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EdTPA LESSON PLAN (learning experience)

1ST LEARNING EXPERIENCE


Title of Learning Experience/Lesson: Beginning Small Moments on Monarch Butterfly Experiences:
Introductory Lesson

DESCRIBE CENTRAL FOCUS: The students will express an understanding of narrative writing by learning
how to provide descriptive detail to explicate their thoughts and feelings through interdisciplinary and
multimodal learning experiences. Students will use their prior knowledge of what they have learned about in
science and social studies with ample literacy and language usage. The students will be partaking in an active
multimodal learning experience through hands-on learning that support the New York State Next Generation
Learning Standards of text types, comprehension and collaboration, and presentation of knowledge and ideas
through writing and oral conversations.

1. Vocabulary (terms & child-friendly definitions):

Narrative Writing: “Narrative means story, which can be a real or an imaginary event. Narrative writing
is all about narrating a story or describing a real incident. In this type of writing, the writer plots a story
by using sensory details. Every paragraph in narrative writing is structured with vivid descriptions and
transition words like subsequently, as soon as, later on, at last, during, suddenly, etc. so as to make the
story or event interesting for readers” (Narrative writing, 2018). (https://english.edurite.com/english-
writing/narrative-writing.html?view=simple)

Child Friendly: A narrative writing piece is a story that you will write by using a lot of descriptive detail to
make the story come to life. The reader will feel like they are a part of the story while making a mental
picture.

Standards/Learning Objectives/Assessments

*Standards “(NOTE: Please *Learning Objectives *Assessment (describe how you


include the number and text will assess/document learning of
of each standard that is being each objective and if assessment is
addressed. If only a portion of formal or informal)- needs to
a standard is being addressed, include at least 1 work sample from
then only list the part or parts each child (SCALE, 2016, p. 10)
that are relevant.)” (SCALE,
2016, p. 10)
2W3: Write narratives which Students will be introduced how Informal Assessment: Observational
recount real or imagined to organize their narrative writing notes in student’s journal from the
experiences or a short piece with modeling from the teacher.
sequence of events, including teacher.
details to describe actions, Informal Assessment: Thumbs up,
thoughts, and feelings; use thumbs in the middle, or thumbs down
temporal words to signal event if the students understand what they
order, and provide a sense of will be writing about.
closure.

2. Lesson Implementation
Differentiation

• To support differentiation, the teacher will provide universal support to meet the needs of all of
the students
• The teacher will allow the students to draw their narrative piece during their pre-assessment
instead of writing it on their own. The students will have the opportunity to draw about their small
moment and verbally express what their small moment was about.
• I will also have students who need modifications (with IEPS or struggling writers) to verbally
express their small moment and I will write exactly what they said down onto their pre and post
assessment writing pieces.
• During the lesson, I will also model how to create a bubble map. This will help the students who
need a visual aid to understand what they are learning and doing.

