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HOLIDAY

2018
ISSUE 19

INTERIOR
T H E AT R E
9 772203 130006 >

ISSN 2203-1308

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE / BEST OF FLORA & FAUNA


INTRODUCING A GALLERY GETAWAY / BUYING ART ONLINE
19

L O V E I T / B U Y I T / H A N G I T / L I V I N G W I T H A R T
Transformations: The Art of Sonia Payes
Ashley Crawford
Thames and Hudson

2017 saw the launch of Dr. moody language. Author Ashley


Ashley Crawford’s monograph Crawford describes it as ‘discourse
on artist Sonia Payes’ work and in chiaroscuro’ in which her camera
practice, published by Thames ‘somehow capsizes our normal
and Hudson. expectations of how the natural
world should appear’. Landscape
‘Transformations’ traces the and the body, and the melding of
development of Payes’s career in the two, are her subjects - but they
which she has quietly created a are formulated in ways that belie
personalised, monochromatic and rational explanation.

soniapayes.com.au scottliveseygalleries.com
ART BY JAC CLARK
www.jacclark.com.au
Artwork: Never Fooled Anyone, $2400, 76cm (W) x 112cm (H).
COURTESY: CECILIA MOK COURTESY: WENDY ARNOLD

46
14 40

#19 ART EDIT /


107

3
CONTENTS / ART EDIT

PHOTO: AMBER ROAD PHOTO: NIKA P. SILVA


CONTENTS / ART EDIT

HOLIDAY 2018 ON THE COVER: Melbourne design practice RAFT Studios uses a high-drama art
collection as the starting point for a conceptual home and office space.
Pictured is Angus O'Callaghan's Arrivals, which hangs in the kitchen.

42
11
LOVE IT
QUIET WORLDS Solo exhibitions have
been stacking up for Alison Percy, whose calm
paintings capture the lyricism of nature.
107
PROJECT SHEETS

DRESSED UP RAWNESS Design


44 THE ELECTRIC COAST Artist Louise irm Amber Road mixes a nostalgic folk-art
Vadasz relies equally on experience and collection with a penchant for sophistication.
12 WHAT’S HANGING: The exhibitions in
intuition for her bright and wild seascapes.
our diaries this season.
117 CONCEPTUAL CRIB Belinda Aucott
17 ONES TO WATCH: Artists you should takes a look at a hybrid home and workspace
keep an eye on.

51 SHOWCASE: We take a closer look at


59 with a high-drama art collection.

123 URBAN PEACE Interiors practice


standout works by a selection of Australian BUY IT Biasol captures the essence of yoga in a home
artists. designed to grow with its occupants.

60 BUYER’S GUIDE Briony Downes

29 Joel Gailer
Q+A guides you through the ins and outs of buying
art online. 127
LIVING WITH ART
38 Tania Wursig
62 DESTINATION ART We take a closer
39 Rebecca Wing Sze Lam look at two exciting new art destinations.
46 Cecilia Mok
128 LIVING/LOVING: GALLERY
47 Ann Snell 65 GALLERY We present a selection of
GETAWAY The couple behind Artstay Hobart
original artworks to make your own.
48 Judy Morris had a wild idea for their art collection: to
entrust it to their AirBnB guests.
49 Liz Gray
74 BEST OF FLORA & FAUNA
Introducing nine artists whose work is steeped 132 DESIGN COUNCIL Art Edit’s design
in nature.
ARTIST PROFILES experts share their tips for styling these pieces
in your home.
24 AERIAL DREAMING Photographer 92 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE The Art Edit
Brooke Holm is shooting for the stars. team shares tips on buying art for your loved 136 ART MOOD Matilda Carr casts her
30 LOADED VESSELS The woven spinifex ones, and presents a hand-picked selection of design eye over ive artworks and shows you
sculptures of Shirley Macnamara are heavy art for the giving season. how to style them in your home
with meaning.

34 HISTORY IN THE HINTERLANDS 146 EXPERT EYE: RETRO DINER


Meg Vivers unites red earth and colonial history
in her gestural landscape paintings.

36 THE WILD CONSCIOUS Mona Choo


106 Stylist Julia Green shows you how to add some
tasteful kitsch to the kitchen.

uses the canvas surface to conduct deeper HANG IT 149 WISH YOU WERE HERE Our
studies into the nature of human perception. quarterly art world wrap-up.

40 SUPERNATURAL AFFECTION In
112
her saturated portraits of sky and earth, Nika
GALLERY PANEL: Our panel of 152 LAST WORD We catch up with
P. Silva matches subjects from nature with leading gallerists takes a closer look at the founder of iconic design brand Maison Balzac,
sublime washes of colour. work of ive artists. Elise Pioch Balzac.

4 / ART EDIT #19


Pa t r i c i a Wa l s h
www.patriciawalshstudio.com.au
pwalsh@australis.net
PUBLISHER
Kerrie Lena
klena@artedit.com.au

EDITOR
Kirsty Sier
ksier@artedit.com.au

GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Justine Scott
jscott@artcollector.net.au

INTERNS
Annie Tonkin
Rose Leake
Zoe Zheng

SUBSCRIPTIONS
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02 9318 6413
artedit.com.au/subscribe

ADVERTISING
Kerrie Lena, Publisher
klena@artedit.com.au

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sspratt@artedit.com.au

DISTRIBUTION
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Trident Sales and Distribution Australia

PRODUCED & PUBLISHED BY


ART EDITED
ABN 48 614 849 197
PO Box 1452 Double Bay 1360
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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Camilla Wagstaf

DIRECTORS
JAC K I   A RC H I BA L D Susan Borham
Beatrice Spence

www.jackiarchibald.com Reproduction in whole or in part is not permitted without the


Coastal View (detail), 2018. Mixed media, 64 x 94cm. written authorisation of the publisher. In the reproduction
of artworks all reasonable eforts have been made to trace
copyright holders where appropriate.
ISSN 2203-1308
CONTRIBUTORS / ART EDIT

MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS

THE DESIGN COUNCIL FEATURES

BELINDA AUCOTT
works as a writer and
media consultant in
Sydney.

MATILDA CARR is in
her final year of Interior
Design at Design Centre
KATHRYN ROBSON has an BRETT MICKAN has been SUZANNE GORMAN is
Enmore, Sydney.
extensive history working working in the design field the founding director of
as an architect in Europe for more than 20 years. Sydney based interior
TIMOTHY DA-RIN
and Australia. She is the Based in Sydney, he is a design studio, Studio
is a Sydney-based
principal architect and DIA-registered designer Gorman. She is passionate
photographer.
co-founder of Robson Rak specialising in high end about creating beautifully
Architecture & Interiors, residential projects. resolved, personal spaces
Melbourne. bmid.com.au that evoke an effortless BRIONY DOWNES is an
robsonrak.com.au sense of understated arts writer residing in
luxury. Hobart.
studiogorman.com
REBECCA GROSS is
a freelance writer,
researcher and design
historian.

HELEN McKENZIE
specialises in writing
T H E G A L L E RY PA N E L about design, travel
and the arts.

KATIE MILTON is a
Sydney-based writer
and a former editor of
Art Edit magazine.

STEPHANIE VIGILANTE
is a journalist and
copywriter based in
KERRY-ANNE BLANKET is REANNON NAVARATNAM SARAH MONTGOMERY
Melbourne.
the director of KAB Gallery, is the senior art advisor at is the gallery manager and
Terrigal. IndiCo Galleries, curator of Sydney Road
kabgallery.com Sydney. Gallery, Seaforth.
indicogalleries.com.au sydneyroadgallery.com

#18 ART EDIT / 7


INTRODUCING THE
N E W LY L AU N C H E D

ART EDIT
WEBSITE
WE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE LAUNCH OF THE
ART EDIT WEBSITE, A NEW ONLINE DESTINATION
PACKED WITH INSPIRATION FOR LIVING WITH ART!
Get online to ind features from previous and current
issues of the magazine, fresh artworks to purchase
from a hand-picked selection of artists, and updates on
important art world events happening around Australia.

• Proiles of new art talent from across Australia


• Tips on how to style art in your home
• Features from previous & current issues of the magazine
• An online shop featuring work from a curated selection
of artists
• A calendar of important art world events
• Sign up to our weekly art newsletters for inspiration
direct to your inbox

www.artedit.com.au
DIRECTOR’S CHOICE
30 January – 23 February 2019

Abie Loy Kemarre, Bush Leaves. 200 x 200cm.

86 Arthur St, Fortitude Valley Brisbane QLD 4006


P: +61 7 3254 2297
E : a d m i n @ m i t c h e l l f i n e a r t g a l l e r y. c o m
W : m i t c h e l l f i n e a r t g a l l e r y. c o m
L O V E I T

24
ARTIST PROFILE
We catch up with aerial
photographer Brooke Holm from
her current base in Brooklyn, USA.

#19 ART EDIT / 11


LOVE IT / WHAT’S HANGING?

WHAT’S HANGING?
THE UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS IN OUR DIARIES. KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

CLAIRE DAVENHALL
LOST SOLES

24 November – 21 December 2018


Opening drinks 6.30pm Saturday 24 November

Claire Davenhall, Lost Soles: Lost at Sea, 2017. Found objects, leather, fabric, paper, resin, green and gold pigment, 250 x 150 x 200cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

In her upcoming exhibition Lost Soles, artist Claire Davenhall shares a collection of work that explores the
mixed experiences of multiculturalism and migration of people to Australia. In these works, Claire captures the
complex heritage of many waves of migration over proceeding generations through sculptural work that draws
upon a surprising material palette of found objects, which are as mixed in aesthetic and composition as her
subject matter. The exhibition will be opened by arts consultant and media presenter, Paula Silbert, on the
evening of Saturday 24 November.

Midland Junction Arts Centre, 276 Great Eastern Hwy, Midland WA


mundaringartscentre.com.au

12 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / WHAT’S HANGING?

FENTON & FENTON


PEACE OF ART

14 – 22 November 2018
Opening drinks 6–8.30pm Thursday 15 November

Armelle Habib, La Dolce Vita. Photographic print, 73.2 x 110cm. Styled by Heather Nette-King for Fenton & Fenton.
COURTESY: ARMELLE HABIB AND FENTON & FENTON

Following a hugely successful 2016 event, the biennial Peace of Art online auction is returning with works from
renowned and emerging Australian artists. Hosted by cult interior design practice Fenton & Fenton, the 2018
event will feature works from more than 60 artists, including Antoinette Ferwerda, Carly Williams, Dion
Horstmans, Jai Vasicek and Michael Bond. All proceeds from the auction will go to School’s a Git, an Aus-
tralian not-for-proit organisation helping children living in poverty in an under-served region of Ethiopia. Mel-
bourne-based bidders are also invited to see the works in person at a corresponding exhibition to be held at
Fenton & Fenton’s Prahran store.

Fenton & Fenton, 471 High St, Prahran VIC


fentonandfenton.com.au

#19 ART EDIT / 13


LOVE IT / WHAT’S HANGING?

WENDY ARNOLD
LOVE SCHOOL

19 – 25 November 2018
Opening drinks 6–8pm Thursday 22 November

Wendy Arnold, Forever. Acrylic on canvas, 182 x 122cm.


COURTESY: THE ARTIST

A stalwart of Sydney’s Balmain precinct, Art Gallery on Darling is a predominantly artist-run space that has be-
come known for picking up new talent. In November, the gallery will host the irst-ever solo exhibition of local
artist Wendy Arnold, whose large-scale, colour-saturated canvases explore the female form – whether in isola-
tion or entangled in a romance that sits just below the surface of the visible. Called Love School, the exhibition
will run for one week only. This is a debut from an up-and-coming talent that’s not to be missed.

Art Gallery on Darling, 307 Darling St, Balmain NSW


artgalleryondarling.com.au

14 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / WHAT’S HANGING?

JENIE FAWCKNER
PERCEPTION

2 – 30 November 2018
Opening drinks 5.30pm Friday 2 November

Jenie Fawckner, Perception. Oil on canvas, 120 x 120cm.


COURTESY: THE ARTIST

The second solo exhibition from Queensland artist Jenie Fawckner, PERCEPTION will bring together a vibrant
collection of Australian botanicals and landscapes. The pastel washes and rich textures of these works – creat-
ed using thick, impasto oil paint on canvas – are relective of the quixotic way the artist perceives the Australian
landscape, with all its seasonal changes. In addition to painting, Jenie also works as a printmaker. The exhibi-
tion will feature some of her framed original screen prints on paper, created using oil-based inks.

The Moree Gallery, Max Centre, Heber St, Moree NSW


jenief.com.au
moreegallery.com.au
info@themoreegallery.com.au

#19 ART EDIT / 15


LOVE IT / WHAT’S HANGING?

ROD BATHGATE
THE GOLDEN MILE

30 November – 17 December 2018


Opening drinks 6-8pm Friday 30 November

Rod Bathgate, Fingal beach reserve, NSW. Pastel on art board, 80 x 100cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST AND THE GALLERY

Australian pastel artist Rod Bathgate has been described by Cooks Hill Galleries director Mark Widdup as a
“master of light relection” and “one of the gallery’s most successful exhibitors”. The artist’s latest exhibition,
The Golden Mile, presents an opportunity to witness the magic he works with his medium, through new works
depicting the serene coastlines between Port Stephens and Redhead. On Friday 30 November, visitors will also
be able to meet the artist himself and hear him talk through his process and practice.

Cooks Hill Galleries, 65 Bull St, Cooks Hill NSW


cookshillgalleries.com.au
mail@cookshillgalleries.com.au
0418 492 259

16 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

ONES TO WATCH
T H E A RT E D I T T E A M P R E S E N TS T H E A RT I STS O N I TS R A DA R R I G H T N OW.
KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

KIERAN FORSTER

As both an artist and a psychiatrist, Kieran Forster uses his artistic practice to explore our emotional and psy-
chological lives. Depending on which of these he is exploring, his work alternates between abstract and igura-
tive modes of expression. According to Kieran, the “peopled” subjects that sometimes emerge from this latter
style, when he is exploring mental states and relationships, have garnered interest from teachers of psychiatry
for their illustrative quality. On the other hand, his pure abstract work is wider in its application, encompassing
foundational concepts from the sciences and the humanities. Sometimes this takes the form of a wave so
violently textured it is almost sculptural, standing as a visual representation of emotional tumult; elsewhere,
it takes on a tactile quality with swathes of empty space, intentionally reminiscent of the poems of T.S. Eliot.

WATCH THIS SPACE… Kieran Forster, The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock.
kieranforster.com Mixed media on canvas, 120 x 150cm.
kieranforster@hotmail.com COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 17


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

TANIA CHANTER

For Tania Chanter, overthinking is antithesis to her artistic practice. Drawing from the immediate, nature-rich
context of her home in Victoria’s Yarra Valley, her gestural brushstrokes relect an intuitive process that is ruled
by emotion. Whether directing her focus on a vase of pink lowers, a choppy moonlit seascape or a sparse,
darkened promontory, the layers, textures and colours of Tania’s work bleed onto the page in the same unin-
terrupted way, lending the inal product a cohesive yet idiosyncratic patina.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


taniachanter.com
tania@taniachanter.com
0425 441 852 Tania Chanter, Promontory Moonlight.
taniachanter Acrylic on canvas, 91 x 61cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

18 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

SALLEIGH OLSEN

The works of Sydney-based painter Salleigh Olsen are a cure for monotony. The National Art School graduate
has spent almost a decade building up a reputation for herself through solo exhibitions that broadcast her love
of colour, expression and contemporary zeal. The content of these works usually centres around the female
igure. Salleigh’s subjects are portrayed with conidence, femininity, and an edge of mystery, with her expert use
of mixed media enhancing each individual form. Whether it be through subtle typography or bold, expressive
lines, the energy and drama of these sophisticated palettes radiates of the canvas, inviting the viewer inside
the mind of each subject.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


salleigholsen.com Salleigh Olsen, 1979 Summer. Acrylic and
salleigholsen@gmail.com shellac on wood and board, 120 x 90cm.
salleigholsenart COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 19


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

DAVID GILES

With 20 art awards and more than 50 solo exhibitions to his name, David Giles has indelibly established himself
as an artist to watch. His history of exhibitions has stretched far beyond his base in Fremantle, Western Australia
to reach Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Singapore, New York and Paris. The artist took up painting ater a dra-
matic near-death experience galvanised his resolve to pursue a career as an artist, and his subsequent output
has been proliic, with works that have become known for their aesthetic and philosophical layers. What might
seem like repetitive expressive mark-making always reveals a hidden pattern that stems from the artist’s preoc-
cupation with the human psyche – an underpinning of beauty and order that must be deciphered.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


davidgilesartgallery.com David Giles, Limerance.
davidgilesartist@hotmail.com Acrylic on canvas, 100 x 85cm.
0416 079 204 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

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LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

CYBELE COX

For sculptor Cybele Cox, making igurative works of ceramics acts as a portal with two destinations: into the
realm of the mystical, and into the more tangible world of the western art canon. The artist – who has exhibited
in Sydney, Melbourne and Vienna and featured in The Age, Sydney Morning Herald and Museum Magazine – uses
hand-built ceramic totems, painting, drawing and costume as a means of world-merging, fusing symbols from
the mythic world with fantasies for a new feminist order. If Cybele has her way, the importance of the spiritual
realm will be reinstated within our secular society, borne on the back of a reverent and challenging art practice.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


cybelecox.com.au
cybelefrancescox@gmail.com Cybele Cox, Dickhead. Hand-built
0431 468 720 ceramic and underglaze, 80 x 30 x 30cm.
cybele.cox COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 21


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

CHELSEA LEHMANN

The dark baroque style of painter Chelsea Lehmann calls into question the immutability of the canvas. Having
recently completed her PhD with an exploration of the retrospective activation of the painted surfaces, her
practice is underscored by intellectual and technical rigour, as she blends traditional techniques with tech-
nologies typically used for art conservation. Chelsea’s works are made up of additions as much as they are of
erasures, blurring the line between process and inal product. This constant push and pull between creation
and censorship relects the tangled abundance of the baroque period, with themes that dance on the edge of
the sinister and the religious.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


chelseajlehmann.com Chelsea Lehmann, Veov, 2016.
chelseajlehmann@gmail.com Oil on linen, 30 x 24cm.
chelseajlehmann COURTESY: THE ARTIST

22 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / ONES TO WATCH

JANINE DELLO

Artist Janine Dello is proof that it is never too late to explore previously nascent talents. The artist has stacked
up recognition for her portraits since graduating as a mature-age student from the Adelaide Central School of
Art in 2016, including as a inalist in the Kennedy Art Prize, the Prospect Portrait Prize, the RSASA Portrait Prize
and the Wyndham Art Prize. The subject matter that has garnered her such accolades relates to the embodied
self, as the artist turns her eye to female culture and what she calls the “appearance industry”. Janine uses her
own photography as the basis for these painted compositions, asking women she knows to model for her and
using their poses as a launching pad to explore love, desire, vanity and vulnerability. With each new work, she
asks her audience to consider our collective obsession with youth and beauty, employing an accessible style
that is as provocative as it is playful.

