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Operating Manual

3000/3000E Controller ®

3000 Series TS1/TS2/NTCIP Traffic Signal Controllers


®
Operating Manual

3000 and 3000E ®


Traffic Signal Controllers

NEMA TS1/TS2 TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS

11/10/2008
Copyright © 2008 Peek Traffic Corporation
All rights reserved.

Information furnished by Peek Traffic is believed to be accurate and reliable, however Peek does not
warranty the accuracy, completeness, or fitness for use of any of the information furnished. No license is
granted by implication or otherwise under any intellectual property. Peek reserves the right to alter any of
the Company's products or published technical data relating thereto at any time without notice.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or
via any electronic or mechanical means for any purpose other than the purchaser’s personal use without
the expressed, written permission of Peek Traffic Corporation, a Signal Group Company.

Peek Traffic Corporation.


2906 Corporate Way
Palmetto, FL 34221
U.S.A.

Trademarks
The 3000, 3000E, 3000 Series, M3000, CLMATS, and IQ Central are trademarks or registered trademarks
of Peek Traffic Corporation in the USA and other countries. Microsoft and Windows are trademarks or
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Other brands and their products are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective holders.

8204C - 3000/3000E Operating Manual Assembly


8202A - 3000/3000E Operating Manual Contents (Rev 4)
99-343 - 3000/3000E Operating Manual Cover
Quick Contents

Figures .......................................................................................................................xii
Preface — About This Manual ...................................................................................1
Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series ...........................................................5
Chapter 2 — Status Displays ...................................................................................27
Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions.................................................................83
Chapter 4 — Detectors .......................................................................................... 163
Chapter 5 — Overlaps............................................................................................ 181
Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination ............................................................ 211
Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming ............................................................ 221
Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions .................................................................... 275
Chapter 9 — Preemption ....................................................................................... 291
Chapter 10 — Comm and System Setup ............................................................. 345
Chapter 11 — Unit Configuration and Security Codes ...................................... 373
Chapter 12 — TS 2 Type 1 Operation................................................................... 395
Chapter 13 — Utilities ............................................................................................ 417
Appendix A — Time of Day Circuit Descriptions................................................ 429
Appendix B — Preemption Programming Forms ............................................... 433
Appendix C — 3000/3000E Connector Pins ........................................................ 437
Appendix D — Passage Time Settings ................................................................ 461
Glossary .................................................................................................................. 465
Index ........................................................................................................................ 505

3000 Series Traffic Controllers iii


Contents

Figures....................................................................................................................... xii
Preface — About This Manual................................................................................... 1
Purpose and Scope ................................................................................................................................. 1
Assumptions ............................................................................................................................................ 1
Related Documents ................................................................................................................................. 2
Technical Assistance............................................................................................................................... 2
Conventions Used in this Manual ............................................................................................................ 3
Typographic Conventions ................................................................................................................. 3
Keyboard and Menu Conventions..................................................................................................... 3
Symbol Conventions ......................................................................................................................... 4
Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series........................................................... 5
Overview.................................................................................................................................................. 6
Hardware in the 3000 Series ................................................................................................................... 8
Version 3000 Traffic Controller Hardware......................................................................................... 8
Version 3000E Traffic Controller Hardware ...................................................................................... 9
User Interface.................................................................................................................................. 12
Display ............................................................................................................................................ 13
Keypad ............................................................................................................................................ 14
Communication Ports...................................................................................................................... 17
Other Features of the 3000 Series Hardware ................................................................................. 19
Configuration Options............................................................................................................................ 24
NEMA TS 1 ..................................................................................................................................... 24
NEMA TS 2, Type 1 (TS 2-1) .......................................................................................................... 24
NEMA TS 2, Type 2 (TS 2-2) .......................................................................................................... 24
Optional Modules ............................................................................................................................ 25
Usage With Conflict Monitors & Malfunction Management Units.................................................... 26

iv 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Chapter 2 — Status Displays ...................................................................................27