A. Introduction/Anticipatory Set (20 mins)


• First, students will complete a pre-assessment on a small moment narrative short story on
anything they wanted to write about. The teacher will give some different examples, which
included; lost a tooth, went on vacation, played on the playground, etc. The teacher will remind
student that a narrative story is a story that is about something that happened in their life by
using details (15 minutes)
• The teacher will begin the lesson with all the students directed to the carpet area for whole
group discussion.
• The teacher will say, “So last night, I had a wonderful idea. My idea was to have you guys
present your small moment on your Monarch Butterfly experience because every single one of
you in this classroom was able to experience the butterflies and watching one of them hatch
from its chrysalis! I think this would be a wonderful opportunity for everyone to write their
narrative piece on their experience of the Monarch Butterflies in our room. Do you guys like this
idea? (Students reply). Each and every one of you had your own individual experiences of how
you felt and what you were able to see. Your small moment about the monarch butterflies
should start from the very first day of school! Can a volunteer raise their hand and tell me
something about what they saw on the first day of school and how they might’ve felt before
coming into our classroom?” (Students’ ideas will benefit all the students when they are thinking
about their own narrative stories.)
• Once all the students have volunteered the teacher will say “you all had some great ideas to
add to your narrative writing. I can’t wait to see what you all will write!”
B. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Procedures (12 mins)
• The teacher will model on anchor chart paper for the students to use for their own bubble maps
to put in their writer’s journal. “Students today I want to create a bubble map with you guys to
activate your prior knowledge of what you learned about in the past few weeks about Monarch
butterflies.”
• “Can anyone give me an idea of what the first stage of a Monarch Butterflies Life Cycle?”
(Student replies) “That is correct, the egg. Where do the butterflies lay their eggs?” (Student
replies) “Right! On a milkweed plant! Let’s add that detail to our bubble map”
• The teacher will continue to ask students what they can recall about the first stage of the life
cycle of a monarch butterfly and add it to the bubble map.
• The teacher will ask the students, “what is the second stage of the life cycle of a monarch
butterfly?” (Student replies) “Right! The monarch caterpillar. What color is the caterpillar? We
want to add details! (Student replies) I love it, black and yellow. Are the caterpillars small or big?
Someone explain to me the size of the caterpillar is when it hatches from the egg (student
replies). The caterpillar is about the size of my pinky nail when it first hatches! What happens
after a few days? What is the size of the caterpillar then? (Student replies) The caterpillar
begins to grow because it eats the milkweed plant, lets add this to out bubble map!”
• The teacher will ask the students the next stage of the monarch butterfly life cycle. “Who now
can give me the third stage? (Student replies) Right! It is time for the caterpillar to form its
chrysalis! Does anyone remember how the caterpillar makes its chrysalis? (Student replies)
that’s right! The caterpillar spits sticky stuff to form its chrysalis, lets add that detail to our bubble
map! What color is the chrysalis in the beginning? (Student replies) It is green! Right before the
chrysalis hatches, what color is it? (Student replies) It is very very dark brown or black! Let’s add
that detail to our bubble map.”
• Lastly, the teacher will ask the students what the last stage of the life cycle is. “Lastly, who can
give me the last stage of the monarch caterpillar? (Student replies) Right! It forms into a
beautiful monarch butterfly after it hatches from the chrysalis. When the butterfly hatches, how
big is it? (Student replies) Yes, the butterfly is super small, and then how does the butterfly get
bigger and when does it know it is ready to fly? (Student replies) Yes, I love all the detail you
gave me about how the butterfly must let the blood flow through its wings and allow the wings to
dry before it is ready to be released! Let’s add all those details to our bubble map!” You guys did
an excellent job giving details to add to our bubble map. You will be able to use this bubble map
to help you when you begin writing your narrative piece!”
• The teacher will place the bubble map in front of the classroom and allow the students to add
these details to their writing journals.
• The teacher will also explain the use of a tiny topic notebook; “Writers, I am going to pass out
this little booklet called, “Tiny Topic Notebook. Today, after you have copied the bubble map
into your writer’s journals, I am going to give each of you your own Tiny Topic Notebook. In this
notebook, I want you to write down some ideas you will want to include in your narrative. Jot
down some ideas.”
• The students will be directed back to their desks to start writing the bubble map in their writer’s
journals and writing down ideas in their tiny topic notebooks.
C. Closure (3 mins)
• Students will go back to their seats and the teacher will do an informal assessment to make
sure the students are understanding the procedure of what they are going to be writing about for
their narrative pieces. The teacher will say “I want everyone to give me a thumbs up if they
know what they will be writing about for their narrative pieces, thumbs in the middle if they kind
of understand, and thumbs down if you have no idea what you will be doing.”
• The teacher will explain to the students that the next day they will be using a writer’s folder to
keep all their writing materials together in a safe place.
D. Materials & References
• Anchor chart paper
• Markers
• Tiny Topics Notebook

References:

Narrative Writing. (2018). Retrieved October 14, 2018, from https://english.edurite.com/english-


writing/narrative-writing.html?view=simple)

New York State Education Department (2015-2018). 2nd Grade English language arts learning standards.
Retrieved from: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/curriculum-instruction/nys-next-
generation-ela-standards.pdf

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2013). Tiny topics notebook. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from Martha Rodgers,
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tiny-Topics-Notebook-482282
2ND LEARNING EXPERIENCE
Title of Learning Experience/Lesson: Begin Small Moment Introductory Paragraph: 2nd Lesson

DESCRIBE CENTRAL FOCUS: The students will express an understanding of narrative writing by learning
how to provide descriptive detail to explicate their thoughts and feelings through interdisciplinary and
multimodal learning experiences. Students will use their prior knowledge of what they have learned about in
science and social studies with ample literacy and language usage. The students will be partaking in an active
multimodal learning experience through hands-on learning that support the New York State Next Generation
Learning Standards of text types, comprehension and collaboration, and presentation of knowledge and ideas
through writing and oral conversations.

1. Vocabulary (terms & child-friendly definitions):

Adjective: Word that describes or clarifies a noun. Adjectives describe nouns by giving some
information about an object's size, shape, age, color, origin or material (What is an adjective, 2018).
(http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html).

Child-Friendly: A descriptive word that explains a noun.

Narrative Writing: “Narrative means story, which can be a real or an imaginary event. Narrative writing
is all about narrating a story or describing a real incident. In this type of writing, the writer plots a story
by using sensory details. Every paragraph in narrative writing is structured with vivid descriptions and
transition words like subsequently, as soon as, later on, at last, during, suddenly, etc. so as to make the
story or event interesting for readers” (Narrative writing, 2018). (https://english.edurite.com/english-
writing/narrative-writing.html?view=simple)

Child Friendly: A narrative writing piece is a story that you will write by using a lot of descriptive detail to
make the story come to life. The reader will feel like they are a part of the story while making a mental
picture.