WATCH THIS SPACE…


janinedello.com Janine Dello, Mercury is in retrograde.
janinedello@bigpond.com Oil on linen, 74 x 85cm.
janinedelloart COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 23


LOVE IT / ARTIST PROFILE

24 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / ARTIST PROFILE

AERIAL
DREAMING
THE AMBITIONS OF AUSTRALIAN-RAISED, NEW YORK-BASED
PHOTOGRAPHER BROOKE HOLM FLY EVEN HIGHER THAN THE
BREATHTAKING AERIAL LANDSCAPES THAT HAVE WON HER
INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM. HELEN MCKENZIE WRITES.

New York-based photographer Brooke Holm shooting in the Namibian desert. PHOTO: JEFF ALBERT

#19 ART EDIT / 25


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26 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / ARTIST PROFILE

SHE LIVES IN NEW YORK’S design epicentre and has built a formidable
reputation as a go-to photographer in the demanding world of advertis-
ing. Between architecture, still life and design shoots she has managed to
have no small number of solo gallery exhibitions for her landscape pho-
tography. You would think that 31-year-old Brooke Holm, who is on the
road for a quarter of her life, has no time for dreaming. But in fact, her
dreaming is almost as large in scale as her ethereal aerial works. As she
tells Art Edit, the high-shooting photographer harbours a burning desire
to travel to the moon – or maybe Mars.
Brooke’s correspondence with NASA reads something like this:

Dear NASA,
My name is Brooke Holm I am a photographer (please see my website).
I would like to go on your next mission to the moon, or Mars.
NASA’s response is something like:

Dear Miss Holm,


Your work is very impressive but unfortunately we are not planning to
take a photographer into space in the near future. Perhaps you would
like to join our astronaut program?

Talking to Brooke from her apartment in a converted knitting factory in


the über-cool Brooklyn sub-pocket of Bushwick, East Williamsburg, it is a
hard to know just how seriously to take the space talk. But to put these
dreams into context, Brooke has recently found herself being chased by
walruses, dangling out of helicopters and getting way too close to a polar
bear – so maybe she’s not fooling.

1 Brooke Holm, Mineral Matter VII.


1
2 Brooke Holm, Lomfjordhalvøya.

#19 ART EDIT / 27


LOVE IT / ARTIST PROFILE

Brooke was born in California to an American fa-


ther and an Australian mother. At age 10, she moved
with her mother and three sisters to Brisbane. Brooke
has now been living back in the states for three years,
but her thoughts are still split between the two con-
tinents.
“I would to love to be in Australia for six months
and here for six months each year,” she tells Art Edit.
New York is, however, where Brooke feels she needs
to be right now. She says: “It’s really cool because I
have access to amazing designers who I didn’t have
access to before. I’ve been able to collaborate with
people I never thought I would. It’s so exciting.”
In Australia, Brooke is represented by Melbourne
gallery Modern Times and has been back to Austra-
lia for her landscape exhibitions. Last year’s show,
Mineral Matter, featured spectacular images of Lake
3
Tyrell, Victoria’s largest salt lake. In 2015, her work
from a trip to the Arctic Circle was shown, and next
year she’ll debut recent work from Namibia. In fact,
2019 is looking to be a big year for the artist. She’ll
also be returning to the Arctic as part of a prestigious
group of scientists and artists on a 17-day expedition
to photographically document the impact of climate
change.
Brooke’s landscapes are not just beautiful to look
at; they also ofer a deeper meaning to be under-
stood. “When I irst went to the Arctic, I learned not
only that climate change is afecting certain places
more than others, but also what is going to happen
when certain areas are no longer habitable – the ref-
ugee crisis becomes so much worse. I want to por-
tray the beautiful, amazing, side of nature that needs
protection, share that with people and hopefully
provide some sort of connection between that per-
son and nature,” she says.
4 With her feet irmly on the ground and the impact
of climate change to show through her photographs,
Brooke may be light years from her space dream, but
she did hear back from NASA again.
“No, I’m not going to the moon yet… But I did get
invited by NASA to come and photograph their rock-
et assembly facility in New Orleans. I went for two
days – it was so exciting!”

SHOW ME MORE…
brookeholm.com
hello@brookeholm.com
brookeholm

3 Brooke Holm, Mineral Matter III.


4 Brooke Holm with pieces from her Salt & Sky series.
5 Brooke Holm, Sea Lake V.
5 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

28 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / Q&A

Q+A THE SIZZLING, FLURO-SOAKED WORKS


OF JOEL GAILER ARE UNDERPINNED BY
AN INTELLECTUAL RIGOUR THAT DRAWS

JOEL GAILER FROM THE LONG HISTORY OF ABSTRACT


EXPRESSIONISM.

How would you describe your style?


My work is multi-artform. I am currently
working on a series of paintings, prints
and photographs that explore form and
colour in an abstract pictorial style.

How did you first start out as an artist?


I come from a long history of Australian
1 Joel Gailer, Surf on the reef,
artists. My whole family are creative prac- 2018. Acrylic and oil on linen,
titioners, writers or musicians. I have a 270 x 180cm.
20-year career and I always anticipated 2 Joel Gailer, Pacific Islands,
having a creative career. I have just com- 2018. Acrylic and oil on canvas,
280 x 230cm.
pleted my PhD in visual arts.
3 Joel Gailer, Untitled, 2018.
Acrylic and oil on linen, 90 x
Where do you currently practice? 210cm.
I am director of a visual art studio, Coz- COURTESY: THE ARTIST

ens Street, in Brunswick, Melbourne. It


provides art spaces for a community of
artists and I have a large, light-illed stu-
dio in this space. We have regular live
music and performance events as well as
art classes.

What does your process entail?


I am currently working with luro pigments
to achieve high-impact, brightly coloured
1 2
abstractions. I follow an intuitive process
that begins with one mark. I can then re-
spond to this mark with another mark SHOW ME MORE…
and the image slowly develops form. Each joelgailer.com.au
joel@joelgailer.com.au
“I am trying to find alternative ways to achieve
component of the image is only added af-
ter considering its relationship to the oth- 0402 519 711 harmony and create abstract change.”
er marks in the artwork. I am trying to ind joelgailer
alternative ways to achieve harmony and
create abstract change.

What are some of the sources of inspi-


ration for your work?
My wife and my three children are my
primary source of inspiration; I couldn’t
be an artist without their inluence and
support. Theoretically, I am currently in-
terested in the artists who inluenced the
emergence of abstraction – particularly
the abstract artists working in New York
prior to WWII and the emergence of ab-
3
stract expressionism.

#19 ART EDIT / 29


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30 / ART EDIT #19


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LOADED
VESSELS
THE WOVEN SPINIFEX SCULPTURES OF ARTIST
SHIRLEY MACNAMARA ARE HEAVY WITH THEMES OF
RESILIENCE, SURVIVAL AND REMEMBRANCE.
ROSE LEAKE WRITES.

A capacity for resilience is oten aligned with being strong or thick-


skinned, or having the ability to endure. This is certainly the view of North
West Queensland artist and cattlewoman Shirley Macnamara, who
draws upon her traditional ties with her Indjalandji-Dhidhanu / Alyawarr
peoples and her deep, ever-expanding connection to the Australian bush-
land to create strong, handwoven works that radiate meaning.
While many of her works centre around themes of belonging and sur-
vival, it is irst and foremost the material she uses that deines her practice
and echoes the history of her ancestors. For the past 20 years, Shirley has
used spinifex grass as the primary material for her sculptural works, a na-
tive plant with knife-like edges that has endured the harshest, most arid
environments of Australia. Spinifex grass manages to survive in seemingly
barren landscapes – and the metaphorical potential of this is not lost on
the artist.
Beyond its practical use, Shirley’s relationship to spinifex is a complex
one, touching upon layers of personal and familial history. For Shirley,
the grass represents her connection to her home and to the land, the two
being inseparable from one another. Shirley explains, “The materials I use
are very important, because they’re a part of the landscape, and they’re
also part of the ongoing cycle that happens. But spinifex is a dificult ma-
terial to work with. I oten have to pick out pieces that end up in my in-
gers. It is dificult [laughs], but I just love it. I just love how it works for me.”

Shirley Macnamara, Mugama for Country, 2018 (detail). Spinifex, feathers, bone,
ochre and spinifex resin. Installation view of Shirley Macnamara: Layered threads,
The University of Queensland Art Museum. Photo: Carl Warner

#19 ART EDIT / 31


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“Using spinifex together with found materials


such as emu feathers, the works retreat from the
functional realm and enter the purely sculptural.”

32 / ART EDIT #19


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Shirley’s sculptures oten take the form of vessels – speciically guutu,


a traditional word meaning a vessel that can carry things. The symbolism
of these guutu extends far beyond their humble forms. The artist explains
that the relationship her grandmother and other older members of her
family have with creating objects is a very important and emotive one.
During the construction process, the Elders sing songs into their works
to embed them with the stories of their land and their people. Shirley
explains that she herself is not able to follow on with this tradition be-
cause it is lost to her, so instead she makes vessels as a symbol of hold-
ing and maintaining these traditions. Though this recognition of lineage
is strong within her work, her methods and use of material is unique to
her. “I taught myself,” she says. “I don’t know if our family members were
weavers; our Country is very dry. By the time I started, there was no one I
could ask to show me what to do, so I just started doing it on my own. My 4
spinifex work is all absolutely self-taught.”
During her recent art residency at The University of Queensland, Shirley
began to experiment with large-scale installations – something she had SHOW ME MORE…
never attempted before. Using her signature material – together with found alcastongallery.com.au
natural materials such as emu feathers, bones and ochres – the works re- artmuseum.uq.edu.au
treat from the functional realm and enter the purely sculptural. Suspended
from the ceiling are woven spinifex rings accompanied by images that col- 1 Shirley Macnamara in front of her Mugama for Country installation at UQ Art Museum,
Brisbane.
laboratively explore the traditions of her people, their resilience and their
2 Shirley Macnamara: Layered threads, UQ Art Museum, 18 August – 24 November
dependence on the land for strength. Underpinning these explorations is a
2018. Installation view with (let) Cruciixes, 2013 (UQ Anthropology Museum) and
pleading message of conservation and remembrance. (right) Gilgai, 2017 (UQ Art Collection).
“I am just so passionate about caring for what we have in terms of the land- PHOTO: CARL WARNER

scape, the Country and the bush,” she says. “We need to be careful that we 3 Shirley Macnamara, Mugama for Country, 2018. Spinifex, feathers, bone, ochre and
spinifex resin. Installation view of Shirley Macnamara: Layered threads, The University of
don’t disrupt anything too much; that we don’t mess the balance up.” Queensland Art Museum, 2018.
Shirley’s new series of sculpture works stands at a juncture between PHOTO: CARL WARNER
ancestral tradition and contemporary reinterpretation in which resilience 4 Shirley Macnamara gathering native materials for use in her work.
is an anchor for survival. COURTESY: THE ARTIST, UQ ART MUSEUM, BRISBANE AND ALCASTON GALLERY, MELBOURNE

#19 ART EDIT / 33


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HISTORY IN THE
HINTERLANDS
ARTIST MEG VIVERS TALKS TO ART EDIT ABOUT COLONIAL WOMEN’S HISTORY, ISOLATED CATTLE
STATIONS AND THE MEDIUM THAT BRINGS THE TWO TOGETHER: PAINTING. ROSE LEAKE WRITES.

The Australian bushland has been a popular subject matter for painters
since long before European settlement, providing a surplus of inspira-
tion that continues to be drawn upon by artists in new and profound
ways. Northern New South Wales artist Meg Vivers is one such artist,
yet her keen interest in colonial women’s history – along with her early
childhood experiences with the isolated Queensland bush – have con-
tributed to the development of a highly idiosyncratic style. The histories
and memories embedded within Meg’s work allow her to evoke a sense
of viewing from within; it is an intimate view of trees, rocks, earth and
landscapes that comes from a deep place of personal resonance.
Growing up on a cattle station in south-west Queensland, Meg de-
veloped a powerful emotive connection with Australian country and
bushland – a connection that is still very much alive in her paintings.
“With this immersion came a deep love for the solitude and beauty of
the Australian landscape,” Meg explains.
Mainly using acrylic and oil – occasionally dabbling with ink, pastel
and charcoal – Meg works quickly and spontaneously from her breezy
outback veranda, building up layers of complementary earth tones
and loose semi-representational shapes. Her depictions of vast, spar-
ing landscapes in such a free yet repetitive manner evokes a depth of
shared responses from viewers. It is a visual sensitivity that reaches well
beyond the power of words.
Holding a PhD in English Literature and History, Meg has also spent
many years focusing on Australian colonial women’s writing and its
importance as a useful historical source material. The artist-academic
has written and published several books and poems around this topic,
which she sees as extensions of her artistic practice. For Meg, writing
and painting go hand-in-hand. Each tells a story about history and
place, yet their contrasting mediums communicate new meanings. This
allows Meg to entice a range of unique experiences and responses from
readers and viewers alike.
Meg attributes her love of colour and semi-abstract shapes to artist
Estelle Cotsell, who she studied under during her early painting career.
Her more recent paintings play with the positive and negative spaces
within landscape sceneries, a visual tool she hopes will declutter her
1
works and portray what she calls the “spatial phenomena” of Australia.
1 Meg Vivers, Evening at Chafey Dam. Acrylic and oil Meg oten holds solo exhibitions in her hometown of Armidale, New
on deep-edged stretched canvas, 122 x 92cm. South Wales. Recently, she took place in a shared exhibition at Gallery
COURTESY: THE ARTIST ONE88 Fine Arts in Katoomba that opened in October this year.

34 / ART EDIT #19


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“For Meg, writing and painting go hand-in-


hand. Each tells a story, yet their constrasting
mediums communicate new meanings.”

SHOW ME MORE…
mvivers@une.edu.au
02 6775 2242
Meg Vivers Australian Landscapes
mvivers

2 Meg Vivers, Purple Moon. Acrylic and oil on deep-sided


stretched canvas, 74 x 101cm.
3 Meg Vivers, Summer Winds. Acrylic and oil on sheet canvas,
64 x 94cm.
4 Meg Vivers.
3 4 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 35


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THE WILD CONSCIOUS


MULTIDISCIPLINARY ARTIST MONA CHOO USES THE SURFACE OF HER CANVAS TO CONDUCT
DEEPER STUDIES INTO THE NATURE OF HUMAN PERCEPTION. ZOE ZHENG WRITES.

A driving force behind Mona Choo’s practice has always been a fascina- Mona’s oeuvres are varied and diverse in medium and style, as she al-
tion with the subject of consciousness. Basing her works on extensive ways searches for the most suitable form to pose a particular question.
research, the multidisciplinary artist explores the nature of human per- Her work from the past ive years combines a layering of techniques and
ception and what constitutes our idea of reality. Her subject matter con- processes: many begin with printmaking on clear materials, which then
stantly branches out from this topic to touch upon various ields of study, evolve into diferent spatial dimensions.
including psychology, philosophy, astrology, quantum theory and sacred By transforming drawings on lat surfaces into three-dimensional
geometry. forms, experimenting with light to form shadows of drawings with ininite
“Art is the platform on which my enquiries into science and spirituality possibilities, and incorporating photography, Mona questions how “con-
come together, oten leading to more questions, provocations and dis- sciousness may exist outside of, and inluence us, from beyond the di-
courses than answers,” she tells Art Edit. “In my practice, every stage of the mensions that our physical bodies inhabit”.
creative process is an opportunity to evolve my work, so the outcome is In her recent series, Current Musings, Mona continues her enquiries
oten not by design but by evolution.” into consciousness from a completely diferent perspective: the internal

36 / ART EDIT #19


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2 3

world. The sense of space disappears into wild lines and layers of paint
over the canvas. Highly saturated and contrasting colours juxtapose
broad swathes of black and white. Beyond a powerful visual impact,
Mona opens up a deep dialogue with herself; a dialogue of inner contra-
dictions. In these works, the conscious and the subconscious, dreams
and reality, fear and confrontation, demons and angels collide.
“Looking into abstract painting is akin to inding something that has
been hidden. Within the colour and forms are feelings, thoughts, ideas
and suggestions,” says Mona. The artist’s advice is to enjoy rather than
try to make sense of them; to give the mind a break and let your deep
consciousness lead the way.
Before graduating from Central Saint Martins with a Master of Arts in
Art and Science, Mona had already started to exhibit internationally. Her
works are in the permanent collections of Singapore Art Museum and the
Printmaking Research Centre of Macao, and private collections in Asia,
Australia, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most 4

recently, she presented in the 2018 Australian Tom Bass Prize for Figura-
tive Sculpture inalists’ exhibition in Sydney. Mona will exhibit in Tasma-
nia in January and in Singapore in May 2019.

SHOW ME MORE…
handmark.com.au
hobart@handmark.com.au
03 6223 7895
handmarkgallery

1 Mona Choo, Disturbing Events. Acrylic on linen, 80 x 120cm.


2 Mona Choo, Hidden. Acrylic on linen, 120 x 80cm.
3 Mona Choo, The Thin Veil. Archival ink on canvas, 90 x 120cm.
4 Mona Choo, Mind Over Matter. Acrylic and archival ink on Fabriano paper, 50 x 70cm.
5 Mona Choo working in her studio.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST
5

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Q+A
SPLITTING HER TIME BETWEEN SYDNEY
AND TAHITI, MIXED MEDIA ARTIST TANIA

TA N I A W U R S I G WURSIG CREATES UPLIFTING WORKS THAT


CARRY AN IMPORTANT CULTURAL MESSAGE.

