of
knowledge.

Rubric: It is a set of scoring guideline for evaluating students’ work. It explicitly describes
different levels of the quality of a work.

SLO: The Student Learning Outcomes are detailed statements describing what students are
supposed to learn, know and able to do at each grade level in order to achieve the specified
benchmarks.

Objective: The teaching objective is detailed statements of what teachers wants to do in the
teaching lesson in order to accomplish the specified teaching goal.

Standard: General statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to
do.

Strand: A key learning area or competency.

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Appendix I
MULTI- STAKEHOLDERS INVOLVED IN THE SESLOAF DESING,
DEVELOPMENT AND EXPERT REVIEW & VALIDATION PROCESSES AND
WORKSHOPS

Policy Makers, Education Advisers and Educational Managers


1. Ms. Saba Mehmood CPM RSU.
2. Mr. Mushtaq Ahmed Shahani, Director Bureau of Curriculum.
3. Mr. Asghar Memon Additional Director Bureau of Curriculum.
4. Mr. Syed Saleh Muhammad Deputy Director Bureau
5. Mr. Aftab Ali Co-ordinator PEACe.
6. Mr. Zameer Khan PM-SAT RSU.
7. Ms. Rana Hussain. Educational Adviser SESP EU
8. Mr. Bernard Doran. Team Leader British Council
9. Mr. John Payne Team Leaders British Council.

PEACe Institution:
10. Mr. Tanweer Ahmad Khan Subject Specialist, PEACe
11. Mr. Ajeeb Nonari Subject Specialist, PEACe.
12. Ms. Majida Soomro Subject Specialist, PEACe.
13. Mr. Ajeeb Nonari Subject Specialist, PEACe.
14. Ms. Tahseen Kousar Ansari Subject Specialist, PEACe.

Government Institution:

15. Mr. Muhammad Waseem Mughal Assistant Professor GECE (M) Mirpurkhas.
16. Dr. Khalil Ahmed Koria Principal GECE(M) Qasimabad, Karachi.
17. Mr. Khalid Mehmood Assistant Professor. Government National Agro-Tech TTI,
Hyderabad.
18. Mr. Sher Nawaz Assistant Professor GCE F.B Area, Karachi.
19. Mr. Imdad Ali Lakho Assistant Professor GECE(M) Qasimabad, Karachi
20. Ms. Attia Tabasum Bhutto. Assistant Professor Govt. Zubeda Girls College, Hyderabad.

Private Institutions and Professional Associations:

21. Ms. Fatima Shahabuddin SPELT


22. Dr. Fozia Ahsan Consultant Oxford University Press Karachi
23. Ms. Maria Talha ERDC.
24. Dr Huma Ghaffer Chair ASSET Faculty AKU and KITE.
25. Ms. Kiran Hashmi Faculty NDIE.
26. Mr Nadeem Kirmani Mathematic Consultant Mathematics Association of Pakistan.
27. Ms. Unaeza Alvi Founding Chair Science Association of Pakistan. Faculty AKU.

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Appendix II

Current : Desired:

Emphasizing on outcomes after learning Assessing learning outcome during the learning
process.
Assessing disconnected and; Isolated facts Assessing Integrated and Interconnected skills.
and skills
Assessing with de-contextualized tasks Assessing with contextualized tasks

One correct answer Multiple correct answers


Providing little feedback to students Providing considerable amount of feedback to
students
Sporadic assessment Continual assessment
Used for power, control and documentation Used for motivation, empowerment and
engagement
Unauthentic tasks Authentic tasks
Assessing knowledge and simple Assessing Deeper understanding, reasoning and
understanding application
Promoting memorization Promoting thinking
Adapted from McMillan, H. (2001). Essential
Assessment Concepts for Teachers and
Administrators. United States: Corwin Press

Figure 1: Recent Trends in the Purpose of Classroom Assessment

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Appendix III

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