Status Check Upon Startup ................................................................................................................... 28
Primary Controller Status Screen .......................................................................................................... 30
Controller Status Screen................................................................................................................. 30
Status Screen Navigation ............................................................................................................... 31
Layout of the Controller Status Screen ........................................................................................... 32
TS 2 Flash Error Messages ............................................................................................................ 36
Controller Status Screen Abbreviations .......................................................................................... 36
Alternate Controller Status Screen ........................................................................................................ 38
Additional Status Screens ..................................................................................................................... 39
Normal I/O Screen .......................................................................................................................... 40
Density Status Screen .................................................................................................................... 41
Outputs Status Screens .................................................................................................................. 43
Inputs Status Screens ..................................................................................................................... 45
Dynamic Detector Display Screens ................................................................................................ 47
I/O Configuration Status Screens ................................................................................................... 49
Coordination Status Screen ............................................................................................................ 54
Time of Day Status Screen ............................................................................................................. 57
TOD Dynamic Circuits Status Screens ........................................................................................... 58
Preemption Status Screens ............................................................................................................ 59
Coordination Functions Screen ............................................................................................................. 62
Time of Day Functions Screens ............................................................................................................ 62
Preemption Functions Screens ............................................................................................................. 62
Voltages Screen .................................................................................................................................... 63
Overlap Functions Status Screens ........................................................................................................ 64
Program Level & Revision Screen......................................................................................................... 65
Log Menu............................................................................................................................................... 66
MOE Log ......................................................................................................................................... 66
Volume/Occupancy Log.................................................................................................................. 68
Detector Failure Log ....................................................................................................................... 68
Event Log ........................................................................................................................................ 69
Keyboard Log.................................................................................................................................. 71
Pattern Change Log........................................................................................................................ 71
MMU Fault Log ............................................................................................................................... 72
Checksum Status Screens .................................................................................................................... 73
Clearing a Checksum Failure.......................................................................................................... 73
Special Case Checksum Errors ...................................................................................................... 74
Comm Status Screens........................................................................................................................... 75
UTCS Status Display ...................................................................................................................... 78
TS 2 Dynamic Help Screens ................................................................................................................. 80
BIU Failure Help Screen ................................................................................................................. 80
MMU Flash Help Screen................................................................................................................. 80
MMU Incompatibility Help Screen................................................................................................... 80
Diagnostics ............................................................................................................................................ 81
MMU Status Screen .............................................................................................................................. 82
Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions.................................................................83
First Time Setup of the 3000 Series Controller ..................................................................................... 84
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 84
Fundamental Requirements for Operation...................................................................................... 84
Additional Commonly-Used Options ............................................................................................... 84
Coordination, Time of Day, Preemption.......................................................................................... 84
Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller ....................................................................................... 85
Summarized Setup Steps ............................................................................................................... 85
Detailed Setup Steps for Minimal Requirements ............................................................................ 86
Load a Default For Basic Programming.......................................................................................... 86