How would describe your style? 1 Tania Wursig, Postcards from


Paradise IV. Acrylic and mixed
My paintings celebrate culture, inspired by media on postcard prints on
exposure to the Tahitian people and the re- canvas, 90 x 90cm.
vival of authentic traditions. Using acrylic and 2 Tania Wursig, Accroche-Toi.
Acrylic and mixed media on
mixed media, I play with textural possibilities, Tahitian cotton pareu print on
painting on collaged surfaces of Tahitian pa- canvas, 152 x 102cm.
reu [a kind of sarong], coconut husk, postcards 3 Tania Wursig in her studio.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST
and various ephemera collected on my travels.
These grounds add narrative to my work, con-
necting it with culture and place.
Have you been working on anything Where can people ind your work?
Is Tahiti your base? special lately? My work is available to purchase online through
Sydney is my home town and Tahiti has be- My recent body of work, Postcards from Par- my website, at my Sydney studio The Artist’s
come my second home. For seven years I had adise, explores themes of historical cultural Studio/Gallery, and at Galerie Winkler in Tahiti.
the great fortune to be artist-in-residence for suppression and revival of culture. In these
three months each year at Le Meridien Tahiti. works, collaged, post-colonial imagery emerg- SHOW ME MORE…
My passion for sharing Tahitian culture has led es through the paint like a memory. Painting taniawursig.com
me to create Painting in Paradise, an all-inclu- images of today’s Tahitians gazing back at the info@taniawursigshop.com
sive, fully immersive cultural tour and creative viewer, reclaiming their power and sense of 0409 362 949
workshop on the islands of Tahiti, Bora Bora place, shining through the shadow of history Tania Wursig Art
and Huahine. strong and proud. taniawursig

38 / ART EDIT #19


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Q+A
2018 HAS BEEN A BIG YEAR

REBECCA FOR REBECCA WING SZE LAM,


WHOSE INTIMATE PORTRAITS

WING SZE LAM ARE INSPIRED BY STORIES BOTH


PERSONAL AND UNIVERSAL.

How would you describe yourself as an artist?


I’m a storyteller – at least I see myself as one more
so than as an artist. My art generally paints a feeling
or an emotion from a distant memory or current. Al-
though I paint other subjects, my passion is painting
portraits. Every piece has a little bit of me. Oten peo-
ple tell me they see a little bit of themselves in my art.
I guess as humans we are all bound to have experi-
enced the same emotion at some point in our lives.

Where did you learn to paint?


I’m self-taught. I have always loved art, but it was al-
ways considered “impractical” growing up in a tradi-
tional Asian family. The closest thing I had to attending
art school was high school art class. Ironically, my art
1 2
teacher absolutely hated my work. To this day, I’m still
quite traumatised presenting my work to an audience .
I tend to hide behind my work with social media.

What have you been working on this year?


This year has been quite the adventure. What start-
ed as painting for “decorating” the home sort of
spun out of control. I was fortunate to be part of sev-
eral art competitions and accepted by a few online
art galleries and have been steadily selling pieces
online. Since May, I have been interviewed by Arts
Culture, featured in Circle Spotlight magazine, ap-
peared in Jimboomba Times, and showcased with
Raw Artist Australia. This October, I participated in
the annual international art catalogue WE CONTEM-
PORARY as one of the 100 emerging artists featured
by MUSA International Art Space. To say the least,
2018 has been a very rewarding year.

Is there any particular message you’re trying to


relay through your work? 3 4
I want to paint pieces that people will feel speak to
them and touch them on a personal level – pretty 1 Rebecca Wing Sze Lam, Ginny. Acrylic and oil
or not. pastel on archival paper, 50 x 40cm.
2 Rebecca Wing Sze Lam, Pixie. Acrylic and oil pastel
on archival paper, 50 x 40cm.
Where can people ind your work?
3 Rebecca Wing Sze Lam, Demi. Acrylic and oil
Mainly on my website, although I prefer clients to con- pastel on archival paper, 70 x 50cm.
SHOW ME MORE…
tact me personally. Bits and pieces are also scattered on 4 Rebecca Wing Sze Lam, Lola. Acrylic and oil pastel rebeccalam.space
my Instagram. I am also part of the Raw Artist team, and on archival paper, 70 x 50cm. bwingszeartstudio@gmail.com
will be showcasing with them throughout Australia. COURTESY: THE ARTIST simplesummerbeachnerd.b

#19 ART EDIT / 39


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SUPERNATURAL
AFFECTION
IN HER SATURATED COLLAGES OF SKY AND EARTH, ARTIST NIKA P. SILVA MATCHES SUBJECTS
FROM NATURE WITH SUBLIME WASHES OF HEAVENLY COLOUR. ZOE ZHENG WRITES.

Behind the playful collages, meticulous ink drawings and neon-coloured for Nika, as she began drawing as part of a recovery practice to increase
paintings of Nika P. Silva lies a deep afection for the natural world. Ac- mobility. However, while the accident was the inal impetus for her prac-
cording to the artist, her works are underpinned with hope and a mission tice, the seeds of Nika’s artistic career were planted long beforehand. Her
to elicit change. Through her art, she intends to advocate for the similarity interest in art developed well before her school years, when her mother
and equality of all lives, emphasising connections rather than diferences irst taught her to draw lowers on bright yellow paper.
between humans and other creatures. Childhood memories have let a mark on Nika’s art. As she recounts the
“My objective is to create upliting and thought-provoking work, high- summers spent in her grandparents’ garden and orchards – not to men-
lighting the beauty of the world around us, and how vital plants and other tion trips spent near tropical rivers and jungles, across deserts, beaches
animals are to us and to the planet,” she tells Art Edit. and backyards full of lora and fauna – she recalls how these experiences
Nika is without doubt ambitious – but just two years ago she never fostered her love for all kinds of animals and plants, which became the
imagined herself as an artist. An accident in 2016 brought a turning point primary subjects of her works.

40 / ART EDIT #19


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“In Nika’s collages, rainbow-like horizon lines divide


the spaces of sky and earth.”

2 3

From carnivorous genets and innocent rabbits to diferent species of SHOW ME MORE…
spiders, butterlies and moths, Nika attempts to capture every precise nikapsilva.com
detail of her subjects through ine-point ink drawings. As a strong con- info@nikapsilva.com
trast, these delicate monotone creatures are placed against shallow back- nikapsilva
grounds made up of bold colour blocks. Rainbow-like horizon lines divide
the spaces of sky and earth. Various rare or endemic plants and lowers
– sketched, painted or cut from coloured paper – evenly spread out below 1 Nika P. Silva, The Killer Queen
of the Swamp. Collage of ink and
or rise above this dividing space. cut paper on paper, 20 x 29cm.
Nika has a special obsession with the horizon. In her studio in Abu Dha- 2 Nika P. Silva, XX. Acrylic on
bi, she looks out over the horizon lines of the Arabian Gulf, which as Nika mountboard with collage of ink
says “smack me in the eyes and stun me with wonder every single day”. and spray paint on paper, ink on
tracing paper, felt, silk and cotton
The moments of stillness, staring at the sky and sea, help revitalise Nika’s thread, 77 x 55cm
mind for her artmaking practice. Hidden under her calmness is oten an 3 Nika P. Silva, Love, Truth, And
explosion of creativity. Interstellar Space. Acrylic on
Beyond appreciation and depiction, Nika’s afinity for nature further mountboard with collage of ink,
acrylic, spray paint and book text
penetrates her practice through the use of environmentally friendly ma- on paper, felt, silk and cotton
terials. Nika avoids solvents and turpentine, minimises the use of toxic thread, 77 x 55cm..
materials and rejects products made from animals. Instead, she sources 4 Nika P. Silva
of-cuts and reuses, recycles and repurposes wherever possible. 4 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 41


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QUIET WORLDS
SOLO EXHIBITIONS HAVE BEEN STACKING UP FOR ALISON PERCY, WHOSE CALM PAINTINGS CAPTURE
THE LYRICISM OF THE NATURAL WORLD. ANNIE TONKIN WRITES.

The paintings of Alison Percy are almost lyrical in their composition, with graphic designer, an interior design consultant, an illustrator and a callig-
the reoccurring theme of the landscape permeating her output. Her stun- rapher. However, ater a 24-year hiatus from painting, Alison found herself
ning brushwork and use of colour low together to capture the natural wanting to pick up a paintbrush again. It wasn’t until 2013 that she really
world with an aesthetic that is reminiscent of a Japanese style. found her stride. “In 2013 I started life drawing again,” she says. “This be-
Alison allows herself to become immersed in the Australian landscape, gan a huge shit in my creative journey from design to following my artistic
oten painting en plein air. In the words of the artist, “I ind inspiration in practice.” It was only two years later – in May 2015 – that she had her irst
the land that surrounds me. I’m captivated by our expansive, Australian solo exhibition. They have been stacking up ever since. “The pace hasn’t
high country and its subtle shits in colour.” Although she would once lis- slowed down. I’m loving the journey, with another solo exhibition coming
ten to slow, quiet music to calm her while she worked, Alison now prefers up in November and a joint exhibition in May 2019,” she says.
the sounds of the natural world. “I ind myself content to mostly work in In order to avoid being distracted by her neverending projects, Alison cap-
silence to hear the birds and the world going on around me, becoming tures moments and places to come back to – a catalogue of inspiration for fu-
totally immersed in my painting.” ture use. “I have numerous folders of images earmarked for future exhibitions
Alison has been working in the creative industries all her life: as a for when the time is right. I’m not in a hurry, I’m enjoying the journey.”

42 / ART EDIT #19


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2 3

SHOW ME MORE…
alisonpercycreative.com.au
alison@alisonpercycreative.com.au
0419 151 315
Alison Percy Artist
alisonpercycreative

1 Alison Percy, Along Pretty Valley Track.


Gouache on paper en plein air, 50.8 x 61cm.
2 Alison Percy, Bogong High Plains Sunrise.
Acrylic on linen, 121.9 x 152.4cm.
3 Alison Percy, Along Bogong High Plains Road.
Acrylic on linen, 156 x 207cm.
4 Alison Percy painting in her studio.
5 Alison Percy, Rocky Valley Lake 1. Gouache on
paper en plein air with Tasmanian oak frame,
50.8 x 61cm.
6 Alison Percy, Roper’s Lookout. Acrylic on linen,
109.5 x 152.4cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST
4

5 6

#19 ART EDIT / 43


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THE
ELECTRIC
COAST
SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ARTIST LOUISE VADASZ RELIES
EQUALLY ON EXPERIENCE AND INTUITION FOR THE
CREATION OF HER BRIGHT AND WILD SEASCAPES.
STEPHANIE VIGILANTE WRITES.

Since graduating from the South Australian School of Art in 1985, the
bones of Louise Vadasz’s extensive portfolio have come to rest on the
dramatic landscapes and seascapes of the state’s nature-rich Southern
Vales region. Although her practice draws from a long history of local con-
temporaries – who have been equally as inspired by the area’s wild coast-
lines – Louise’s own bright and jagged works indicate a style that is both
informed and idiosyncratic.
“I grew up there,” Louise tells Art Edit. “It’s the wine and coast region,
1
and I still paint in that area. There’s been a long tradition of artists down
there, like [20th-century Adelaide artist] Horace Trenerry. Artists like that
have inspired me. But I’m a bit more abstract.”
Magenta, deep blues, bright oranges, pastel pinks and neon greens
make up her electrifying compositions. “I use a lot of bright colours that
aren’t true to life colours. It’s more how I feel rather than what I’m seeing,”
she says. The artist’s vivid works are textured compositions of oil on can-
vas, a medium that Louise prefers for its malleable qualities. However, she
is anything but limited in the way she chooses to approach her subject
matter, as exempliied by the large number of charcoal drawings that can
be found scattered throughout her collection.
“I did a lot of drawing at art school and I still love to draw,” Louise says,
noting a recent trip to Italy where she spent much of her time drawing be-
side Lago d’Iseo in Lombardy. Alongside land and seascapes, Louise also
does the odd donkey painting. “People love these,” she says, laughing.
They remain true to her style, with their smacking colours and layers of
paint.
Over the years, Louise has found herself in the spotlight at a number
of awards, including as a inalist in the Fleurieu Landscape Art Prize 2016,
the Adelaide Parklands Art Prize 2018, and the Doug Moran National Por-
trait Prize 2015. This latter was an opportunity to showcase her portrait
of Sydney Mardi Gras creative director Greg Clarke, an old friend of the
artist. Throughout the year, the artist can be found exhibiting her work at
2 a number of arts-based festivals throughout Australia, such as the South

44 / ART EDIT #19


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Australia Living Arts Festival, which she attends every August. “Last year I
also exhibited in the Fran Fest, a women’s painting festival in South Aus-
tralia. That was the last exhibition I was in, called Scapes,” Louise recalls.
Most recently, the artist has been working on a collection of 10 artworks
to feature at the well-loved Star of Greece restaurant in Port Willunga, “I use a lot of bright
where her summer-perfect palette will enliven the breezy seaside space
from 1 December onwards. colours that aren’t true
4
to life colours. It’s more
how I feel rather than
what I’m seeing.”

5 SHOW ME MORE…
louisevadasz.com
louise.vadasz@gmail.com
0407 015 280
lou.vadasz

1 Louise Vadasz, Gulls Rock. Oil on


canvas, 76 x 50cm.
2 Louise Vadasz, Hugo. Charcoal
drawing with oil wash, 60 x 40cm.
3 Louise Vadasz, Coastline. Oil on
canvas, 80 x 150cm.
4 Louise Vadasz, Clifs Port
Willunga. Oil on canvas, 60 x 50cm.
5 Louise Vadasz in her studio.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 45


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Q+A GRAPHIC PATTERNS MEET TRADITIONAL


PAINTING TECHNIQUE IN THE SURREAL
DREAMSCAPES OF CECILIA MOK, WINNER

CECILIA MOK OF THE SAINT CLOCHE LITTLE THINGS


ART PRIZE 2018.

How would you describe your painting style?


My art celebrates the natural beauty of this world at the edges
of the otherworldly. Landscapes are illed with the memory of
place and the emotions of the day. Portraits oten transform into
dreamscapes of the subject. A loral still life can blossom into a
forest. My paintings are representative of what I see combined
with layers of the subconscious, memories, and storytelling.

Did you study art?


I studied design at East Sydney Tech when it was also the
grounds of the National Art School, and I longingly watched the
art students going about their studies. Years later, while working
as a graphic designer, I inally decided to follow my heart into
ine arts. I started attending the Julian Ashton Art School [Syd-
ney] in the evenings ater work and I fell in love with oil paint-
ing. My irst lessons were classical drawing classes taught by
[art teacher] Rod Wong. This whole world of very traditional
practices and an amazing community of likeminded artists just
opened up. I really appreciated a traditional painting education 1
from which I can explore and develop my own storytelling ideas
and concepts.

Where do you create these pieces?


My studio is a room with a big window and lots of ongoing paint-
ings stacked everywhere. I share it with my partner who is also a
painter. His art book collection ills the bookshelves. I really enjoy
it when we are both working on our own projects on our sides of
the studio and I can turn to chat to him about anything. We take
turns choosing the music. Recently, my six-year-old daughter has
had her little desk right next to mine so she can do her art at the
same time! She’s very proliic; she draws at the breakfast table,
in the car, in waiting rooms, absolutely everywhere. My four-year-
2 3
old boy has really taken to art as well. We took them to an exhi-
bition recently and he said, ‘Can we go home and paint now?’.

What kinds of materials do you use in your artmaking process? SHOW ME MORE…
I love the character of oil paints. They seem to have a life of their ceciliamok.net
own in the way they mix and how they sit on the canvas, ready to mail@ceciliamok.net
react to the next brushstroke or work with another layer of paint ceciliamokart
applied the next day. I love the richness of the texture and the
1 Cecilia Mok, Sunday on the River. Oil on
slow drying nature of oils. When the kids were little, I started ex- wood, 20 x 25.5cm.
ploring watercolours as a purely practical alternative. They were 2 Cecilia Mok, The City of Sleep. Oil on
relatively safe to keep around and very simple to clean up quick- wood, 42 x 31cm.
3 Cecilia Mok, Birds and Blooms
ly. I soon discovered the translucent layering and quick drying Chinoiserie {Reverie}. Watercolour and
nature of watercolours introduced a completely diferent way of gouache and digital repeat design.
painting. The considerations you have to make about order, the 4 Cecilia Mok, Blooms of the Golden Tree.
Gouache and ink on Arches watercolour
timing, and the intensity of the paint makes it a really exciting paper, 36 x 28cm.
4
challenge. Now I use watercolours regularly in my artmaking. COURTESY: THE ARTIST

46 / ART EDIT #19


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Q+A
MULTIDISCIPLINARY ARTIST ANN
SNELL MOVES BETWEEN PAINTING AND

ANN SNELL SCULPTURE TO EXPRESS HUMAN EMOTION


FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES.

How would you describe yourself as an artist?


SHOW ME MORE…
I would describe my art as very emotive and expres-
annsnellart.com
sive. I paint like a sculptor, inding form in light and
ann@annsnellgallery.com.au
dark editing. I paint in a very direct, intuitive and
0413 554 624
gestural style, in an efort to convey an emotion or
ann_snell_art
atmosphere based on the subject or theme I am
navigating. I have found that my paintings are much
more successful when I work on a large scale, as I like
to use my whole body when I work – it’s like a dance.

What initially compelled you to start practicing?


I irst fell in love with art as a safe place to hash out
my feelings as a young person. I further developed
an understanding of art as a language that speaks to
all people, just as music does. This was very import-
ant to me as I felt I could never write well enough or
speak fast enough for the thoughts and emotions I
was experiencing.

1 2
How does each work begin?
I sketch out an idea and make sure the theme and
image are both meaningful enough for me to invest 3
in. I then paint directly onto canvas. I move between
painting and sculpture and explore the same themes “I like to use my whole body
with both, as I ind one discipline triggers and in- when I work – it’s like a dance.”
forms the other. From a curatorial perspective, ex-
hibiting both mediums can be very efective for the
viewers’ engagement.

What are you working on at the moment?


Since 2016 I have been developing a body of work
called Herstory: Our shared humanity from a female
perspective. The term “Herstory” was adopted when
I understood that my female perspective is at the
core of my art and I have established intimate rela-
tionships as a woman and a mother. Further to this, I
am conscious of the inequity of the female voice and
visual legacy in our art history.