Standards/Learning Objectives/Assessments

*Standards “(NOTE: Please *Learning Objectives *Assessment (describe how you


include the number and text will assess/document learning of
of each standard that is being each objective and if assessment is
addressed. If only a portion of formal or informal)- needs to
a standard is being addressed, include at least 1 work sample from
then only list the part or parts each child (SCALE, 2016, p. 10)
that are relevant.)” (SCALE,
2016, p. 10)
2W3: Write narratives which Students will be able to Formal assessment: Notes back from
recount real or imagined demonstrate their ability to start teacher to students on their beginning
experiences or a short their beginning piece of their narrative pieces in their writing
sequence of events, including narrative writing by hooking the journals.
details to describe actions, reader in with descriptive details
thoughts, and feelings; use from past and current learning
temporal words to signal event experiences from Social studies
order, and provide a sense of and Science.
closure.

2SL4: Describe people, Students will be able to explain to Informal Assessment: Thumbs up or
places, things, and events with a partner what they have started thumb down if it is helpful to verbally
relevant details, expressing to write with relevant detail that read aloud their narrative stories to a
ideas and feelings clearly partner
expresses their writing and
feelings using adjectives.

2. Lesson Implementation
Differentiation

• To support differentiation, the teacher will provide universal support to meet the needs of all of
the students. The teacher will provide a video to support students who need visuals and song to
help the individuals become more familiar with the vocabulary word adjective. The visuals and
music will allow the students to be able to make the connection to the vocabulary word through
a different method of learning as well as the written worksheet of providing examples of different
adjectives.
• The teacher will also provide students to orally communicate to a partner about their narrative
story. This is beneficial for the students who need to orally explain their writing before they can
fully finish their piece. This will also allow the teacher to focus in on the students who need
additional scaffolding when they write their narrative pieces.

A. Introduction/Anticipatory Set: (10 mins)


• To begin the lesson, students will be asked, “Do any of you know what an adjective word is/or
what a descriptive word means?” This will activate their prior knowledge from previous lessons
and from first grade.
• Once the students have developed enough answers, the teacher will play a YouTube video
called “Wide Open Word of Adjectives” by The Bazillions. This video will describe what an
adjective is and how to use them.
• Students will begin by learning how to use descriptive language when writing their small
moment narratives. The teacher will pass out adjective worksheet that goes along with the
YouTube video.
• The teacher will explain to the students that the purpose of this lesson is to help them include
more descriptive words when they are writing their narrative pieces.

B. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Procedures: (15 mins)


• The teacher will say, “everyone, an adjective is a word that gives your writing more description!
It makes it feel like the readers are actually in the story. I am going to write it down and please
copy this definition on the worksheet I just passed out.”
• The students will be asked to give examples of adjectives for six different categories; describing
a person, personality, appearance, sounds, size, and shape. The teacher will give a few
examples at first to model.
• These examples will assist students when they begin writing their narrative piece in hopes of
them using the descriptive words.
• Students will then take their worksheet and place it in their writer’s folder when they need to use
it as a resource.
• Students will then be directed to go to the carpet. The teacher will reiterate Fridays lesson about
the start of their narrative writing pieces. “Students, what do you remember about Fridays
lesson during our narrative writing time? What did we start? (Students reply). Right! We started
to talk about narrative writing about monarch butterflies.
• The teacher will model a beginning of a narrative piece on the anchor chart and read it aloud to
the students. The teacher will ask “how does this narrative beginning sound?” “Did I use a lot of
descriptive details?” (Students reply) Yes, I used details to make sure the reader can make a
mental image!
• To include prior vocabulary from lessons in social studies and science, the students will need to
include the vocabulary words, rural community and monarch caterpillars.
• The teacher will write down what she expects to see in their writing pieces by writing on an
anchor chart. “Students, these are the vocabulary words I expect to see in your writing pieces:
rural community, and monarch caterpillar.
• The teacher will then explain to the students that they will have writing partners during this
writing unit. The students are able to choose their own partners.
• The teacher will explain to them that they will be rehearsing their narratives aloud to their
partner and the partner will need to be active listeners to give feedback. The teacher will say, “I
am going to model how you and your partner should be talking when you are meeting about
your writing pieces.” (Teacher will model with another student).
• The students will be able choose where they feel comfortable siting in the classroom to begin
writing their narrative piece. When the students think they have finished, they will come to the
teacher and show what they have done. When the teacher gives the okay, they will be able
to meet with their writing partner to read what they have started in their narrative writing piece.
This will be the time for the students to give feedback to their partners about their writing pieces.