3000 Series Traffic Controllers v


Edit The Startup Phases And Interval ............................................................................................. 88
Edit Phases Enabled If Default Is not an Exact Match.................................................................... 89
Edit Phase Functions (Phase Recall Modes).................................................................................. 90
Editing Phase Times ....................................................................................................................... 94
Setting Up a Coordination Plan....................................................................................................... 95
Basic Procedure For Setting Up a TOD Plan.................................................................................. 95
Setting Up a Preemption Run ......................................................................................................... 96
Using First Time Setup Menus .............................................................................................................. 97
Menu Descriptions .......................................................................................................................... 98
Using the Controller Menu................................................................................................................... 101
Sequence/Start-up Configuration Screens.................................................................................... 102
Enhanced Sequence Configuration and Exclusive Ped................................................................ 104
Library of Default Sequence Diagrams ......................................................................................... 107
Phases, Rings, Co-Phase Groups and Barriers............................................................................ 108
Examples Using Co-Phase Groups .............................................................................................. 112
Exclusive Pedestrian Operation .................................................................................................... 117
Phase Recalls and Modes ................................................................................................................... 122
Timing Plan Assignable Recall Modes (Menu 1 Recall Modes) ................................................... 122
Timing Plan Assignable Phase Recall Definitions ........................................................................ 123
Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions........................................................................................... 128
Per Unit Phase Recall Definitions ................................................................................................. 129
Phase Times ................................................................................................................................. 133
Terms Used in Phase Timing........................................................................................................ 134
Volume Density Discussion ................................................................................................................. 139
Variable Initial Function................................................................................................................. 139
Gap Reduction Function ............................................................................................................... 141
Dual Entry ............................................................................................................................................ 143
Dual Entry by Time Plan Screens ................................................................................................. 143
Dual Entry Example ...................................................................................................................... 143
Dual Entry Misconception ............................................................................................................. 144
Single Entry Mode......................................................................................................................... 144
Conditional Service.............................................................................................................................. 145
Criteria for Conditional Service ..................................................................................................... 145
Conditional Service Example ........................................................................................................ 145
Conditional Service by Time Plan Screens ................................................................................... 146
Ped Options ......................................................................................................................................... 147
Auto Ped Clear With Manual Control Enable (MCE)..................................................................... 147
Enhanced Pedestrian Operation ................................................................................................... 147
Dual Ped Control........................................................................................................................... 147
Enhanced Options ............................................................................................................................... 148
Dynamic Omits.............................................................................................................................. 148
Dynamic Recalls ........................................................................................................................... 149
Uniform Controlled Flash .............................................................................................................. 150
Density Enables and Last Car Passage........................................................................................ 151
Simultaneous Gap Out.................................................................................................................. 152
Max 3 Options ............................................................................................................................... 153
Passage Sequential, Red Revert, Preempt Override ................................................................... 154
Dimming ........................................................................................................................................ 155
Lead Lag Phasing ......................................................................................................................... 156
Soft Flash ...................................................................................................................................... 159
Chapter 4 — Detectors........................................................................................... 163
Detector Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 164
Detector Assignments ......................................................................................................................... 164
Detection Modes.................................................................................................................................. 166
Call/Extend – Mode 0.................................................................................................................... 166
Call – Mode 1 ................................................................................................................................ 166

vi 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Stretch/Delay – Mode 2 ................................................................................................................ 166


Stop Bar – Modes 3 and 4 ............................................................................................................ 167
Detector Lock Mode...................................................................................................................... 168
Detector Times (delay, stretch/stop bar) ............................................................................................. 169
Detector Delay Inhibits.................................................................................................................. 169
Detector Switch and Copy ................................................................................................................... 171
Switch And Copy Enables............................................................................................................. 171
Detector Switch and Copy Clock Disable ..................................................................................... 171
Switch And Copy Pattern Screens ................................................................................................ 172
Detector Failure Monitoring ................................................................................................................. 174
Absence Monitor Time Of Day, Erratic Monitor Enable ................................................................ 174
Lock Times.................................................................................................................................... 175
Absence Of Call ............................................................................................................................ 175
Minimum Presence ....................................................................................................................... 176
Erratic Counts Per Minute (TS 2).................................................................................................. 176
Loop Length .................................................................................................................................. 177
Failed Detector Phase and Fail Max Recall Times ....................................................................... 177
Pedestrian Detector Diagnostics................................................................................................... 178
System Sensor Assignment ................................................................................................................ 179
Third Car Detection Feature ................................................................................................................ 180
Chapter 5 — Overlaps............................................................................................ 181
General Description............................................................................................................................. 182
Overlap Channels and Compatibility............................................................................................. 183
Overlap Programming ......................................................................................................................... 185
Assignments & Types ................................................................................................................... 185
Start-Up, Card, Alternate Flash..................................................................................................... 191
Double Clearing Overlaps ................................................................................................................... 192
Double Clear Overlap Programming............................................................................................. 193
Double Clearing Overlaps–Example 1.......................................................................................... 195
Double Clearing Overlaps–Example 2.......................................................................................... 196
Pedestrian Overlaps ............................................................................................................................ 197
Ped Overlap Mode Screen............................................................................................................ 198
Advance Warning Logic (TS 2 Only) ................................................................................................... 202
Advance Warning Example........................................................................................................... 202
Advance Warning Set-Up Procedure............................................................................................ 203
Lead/Advance Green Overlaps ........................................................................................................... 207
Inhibiting Overlaps............................................................................................................................... 209
Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination ............................................................ 211
General Overview of Coordination ...................................................................................................... 212
Signal Timing in a Coordinated Environment ...................................................................................... 213
Cycle Length ................................................................................................................................. 213
Local Cycle ................................................................................................................................... 213
Split (Phase Allocation)................................................................................................................. 213
Local Cycle Reference Point......................................................................................................... 213
Master Cycle ................................................................................................................................. 214
Offset ............................................................................................................................................ 215
Synchronization Methods .................................................................................................................... 216
Historical Sources of Sync Pulses ................................................................................................ 216
Offset Seeking .............................................................................................................................. 216
Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit ........................................................................................ 217
Functions Used to Coordinate an Actuated Controller.................................................................. 217
Example of Force Off And Permissive Placement ........................................................................ 217
Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming ............................................................ 221
Understanding the Coordination Menu................................................................................................ 222