What is the message you hope to convey with 1 Ann Snell, Evolving. Oil on
your art? canvas, 152 x 122cm.

My practice contributes further to the female 2 Ann Snell, Marigold (detail). Oil
on canvas, 122 x 60cm.
perspective in Australian art. The portraiture is
3 Ann Snell, Lord is a Lady. Oil
concerned with portraying the subject’s human on canvas, 152 x 122cm.
condition or emotional state, and continuing con- 4 Ann Snell, By Her Grace. Oil on
versations shared with my diverse subjects in a form canvas, 152 x 122cm
4
that is inclusive and memorable. COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 47


LOVE IT / Q&A

Q+A
NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCHER TURNED
ARTIST JUDY MORRIS CHALLENGES THE

J U DY M O R R I S NEED FOR A CAMERA WITH HER LIFELIKE


PENCIL DRAWINGS.

How would you describe your work?


I represent the world around me in drawings that
emphasise the contours and textures of animal
and plant forms, interpreting their intricate beauty
at the microscopic and macroscopic scales with
graphite and coloured pencil on a variety of sur-
faces.

When did you irst start practicing?


I have been a full-time artist for almost 10 years,
ater a long career as a neuroscience researcher
where I studied the structure and function of sin-
gle nerve cells using advanced microscopy and
electrical recording techniques. I am mostly a self-
taught artist.

1
Whereabouts are you based?
I have a light-illed studio at my home in the Ad-
elaide Hills, overlooking my garden illed with SHOW ME MORE…
native and introduced plants that provide daily judymorris.net.au
inspiration for my drawings. judymorris@tpg.com.au
Judy Morris Fine Art
Your drawings are so intricate. What are your
stylistic inluences? 1 Judy Morris, Turrets. Pencil on
cotton rag, framed 53 x 72cm.
I am fascinated with overall forms and surfaces in
2 Judy Morris, Weeping she-oak
nature, as well as underlying detailed structures. cone. Graphite and pencil on cotton
Through my drawings, I seek to present images rag, framed 76 x 90cm.
that communicate the immersive experience of 3 Judy Morris, Go gentle. Pencil on
understanding and representing the compelling cotton rag, framed 58 x 80cm.
4 Judy Morris, To market to market.
beauty of the natural world.
Pencil on cotton rag, framed 79 x
77cm.
2 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

4 3

48 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / Q&A

Q+A
THE SATURATED BLUE CANVASES OF
LIZ GRAY START OUT AS IMMERSIVE,

L I Z G R AY LIVED EXPERIENCES IN THE CRYSTALLINE


WATERS OF AUSTRALIA’S WEST COAST.

What kinds of subjects inform your work?


I create large-scale oil paintings of igures in water. From play-
ful inhibition in Australian waves to the quietness of warm
Mediterranean waters, I paint to generate atmosphere and
beauty in living spaces.

When did you irst start to paint?


Since my father introduced me to the tactile and sensory qual-
ity of oil paint at a young age, I have always loved to paint. For
better or worse, I have been quite obsessed with it and com-
pleted an Honours in Fine Art in 1988. I cannot describe the
involuntary reaction I have to my box of oil paints; they are so
forgiving and adaptable to my application and will. My paints
are part of me. They are my phantom limbs. 1

Could you describe your studio space?


Large rugs, worn from love; cushions and an oversized couch
splattered with Prussian blue; shelves bending in protest to
books and photos; an ancient and out of tune piano; warm “My paints are part of me.
light; and a badly behaved dog. My studio is a conglomeration They are my phantom limbs.”
of memories and muses situated peacefully at the bottom of
my garden. I can become lost in time there and only remem-
ber to wander back to the house when I am reminded fervent-
ly that it is dinnertime by said dog.
SHOW ME MORE…
lizgrayart.com
What’s a typical day in the life of Liz Gray?
egray@lizgrayart.com
In the early morning, I face the canvas and consult my mood
0406 675 826
and materials for the day. From my photos – and sometimes
live poses – I start painting slowly and loosely. With some con- 1 Liz Gray, Surrender. Oil on canvas, 91 x 151cm.
vincing by numerous cups of tea and the warm Perth sun, it is 2 Liz Gray, Decision made. Oil on canvas, 183 x 106cm.
3 Liz Gray, Deep conversation. Oil on canvas, 91 x 151cm.
eventually dificult for me to stop. And with a blink of an eye 2 COURTESY: THE ARTIST
it’s dusk and I am covered in (mostly) blue paint.

How does each piece come together?


I love being in and around water: pools, the ocean and rivers.
On warm and clear days, I’m oten in there with my GoPro
camera, snorkel and goggles and take numerous photographs
of my daughters and their friends in the water. Ater this, it’s a
case of manipulating the images to create solid compositions,
and inally a work that conveys a feeling or universal memory
of water.

Where can people ind your work?


Online through my website and a couple of galleries, includ-
ing Nissarana Galleries in Noosa, Applecross Art & Framing in
Perth and the Margaret River Gallery. I also love working with
3
clients to create individual works for particular spaces.

#19 ART EDIT / 49


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

S H O W C A S E
ART EDIT TAKES A CLOSER LOOK AT THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THESE STANDOUT WORKS. KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

G AT H E R I N G L I G H T
BY RACHEL PRINCE

Sufused with concepts of transience and renewal, Rachel Prince’s abstract


expressionist paintings have a grand moodiness to them. Working from her
studio in Brisbane, Rachel’s rich layering technique allows complex emotional
meaning to be gradually revealed to the viewer. In Gathering Light, the shiting
tone captures the sky in a dramatic moment of lux, evocative of the artist’s
deep interest in nature. The canvas, awash with acrylic polymer paint, sits on
the cusp of violence and meditation – an opposition of forces oten witnessed
in the brooding clouds or sunburnt skies above us.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


rachelprinceart.com.au
rachel@rachelprinceart.com.au Rachel Prince, Gathering Light.
Acrylic polymer paint on canvas,
Rachel Prince Art 120 x 120cm.
rachelprinceart COURTESY: THE ARTIST

ENCHANTED
BY CORINA TREITL

There is no one subject that interests artist Corina Treitl, who uses oil paints to capture
the fantastical scenes of her dream life. For her work Enchanted, the artist wanted to
capture the feeling one has when looking at the sky as it slowly vanishes between the
treetops and a glowing light passes through the leaves. Although the content of the
piece is recognisable from the real world, there’s a surreal aspect that Corina has im-
parted through clever use of perspective and a chimerical dappling of colour.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


treitl13@yahoo.com.au
0417 670 917

Corina Treitl, Enchanted. Oil on cotton stretched canvas and satin varnish, 90 x 60cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 51


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

R E D A N D G R E E N PA W S
BY MARIE DALLISTON

Sydney-based artist Marie Dalliston has an unusual start to


her process in that it starts with words rather than images.
Ater determining her subject matter – usually an item of Aus-
tralian lora or fauna – she will jot down words that describe
the colours, shapes and feelings, and expand these out into
a Haiku poem. Red and Green Paws has just such an accom-
panying narrative, inspired by the artist’s daily urban walk
around a reclaimed tramway. The pedestrian walk-through
had been transformed with an array of native plants, the jew-
el-like hues of which are distilled in Marie’s wash of pigment
paints on stretched linen.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


mariedalliston.com.au
mariedalliston@icloud.com
Artist Marie Dalliston
artistmariedalliston

Marie Dalliston, Red and Green Paws. Pure pigment on linen, 60 x 60cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

A LO N E TO G E T H E R , M O N ST E R C A F É Although the work of artist Leigha White


stems from a particular moment in time, each
BY LEIGHA WHITE contains a narrative that moves beyond the
frozen scene. In the case of Alone together,
Monster café, the narrative began with a pho-
tograph Leigha took in Kawaii Monster Café,
a Tokyo establishment famed for its over-the-
top design and eccentric themes. Despite the
happy clash of colours in the café, there is a
sense of loneliness that pervades Leigha’s in-
terpretation of it, subtly rendered in the body
language of her subject. The juxtaposition of
a clean, glossy aesthetic against the deeper
theme of seclusion in a public space speaks
volumes of Leigha’s ability to move beyond
the surface to create works of aesthetic and
emotional complexity.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


leighawhite.com
leigha@leighawhite.com
0407 902 915

Leigha White, Alone together, Monster café. Oil on


linen, 90 x 130cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

52 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

U N TA M E D H E A RT
BY AMBER GITTINS

Known for her abstracted representations of lowers,


foliage and landscapes, South Australian artist Amber
Gittins uses spontaneous brushwork and contrasting
colour palettes to create works that shiver with life
and movement. In her piece Untamed Heart, vibrant
red tones jostle against darker blue edges to create an
atmosphere of intensity, intended to be reminiscent
of our own internal landscape. The artist built up layer
upon layer of acrylics to bring out a third dimension
in the piece; a textural cacophony of emotion and tur-
moil cohering on the canvas.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


ambergittins.com
ambergittinsart@gmail.com
Amber Gittins Art
ambergittinsart

Amber Gittins, Untamed Heart. Acrylic, 100 x 140cm.


COURTESY: THE ARTIST

M O N D AY I S WAS H I N G D AY
BY PENNY LEVETT

Attention to detail is a must when working in miniatures, and this is


something Penny Levett has in spades. The graphic designer turned
artist has won numerous awards for her small-scale works, using mixed
media to create narrative-driven art of delicate colour, shape and tex-
ture. Her work Monday is Washing Day forms part of her Bird Song Se-
ries of eight paintings, which contains a story for each day of the week
accompanied by a rhyming word piece that ties them together. In this
series, the artist takes scenes from real life and imbues them with the
bucolic, slightly surreal atmosphere of a nursery rhyme, amusing the
viewer with visual stories that could just as easily be deciphered as true
or make-believe.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


lovethatart.com.au
lovethatart@gmail.com
0408 610 714
Love That Art by Penny

Penny Levett, Monday is Washing Day. Watercolour, pencil and gouache, 10 x 10cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 53


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

LOT US N O . 9
BY LIHONG Z

Melbourne-based painter Lihong Z works with the sea-


sons, infatuated with the lifecycle of the lotus in particu-
lar. From the seedpod to the blooming baby lotus to the
full-grown adult lower, Lihong’s oil paintings are imbued
with beauty that seems to come from a diferent period –
modern impressions that are recognisable without being
realistic. Works such as Lotus No.9 are built up slowly, layer
by layer, over an original compositional sketch. Although
this means it takes some time to inish each artwork, the
inal result is a saturated ield of colour, illed with real-life
scenes that have been sieved through a kaleidoscopic ar-
tistic imagination.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


alex@whitecompass.com.au
Lihong Z Artist
artist_lihongz

Lihong Z, Lotus No.9. Oil painting on canvas, 102 x 102cm.


COURTESY: THE ARTIST

THE LACHLAN
BY KATHRYN LEWIS

Working from a cattle station in far central west New South Wales,
the colours and forms of the Australian outback make their indeli-
ble mark on the works of Kathryn Lewis. Yet, the way in which the
landscape and its various inhabitants make their way onto the can-
vas oscillates between realism and abstract expressionism. For The
Lachlan – made for a fundraising event in the Lachlan River area –
the artist started with an aerial map of the land, then pushed tactile
materials such as oil, oil sticks and beeswax around the canvas to
create a thick, almost sculptural work. With all its brightly coloured
abstraction, this bird’s eye view of the landscape could easily be mis-
taken for the lush plumes of a peacock.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


kathrynlewis50@gmail.com
Kathryn Lewis Art
kathrynlewisart

Kathryn Lewis, The Lachlan. Oil, oil stick, beeswax on stretched gallery canvas, 121
x 12 x 3cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

54 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

TEMPTRESS
BY TRACEY BERTHOLD

Tracey Berthold is an emerging artist with an already re-


ined and established aesthetic. Taking inspiration from
new media, the dramatic whorls she creates on canvas
would best be described as abstract expressionism with
a penchant for explosive colour. In her work Temptress,
the artist used a variety of media – oil, cold wax and oil
stick – to create a layered piece consisting of under-paint-
ing, foundational structure, thin applications of bold
colour and ine, inishing details. Not content to sit as a
walllower, it is a complex work with a gut-punch of an
impact.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


tracey.berthold@gmail.com
0414 845 293
tracey_abstractart

Tracey Berthold, Temptress. Oil, cold wax, oil stick, matt inish, 200 x
167 x 3.5cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

HAPPY HIBISCUS
BY HEIDI SAVAGE

Since graduating from Queensland College of the Arts in its early


years at the original Seven Hills campus, painting has become
for Heidi Savage a practice of two-fold meaning: the artist uses
it both as a means of distilling and processing information, and
as a means of pure, spontaneous expression. Her work Happy
Hibiscus its neatly into the latter mode, having been inspired
by a lowering hibiscus plant that the artist passes every day on
the street. The oil painting captures the bold colour of the plant
without overcrowding the canvas. The subject becomes partic-
ularly striking for its juxtaposition against negative space, with
touches of gold and silver leaf adding a inal touch of richness
to an otherwise fairly minimal palette.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


heidisavageineartgallery.com
heidi.savage62@gmail.com
heidi_art62

Heidi Savage, Happy Hibiscus. Oil, gold and silver leaf on canvas, 110 x 110cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 55


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

UNTITLED #7
BY M A R Y D O N N E L LY

Mary Donnelly is a master of transposing scenes of the


everyday into insightful studies of shape and compo-
sition. Working from her base in Orange in the central
tablelands of New South Wales, the artist creates tran-
quil still lifes that convey a distinct sense of place, tak-
ing items from the domestic day-to-day and arranging
them thoughtfully within quiet expanses of coloured
space. In Untitled #7, the viewer’s attention is fully fo-
cused on the existence of objects that are generally
overlooked. Working with charcoal and pastels, Mary
has used a combination of mark-making and erasure to
create a series of shadowy lines that open up discourse
between her objects and the loaded space between
them.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


marydonnelly.com.au
marydonnellyart@gmail.com
marydonnelly_artist Mary Donnelly, Untitled #7. Charcoal and pastel on Arches paper, 56 x 75cm. COURTESY: THE ARTIST

OVER THE DUNES The canvases of multi-award-


winning artist James Ainslie
BY JAMES AINSLIE reverberate with intense un-
derstanding of the Australian
landscape. Although the artist’s
preoccupation with sand and
water hark back to a childhood
spent in South Australia, his cur-
rent pieces are informed by his
days spent in close proximity to
the undulating dunes of Fraser
Island and the many beach-
es along the Sunshine Coast
shoreline. Over the Dunes is one
such work, a piece of modern
realism that perfectly replicates
the strong track shadows and
sparse lora of an Australian
beach through layers of delicate-
ly wrought impasto and glazing.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


ainslieart.com
James Ainslie, Over the Dunes. Acrylic on linen, 61 x 122cm. ainsliestudio@aapt.net.au
COURTESY: THE ARTIST Ainslie Art

56 / ART EDIT #19


LOVE IT / SHOWCASE

OCEAN POOL
BY CANDYSS CROSBY

Underpinning the large-scale compositions of


artist Candyss Crosby is a desire to replicate
the expansiveness of the Australian outback
and seaside. Part of her Lost Horizons series,
the work Ocean Pool speciically captures the
iridescent pigments and stacked textures of
the oldest ocean pool in New South Wales, the
Bogey Hole in Newcastle. Using the thick, but-
tery medium of oil paint – manipulated with
spatulas and palette knives – the artist has
built her canvas into an undulating landscape
of banded colour.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


Gallery 3/2 Roseberry St, Balgowlah NSW
candysscrosby.com
Candyss Crosby Contemporary Art
candysscrosby
candysscrosby Candyss Crosby, Ocean Pool. Oil on canvas, 122 x 153cm. COURTESY: THE ARTIST

KEWZOO
zazzle.com/kewzoo
facebook: kewzoo
THE ESSENCE
OF PLACE
at EARLYWORK
330 South Terrace, South Fremantle

27 October – 18 November 2018


artitja ine art
0418 900 954
info@artitja.com.au
www.artitja.com.au

Selina Teece Pwerl, Gum Blossoms.


90 x 150cm.

Lost Soles
Claire davenhall
An exhibition of work by international artist Claire Davenhall,
capturing the complex multicultural heritage of the waves of
migration to Australia through sculpture.

24 NOV - 21 Dec 2018


OPEN WED TO FRI 10AM - 5PM
OPENING NIGHT SAT 24 NOV 6.30PM - 8PM

Midland junction
ARTS CeNTRe

276 GREAT EASTERN HWY


CORNER OF CALE ST
MIDLAND WA

WWW.MUNDARINGARTSCENTRE.COM.AU

PRESENTED BY SUPPORTED BY
B U Y I T

62
DESTINATION ART
We take a look The Interiors Assembly,
a new online art destination.

#19 ART EDIT / 59


BUYERS GUIDE / BUY IT

BUYING ART ONLINE


WRITER BRIONY DOWNES SHARES HANDY TIPS FOR COLLECTORS LOOKING
TO DIP INTO THE LIMITLESS WORLD OF ONLINE ART BUYING.

UNLIKE THE CONTAINED SPACE of a bricks and mortar store, buying


art online appears limitless, with a vast array of pieces to choose from.
But collectors are oten cautious about online purchasing, afraid that
the artwork will appear diferently when it arrives than it did on screen.
Whether buying directly from the artist or from an online gallery, here
are a few key points to click your way to the perfect piece.

1 Mary Donnelly, Untitled Landscape. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 81 x 103cm. $3,190 via artedit.com.au

60 / ART EDIT #19


BUYERS GUIDE / BUY IT

1
FILTERS NEEDED
Have a strong idea of what you are looking for and
apply search ilters to narrow your options. To start,
think colour palette, size, medium and budget. If you go
in knowing what you want and what kinds of textures will
sit together, you’ll ind no shortage of options to decorate
your space.

2
KEEPING IT REAL
As with any online purchase, it is crucial to know the
origins of an artwork and to trust the source you’re
buying it from. Ideally, the online store will work directly with
the artists to ensure each work is authentic. For instance, the
pieces that populate Art Edit’s own online store are uploaded
by the artists themselves, of all whom have been selected by
our in-house editorial team for quality. Once you start look-
ing to buy a work, quick and efective communication via
email and phone is also essential so that you can arrange the
details of the postage and handling and ensure your new art-
work arrives safely to its destination.
2

3
ONLINE ECONOMY
Buying art online can be economical in more ways
than one. Having no street frontage means an on- “If you go in knowing what you
line store spends signiicantly less on rent, a saving oten
relected in the price of artworks listed online. With less want, you’ll find no shortage of
storage space required, online galleries will oten request options to decorate your space.”
an artist pack and send their work directly to the custom-
er, reducing handling and postage costs considerably.
Others, such as Art Edit’s own online store, will be able to
provide shipping entirely free of charge.