C. Closure (Summary of the lesson, checking for understanding, connection to future learning, how
children will provide feedback and share what they have learned) (3 mins)
• The teacher will ask the students to finish up what they are working on, either finishing up their
beginning piece, or if they are with their partners. “Students, we will need to start finishing up
what you are working on and put everything back into your writing folders. We will continue on
with our writing pieces tomorrow”
• The teacher will ask the students, “how does everyone feel about their writing pieces? Does
having a partner help you guys?” (Thumbs up or thumbs down)
• I will tell the students that “this lesson will help you when you are continuing to write your
narratives on your very own Monarch Butterfly experience! Tomorrow we are going to learn how
to make your stories come to life and we will see an example and learn how to add more details
to the narrative piece.”

4. Materials & References


• Writers notebook
• Adjective worksheet
• Pencils
• Anchor Chart Paper
• Markers
• YouTube video “Wide Open World of Adjectives,” by The Bazillions
(https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HWB8rTg0jzQ)

References:

Calkins, L., Mooney, J., & Hartman, A. (2013). Lessons from the masters: Improving narrative writing. Portsmouth,
NH: Firsthand, an imprint of Heinemann.

New York State Education Department (2015-2018). 2nd Grade english language arts learning standards.
Retrieved from: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/curriculum-instruction/nys-next-
generation-ela-standards.pdf

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2013). Tiny topics notebook. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from Martha Rodgers,
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tiny-Topics-Notebook-482282

What is an adjective? (2017, October 26). Retrieved from http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-


speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html

Wide open world of adjectives by the bazillions. (2018, February 13). Retrieved October 14, 2018, from
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HWB8rTg0jzQ
3rd LEARNING EXPERIENCE
Title of Learning Experience/Lesson: Adding More Detail to Bring Your Stories to Life: 3rd lesson

DESCRIBE CENTRAL FOCUS: The students will express an understanding of narrative writing by learning
how to provide descriptive detail to explicate their thoughts and feelings through interdisciplinary and
multimodal learning experiences. Students will use their prior knowledge of what they have learned about in
science and social studies with ample literacy and language usage. The students will be partaking in an active
multimodal learning experience through hands-on learning that support the New York State Next Generation
Learning Standards of text types, comprehension and collaboration, and presentation of knowledge and ideas
through writing and oral conversations.

1. Vocabulary (terms & child-friendly definitions):


Adjective: Word that describes or clarifies a noun. Adjectives describe nouns by giving some information about
an object's size, shape, age, color, origin or material (What is an adjective, 2018).
(http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html).

Child-Friendly: A descriptive word that clarifies a noun.

Narrative Writing: “Narrative means story, which can be a real or an imaginary event. Narrative writing is all
about narrating a story or describing a real incident. In this type of writing, the writer plots a story by using
sensory details. Every paragraph in narrative writing is structured with vivid descriptions and transition words
like subsequently, as soon as, later on, at last, during, suddenly, etc. so as to make the story or event
interesting for readers” (Narrative writing, 2018). (https://english.edurite.com/english-writing/narrative-
writing.html?view=simple)

Child Friendly: A narrative writing piece is a story that you will write by using a lot of descriptive detail to make
the story come to life. The reader will feel like they are a part of the story while making a mental picture.

Dialogue and Child Friendly: A conversation between two or more people using quotation marks.

2a/b/c. Standards/Learning Objectives/Assessments

*Standards “(NOTE: Please *Learning Objectives *Assessment (describe how you


include the number and text will assess/document learning of
of each standard that is being each objective and if assessment is
addressed. If only a portion of formal or informal)- needs to
a standard is being addressed, include at least 1 work sample from
then only list the part or parts each child (SCALE, 2016, p. 10)
that are relevant.)” (SCALE,
2016, p. 10)
2W3: Write narratives which Student will demonstrate their Informal Assessment: Observational
recount real or imagined ability to add descriptive detail to notes
experiences or a short their narrative pieces.
sequence of events, including
details to describe actions,
thoughts, and feelings; use
temporal words to signal event
order, and provide a sense of
closure.

2SL4: Describe people, Students will be able to verbalize Informal Assessment: Observation
places, things, and events with their ideas and feelings to their
relevant details, expressing partners about their narrative
ideas and feelings clearly writings.