3000 Series Traffic Controllers vii


Clear/Load Defaults............................................................................................................................. 223
Selection Sources................................................................................................................................ 224
Notes about Selection Sources..................................................................................................... 224
Basic Options ...................................................................................................................................... 225
Reference to End of Main St. ........................................................................................................ 225
Use % for Phase Allocation (Splits) ............................................................................................. 225
Offset Entry in % ........................................................................................................................... 225
Use of Fixed vs. Floating Force-Offs............................................................................................. 226
Permissive Type............................................................................................................................ 229
Computation Of Force Offs And Permissives ............................................................................... 235
Phase Re-Service and Early Coord Phase Return ....................................................................... 235
Cycles and Offset Times ..................................................................................................................... 236
Adjusting Offset Times in the Field ............................................................................................... 237
Minimum Cycle Length or Max Dwell............................................................................................ 237
4 Splits Per Cycle Mode................................................................................................................ 238
Coordination Phase Programming ...................................................................................................... 239
Phase Allocation.................................................................................................................................. 240
Entering Phase Allocation Times .................................................................................................. 240
Additional Details Concerning Phase Allocation ........................................................................... 242
Adjusting Allocation Times in the Field ......................................................................................... 242
Offset Seeking ..................................................................................................................................... 243
Types of Offset Seeking................................................................................................................ 243
Coordination Plan (COS/F) to TOD Circuits ........................................................................................ 245
Programming a Plan ..................................................................................................................... 245
Enhanced Coordination Options.......................................................................................................... 246
Operating Options ......................................................................................................................... 246
Cycle Sync Options....................................................................................................................... 252
Local Split Modes.......................................................................................................................... 257
No Early Release .......................................................................................................................... 262
C/S to Timing Plan ........................................................................................................................ 263
COS to LEAD/LAG........................................................................................................................ 264
Offset to Free ................................................................................................................................ 264
Using the Check Coordination Plan Feature ....................................................................................... 265
Setting Up a Check Coordination Plan.......................................................................................... 265
Executing the Check Coordination Plan........................................................................................ 267
Basic Coordination - An Example........................................................................................................ 269
Overview of This Example ............................................................................................................ 269
Defining the Selection Source....................................................................................................... 269
Basic Operating Modes................................................................................................................. 270
Cycle and Offset Times................................................................................................................. 271
Phase Allocations.......................................................................................................................... 272
Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions..................................................................... 275
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 276
TOD Data Entry Modes ....................................................................................................................... 277
Day Plans (event programming).......................................................................................................... 278
Erasing A Day Plan ....................................................................................................................... 278
Editing a Day Plan......................................................................................................................... 278
Deleting Events ............................................................................................................................. 279
Event Times .................................................................................................................................. 279
Types Of Events............................................................................................................................ 279
Circuit Plan Events........................................................................................................................ 279
C/O/S Pattern Events.................................................................................................................... 279
Circuit ON/OFF Events ................................................................................................................. 279
Event Screen Selection Shortcut .................................................................................................. 280
Automatic Circuit Reset At Midnight.............................................................................................. 280
Typical Day Plan Example................................................................................................................... 280

viii 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Configuring Circuit Plans ..................................................................................................................... 282