4
SIZE DOES MATTER
It sounds like a no-brainer but when shopping for
art online be sure to check the size of the work
you are buying and conirm it will it in its destined loca-
tion. As an art lover, it’s easy to be bowled over by an art-
work only to realise it’s the wrong size on delivery. Some
websites will show the artwork in an interior setting with
furniture for comparison, allowing buyers to get an ac-
curate idea of three-dimensional size and shape. If you
are wary of buying sight unseen, ask the store or artist to
send you a selection of high-resolution images over email.
These will allow you to zoom in to see the details of texture
and colour up close.
3

5
PUT IT TO THE TEST
2 Joanne Dufy, Dunsborough Morning. Oil on cotton canvas, 110 x 110cm. $4,200 via
To see for yourself how easy it is to buy art online, artedit.com.au
head over to the newly launched Art Edit website, 3 Vanessa Whittington, Kakadu, The Dry. Watercolour on 300gsm Arches watercolour
where you’ll ind a comprehensive selection of works from paper custom-framed in Tasmanian oak, 80 x 101cm. $1,200 via artedit.com.au
artists who have been hand-picked by our editorial team. COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 61


BUY IT / DESTINATION ART

D E S T I N A T I O N A R T

T H E I N T E R I O R S A S S E M B LY
NEWLY LAUNCHED ONLINE GALLERY, THE INTERIORS ASSEMBLY, MAKES FINDING ART FOR YOUR HOME MORE ACCESSIBLE THAN EVER.
KIRSTY SIER TALKS TO FOUNDER KELLY FERRARA ABOUT THE CHANGING RULES OF THE GAME.

1 Antoinette Ferwera, Forest Green Hills. Acrylic and mixed media on cotton canvas framed
in Oak, 53 x 53cm. Styling by Kelly Ferraro for The Interiors Assembly. Image: Justin Cooper
2 Joan Blond, Forest Surrounds. Acrylic on linen framed in black-stained oak, 123 x 201cm.
Styling by Kelly Ferraro for The Interiors Assembly. Image: Justin Cooper
3 Jud Keresztesi, Hot For You In The Lagoon. Acrylic on linen, 122 x 153cm. Styling by Kelly
Ferraro for The Interiors Assembly. Image: Justin Cooper
1 COURTESY: THEGALLERY

The Interiors Assembly is not your usual and oten the story behind its design process.
gallery. How would you describe it? I work very closely with our team of Australian
It’s an art destination, perfect for those start- artists to bring you a lovingly curated collection
ing their art collection or adding to an existing of artworks across many mediums to ensure
one. As we are an online gallery, works can there is a little something for everyone, ranging
be viewed there. We also ofer private studio between $350 and $5,000.
appointments. The beauty of working from a
home studio is that our visitors can view art- What types of artists and artworks do you
works in-situ, which is oten very helpful. represent?
We exhibit and represent Australian artists
What was behind the decision to launch across many diferent styles and mediums, from
the site? emerging to established creatives. We currently
I have been in the creative arena for a while now, have a collective of over 15 artists, which is grow-
irstly running an interiors blog, then assisting ing rapidly. Some of our artists include Antoi-
private clients by curating their art collections nette Ferwerda, Cathy Quinn, Clair Bremner,
and ofering interior styling solutions. Opening Michele Luminato, Joan Blond, Francesca
a gallery was a natural progression. My goal al- 3 Gnagnarella, Sabi Klein, Tracey Mock, Chris
ways is to connect our customers with incred- Minter, Jenny Fusca and Jud Keresztesi.
ible Australian creatives and unique products,
ofering them something diferent; something Do you have any upcoming exhibition or
they will love forever. FIND OUT MORE... event highlights?
theinteriorsassembly.com.au We have a new shipment of art landing in time
Aside from the online aspect, how would you kelly@theinteriorsassembly.com.au for Christmas from a lot of our artists. We also
describe your diference to other galleries? 0418 100 574 have a curated range of art under $2,000 and an
Importantly, you deal with the owner and cu- The Interiors Assembly exclusive selection of small works by Antoinette
rator. I know every product we have on ofer theinteriorsassembly Ferwerda priced under $1,000.

62 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / DESTINATION ART

1 Kerry Bruce and Gitte Backhaussen,


co-founders and directors of Fern Street
Gallery.
2 Gitte Backhaussen, Where My Mind
Wanders 1. Polymer on canvas, 64 x
64cm.
3 Kerry Bruce, Passion for Florals.
Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 90cm.

COURTESY: THE ARTISTS

FIND OUT MORE...


2/131 Fern St, Gerringong NSW
fernstreetgallery.com.au
art@fernstreetgallery.com.au
0418 463 207
Fern Street Gallery
1 fernstreetgallery

D E S T I N A T I O N A R T

FERN STREET GALLERY


KIRSTY SIER TALKS TO KERRY BRUCE AND GITTE BACKHAUSSEN, THE CREATIVE POWERHOUSES BEHIND
THE ARTIST-RUN FERN STREET GALLERY.

How long has the gallery been running?


Fern Street Gallery opened in mid-October this
year. It’s a brand new, artist-run, ine art gallery
located on the south coast of New South Wales
in the beautiful coastal town of Gerringong.

What made you decide to open a gallery?


We had a joint vision to create a professional
gallery for artists to self-represent. We further-
more wanted to provide art collectors with a
ine art experience where they can have direct
contact with the artists.

How would you say your gallery is unique? 2 3


We are unique in that the gallery is run by the
exhibiting artists while still being a ine art larly have exhibitions by visiting artists, and both always beautifully and respectfully presented.
gallery. We are breaking down the barriers be- established and early career artists. This always
tween the creators and the collectors, which makes it an exciting trip to the gallery! Do you have any exhibition highlights
opens up a deeper connection to the art itself. coming up?
What can visitors expect to ind when they We’ve opened the gallery with a fantastic
What types of artists have you selected to walk through the gallery doors? group exhibition featuring all new works by
participate in Fern Street? It’s a gallery that allows art to breathe; where art- our resident artists. Going forward, we’ll con-
All resident artists are established practicing ists are approachable and visitors can enjoy a ine tinue to have new exhibitions every one to two
artists, most with many years of experience in art experience with a personal touch. There is a weeks, so there will always be new pieces to
their ield and a vast number of exhibitions, art great representation of art from a range of genres engage with. All of the exhibition details can be
prizes and sales already behind them. We regu- within the contemporary art scene, and they are found on our website (where we also sell art)!

#19 ART EDIT / 63


m a r k _ t i p p e t t
0423 130 959 @mark_tippett
Sculpted Faces Exhibition early 2 01 9

Tania Daymond
www.missdaymonddesigns.com

• Original hand-drawn ink drawings


• Limited edition Giclee prints
• Framed wall art
• Commissions welcome

missdaymonddesigns@gmail.com
G A L L E R Y
O R I G I N A L A RT W O R K S TO M A K E YO U R O W N .

#19 ART EDIT / 65


GALLERY

DAVID K. WIGGS

Morning light–Big swell and guys on the point–Dee Why–Plein air. Oil on canvas, 92 x 150cm. $6,000

dwiggsart.com dwiggs@optusnet.com.au 0452 451 642 wiggs6114

66 / ART EDIT #19


GALLERY

S A L LY W E S T

Natives in Pink. Oil on canvas, 75 x 75cm. $2,800

sallywestart.com sally@sallywestart.com 0407 262 715 Sally West Art sallywestart

#19 ART EDIT / 67


GALLERY

SHANE ROBERTSON

Wonder Wheel. Acrylic and enamel on board, 60 x 47cm. $750

shanerobertson.net shane@shanerobertson.net shanerobertsonart

68 / ART EDIT #19


GALLERY

MICHELLE GILKS

The Real Macaw. Acrylic on stretched canvas, 61 x 61cm. $580

michellegilks.com art@michellegilks.com 0431 989 902 Michelle Gilks Art michellegilksart

#19 ART EDIT / 69


GALLERY

RHETT BREWER

Towards Wedding Cake Island, 2017. Oil on canvas, 110 x 153cm. $5,000

rhettbrewer.com.au 0412 307 558

70 / ART EDIT #19


GALLERY

STELLA DANALIS

Sassy Red Architectonix, 2018. Acrylic on linen, 90 x 90cm. $1,650

stelladanalis.com stella@stelladanalis.com

#19 ART EDIT / 71


GALLERY

BRONWYN DOHERTY

Sot Fields with Crows. Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 91cm. $860

bronwyndohertyart.com bronwyndohertyart@outlook.com 0420 926 646 Bronwyn Doherty Art bronwyndohertyart

72 / ART EDIT #19


Luke David Designs www.lukedaviddesigns.com
@luke_david_designs
The New Ink Series Info@lukedaviddesigns.com

Image courtesy: Starry Kong


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

BEST of FLORA
A N D FAU N A
A RT E D I T P R E S E N TS A CU R AT E D S E L E CT I O N O F A RT I STS W H O S E
WO R K I S I N S P I R E D BY N AT U R E . K I RSTY S I E R W R I T E S .

74 / ART EDIT #19


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2 3

4 5

ANGELA
R O B E R TS O N - B U C H A N O N
The birds depicted in the work of Angela Robertson-Buchanon are al-
most hyper-real, sitting conidently at the forefront of their settings. The
UK-educated, Sydney-based photographer uses a macro lens and a shal-
low depth of ield – requiring meticulous focus and extreme proximity to
her subjects – to give her photographic portraits and intricate montages
1 Angela Robertson-Buchanon, Drought.
a three-dimensional feel. Underneath the beauty and technical prowess Photographic ine art print, 85 x 65cm. $490
of these images lies a deeper concern for wildlife conservation. When not 2 Angela Robertson-Buchanon, Yellow
practicing photography, Angela works as a carer for rescued birds, and a Robin. Photographic ine art print, 40 x
percentage of her art sales is donated to wildlife organisations. 60cm. $240
3 Angela Robertson-Buchanon, Brown
Thornbill. Photographic ine art print, 40 x
60cm. $250
MAKE THIS YOURS… 4 Angela Robertson-Buchanon, Olive-
angelarobertsonbuchanon.com backed Oriole. Photographic ine art print,
angela@angelarobertsonbuchanon.com 40 x 60cm. $240

1300 402 094 5 Angela Robertson-Buchanon, Scarlet


Honeyeater. Photographic ine art print, 40
The Bird Photog x 60cm. $240
thebirdphotog COURTESY: THE ARTIST

#19 ART EDIT / 75


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

SANDRA TEMPLE

“There is a sense that you’ve come closer to the subject than


real life would permit.”

76 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

1 Sandra Temple, King of


the Castle. Mixed media, 56 x
107cm. Sold.
2 Sandra Temple, Too Close!.
Acrylic, 28 x 35cm. $650
3 Sandra Temple, The Hop
Bush. Mixed media, 50 x
60cm. $2,100
2 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

The detail in the works of painter and illus-


trator Sandra Temple is so ine that at irst
glance you’d take her for a photographer. The
Brisbane-based artist – who both teaches
and practices in a wide variety of mediums
– works in intricate stages, irst rendering her
subjects in small, tonal sketches before trans-
ferring the work onto board or canvas and
inishing them with a ine detail that adds to
the spectacular efect of realism. Whether the
inal result is a posing snake or a resting lion,
there is an element of voyeurism to the work;
a privileged sense that you’ve come closer to
the subject than real life would permit.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


sandratemple.com
sandra@sandratemple.com
0407 126 908
3
Sandra Temple Fine Art

#19 ART EDIT / 77


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

GARTH HENDERSON

1 2

The architectural background of Garth Henderson – who moved to Mel-


bourne to study three-dimensional modelling before embarking on his
subsequent vocations as a horticulturalist and artist – is clear upon view-
ing his meticulous, geometric renditions of Australian lora. In his works,
beauty is not just found in colour and form; it is also found in the complex
mathematical constructs and organic architecture of our native plants.
At the beginning of each work, Garth will take a physical specimen of the
plant he’s working on and literally deconstruct it, a process that allows
1 Garth Henderson, Banksia Coccinea
him to start building its individual components using a virtual sculpting
01. Giclée print on Hahnemüle rag paper,
program. These models are then subjected to the same lighting physics 84 x 59.5cm. $950
that exist within a photographic studio. The inal images are presented as 2 Garth Henderson, Banksia Prionotes 01.
limited edition archival prints on museum paper. Giclée print on Hahnemüle rag paper, 84
x 59.5cm. $950
3 Garth Henderson, Banksia Stenocarpus
01. Giclée print on Hahnemüle rag paper,
MAKE THIS YOURS… 84 x 59.5cm. $950
garthhenderson.com COURTESY: THE ARTIST

78 / ART EDIT #19


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#19 ART EDIT / 79


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

SARAH WAGHORN

1 3

Sydney-based artist Sarah Waghorn is a self-proclaimed “colour enthusi-


ast” – a title that is well-represented in her subtly gradated botanical works
inspired by neighbourhood walks. Sarah’s background as an art director “Sarah uses tonal shits to
in London – as well as her cited inluences: David Hockney, Margaret Ol-
ley, Vincent Van Gogh and Henri Matisse – come through in the intricacy
perfectly capture light play
of the work, and the detness with which she uses tonal shits to perfectly
capture light play on her subject. The artist will usually start with a small,
on her subject.”
gouache sketch to work out the colour and composition of the piece be-
fore painting alla prima, layering on oil paints in clear brushstrokes that
eventually culminate in textured landscapes of bright, dappled colour.

1 Sarah Waghorn, ANGOPHORA FLORIBUNDA, 2018. Oil on wood panel, 30 x 30cm.


MAKE THIS YOURS… Sold.
sarahwaghornart.com 2 Sarah Waghorn, BANKSIA, 2018. Oil on wood panel, 40 x 40cm. $770
swaghorn.art@gmail.com 3 Sarah Waghorn, PINK OBSESSION, 2018. Oil on wood panel, 61 x 61cm. Sold.
0434 364 252 4 Sarah Waghorn, GUM NUTS, 2018. Oil on wood panel, 50.9 x 40.7cm. Sold.
sarahwaghornart COURTESY: THE ARTIST

80 / ART EDIT #19


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#19 ART EDIT / 81


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

NICOLE GRIMM-HEWITT

82 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

1 Nicole Grimm-Hewitt, Black


Cockatoo. Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40cm.
Sold.
2 Nicole Grimm-Hewitt, Cheeky Emu.
Acrylic on linen, 61 x 61cm. Sold.
3 Nicole Grimm-Hewitt, Sea Eagle.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40cm. $950
2 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

The unwavering glance of a bird isn’t always cause for calm, but in the
painted resemblances of New South Wales artist Nicole Grimm-Hewitt,
it becomes the subject of quiet contemplation. Particularly enthralled by
their stare, Nicole will start by painting the eyes, usually against a plain
background designed to draw attention to her intended focal point. The
artist will then go about the time-consuming task of painting each feather
in single strokes using a ine brush, until each of her subjects – whether a
magpie, a sea eagle or a cockatoo – emerges as a detailed and engaging
doppelgänger of its original.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


grimmhewitt.com.au
art@grimmhewitt.com.au
0425 299 257
Grimm-Hewitt Art Gallery
3
grimmhewitt_artist

#19 ART EDIT / 83


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

PAMELA PAULINE

84 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

Although the intricate photographs of Pamela Pauline are grounded in Austra- 1 Pamela Pauline, I’ll Fly Away. Digital pigment print on cotton rag,
edition of 10, 101 x 101cm. Framed $2,300
liana, there is a sense of light and freedom that lends the images universal res-
2 Pamela Pauline, Kookaburra Sits. Print on metal, 150 x 100cm.
onance. The artist grew up camping and cross-country skiing in the high plains
$2,500
of Wyoming, USA, and her art has drawn upon these outdoors inluences since
3 Pamela Pauline, Protea. Digital pigment print on cotton rag, 91 x
the inception of her practice. There is a certain minimalism within the layout 91cm. Framed $1,300
of the work, but the subjects themselves are painted in high detail by Pamela’s COURTESY: THE ARTIST

lens – detail that is further honed during her meticulous editing process. This
post-shoot skill is particularly evident in images such as I’ll Fly Away, wherein el-
ements from 80 photographs are combined into a inal, sprawling composition.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


pamelapauline.com
pamelapauline5@gmail.com
03 1223 4675
Pamela Pauline Photography
3
pamelapaulinephotography

#19 ART EDIT / 85


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

1 1

KRISTY-ANN DUFFY
The range of references in the work of Brisbane-based paint-
er Kristy-Ann Dufy spread near and far, past and present.
Australian birds and the lora that nourish them form the
primary content matter of her dynamic pieces, which hum
with the dappled application of a diverse colour palette. But
while it is our native environment that is most conspicuous
on the canvas, the artist looks further abroad – to Vincent
Van Gogh, Henri Matisse and Edgar Degas – for technical
inspiration. Learning from their colour, line-work and mas-
tery of expression, she then composes her own detailed sto-
ries based on observances closer to home.

MAKE THIS YOURS…


kadufy.com
art@kadufy.com
0407 785 516
KADufy.art

1 Kristy-Ann Dufy, Three Musketeers (Musk Lorikeets). Acrylic on deep-


edge canvas, triptych panels 35.56 x 35.56cm. $1,275
2 Kristy-Ann Dufy, Propagation of Wild Rose (Galah, Rose Cockatoo).
Acrylic on deep-edge canvas, 76.2 x 76.2cm. $1,685
1
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

86 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

“Kristy-Ann’s textured pieces hum


with the dappled application of a
diverse colour palette.”

#19 ART EDIT / 87


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

LIZ H. LOVELL

“The
complexity and
beauty of the
natural world
are rendered in
high detail.”