2. Lesson Implementation
Differentiation

•To support differentiation, the teacher will provide universal support to meet the needs of all of
the students.
• The teacher will display a visual for the students on an anchor chart for students to see how to
make their narrative writing come to life
• The teacher will also provide students to orally communicate to a partner about their narrative
story. This is beneficial for the students who need to orally explain their writing before they can
fully finish their piece. This will also allow the teacher to focus in on the students who need
additional scaffolding when they write their narrative pieces.
A. Introduction/Anticipatory Set (7 mins)
• The teacher will start the lesson by bringing the students to the carpet.
• The teacher will explain how she read the beginning of their narratives and how they can be
improved.
• The teacher will ask the students, “what does it mean to bring stories to life?”
• The teacher will then ask the students to close their eyes and think about what it means to bring
a story to life.
• Once the students have an idea, they will turn and talk to a partner and explain to one another
what it means to bring a story to life (students will then be asked to volunteer).
• The teacher will listen to all the student’s responses in hopes for them to respond with using the
words expression and descriptive detail.
• The teacher will then display the anchor chart to the students (Lucy Calkins’ Anchor Chart,
2013,)
B. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Procedures (25 mins)

• The teacher will say, “I am going to show you how to make your stories come to life.”
• The teacher will go through the anchor chart and first explain “you want to unfreeze people, you
want to make them move and and make them talk!” This anchor chart will display a visual for
students to see that it is vital to make their narratives come to life
• The teacher will ask the students “do you know what the word dialogue means?”
• She will then present an impression of quotation marks and describe what those quotation
marks mean if they are seen in a narrative piece
• Then the teacher then will go down the anchor chart and explain “Tell small steps, look at the
first picture, what is it?” (Students reply). “The picture is showing how the person is starting at
the bottom of the ladder, which represents the beginning of the story.”
• The teacher will then explain to the students; “each photo is displaying a different step; the
beginning, middle, and the end. This last picture shows the person reaching to the top and
sliding down the slide, which tells the reader that the story is coming to an end.”
• Students will then be asked to look at the bottom of the anchor chart and the teacher will ask
“what does it mean to give the story/person feelings?” (Student reply)
• The teacher will explain that “this strategy will make the story come to life, the reader will feel
like they are actually there with the author. It is important to give your writing feelings. Describe
your feelings when you are telling your small moment about the monarch caterpillars and
butterflies!”
• The teacher will then read a student’s example (gifted student) of their writing piece to show the
students how they should be writing their beginning of their small moment narrative. (Only if
there is a well written narrative piece)
• The teacher will ask that student to tell their classmates why he/she wrote her beginning story
like that and what does it do for the readers? (Student will explain)
• The teacher will want the students to use their peers story as a helpful tool when they write their
own piece
• The teacher will then move onto the last part of the whole group teaching session. The teacher
will turn the chart paper to a new page with a beginning story that was written by another
student.
• The teacher will explain, “we are going to look at this writing piece and we are going to magnify
into the story and stretch out the details.”
• The students will help the teacher by giving their thoughts on what descriptive detail should be
added to the story from the example written on the anchor chart
• The teacher will read the narrative piece and ask students what needs to be added to have
more descriptive detail (students reply)
• The teacher will include the descriptive details by using the “^” symbol to add the details
between the sentences.
• The teacher will then explain, “writers you will be doing the exact same thing to your own
narrative pieces by adding more descriptive detail using the “^” symbol to improve your
narratives and to make your stories come to life.”
• The teacher will send the students to grab their writing journals and begin to write their middle of
their narrative writing
• While the students writing (teacher will observe to make sure students are ready to move onto
partners), the teacher will stop them and say “I am going to have you meet with your writing
partners and you and your partner are going to give each other advice about your stories. You
and your partner will give each other ideas of descriptive words to add to your narrative writing.”
• The teacher will ask a student volunteer to model how writing partners will work by sitting elbow
to elbow, knee to knee, using a whisper voice, and giving ideas and advice to your partner.
• Students will continue working with their writing partners and adding more to their stories.
C. Closure
• The teacher will ask the students to guide their attention to the teacher.
• The teacher will ask the students how they feel about their pieces by doing an informal
assessment of using thumbs up, in the middle or down for the way they feel.
• This informal assessment will show the teacher who is feeling comfortable with their writing and
who is not, and which students may need more scaffolding
• The teacher will explain, “tonight I am going to go home and read your beginning stories.
Tomorrow, we will start the middle piece of our narrative writing and using even more
descriptive detail! Right now, writers, put your notebooks on my desk and we will continue
writing tomorrow.”

4. Materials & References


• Writers notebooks
• Anchor chart paper
• Markers
• Pencils

References:

Calkins, L., Mooney, J., & Hartman, A. (2013). Lessons from the masters: Improving narrative writing. Portsmouth,
NH: Firsthand, an imprint of Heinemann.

New York State Education Department (2015-2018). 2nd Grade English language arts learning standards.
Retrieved from: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/curriculum-instruction/nys-next-
generation-ela-standards.pdf

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2013). Tiny topics notebook. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from Martha Rodgers,
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tiny-Topics-Notebook-482282
What is an adjective? (2017, October 26). Retrieved from http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-
speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html
4th LEARNING EXPERIENCE
Title of Learning Experience/Lesson: Starting Middle of Narrative Piece
Position of Learning Experience/Lesson (i.e. Introductory, 2nd, Closing): 4th Lesson

DESCRIBE CENTRAL FOCUS: The students will express an understanding of narrative writing by learning
how to provide descriptive detail to explicate their thoughts and feelings through interdisciplinary and
multimodal learning experiences. Students will use their prior knowledge of what they have learned about in
science and social studies with ample literacy and language usage. The students will be partaking in an active
multimodal learning experience through hands-on learning that support the New York State Next Generation
Learning Standards of text types, comprehension and collaboration, and presentation of knowledge and ideas
through writing and oral conversations.