Programming a Circuit Plan .......................................................................................................... 282
Configuring Week Plans ...................................................................................................................... 283
Configuring a Year Plan ...................................................................................................................... 284
Defining Exception Days ..................................................................................................................... 285
Circuit Overrides.................................................................................................................................. 286
Daylight Savings Time......................................................................................................................... 287
Sync Reference ................................................................................................................................... 288
Sync Reference Modes................................................................................................................. 288
Comparing Time Dependent And C/O/S Event Modes................................................................. 288
Sync Reference Times.................................................................................................................. 289
External Clock Reset Time ........................................................................................................... 289
Interrupter Mode ........................................................................................................................... 289
Setting the Date and Time................................................................................................................... 290
Chapter 9 — Preemption ....................................................................................... 291
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 292
Basic Description of Preemption Operation .................................................................................. 292
Key Concepts Used in Preemption ............................................................................................... 293
Preemption Programming.................................................................................................................... 295
Viewing and Programming a Single Preemption Run................................................................... 295
Clearing a Single Preemption Run................................................................................................ 295
Clearing All Preemption Runs ....................................................................................................... 295
Loading Default Values to a Single Preemption Run.................................................................... 295
Editing A Preemption Run ................................................................................................................... 296
Per Run Data ................................................................................................................................ 296
Interval Data.................................................................................................................................. 308
Comparison of Cyclic, Fixed, and Dwell Intervals......................................................................... 315
Applying Exclusive PED During Preemption................................................................................. 320
Documents and Charts Supporting Preemption Programming..................................................... 321
Preemption Interval Table............................................................................................................. 321
Description Of Preempt Run Rejection (‘Run Invalid’) .................................................................. 322
Flash Plans ................................................................................................................................... 323
Quick Set-Up Procedures ............................................................................................................. 324
Placing a Manual Preemption Call ...................................................................................................... 332
Examples of Preemption Programming............................................................................................... 333
Chapter 10 — Comm and System Setup ............................................................. 345
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 346
Closed Loop ID.................................................................................................................................... 347
Comm Setup........................................................................................................................................ 348
Setting Up Comm Port 2 ............................................................................................................... 349
Setting Up Comm Port 3 ............................................................................................................... 351
Setting Up an AT Modem String ................................................................................................... 352
Ethernet Setup .............................................................................................................................. 353
Additional Notes About Configuring Modems ............................................................................... 354
Phone Numbers................................................................................................................................... 361
Event Call-In ........................................................................................................................................ 362
Log Data .............................................................................................................................................. 364
Port 1 Setup......................................................................................................................................... 366
System Name ...................................................................................................................................... 370
Contact Name...................................................................................................................................... 371
HDLC Address..................................................................................................................................... 372
Chapter 11 — Unit Configuration and Security Codes ...................................... 373
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 374
Security Codes .................................................................................................................................... 375

3000 Series Traffic Controllers ix


Restricting Access to Menus ............................................................................................................... 376
Restricting a Menu Selection ........................................................................................................ 376
Restoring a Menu Selection Back To Full Access ........................................................................ 376
Adding and Deleting Menus ................................................................................................................ 377
Adding/Deleting Menus ................................................................................................................. 377
To Restore a Menu Item ............................................................................................................... 377
Setting the Intersection Name ............................................................................................................. 378
EEPROM Settings/Audio Adjustment.................................................................................................. 379
Updating the Controller Firmware........................................................................................................ 380
Firmware Tools for Flash-Enabled Controllers.............................................................................. 382
Loading the New Firmware ........................................................................................................... 386
Updating the Modem Setup String ................................................................................................ 391
I/O Steering ......................................................................................................................................... 392
Output (Signal Head) Steering Programming ............................................................................... 392
Output Steering Examples ............................................................................................................ 394
Using Overlaps in Output Steering................................................................................................ 394
Chapter 12 — TS 2 Type 1 Operation ................................................................... 395
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 396
The NEMA Standards for Controller Input and Output ................................................................. 396
Cabinet Components........................................................................................................................... 397
BIUs .............................................................................................................................................. 399
MMU.............................................................................................................................................. 400
Default BIU Input/Output Mapping....................................................................................................... 400
Customizing BIU Input and Output Mapping................................................................................. 404
Activating/Deactivating BIU I/O Mapping............................................................................................. 406
Activating I/O Mapping .................................................................................................................. 406
Deactivating the I/O Mapping........................................................................................................ 407
Clearing BIU I/O Mappings ........................................................................................................... 407
Configuring Input Mappings................................................................................................................. 408
Using Logical Operators with Input Mappings............................................................................... 409
Configuring Output Mappings.............................................................................................................. 410
Loading a Default NEMA Mapping ...................................................................................................... 410
Copying MMU Channels ............................................................................................................... 411
I/O Mapping Screen Abbreviations...................................................................................................... 413
Input and Output Pin Mapping Options ......................................................................................... 414
Chapter 13 — Utilities ............................................................................................ 417
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 418
Default Data Load................................................................................................................................ 419
Transfer Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 420
Clear Logs ........................................................................................................................................... 420
EEPROM - RAM Copy ........................................................................................................................ 421
Restart Machine .................................................................................................................................. 422
Printer Menu ........................................................................................................................................ 423
Printer Setup ................................................................................................................................. 423
Printing Portions of the Controller Database................................................................................. 424
Copy Functions.................................................................................................................................... 425
Controller....................................................................................................................................... 425
Coordination Copy ........................................................................................................................ 426
Time of Day Copy ......................................................................................................................... 426
Preemption Copy .......................................................................................................................... 427
Request Download .............................................................................................................................. 428
BIU I/O Mapping .................................................................................................................................. 428
Appendix A — Time of Day Circuit Descriptions ................................................ 429
TOD Circuit Descriptions ..................................................................................................................... 430