MAKE THIS YOURS…


lizlovellartworks.com
agaricartworks@gmail.com
liz_artworks

1 Liz H. Lovell, Cockatoos with


Banksia. Watercolour and gouache,
59.4 x 42cm. $650
2 Liz H. Lovell, Lorikeets with
Camellias. Watercolour and gouache,
42 x 29.7cm. $550
1 COURTESY: THE ARTIST

When you irst look at work by Sydney-based artist Liz H. Lovell, it might be The complexity and beauty of the natural world are rendered in high detail
the big, bold strokes of a native bird that you see – the gentle pinks of a rose in Liz’s works, who uses mixed media – such as oils, watercolours and inks
galah, or the jaunty mane of a sulphur-crested cockatoo. But the deeper – to achieve her desired efect. The result is oten a blend of impressionism
you look, the more detail emerges – the delicate speck of a bee extracting and realism; an evocation of classical techniques that draws attention to
honey from a blossom, or the dainty dew drops that cling to a camellia leaf. the interconnectedness of the natural world as we experience it today.

88 / ART EDIT #19


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#19 ART EDIT / 89


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

BETTY COLLIER

Looking at the diversity of her practice, it would be easy to mistake the


work of Betty Collier as the output of two separate artists. Inluences of
a childhood spent on the farm permeate her stylised, lifelike drawings
and paintings of lora and fauna. While this subject matter is also the
“Looking at the diversity
focus of Betty’s sculpture work, her bronzes are usually more abstract- of her practice, it would be
ed and free-lowing – for example, frogs that appear as characters from
a picture book. Considering the sense of control that is apparent in the
easy to mistake the work of
inal pieces, it may come as a surprise that Betty only started to sculpt
when she was nearly 40, ater completing a sculpture major. When she
Betty Collier as the output of
irst trained as an art teacher for secondary school, women weren’t
allowed to work with metal, wood or stone. Betty’s current practice
two separate artists.”
proves that she has since more than made up for lost time.

90 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / BEST OF FLORA AND FAUNA

1 Betty Collier, Egore & Gollam. Bronze on Perspex, 18 x 38 x 36cm. $1,500


2 Betty Collier, Clown Fish. Watercolour on watercolour paper, 22 x 32cm. $400 MAKE THIS YOURS…
3 Betty Collier, Sea Dragon. Watercolour on watercolour paper, 24 x 32cm. $450 bettycollier.com
4 Betty Collier, Tortoise Galapagos. Ink on cotton rag, 60 x 65cm. $800 thegecollier@hotmail.com
COURTESY: THE ARTIST

3 4

#19 ART EDIT / 91


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

In a world where almost anything can be manufactured, copied and

GIVING bought online, the giving of art is an act that rejoices in the authentic, the
creative and the handmade. Christmas – along with weddings, birthdays
and even Valentine’s Day – has become a time when people search for

PAUSE something that resonates with the recipient in a way that an of-the-shelf
present cannot.
One of the beneits of art as a git is the sheer number of mediums there
are to explore. Between textile art, video art, photography, prints, paint-
ing, and sculpture for indoors and out, the options are broad, with limit-
IN THE LEAD-UP TO THE HOLIDAY SEASON, HELEN McKENZIE less potential to tailor to the tastes and home of the receiver. The hunt
MUSES ON WHAT MAKES ART THE MOST MEANINGFUL GIFT ONE itself is also great fun for the shopper, as it gives you the opportunity to
CAN GIVE. SHE TALKS TO ARTHOUSE’S ALI YELDHAM ABOUT see the latest works and keep your eye on possible purchases for yourself.
FINDING THE PERFECT PIECE. Selecting a work of art for someone is thoughtful in the truest sense.
Instead of walking into the irst store and grabbing the irst item you come
across, buying an artwork for someone requires a deep consideration of

92 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

1 Raymond Walters
Japanangka, Emu
Feathers. Acrylic on
linen, 120 x 180cm.
Courtesy: Ngarru
Gallery
2 David Wiggs, Kilcare
rain – Plein air. Oil on
canvas, 100 x 150cm.
3 Jo Lankester, Cortex
– Botanic Gardens,
Melbourne, 2017. Plate
lithograph, 76 x 55cm.
2 COURTESY: THE ARTISTS

“Selecting
a work of art
for someone
is thoughtful
in the truest
sense.”

the personality and tastes of the recipient. It is one of the most personal
gits that can be given.
By way of advice, Ali Yeldham from Arthouse Gallery in Sydney says:
“Buying art is really personal; you need to know that person well. Look at
the things the receiver has in their home to work out what will resonate.”
Ali ofers a few key questions to answer before purchasing work for an-
other person. “Do they like bolder, more expressive work such as strong 3

gutsy abstraction? Or do they prefer very ine, highly detailed work – per-
haps a delicate igurative style? a moving present. Ali agrees: “It is very meaningful, and when it hangs
“Colour plays a big role,” she continues. “Are they drawn to monochro- on their wall they think about all the people who have contributed to
matic work, or dynamic, saturated palettes? They might be lovers of works that work.” With the recent boon of online galleries, the buying of art has
that have a textural quality or strong conceptual base. Other elements like never been easier. However, in the midst of seemingly endless choice, it
humour also come in to play, since satire and social commentary can be can help to have some professional curation and guidance to steer you
found within many artists’ practices.” in the right direction. For artworks handpicked by the Art Edit team, see
Take your time, do your homework and your git of art will make for our Christmas git guide on the next page, and visit www.artedit.com.au.

#19 ART EDIT / 93


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H O L I D AY
GIFT GUIDE
T H E A RT E D I T T E A M P R E S E N TS A H A N D - P I C K E D S E L E CT I O N
OF AFFORDABLE ARTWORKS FOR THE GIVING SEASON.

PATRICIA WALSH HEIDI SAVAGE


Deep Blue. Oil on wood, diptych each panel 25 x 20cm. $450 Shallow Tempest II Cape Moreton. Oil on canvas, 55 x 55cm. $950
patriciawalshstudio.com.au heidisavageineartgallery.com

94 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

MICHELE RUDDER
THE SUN WAVING GOOD BYE TO THE DAY. Acrylic, 80 x 65cm. $600
micheleartist.com

NICOLE GRIMM-HEWITT
Kookaburra. Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40cm. $800. COURTESY: CIE-ELLE DIGITAL IMAGING
grimmhewitt.com.au

JOEL GAILER
Pallet painting series 1. Oil and acrylic on card,
30 x 20cm. $300
joelgailer.com.au

S A L LY W E ST
1-2 Ft, Moderate Onshore – Beach Palmy 1 (13.2.18) – Plein Air. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm. $990
sallywestart.com

#19 ART EDIT / 95


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SHANE ROBERTSON
Shuttlecock. Acrylic and enamel on board, 60 x 47cm. $750
shanerobertson.net

TANIA WURSIG
Oiseau du Paradis. Limited edition ine art pigment print on canvas, 50 x 50cm. $450
taniawursig.com

S Y LV I A
DITCHBURN
Anthuriums. Acrylic on canvas,
15 x 15cm. $250
sylviaditchburnineartgallery.com

CANDYSS CROSBY
Queensclif Sandbanks. Oil on canvas, 73 x 91cm. $975
candysscrosby.com

96 / ART EDIT #19


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DAVID BROMLEY
Butterlies. 77 x 126cm. Signed limited edition print, $1,000. COURTESY: MARTINEZ ART DEALER
martinezartdealer.com

RACHAEL
LIONEL
Dust Storm. Acrylic on canvas,
100 x 50cm. $980
artitja.com.au

JENNIFER
SANDRA HARRIS
Songs of Glass – Aria, Sonata and Cantata.
TEMPLE Acrylic on canvas, 33 x 33cm.
Full Steam Ahead. Pastel, 48 x 24cm. Framed $980 Framed $330 each or $900 for set of 3.
sandratemple.com artofjenniferharris.com.au

#19 ART EDIT / 97


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ANGELA ROBERTSON-
BUCHANON
Swit Parrot (A critically endangered bird).
Photographic ine art print, 40 x 60cm. $240
angelarobertsonbuchanon.com

DAVID K. WIGGS
Lovers at Palmy–Plein Air. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm. $900
dwiggsart.com

AMBER GITTINS
Outback Delight. Acrylic,
76 x 102cm. $760
ambergittins.com

MARK
TIPPETT
Anthony Bourdain. Oil on canvas,
102 x 76cm. $600
0423 130 959

98 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

YONDEE
SHANE HANSE
Saltwater Dreaming. Acrylic on canvas, 120 x
30cm. $950 COURTESY: NGARRU GALLERY
ngarrugallery.com.au

TANIA CHANTER
Dancing by the Beach. Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 91cm. $640
taniachanter.com

BRONWYN
CYBELE COX DOHERTY
Janis Head Stack. Hand-built ceramic with Dragon Lady. Glazed ceramic sculpture,
underglaze, 80 x 30 x 30cm. $1,000 40 x 19 x 16cm. $650
cybelecox.com.au bronwyndohertyart.com

#19 ART EDIT / 99


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KATHRYN LEWIS
SCOUT The Australian Kelpie. Pastel on Velour paper, 30 x 40cm. $150
kathrynlewis50@gmail.com

SARAH WAGHORN
RAINY DAY CAMELLIA. Oil on wood panel, 50.9 x 40.7cm. $825
sarahwaghornart.com

ANTOINETTE
FERWERDA
Orion. Acrylic and mixed media on cotton canvas, 43 x 33cm.
Framed $990 LIHONG Z
interiorsassembly.com.au Lotus NO.3. Oil painting on canvas, 61 x 50.8cm. $650
alex@whitecompass.com.au

100 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

TRACEY BERTHOLD
The Blue Depths. Acrylic with semi-gloss, 124 x 197cm. $990 tracey.berthold@gmail.com

CHELSEA LEHMANN ADRIAN ROBERTSON


Bathys, 2017. Oil on primed paper, 30 x 29cm. $1,000 Yalpirakinu. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 30cm. $720
chelseajlehmann.com artitja.com.au

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RHETT BREWER
Into the Gold, 2018. Oil on canvas, 35 x 50cm. $900
rhettbrewer.com.au

MARIE DALLISTON
Gum Nuts on a Blue Sky Day. Pure pigment on linen, 60 x 60cm. $450
mariedalliston.com.au

RACHEL ROVAY
Colour the Blue Flower Red, 2018. Acrylic paint on cut-out 640gsm
Fabriano paper on mount board, 59.5 x 42cm. $880
rovay.com

ANN SNELL
Diana, 2017. Mixed media on Arches paper, 76 x 56cm. Framed $960
annsnellart.com

102 / ART EDIT #19


BUY IT / PICTURE PURCHASE

LORNA
BALLANTYNE EPPS
Bloom True. Acrylic and oil pastel limited edition ine art print,
dimensions variable. From $200
leveeartgallery.com.au/lorna-ballantyne-epps

DAVID GILES
Tree of Life. Acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50cm. $900
davidgilesartgallery.com

JANINE DELLO
Makes my lips pop. Oil on linen, 61 x 61cm. $850
janinedello.com

GARTH HENDERSON
Banksia Sketch 06. Giclée print on Hahnemüle rag paper, 40 x 40cm. $350
garthhenderson.com

#19 ART EDIT / 103


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LEYLA BULMER
Marianne #3. Ink on art paper with oak frame,
96 x 75cm. $950
theinteriorsassembly.com.au

WENDY ARNOLD
Chit chat. Acrylic and gold leaf on linen, 52.5 x 52.5cm. Framed $540
0419 252 339

STELLA DANALIS
Origami #1, 2018. Acrylic on linen, 40 x 40cm. $600
stelladanalis.com

RACHEL PRINCE
Ebb and Flow. Acrylic polymer paint on canvas.
Framed in oak shadow frame, 61 x 61cm. $675
rachelprinceart.com.au

104 / ART EDIT #19


‘Womb of the
Wood Nymph’
by Lisa G Hunter

Bushland scenes, textures


and wild flowers
LisaGHunter.com.au
0414 895 020

Art by Jude Lane


www.judelane.com
H A N G I T

107
PROJECT SHEET
We take a look at Amber Road’s
highly personal transformation
of this Bondi apartment.

106 / ART EDIT #19


HANG IT / PROJECT SHEET HANG IT / PROJECT SHEET

DRESSED UP RAWNESS

IN THIS BONDI APARTMENT, DESIGN FIRM AMBER ROAD


MIXES A NOSTALGIC FOLK-ART COLLECTION WITH A
PENCHANT FOR SOPHISTICATION.
REBECCA GROSS WRITES.

#19 ART EDIT / 107


HANG IT / PROJECT SHEET

WHEN SYDNEY DESIGN practice Amber Road transformed this two-bed-


room apartment on Bondi Beach, their intention was to jump from lack-
lustre to luminous by way of a playful, nostalgic art collection. Their client,
recently divorced, wanted a fresh start. Demolishing much of the interior
provided the blank canvas necessary to create a casual, sophisticated
home of new beginnings.
The apartment – formerly a suite in the Swiss Grand Hotel – has pan-
oramic views of the Paciic Ocean, but the new resident wanted to break
away from the predictable coastal palette. Instead, he wanted a home
that showcased his collection of tribal pieces, as well as works by up-and-
coming contemporary artists, of which he is an avid supporter.
“A person’s selection of artworks is very revealing of their character,
so it is always one of our greatest inspirations when we are developing a
concept,” says Yasmine Ghoniem, co-director of Amber Road alongside
landscape architect Katy Svalbe. The client’s collection of tribal artefacts
– a reminder of his early life in Papua New Guinea – inspired the choice
of Michelle Connolly’s Mind at Play sculptures, which are lined up across
the living room wall. The folk art-like pieces embody a kind of raw spirit-
edness, made of salvaged materials such as electrical wire, ragged plas-
tic, broken wood and chewing gum wrapper. In the apartment, they are
made to contrast with the radiant Marmorino plaster-rendered walls and
ceiling, which relect light deep into the space.
Michelle’s sculptures are framed by the bulkhead and sofa, as well as
by a custom-designed totem unit in the corner. This latter provides dis-
play space for decorative objects and bottles. The rounded corners are a 2
repeated design element throughout the apartment, sotening the edges
of the bulkhead, walls and joinery. “The curves became a recurring yet
non-repetitive motif, celebrating sculpture and form,” says Yasmine.
These curves are further complemented with a limestone planter by 1 The apartment has panoramic
Steve Clark of design practice Den-Holm and the luid, abstract igures of views over the Paciic Ocean, but
the client wanted to break away
Kirsty Budge’s painting The Real Housewives is the Tennessee Williams of
from the predictable coastal
our times, and I stand by this statement 100%, which was selected for its palette.
forms and scale. 2 Michelle Connolly’s Mind at
“Art feeds of of its surroundings, so placement needs to be carefully Play wall sculptures are lined
up across the living room
considered,” explains Yasmine. “We allocate walls for artworks at the be-
wall, in contrast to the radiant
ginning of a project as the length and height inform our decisions.” Marmorino plaster-rendered
The polished white walls frame the textured black hallway with a walls and ceiling.
vintage wall sconce and Charlotte Perriand armchair, as if creating a 3 A timber fertility sculpture
from the client’s collection.
three-dimensional artwork. Sumptuous black walls continue through the
Custom-designed light by AR
bedrooms, with woven-textured wallpaper on the ceiling inspired by the with Marmorino inish.
client’s spear collection. 4 The design team visited
A timber fertility sculpture sits on a black plinth, and Janusz Woz- galleries with the client to select
new artworks.
ny’s black-and-white ine-art photograph Dream hangs above the bed.
5 The client’s collection of tribal
“It takes a long time sourcing the perfect piece, but when the right one
artefacts reminds him of his early
comes along, you just know,” says Yasmine. The design team visited gal- life in Papua New Guinea.
leries with the client to select new artworks, including an underwater
nude that alludes to the coastal location in a more subtle manner than
is typical of design in the area. The nude is a particularly personal piece
from Wozny’s Mask series – an introspective journey about the search for
true identity. “Like all the artworks, it reminds us that there is a human
element to the built form,” says Yasmine. 4

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“Art feeds off its


surroundings, so
placement needs to be
carefully considered.”
– YASMINE GHONIEM

6 The folk-art pieces – made from salvaged materials – have a


nostalgic value for the client.
7 Kirsty Budge’s The Real Housewives is the Tennessee Williams of our
times, and I stand by this statement 100% complements the curved
forms of a Den-Holm limestone planter. CAS Utrecht Armchair in
Charlot fabric from Cult.
8 A French vintage metal wall sconce was sourced from Pamono. LC7
Charlotte Perriand Chair for Cassina from Cult.
9 Rounded corners are a repeated design element throughout the
apartment.

8 9

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H A N G I T / G A L L E R Y PA N E L

G A L L E RY PA N E L

A RT E D I T ’ S PA N E L O F L E A D I N G G A L L E R I STS TA K E S A
C LO S E R LO O K AT T H E W O R K O F T H E S E F I V E A R T I STS .
KERRY-ANNE BLANKET REANNON NAVARATNAM SARAH MONTGOMERY
KAB Gallery, IndiCo Galleries, Sydney Road Gallery,
Terrigal Sydney Seaforth

R U D Y M U L D E R

Marilyn. Acrylic on canvas, 76 x 102cm.

K E R R Y- A N N E Marilyn Monroe has been REANNON Rudy Mulder’s Marilyn is a fresh SARAH Monroe, a timeless icon of popu-
a favourite subject of artists around the world take on an iconic subject in the world of pop lar culture, inspires a wide range of emotions
for many years, playing an iconic role within art. The artist’s clever use of texture adds a and creative endeavours. This is an interesting
pop culture. For his take on Marilyn, Rudy hauntingly realistic element to the work, which portrait to paint – her presence is so felt with
Mulder has approached the work with bold is juxtaposed against a vividly contrasting co- the heat of the red and cool of the blue, with
brushstrokes and an incredibly vivacious pal- lour palette. many gestural brushstrokes. Marilyn’s image
ette, echoing his subject’s celebrated person- holds continued relevance in mass media and
ality. Marylin’s quintessential pout and seduc- consumer culture. As depicted, she brings
tive eyes are unmissable, but the unique play broader discussions about modern society
of red, white and blue is what captures my at- that transcend her lifetime.
tention. It is a clear invitation for viewers to
consider a deeper meaning with the painting.

rudymulderart.com mulder.rudy@yahoo.com.au 0416 575 270 Rudy Mulder Art

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J A N E T T E D R Y S D A L E

Drone Days. Oil on stretched canvas, 122 x 122cm.