1. Vocabulary (terms & child-friendly definitions):

Adjective: Word that describes or clarifies a noun. Adjectives describe nouns by giving some information about
an object's size, shape, age, color, origin or material (What is an adjective, 2018).
(http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html).

Child-Friendly: A descriptive word that explains a noun.

Narrative Writing: “Narrative means story, which can be a real or an imaginary event. Narrative writing is all
about narrating a story or describing a real incident. In this type of writing, the writer plots a story by using
sensory details. Every paragraph in narrative writing is structured with vivid descriptions and transition words
like subsequently, as soon as, later on, at last, during, suddenly, etc. so as to make the story or event
interesting for readers” (Narrative writing, 2018). (https://english.edurite.com/english-writing/narrative-
writing.html?view=simple)

Child Friendly: A narrative writing piece is a story that you will write by using a lot of descriptive detail to make
the story come to life. The reader will feel like they are a part of the story while making a mental picture.

Dialogue and Child Friendly: A conversation between two or more people using quotation marks.

2a/b/c. Standards/Learning Objectives/Assessments

*Standards “(NOTE: Please *Learning Objectives *Assessment (describe how you


include the number and text will assess/document learning of
of each standard that is being each objective and if assessment is
addressed. If only a portion of formal or informal)- needs to
a standard is being addressed, include at least 1 work sample from
then only list the part or parts each child (SCALE, 2016, p. 10)
that are relevant.)” (SCALE,
2016, p. 10)
2W3: Write narratives which Student will demonstrate their Informal Assessment: Observational
recount real or imagined ability to add more descriptive Notes
experiences or a short detail to their narrative pieces,
sequence of events, including while
details to describe actions,
thoughts, and feelings; use
temporal words to signal event
order, and provide a sense of
closure.
2SL4: Describe people, Students will be able to verbalize Informal Assessment: Observational
places, things, and events with their ideas and feelings to their
relevant details, expressing partners about their narrative
ideas and feelings clearly writings.

2R9: Make connections Students will demonstrate how Informal Assessment: Observational
between self and text (texts the book read aloud to them will
and other people/ world). help when they continue to write
(RI&RL) their own narrative pieces

2. Lesson Implementation
Differentiation

• To support differentiation, the teacher will provide universal support to meet the needs of all of
the students.
• The teacher will be doing a read aloud, which will support all students to see an illustration,
along with the reader, reading the story with expression. This will allow the students to hear how
the author used descriptive detail
A. Introduction/Anticipatory Set (5 mins)
• The teacher will ask the students; “what did we do yesterday to practice our narrative
writings? What is the strategy that I wanted you all to use and include your narrative pieces?”
(Student Replies). “That’s right, details! I want you to add descriptive details to make your
narrative pieces come to life! You want the reader to feel like they are a part of the story. You
want them to be able to create a mental image! I love how you guys are thinking super hard so
that you can improve your writing!”

• The teacher is going to introduce a picture book to the students that will help them when they
begin writing their narrative pieces.
• The teacher will say “I am going to read aloud this book, it is called “The Relatives Came. Has
anyone read this book before?” (Students reply).
• “This book is another book, just like Owl Moon, where the author is going to tell her readers
about her small moments with lots and lots of….” (students insert the word details). I will also
read this book by using what?” (student replies). “With expression! That’s right, the author wants
the reader to read the story with expression, which allows the readers to feel that they are in the
story!”
• The teacher will now begin the read aloud.

B. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Procedures (25 mins)


• The teacher will read aloud the entire book to the students by using expression to make the
story come to life.
• When the teacher has finished the read aloud, she will guide the students to think about the
story and she will say, “close your eyes, think about how this book was entertaining because of
all the details, how and why was it interesting? What was added to make the story interesting?
What made it fun to read?”
• Teacher will then say, “Okay, open your eyes, turn and talk to a partner and talk about why this
story was so interesting.” (students will reply when directed).
• The teacher will say, “Okay turn back to me, and I should see a lot of hands raised! Why was
this story so much more entertaining to read?” (students will reply)
• “Right, the author uses descriptive detail and I read with expression! The author wrote the story
for the reader to read with expression by using dialogue and having words bolded to make it
known to the reader to use expression.”
• The teacher will also ask “what was the purpose of me reading this story aloud?” (student
replies)
• The teacher will explain to the students that this story was read aloud to help the students write
and understand that they should have descriptive details, which will allow the reader to want to
know and to keep on reading.
• The teacher will then go back to the anchor chart that was made the day before to remind them
what is expected when continuing to write their narrative pieces.
• The teacher will say, “Yesterday, what did I say to do?” Teacher will be pointing to the anchor
chart and the students will read what the teacher is point to. “You will need to make your
characters…. (students insert move) Make them… (students insert think) … tell…(students
insert small steps) make your characters… (students insert feel) and (students insert think).
• The teacher will explain, “you will take out your tiny topics notebook that is in your writer’s folder
and use those ideas you have in your notebook to start your middle piece of your narrative
writing using descriptive details!”
• The teacher will call on students that are sitting quietly to go back to their desks to begin
working.