x 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Notes on the Definitions ...................................................................................................................... 431


Appendix B — Preemption Programming Forms ............................................... 433
Preemption Programming Forms ........................................................................................................ 434
Appendix C — 3000/3000E Connector Pins ........................................................ 437
Pin Assignments: MS-A Connector (TS 1 Controllers)........................................................................ 438
Pin Assignments: MS-B Connector (TS 1 Controllers)........................................................................ 440
Pin Assignments: MS-C Connector (TS 1 Controllers) ...................................................................... 442
Pin Assignments: 10-Pin MS-A Connector for TS 2 Type 1 ................................................................ 443
Pin Assignments: TS 2 Type 2 Through A-B-C Connectors ............................................................... 444
Inputs ............................................................................................................................................ 444
Outputs ......................................................................................................................................... 445
Pin Assignments: Closed Loop D Module ........................................................................................... 446
Auxiliary Connector (37 Pin) ......................................................................................................... 446
Preemption Connector (25 Pin) .................................................................................................... 447
Coordination Connector (26 Pin) .................................................................................................. 448
Pin Assignments: 12 Phase D Module ................................................................................................ 449
Pin Assignments: LMD D Module (63 pin CPC) .................................................................................. 452
Pin Assignments: Texas D Module...................................................................................................... 454
Circular Connector (57 Pin) .......................................................................................................... 454
AUX Connector (37 Pin) ............................................................................................................... 455
Pin Assignments: Las Vegas D Module .............................................................................................. 457
Circular Connector (57 Pin) .......................................................................................................... 457
25 Pin Connector .......................................................................................................................... 458
Communication Ports .......................................................................................................................... 459
Port 1–SDLC Connector ............................................................................................................... 459
Port 2–EIA-232 (RS-232C) Connector.......................................................................................... 459
Aux Connector .............................................................................................................................. 460
Port 3–Modem Connector............................................................................................................. 460
Appendix D — Passage Time Settings ................................................................ 461
Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 462
Selecting a Passage Time................................................................................................................... 462
Examples ...................................................................................................................................... 462
Glossary .................................................................................................................. 465
Quick Guide to Controller Functions.................................................................................................... 466
Quick Guide to Coordination Functions............................................................................................... 487
Quick Guide to Preemption Functions................................................................................................. 498
Acronyms............................................................................................................................................. 503
Index ........................................................................................................................ 505