K E R R Y- A N N E Aerial drone photography REANNON Incorporating precise detailing SARAH Drone Days is a tranquil oil paint-
has opened up new possibilities for studio while maintaining a simplistic, illustrative ef- ing delivering a distinct feeling of relaxation
painters. This stunning original painting by Ja- fect is no easy feat, but the artist here has man- and time well-spent on the Australian coast. I
nette Drysdale, Drone Days, is a great example aged to perfectly combine the two. The calm- love the spaces between the umbrellas: the
of how new angles and perspectives of the ing nature of this beach scene is cleverly unsaid beach rule of “not too close” is well-un-
landscape are being explored through contem- conveyed from a bird’s eye view, alluding to an derstood. The drone perspective allows the
porary painting. Here the artist has used her element of weightlessness. viewer to see new details; patterns emerge in
brushes to present the aerial subject in a very the water in sot, translucent layers. What an
realistic style, almost tricking me into thinking it exquisite natural world we inhabit.
was a photograph at irst glance. I am particu-
larly drawn to the pair of canoes: an interesting
way of breaking the horizontal composition.
The rocky outcrops just ofshore are also fantas-
tic as they draw the viewer directly into the main
action of the painting almost instantly.

janettedrysdale.com gerryjay@bigpond.com.au janettes_art

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L O R N A B A L L A N T Y N E E P P S

Lorna Ballantyne Epps, Sotly Sotly. Acrylic and oil pastel on birch panel, 102 x 102cm.

K E R R Y- A N N E Lorna Ballantyne Epps has REANNON This work successfully conveys SARAH What a warm, expressive land-
created a beautiful contemporary artwork with a sense of depth and mood by carefully com- scape. This artwork would be a knock-out fea-
so much to ofer. Appropriately titled Sotly, Sot- bining colour and texture. Most notably, the ture in a grand entrance with a darker toned,
ly, this work is subtle and oozes a sense of calm. ine yet minimal line work employed by the matt wall. The contrast of the lighter layers and
The composition is engaging, with the artist’s artist delicately punctuates the sot tones of hues of sot white would lit the light in any
careful use of line and brushwork drawing my the background, creating a visual journey room that needs a burst of fresh energy. With
eye from one edge to the other. Measuring just through the abstract realm. the tree standing tall and leaning out, almost
over one metre by one metre, this work is versa- looking over the deep valley below, Lorna is
tile for positioning – however, I would personal- clearly enjoying spontaneous mark-making
ly feel it best positioned within my living space. with the inishing touches of oil pastel.
It could also perhaps ofer a warm irst impres-
sion to any corporate reception area.

leveeartgallery.com.au/lorna-ballantyne-epps info@lornaballantyneepps.com 0407 123 200


The Levee Art Gallery leveeartgalleryandstudios

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C H E R I E S T R O N G

Somewhere in the middle of all the chaos… peace. Charcoal on 300gsm paper, 60 x 42cm.

K E R R Y- A N N E Cherie Strong’s surreal por- REANNON The artist has captured the es- SARAH A gentleman, a deep thinker, with
trait Somewhere in the middle of all the chaos… sence of the natural world by combining hu- an impressive handlebar moustache. The title
peace is dark and evocative. Typically with por- manity and nature in the subject matter of this Somewhere in the middle of all the chaos…
traiture, the subject’s face and expression is the raw work. Although the style of realism has peace relects on gathering oneself when all
focus, but here the inlaid dreamlike landscape been employed, the work itself is presented in a around you is chaos. I ind myself transported
instantly draws your attention. The artist’s choice most unreal way, challenging the viewer and to a time without technology. This charcoal is
of the smudged charcoal to depict the landscape their perception of life as a whole. a classic drawing and its uncomplicated appli-
is particularly interesting. On one hand, the calm cation is a great reminder to look inwards; to
mountain scene evokes a sense of peace as not- dream and close your eyes to the distractions
ed in the title. On the other, the dark and cloudy of our modern-day digital lives. A fantastic art-
sky appears quite foreboding. This hints at an in- work that relects strength and focus. It would
ternal struggle and adds a wonderful extra di- be well-suited to a salon illed with memora-
mension to the work. A detailed and engaging bilia, and framed in a dark walnut or ash wood
artwork that I am sure would be the talking point inish.
for any space.

cstrongart@hotmail.com Cherie Strong Art cheriestrongart

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A L I S O N M O O N E Y

Alison Mooney, Sun Shower, 2018. Mixed media, 150 x 150cm.

K E R R Y- A N N E An impressive artwork that REANNON The interpretive nature of ab- SARAH This cleverly constructed abstract
is sure to sit centre stage within any interior. straction means that each and every viewer is painting presents a contemporary swirl of a
The alluring, warm palette conveys an irresist- taken on a unique journey with the piece, and sun shower rainbow. There is a calmness and
ible sense of joy and happiness. For me, ab- Alison Mooney accomplishes exactly this. The room for self-relection elicited through light
stract art brings endless enjoyment; I cannot artist captures light in its truest sense: bold refraction and broad sweeps of colour. It’s nice
help but imagine various narratives and con- with a sheer transparency. Further, the colours to see such conident and uninterrupt-
template the range of moods evoked by the illustrated here allude to a divine energy that ed curves. This painting would be wonderful in
composition. This piece, bursting with aesthet- its perfectly with the subject matter of this a minimalist white space –perhaps a space for
ic beauty and appropriately titled Sun Showers, piece. meditation.
is reminiscent of the blue skies and sunny
warmth of a beautiful spring day. Considering
its size, it would look best as the single feature
on a wall with high ceilings, or centrally posi-
tioned in an entrance or hallway. This arrange-
ment would allow the piece to be displayed
with the adequate distance and height for the
viewer to truly take in all of its charms.

alisonmooney.co alisonrmooney@gmail.com alison__mooney

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CONCEPTUAL CRIB

AT RAFT STUDIOS, AN ART COLLECTION BECAME A


CRUCIAL STARTING POINT FOR THE REDESIGN OF A HYBRID
APARTMENT/OFFICE SPACE IN MELBOURNE’S COLLINGWOOD.
BELINDA AUCOTT WRITES.

The brass-clad hallway at RAFT Studios features the neon light work This Way Up by Kristin McIver.

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EDWARD COMMONS and Stasia Rat, who share the reins of a graphics
and branding practice, knew they required a space that would make their
art collection ‘pop’. Now, inside the front door of the existing warehouse
shell, a sizzling neon light greets guests as they enter a brass-clad hallway.
And that’s just the beginning of the conceptual experience that’s in store
for whoever crosses the threshold into this hybrid home and workspace.
Works presented inside the ofice include a biting, tongue-in-cheek in-
stallation by Ronnie van Hout, photography by Michael Cook and multi-
ple works by artist Meredith Turnbull.
As a branding and graphics studio, Edward says he and Stasia wrote
the kind of brief they themselves would have liked to receive. “There was
a sculptural form we both wanted. We were keen that the architecture
would not overwhelm the space and we needed it to be cohesive with
everything we have going on here,” he says.
The brief also described the porous line between their work and social
lives, and laid out criteria for not closing down the space. The architects
at Melbourne-based practice Edition Ofice honoured this whimsical line
between work and play with a solution of high drama.
Taking a charred piece of meat as his inspiration, lead architect Aaron
Roberts based his design on an object that is charcoal black on the out-
side and blood red on the inside. Black steel, gold brass, pink tinged mar-
ble and blackened wood veneer comprise the elemental palette, against
which the art smacks.

1 A pink-tinged marble kitchen benchtop faces the artwork Arrivals by Angus O’Callaghan.
2 Zoe Croggon’s Concrete #3 leans against the red room’s magnetically sealed walls. Courtesy of
Daine Singer Gallery.

1 2

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3 4

While the program of the rooms is fairly conventional – two ofices that
can be used as bedrooms, a bathroom, a powder room, a central kitchen “RAFT Studios doesn’t read
and large warehouse windows facing the loungeroom – the trick lies in
the way each module can withdraw and protrude from the centre line de-
as architecture. Editing and
pending on what’s required. Kim Bridgland, co-founder of Edition Ofice, detailing allow it to become
describes the studio as an “object in the round”.
“The rooms are designed to withdraw into themselves and to create an something far more religious.”
enigmatic object,” he tells Art Edit. “The architecture is experienced as a
body in the room. Taking that more literally, the space is like a whale with
dermal and sub-dermal layers that are graphically becoming more and in histories. We see architecture not as art, but as a modiier, as something
more intense as you penetrate the space.” that informs people, unites people, and as a force that seeks to upgrade or
Importantly, he says all the handles on the black steel doors are mag- enhance people’s experience of a place.
netic and can be removed to conceal entrances and exits. Like a magic “We are incredibly proud that RAFT Studios doesn’t read as architec-
box, this has a reductive quality that makes the studio both lexible and ture,” he continues. “Editing and detailing allow it to become something
appealing. far more religious. I love the fact that when the doors are closed you just
“We work with art institutions and art collectors a lot,” says Kim. “We see see red cracks and when the doors are open the colour bleeds out and
architecture as something that exists in an urban landscape; in spaces and provides a red wash on the surrounding space.”

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3 Roko Rennie’s Regalia sits above Ronnie van


Hout’s Sitting Figure 11.
4 Michael Cook’s Object (Vase) lends the dining
area an eery formality.
5 The artwork Drawing Blood by Eno makes a
perfect complement to the dark and metallic
interior palette.
6 Artist Meredith Turnbull rules in the kitchen,
with a print that leans against the back wall
and sculptures that add strange geometries to
6 the smooth marble benchtop.

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1 2
3

4
GET
5 THE LOOK

9 WANT TO RECREATE THE LOOK IN YOUR OWN HOME?


MATILDA CARR SHOWS YOU HOW.

6
8 1 Leather Strap Mirror, $259, handgdesigns.com
2 Bolan Black Leather Occasional Chair, $1,249,
cranmorehome.com.au
3 Efie 2 Seater Loveseat Sofa, $1,107,
cultfurniture.com
4 Teak Tree Root Cofee Table, $1,599,
cranmorehome.com.au
5 Lampadaire Chanpen Hexagonal Lamp, $710,
nedgis.com
6 Mensch Made Concrete Vase with Gold-Plated
Leaves, $249, thedesigngitshop.com
7 Kate Tucker, In Deep, 2018. Acrylic, oil, digitally
printed cotton, acrylic medium, found image,
hemp and bronze support, 27.5 x 21 x 3cm.

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7 $1,900. Courtesy: Daine Singer, Melbourne
8 Ruby Red Plush Velvet Cushion, $46.50,
danetti.com
9 Reined Velvet Cushion, $89, danellemessaike.com
HANG IT / PROJECT SHEET

URBAN
PEACE
INTERIORS PRACTICE BIASOL CAPTURES
THE ESSENCE OF YOGA IN A MELBOURNE
HOME DESIGNED TO GROW WITH ITS
OCCUPANTS. HELEN MCKENZIE WRITES.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES MORGAN.

#19 ART EDIT / 123


“It wasn’t a case of
filling rooms just to have
something.”

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SHANTI MEANS PEACE in ancient Indian Sanskrit. In the Melbourne sub- 1 The home’s recent renovation includes an addition to the rear of the property that
urb of Caulield, the aptly named Shanti House is home to Debra Kiven, culminates in a light-illed living space.

a yoga practitioner, and her husband Ron. It is also a base for their three 2 A vibrant blue work by Matthew Johnson energises the otherwise pared back
family room.
adult children when they are not studying or travelling overseas, or living
3 The home’s tranquil interior design, inluenced by the client’s yoga practice, is
in share houses with friends. enhanced by its private, tree-lined location.
Over the past two years, the family home has undergone an extensive 4 A set-back family room is enhanced by clerestory windows, high ceilings and a
renovation, including an addition to the rear of the property that culmi- clever garden design.
nates in a light-illed living space. This set-back family room is enhanced
by clerestory windows, high ceilings and a clever garden design that visu-
ally brings the outside in.
Interior designer Jean-Pierre Biasol – founding director of design
practice Biasol, which was responsible for the renovation – was irst
briefed for the project in late 2016. “Flow and connectivity to every space”
were the key requirements that came out of that initial chat with the cli-
ents, he tells Art Edit.
“We wanted to capture the essence of yoga, relating to an open feel
with lowing spaces and an atmosphere energised by light and air. The re-
sult is timeless, minimalistic and tranquil, and at heart shows the client’s
yoga practice,” says Jean-Pierre. “It was all about having layers of diverse
design, so that as you moved further and further, deeper and deeper into
the home it continues to open up. When you get to the larger space at the
back of the house, the ceiling height is around four metres, which really
embraces the energy from the sunlight and brings the landscaping as-
4
pects into the living area.”

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5 A hyper-real, day-glo
work by Darren Wardle
is positioned between
two large windows in
the kitchen.
6 The art collection is
diverse and constantly
5 evolving.

The minimalism Jean-Pierre speaks of was a deliberate device; the Bi-


asol design team created a blank canvas on which the owners could tell
their story. “All the fabrics in the home are pared back and subtle. Deb
and Ron travel a great deal for both work and yoga retreats. They like to
collect new pieces of art and their collection is constantly evolving. All the
strength, mood and colour is through their artwork and pieces of sculp-
ture.” The collection is diverse; it includes works by top Australian artists
and pieces that mark their travels, such as the two loral paintings in the
kitchen that were purchased in Mumbai.
A vibrant blue work by Matthew Johnson is spectacularly positioned
in the sitting room. The work sits centre stage, lanked by two full-height
windows that reveal deep green hedges. The otherwise white room, dec-
orated with pale furnishings, is given a further colour splash with Missoni
cushions. In the dining room, a hyper-real work by Darren Wardle in ‘day-
glo’ pink and bright aqua is similarly centred between two large windows.
A recent addition to the collection is a piece by Sydney artist Brooklyn
Whelan, known for gradated pastel cloudscapes, conirming the couple’s
love for colourful art.
Biasol’s decision to give their clients a fresh palette on which to paint
their story has clearly been a good one. Jean-Pierre says the two-year
project has been accomplished at a considered pace; he says it has been
like a “journey with Ron and Deb, and that is because they really wanted
to love every piece that went in. It wasn’t a case of illing rooms just to
have something. It was always about them being happy to have negative
6 space for the moment and then work in things that they can adore.”

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L I V I N G W I T H A R T

128
LIVING LOVING
Introducing Artstay Hobart,
an AirBnB that feels like
staying in an art gallery.

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GALLERY
GETAWAY
THE COUPLE BEHIND ARTSTAY HOBART HAD A WILD IDEA FOR THEIR ART COLLECTION:
TO ENTRUST IT TO THEIR AIRBNB GUESTS. KATIE MILTON WRITES.

1 2

WHEN ARGENTINA-BORN artist Fernando do Campo and his partner and international artists, queer artists, young women artists and Indige-
Vino Rajandran were visiting Hobart for an exhibition earlier this year, nous artists, and to present them in a domestic space,” says Fernando.
they attended an open house on a whim. What they found was a rundown While the pair currently live in an art-illed rental in Sydney’s Padding-
1890s workers’ cottage, the entire façade of it hidden behind an untamed ton that doubles as Fernando’s painting studio, their ties to Tasmania are
grapevine. Despite the overgrowth, they were sold. strong. Years prior, the two then-Tassie residents met at MONA’s annual
Seven months on and you can ind the same house listed on Airbnb Dark Mofo Festival. Since then, Fernando – a former director of Sawtooth
as Artstay Hobart, a curated gallery home where guests live among con- ARI Gallery in Launceston – has introduced Vino, a Singapore-born agri-
temporary art – a rare opportunity to experience what it might be like to cultural scientist, to the world of art collecting.
live in a gallery. “We’re trying to share the idea of living with contemporary art with
“The project is an opportunity for us to support early career Australian strangers; this idea that you can have a video work permanently installed

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in a living room, and a textile installation in the corridor – these more ex- 1 The interior of Artstay Hobart, featuring a large
photographic work by Harleigh English and a video
perimental ways of collecting,” says Vino.
work by Jacolby Satterwhite. PHOTO: MELANIE KATE
Come December, Artstay will launch an ongoing collaboration with
2 A neon light installation by Zelab and
London-based gallery Daata Editions, an online gallery that commissions Alessandro Zambelli welcomes guests to their
artists for moving image and sound works. Daata Editions is set to curate accommodation. PHOTO: MELANIE KATE
a series of digital works for Artstay, among them some of the gallery’s irst
commissioned Australian works.
Taking great care to respect the heritage of the original house, a local
builder helped the pair peel back the foundational layers of the cottage,
re-exposing the ireplaces and the original metal and brickwork.

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3 4

3 Warm pops of colour enliven the gallery-white palette of Artstay Hobart.


PHOTO: MELANIE KATE
4 A painting by Tasmanian artist Amber Koroluk-Stephenson hangs in the bedroom.
PHOTO: MELANIE KATE
5 With its mish-mash of diferent mediums, Artstay Hobart allows guests to experience
what it might be like to live in a gallery. Here, a canine carving by Indigenous artist Lex
Namponan sits in the living room. PHOTO: MELANIE KATE
6 Artstay owners Fernando do Campo and Vino Rajandran in their art-illed Paddington
rental. PHOTO: TIMOTHY DA-RIN

Ater a trip to the state library archives failed to produce a record of the
home, the pair managed to date it by the square-headed nails they found
in the loorboards. “A pre-1900s nail,” muses Vino.
“It was really interesting inding this in the house and then layering that
history with charged contemporary works like the Jacolby Satterwhite
video,” he adds.
The pair intentionally painted the home walls a stark shade of gallery
white. The self-styled interiors feature warming pops of colour and more
art than furniture. The collection – which includes everything from a tim-
er-controlled light work to one of Fernando’s own wall murals – is set to
rotate every six months.
“We want our guests to leave with a new experience of living with art.
They’re not in a gallery. It’s about the fact they can spend as long as they
want with that video; they can look at that textile work; they can sleep
5 under that painting. That’s the key diference,” says Fernando.

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LIVING WITH ART / DESIGN COUNCIL

DESIGN COUNCIL
ART EDIT’S DESIGN EXPERTS SHARE THEIR PROFESSIONAL TIPS ON KATHRYN ROBSON BRETT MICKAN SUZANNE GORMAN
Robson Rak Architecture Brett Mickan Interior Studio Gorman Interior
HOW TO HANG AND STYLE THESE ARTWORKS IN YOUR HOME. & Interiors, Melbourne Design, Sydney Design, Sydney

C A R O L Z S O LT
Carol Zsolt, Abstract CZ18032. Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 122 x 4cm.