Small Group: (15 mins)

• Five students will conference with the teacher about their small moment narrative pieces on
their experience with Monarch Butterflies.
• In the group, the teacher will have every student read their beginning piece and have the
students self-assess.
• The students will need to give their peers advice and feedback of what they could include in
their pieces, what descriptive details can add to make their narrative writing stronger

C. Closure (3 mins)
• Students will be directed to finish up their last sentence and or thought on their narrative
writing.
• I will ask the students to turn in their writing notebooks to the front table
• I will explain to the students, “I am going to take your writing journals home and I am
going to read your stories and give you feedback on what you will need to work on for
tomorrow. I am so excited to read your narrative pieces and see what you came up
with?”

4. Materials & References


• Writing Notebooks
• Pencils
• “The Relatives Came” book by Cynthia Rylant

Reference:

Calkins, L., Mooney, J., & Hartman, A. (2013). Lessons from the masters: Improving narrative writing.
Portsmouth, NH: Firsthand, an imprint of Heinemann.

New York State Education Department (2015-2018). 2nd Grade English language arts learning standards.
Retrieved from: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/curriculum-instruction/nys-next-
generation-ela-standards.pdf

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2013). Tiny topics notebook. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from Martha Rodgers,
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tiny-Topics-Notebook-482282

What is an adjective? (2017, October 26). Retrieved from http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-


speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html
5th Learning Experience
Title of Learning Experience/Lesson: Begin end of Narrative Piece and Editing/Revising
Position of Learning Experience/Lesson (i.e. Introductory, 2nd, Closing) Closing

DESCRIBE CENTRAL FOCUS: The students will express an understanding of narrative writing by learning
how to provide descriptive detail to explicate their thoughts and feelings through interdisciplinary and
multimodal learning experiences. Students will use their prior knowledge of what they have learned about in
science and social studies with ample literacy and language usage. The students will be partaking in an active
multimodal learning experience through hands-on learning that support the New York State Next Generation
Learning Standards of text types, comprehension and collaboration, and presentation of knowledge and ideas
through writing and oral conversations.

1. Vocabulary (terms & child-friendly definitions):

Adjective: Word that describes or clarifies a noun. Adjectives describe nouns by giving some
information about an object's size, shape, age, color, origin or material (What is an adjective, 2018).
(http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html).

Child-Friendly: A descriptive word that explains a noun.


Narrative Writing: “Narrative means story, which can be a real or an imaginary event. Narrative writing
is all about narrating a story or describing a real incident. In this type of writing, the writer plots a story
by using sensory details. Every paragraph in narrative writing is structured with vivid descriptions and
transition words like subsequently, as soon as, later on, at last, during, suddenly, etc. so as to make the
story or event interesting for readers” (Narrative writing, 2018). (https://english.edurite.com/english-
writing/narrative-writing.html?view=simple)

Child Friendly: A narrative writing piece is a story that you will write by using a lot of descriptive detail to
make the story come to life. The reader will feel like they are a part of the story while making a mental
picture.

Dialogue and Child Friendly Definition: A conversation between two or more people using quotation
marks.

2a/b/c. Standards/Learning Objectives/Assessments

*Standards “(NOTE: Please *Learning Objectives *Assessment (describe how you


include the number and text will assess/document learning of
of each standard that is being each objective and if assessment is
addressed. If only a portion of formal or informal)- needs to
a standard is being addressed, include at least 1 work sample from
then only list the part or parts each child (SCALE, 2016, p. 10)
that are relevant.)” (SCALE,
2016, p. 10)
2W3: Write narratives which Student will demonstrate their Informal Assessment: Observational
recount real or imagined ability to add more descriptive Notes
experiences or a short detail to their narrative pieces
sequence of events, including while editing and revising. Formal Assessment: Rubric for final
details to describe actions, Students will also be able to narrative piece
thoughts, and feelings; use provide a sense of closure.
temporal words to signal event
order, and provide a sense of
closure.
2SL4: Describe people, Students will be able to verbalize Informal Assessment: Observation
places, things, and events with their ideas and feelings to their
relevant details, expressing partners about their narrative
ideas and feelings clearly writings.