K AT H R Y N Carol’s sot, diluted tones are BRETT What appears as an accidental play SUZANNE Tones of amber, olive and ochre
punctuated by ine lines that give this painting of colour gently washing across the canvas is giv- morphing into one another with sot linework,
great depth and movement. The earthy colours en a layer of depth and control by the linework. A barely there, draws you in gently. Like looking at
and forms are reminiscent of a raging bushire simple frame of natural Australian timber – like a rugged Australian landscape from above or
and would be a dramatic addition to a living Blackbutt – would set the work of beautifully. perhaps the bark of an ancient tree. I would love
space with natural timber textures and a visual The scale of this piece would sit comfortably in a to see this hung in a contemporary dining room
connection to a green landscaped outlook. large contemporary living room: wood loors, sot featuring tan leather chairs and a solid timber
grey walls and blue upholstery to accent the pre- dining table with raw uneven edges, where its
dominately warm tones. I would add tables and energy will enhance positivity by stimulating
accents in black metal, natural timbers and terra- both the appetite and conversation.
cotta. A black metal and frosted pendant from the
Laurent collection from Lambert & Fils would
complete this contemporary, casual retreat.

czoriginalart.com czoriginalart@bigpond.com 0419 511 076


CZ Original Art czoriginalart

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F E L I C I A A R O N E Y

Felicia Aroney, Pink song. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 90 x 150cm.

K AT H R Y N Felicia’s study of lowers BRETT Felicia’s bold combination of co- SUZANNE A joyous and upliting painting,
against a white-washed wall reminds me of a lour and texture bursts of the canvas. This work with fresh crisp colours and movement created
recent trip to Greece. I can imagine this work doesn’t require any more vibrancy in the through the arching stems. Pink Song is asking
being translated into a large-scale mural on the room to show it to its best advantage. I would to be hung in a sunny reading conservatory
outside of a building. It would be equally beau- hang it in a room with bottle-green walls and where it can be enjoyed while savouring a cup
tiful hung in a simple, feminine dressing room charcoal-stained wood loors; a plush rug in a of tea with friends. I imagine the room to be
with sot linens and velvets to pick up on the colour blend of taupe and acid yellow; a warm comfortable and bright, with an array of artful-
painting’s pink tones. grey velvet sofa; and arm chairs in a dark green ly mismatched textiles, layered on a cosy sofa
chenille. To contrast the femininity of the sub- with views to the garden.
ject, I would include steel cofee and side tables
in a matt grey powder coat. In order to keep the
colour focus at eye level I would add a vintage
Picasso-esque white plaster chandelier.

feliciaaroney.com feliciaaroneyart@icloud.com 0418 945 452


feliciaaroneyart

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J E N N I F E R H A R R I S
Jennifer Harris, Nigh-night Ninderry. Acrylic on canvas, 76 x 76cm.

K AT H R Y N Jennifer’s large, detailed work BRETT These beautifully simple, mono- SUZANNE The whispy, cumulous-like
would provide a striking visual element to any chromatic forms allow the viewer to imagine their forms create a feeling of loating above clouds
room. If this was hung over my dining table the own interpretation of the work. The calmness and at night and evoke a sense of adventure, taunt-
fascinating forms would provoke many inter- level of detail would allow it to hang in almost ing the mind with the possibilities of a mid-
esting dinner party discussions about depth, any interior style. To best ground it, your only con- night jaunt. What better place for such an evoc-
detail, and structure. This painting would look sideration would be to balance the strength of the ative piece than in the bedroom of a broody
stunning in a contemporary home with a black somewhere else in the room. I would love to teen who is yearning to discover the world.
monochromatic colour palette. Its large scale see it hang in a warm, neutral sitting room. Beige Best hung on dark walls in a room that is all
would ensure the painting helped ill a gener- silk upholstered walls with camel-coloured about dark tones – think charcoal bed linen,
ous, minimal room. wool-cashmere Baker Furniture upholstery, all sit- black oak furniture and deep indigo denim
ting on a plush vintage wool carpet in muted loor cushions. The only light is the contrasting
warm tones. Add black metal tables and some loating white linen curtains that catch the
clear crystal lamps. The ideal space to relax and breeze.
gaze into the sot, smoke-like landscape forms.

artofjenniferharris.com.au jennifer@artofjenniferharris.com.au 0413 584 859


Art of Jennifer Harris artofjenniferharris

134 / ART EDIT #19


LIVING WITH ART / DESIGN COUNCIL

S Y L V I A D I T C H B U R N

Sylvia Ditchburn, Tropical Garden with Crab Claw. Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 45cm.

K AT H R Y N Sylvia’s work Tropical Garden BRETT Just like tropical plants in nature, SUZANNE Wildly vibrant, this piece is suit-
with Crab Claw is a vibrant, colourful painting the vibrant colour of this work bursts of the ed to an entry hallway where it will welcome
that would beneit from being in a room with canvas. To balance this bold painting I would guests with its bold jewel colours. I’d like to see
even more colour and texture. I can see this hang it in a room with white walls and comple- it hung on a wall just barely bigger than the
piece on a cafe wall, nestled amongst equally ment the strength of colour with furniture piec- piece itself, without too much white space
dynamic colourful works. es. I’d love to see the sumptuous, 1970s-in- framing it, so that it is contained and can sing
spired Arkley curved sofa from Jardan, loudly without overwhelming. I see hon-
upholstered in a taupe colour with acid green ey-toned patinaed timber loors and walls in
cushions. Add a pair of Ruché armchairs from charcoal grey with exaggerated brushstrokes
Ligne Roset in cobalt blue quilted velvet and visible. Layers of texture and deep tones will
terracotta side tables with lighting in black complement and contain this conident piece.
metal – a bold, contemporary symphony.

sylviaditchburnineartgallery.com sylviaditchburnart@icloud.com 0419 790 245


Sylvia Ditchburn sylviaditchburn

#19 ART EDIT / 135


LIVING WITH ART / ART MOOD

ART MOOD
M AT I L DA C A R R C A STS H E R D E S I G N E Y E OV E R F I V E A RT W O R K S A N D
S H O W S US H O W T H E R I G H T A CC E SS O R I E S C A N B E ST S H O W C A S E T H E M .

2
1
4 5
3
6
7 8
MAPPING THE INTERIOR
1 Abbey 3 Seater Sofa, $1,295, nordikliving.com.au 2 Bistro Wooden Pendant Light, $213.95, zanui.com.au
3 Augusta Small Leather Ottoman, $149, schots.com.au 4 Tribal Cushion, $135, saarde.com 5 New York Bar Stool, $806, satara.com.au
6 Banquet Trays, $220 for set of two, satara.com.au 7 Burton Throw Ochre, $214, thedesignhunter.com.au
8 Horizon 140W ETU Side Table, $POA, ozdesignfurniture.com.au

136 / ART EDIT #19


JO LANKESTER
Cortex – Cambiums, Ogmograptis II, 2018.
Multicolour plate Intaglio, 75.5 x 52cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST. SCALE OF ARTWORK MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN IT APPEARS

jolankester.com
jo@jolankester.com
Jo Lankester Brush & Press
jo.lankester

#19 ART EDIT / 137


LIVING WITH ART / ART MOOD

1 2

4
3 5

6
7
PRETTY IN PASTEL
1 Angelica 2 Seater Sofa, $899, zanui.com.au 2 Glass Triangle Bud Vase, $34.22, audenza.com
3 Venus Ottoman, $146.95, zanui.com.au 4 Bayliss Table Lamp, $POA, montauklightingco.com 5 Bogart Tulip Sofa Chair, $1,950, globewest.com.au
6 Luxe Oblong Side Table, $694 for set of two, zanui.com.au 7 Martini Cushion, $111, thedesignhunter.com.au

138 / ART EDIT #19


JOAN BLOND
Aquamarine Whirl.
Acrylic, 150 x 120cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST. SCALE OF ARTWORK
MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN IT APPEARS

joanblondart.com
joanblond10@hotmail.com
joanblond

#19 ART EDIT / 139


LIVING WITH ART / ART MOOD

3
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
ABSTRACT BLOOMS
1 Halcyon Accent Table Lamp, $POA, montauklightingco.com 2 Haven Rope Occasional Chair, $1,095, globewest.com.au
3 Vintage Wash Blanket, $165, saarde.com 4 Kennedy Curl 4 Seater Sofa, $5,530, globewest.com.au 5 Sapphire Mirror, $POA, maisonvalentina.net
6 White Round Planters, $319, satara.com.au 7 Velvet Cushion in Himalayan, $220, fentonandfenton.com.au
8 Ovela Noguchi Replica Glass Coffee Table, $339, kogan.com

140 / ART EDIT #19


MAGGI MCDONALD
Jasmine Flower I & II. Acrylic on canvas, diptych panels 122 x 76cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST. SCALE OF ARTWORKS MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN THEY APPEAR

maggimcdonald.com
hello@maggimcdonald
Maggi McDonald Artist
maggimcdonaldart

#19 ART EDIT / 141


LIVING WITH ART / ART MOOD

2
1
3
4

5 6

7
NATURE TRAILS
1 Felix Chubby Occasional Chair, $1,350, globewest.com.au 2 Padua 6 Light Pendant, $217.95, zanui.com.au
3 Sanctuary Silk Rug, $3,335, tribehome.com.au 4 Tall Timber Vases, $550 for set of three, satara.com.au
5 Velvet Cushion in Mango, $220, fentonandfenton.com.au
6 Havana Coffee Table, $1,464, zanui.com.au 7 Mia 3 Seat Sofa in Forest, $1,500, ricefurniture.com.au

142 / ART EDIT #19


JOHN OLSEN
Spring Frogs. Signed limited
edition print, 64 x 71cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST. SCALE OF ARTWORK
MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN IT APPEARS

martinezartdealer.com
0412 666 243
LIVING WITH ART / ART MOOD

1
5
2 4

3 6

7
8
LORE OF THE LAND
1 Linderman Buffet Tasoak Marri, $POA, ozdesignfurniture.com.au 2 Madam Stoltz Stoneware Side Plate, $15.62, printerandtailor.com
3 Round Timber Vases, $308 for set of two, satara.com.au 4 Silla Luna Cuero Chair in Natural, $POA, solxluna.com
5 WZ S3051GINP Lamp, $POA, montauklightingco.com 6 Taper Mirror, $POA, ozdesignfurniture.com.au
7 Madam Stoltz Abstract Cushion Cover, $90.29, printerandtailor.com 8 Arthur LHF Modular Sofa, $POA, ozdesignfurniture.com.au

144 / ART EDIT #19


FIONA YOUNG NAPANANGKA
Women’s Ceremony at Yumara.
Acrylic on linen, 121 x 121cm.
COURTESY: THE ARTIST. SCALE OF ARTWORK
MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN IT APPEARS

ngarrugallery.com.au
art@ngarrugallery.com.au
07 4099 5531
LIVING WITH ART / EXPERT EYE

146 / ART EDIT #19


LIVING WITH ART / EXPERT EYE

RETRO DINER
STYLIST JULIA GREEN SHOWS US HOW TO BRING THE PATTERNED EUPHORIA AND
PROVOCATIVE ART OF THE 1970S TO THE DINING TABLE AND LIVING SPACES.

THE 1970S HAD IT ALL. The unbridled use of “It was as if the colours of
colour and pattern throughout the decade made
it an unforgettable era – and one that has had the time set the scene for the
a heavy inluence on our current trends. Bold
hues were introduced and retro patterns made
positive changes ahead.”
a bohemian statement. As a child of the 1970s,
I can recall lively conversations around the din-
ing table; it was a revolutionary time not just for
interiors but for women’s rights. It was as if the

1
colours of the time set the scene for the positive
changes ahead. And to see them make a glamor- TOUCHABLE LAYERS
ous comeback within contemporary living spac- Shagpile is deinitely a word that springs
es brings back happy memories of change and to mind when it comes to the 1970s. But
the strength it brought with it. these days, the texture that carpet brings to
Retro is back in style and the use of texture a room has been replaced with highly tactile
and contrast is now more present than ever. wall hangings, faux fur and sot furnishings.
For instance, you may ind a bold mustard lo- These touchable layers make a space cosy, re-
ral wallpaper paired with velvet-covered din- laxed and lived in.
ing chairs and a lokati rug, and this very mix of

2
colour and texture is what will bring back the EXPERIMENTAL PATTERNS
70s in a sophisticated yet modern way. Here’s The years of the 1970s brought with
how to recreate the time-travelling look within them wild wallpapers that told lam-
your own kitchen. boyant stories about the homeowners who
lived with them. People experimented not
only with colour but with pattern on the walls
– and to great efect. From oversized lorals to
retro patterns, wallpaper set the mood of the
space and dictated the palette of the home as
a whole.

3
LOOSE ATTITUDE
The stif upper lip of the 1960s went
out the window once the 1970s rolled
around, and this became evident within inte-
rior design. Relaxed spaces became the norm,
Styling by Julia Green and Noél rather than impeccably manicured ones. For-
Coughlan for the Arthide and Amigos de merly hard-surfaced rooms such as the din-
Hoy campaigns. Photography by Armelle ing room became layered with texture and
Habib. Wallpaper by Sparkk. pattern, and a lived-in, rockstar vibe took over
COURTESY: GREENHOUSE INTERIORS from the reinement of the previous decade.

#19 ART EDIT / 147


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LIVING WITH ART / WISH YOU WERE HERE

WISH YOU WERE HERE


SNAPSHOTS FROM RECENT ART EVENTS ACROSS AUSTRALIA

1 Opening night of the Home


is Where the Art Is exhibition
at Sydney’s Art Gallery on
Darling with artist Kerry
Bruce, July 2018.
2 The mayor of Sydney’s

1 Woollahra Council, Peter


Cavanagh, opens the inalist
exhibition of the Little Things
Art Prize at Saint Cloche
Gallery, Paddington, Sydney.

JOIN THE
PARTY! 2
Getting out into the
art world is a great
way to discover the
latest from your
favourite artists
and scout for new
talent.

Get in touch with


your local galleries
and artists to stay
in the know about
upcoming events.

#19 ART EDIT / 149


LIVING WITH ART / WISH YOU WERE HERE

3 Batemans Bay artist Naomi


Crowther pictured with Australian
Defence Force Academy chaplain
Wayne Ross at the oficial
unveiling of her painting, Flanders
Poppies Rising, commissioned by
ADFA for the Academy Chapel.
4 Artist Kerrie Hess with her
painting Roselle, inspired by pale
pink Dior couture at Le Meurice,
Paris.
5 One of the youngest inalists in
the Saint Cloche Little Things Art
Prize, Romy Cowan, dropping
of her entry Music and Love by
the Sea.
3

5
150 / ART EDIT #19
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LIVING WITH ART / LAST WORD

E L I S E
P I O C H
B A L Z A C
KIRSTY SIER CHATS TO FOUNDER OF ICONIC
DESIGN HOUSE MAISON BALZAC, ELISE PIOCH
BALZAC, ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF HUMOUR AND
MEMORIES IN THE MAKING OF A HOME.
1 2

Maison Balzac has grown to become such an iconic design brand. 1 Maison Balzac Le Lobster
ceramic match box.
Where did it all begin?
2 Maison Balzac founder,
It all began in 2012 when I poured 100 perfumed candles in my kitch-
Elise Pioch Balzac.
en. This was the irst batch ater a full year of research, trial and error,
3 A selection of Maison
perfume development and branding exercises. It took me 12 months to Balzac’s mouth-blown
ind the right vessel – a mouth-blown opaline glass – and another eight glassware.
months to sign of on the irst ive fragrances of the collection. Once COURTESY: MAISON BALZAC

this was set, I had the conidence to start Maison Balzac. Two years ago,
we decided to ofer the mouth-blown vessel by itself, instead of full of
fragrant wax, and it changed the business for the better. Now we are
equally known for our candles and glassware collections, which makes
me so proud. 3

You’re known for such elegant yet irreverent design items, such as Do you collect art? If so, is there a particular way you go about incor-
the Maison Balzac Le Lobster ceramic match box – and of course porating art with design in your home?
your range of candles. How would you describe Maison Balzac’s Only very recently I started to invest in art. My irst was a Crystal Mary
aesthetic? sculpture by Kyle Montgomery, a Sydney artist based in New York. The
From the start I didn’t want the brand to be too serious. I aimed to sell second was a huge painting by Christiane Spangsberg, ater we collab-
extremely good quality products to people with a sense of humour. One orated for La Plage candle packaging. Again, there was a reason behind
of my all-time sources of inspiration is Salvador Dali’s holiday home in both choices – it was not just because they are in high demand.
Cadaqués, Spain. This is where the idea for the lobster match box came
from. Having worked for Hermès in Paris for a while, I saw it was possible You’ve recently moved from your home in Sydney back to the South
to treat quality with irreverence. of France. How do these two places difer, in terms of style?
It’s funny because we feel they are both similar. Both were bought in terri-
Outside of Maison Balzac, you’ve had quite a lot of attention for ble states and both needed a lot of love. We enjoy adding value to places.
your personal decorating style. What kind of interior atmosphere It’s like saving them from a state of disrepair and transforming them into
do you try to create at home? liveable, home-y homes.
I never thought that my homes would attract so much interest! I guess
I favour unusual buildings – we had a church home then a warehouse Do you have any tips for someone who wants to incorporate art and
home and now we have an 1880 manor house in France – and I deco- design into their home but may not know where to start?
rate them with my heart. I never follow any trend and prefer timeless, I think there is only one answer to this: follow your gut feelings. I was
personal, comfortable interiors. Every piece I add to the house has got taught at a very early age that there is no right or wrong with art; we know
a story, a meaning, a memory attached to it, so my homes are like per- we want a piece when it’s resonating with us instantly. It needs to be a
sonal museums. coup de foudre!

152 / ART EDIT #19


The roots of the tree grow deeper and deeper,
Neither rock nor root will surrender,
But still, the roots wind their way through cracks,
Gaining strength through persistence,
Like in life when you are determined to achieve your goal.

Michele Rudder, TENACIOUS. Acrylic, 104 x 104cm.

MICHELE RUDDER
0414 418 468
michele.rudder@internode.on.net
micheleartist.com