2. Lesson Implementation
Differentiation

• To support differentiation, the teacher will provide universal support to meet the needs of all of the
students.
• The teacher will also provide students to orally communicate to a partner about their narrative story.
This is beneficial for the students who need to orally explain their writing before they can fully finish
their piece. This will also allow the teacher to focus in on the students who need additional
scaffolding when they write their narrative pieces.
A. Introduction/Anticipatory Set (5 mins)
• Students will be directed to go to the carpet
• The teacher will start the lesson off by explaining to the students that they will begin to finish
their narrative writing and start to edit and revise before they write their final piece.
• As a class, the students are going to practice how to show details and how to not tell the details.
• The teacher will say, “before you go back to editing and revising your writing piece, I want to
display a chart on how to not tell about your details but show them! You are going to see a
sentence that is telling the reader what is happening, but as a class, we need to fix the sentence
to show the reader exactly what happened.”
• The students will see and read the “Don’t Tell” section on the anchor chart.
• The teacher will read aloud the “Don’t Tell” section and the teacher will ask the students how
they can make this sentence more interesting by adding more details.
• The students will think of ideas on how to add more details to the sentence with prompting if
needed from the teacher. The students will practice with four difference sentences; “I am tired,”
“I walked down there,” “I am happy,” and “I am nervous.”
• After the students have finished editing the practice sentences, the teacher will say, “thank you
all for helping by editing and revising these telling sentences. We now changed the sentences
by having them show the reader exactly what has happened. We made the sentences come to
life!”
• The teacher will then say, “everything I have included on our anchor charts, are posted around
the room for everyone to use as a resource when finishing and editing your writing.”
• The teacher will explain, “I will hand back your journals and I have written down notes to help
you all improve on your writing. I will come around to everyone to make sure you understand
what I asked for you to do while editing your writing”
• The teacher will give an example of what a journal might look like with editing marks to show
students what they need to do independently
• The teacher will also have the students remind each other how to make their stories come to
life.
• I will ask the students, “can someone tell me how they can make their stories come to life?”
(student replies).
• “Good! I want you all to remember those strategies to keep in mind when you are fixing up your
writing by using dialogue, descriptive detail, bolding or capitalizing certain words you want the
reader to say with a lot of expression. You can also look back at your adjective worksheet to
help you.”
B. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Procedures
• The teacher will remind the students of the ladder visual from the anchor chart to explain to
them how to write their ending of their narrative piece.
• “Writers, when you are writing your ending, what should you include?” (Student replies)
• Teacher says, “You want to signal the reader that your story is coming to an end. An example is
saying, “lastly, we let out all the butterflies in the courtyard one by one. The big beautiful
butterflies flew onto my teacher’s finger. They sat on her finger for a few seconds, then all of a
sudden, the butterfly started to flap its wings and flew up into the beautiful blue sky. You want to
write with descriptive detail to what happened to all the butterflies that hatched and what we did
with the butterflies after they were fully grown! Don’t forget to include those details too!”
• The teacher will explain to the students that they will begin and try to finish their ending piece of
their narrative writing.
• The students will be directed to go back to their desks or in a comfortable place in the
classroom and start finishing up their ending of their narrative story.
• The teacher will explain to the students to finish their ending of their writing, and I will check to
make sure they are able to start writing their final piece on clean paper given to them from the
teacher. Students will also receive a cover page. The students will need to include their name, a
title and an illustration.
• Students will be at their desks completing and editing their writing pieces independently.
C. Closure (Summary of the lesson, checking for understanding, connection to future learning, how
children will provide feedback and share what they have learned.
• When the students are finishing their ending or starting to write their final paper, I will have the
students stop where they are.
• The teacher will explain, “you are all working very hard to complete your writing pieces. I love
how you all have tried to use more descriptive detail to make your stories come to life. But right
now, we are going to end our writing session, and everyone will be able to finish tomorrow.
• Over the next few days the students will finish writing their final paper (post assessment).

4. Materials & References


• Writing journals
• Final paper sheet
• Cover page
• Cover page
• Pencils
• Grading rubric

Reference:

Calkins, L., Mooney, J., & Hartman, A. (2013). Lessons from the masters: Improving narrative writing.
Portsmouth, NH: Firsthand, an imprint of Heinemann.

New York State Education Department (2015-2018). 2nd Grade English language arts learning standards.
Retrieved from: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/curriculum-instruction/nys-next-
generation-ela-standards.pdf

Smart start writing paper. (2017) Southlake, Texas: Frog Street Press, Inc.

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2016). Small moments writing packet. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from The Inked
Educator, https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Small-Moments-Writing-Packet-2781484

Teachers Pay Teachers. (2013). Tiny topics notebook. Retrieved, October 14, 2018, from Martha Rodgers,
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tiny-Topics-Notebook-482282

What is an adjective? (2017, October 26). Retrieved from http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-


speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html