3000 Series Traffic Controllers xi


Figures
Figure 1 – 3000 Controller ..................................................................................................................................................8
Figure 2 – 3000E Controller, typical TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 configuration ...........................................................................9
Figure 3 – 3000E Controller, typical TS 2 Type 1 configuration...........................................................................................9
Figure 4 – Flash-enabled 3000E Controller (TS 2 Type 2 version)....................................................................................11
Figure 5 – ‘Flash Memory Enabled’ logo ...........................................................................................................................11
Figure 6 – Sample representation of a 3000 Series screen...............................................................................................13
Figure 7 – 3000E Keypad .................................................................................................................................................14
Figure 9 – Ports with DSP modem installed as Port 3 .......................................................................................................17
Figure 10 – Ports with second serial port installed as Port 3 .............................................................................................18
Figure 11 – Ports with fiber optic modem installed as Port 3 .............................................................................................18
Figure 12 – Ports with serial/Ethernet card installed as Port 3 ..........................................................................................18
Figure 13 – Self-test screen that appears upon power up .................................................................................................28
Figure 14 – Power-on Error Message with 3 database errors detected.............................................................................28
Figure 15 – Controller Status screen.................................................................................................................................30
Figure 16 – Navigating the status screens ........................................................................................................................31
Figure 17 – Detail: Top three lines of the controller status screen.....................................................................................32
Figure 18 – Detail: Middle four lines..................................................................................................................................33
Figure 19 – Alternate Controller Status screen..................................................................................................................38
Figure 20 – Normal I/O Status screen ...............................................................................................................................40
Figure 21 – Density Status screen ....................................................................................................................................41
Figure 22 – Density Status screen - Example 1 ................................................................................................................42
Figure 23 – Density Status screen - Example 2 ................................................................................................................42
Figure 24 – Density Status screen - Example 3 ................................................................................................................42
Figure 25 – Density Status screen - Example 4 ................................................................................................................42
Figure 26 – Output Status screen - page 1 .......................................................................................................................43
Figure 27 – Output Status screen - page 2 .......................................................................................................................43
Figure 28 – Inputs Status screen - page 1 ........................................................................................................................45
Figure 29 – Inputs Status screen - page 2 - Ring Inputs ...................................................................................................45
Figure 30 – Inputs Status screen - page 3 - Machine Inputs .............................................................................................45
Figure 31 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 1 (TS 1)..........................................................................................47
Figure 32 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 1 (TS 2)..........................................................................................47
Figure 33 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 2 (TS 1 or 2)...................................................................................47
Figure 34 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 1 or TS 2 Type 2).................................................................................49
Figure 35 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 1 or TS 2 Type 2).................................................................................49
Figure 36 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 2 Type 1) .............................................................................................50
Figure 37 – I/O Module Configuration screen - Page 1 (TS 2 Type 1)...............................................................................50
Figure 38 – I/O Module Configuration screen - Page 2 (TS 2 Type 1)...............................................................................50
Figure 39 – D Module Status screen - page 1 ...................................................................................................................52
Figure 40 – D Module Status screen - page 2 ...................................................................................................................52
Figure 41 – D Module Status screen - page 3 ...................................................................................................................52
Figure 42 – D Module Status screen - page 4 ...................................................................................................................53
Figure 43 – Coordination Status screen ............................................................................................................................54
Figure 44 – Time of Day Status screen .............................................................................................................................57
Figure 45 – Time of Day Dynamic Circuits screen - page 1 ..............................................................................................58
Figure 46 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 1 ........................................................................................................59
Figure 47 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 2 ........................................................................................................59
Figure 48 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 3 ........................................................................................................60
Figure 49 – Voltages screen .............................................................................................................................................63
Figure 50 – Overlap Functions Status screen ...................................................................................................................64
Figure 51 – Program Level & Revision screen ..................................................................................................................65
Figure 52 – Log Menu.......................................................................................................................................................66
Figure 53 – MOE Log - type 1 ...........................................................................................................................................66
Figure 54 – MOE Log - type 2 ...........................................................................................................................................66

xii 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Figure 55 – MOE Log - type 3...........................................................................................................................................67


Figure 56 – MOE Log - type 4...........................................................................................................................................67
Figure 57 – Volume/Occupancy Log screen .....................................................................................................................68
Figure 58 – Detector Failure Log screen...........................................................................................................................68
Figure 59 – Event Log screen ...........................................................................................................................................69
Figure 60 – Keyboard Log screen .....................................................................................................................................71
Figure 61 – Pattern Change Log screen ...........................................................................................................................71
Figure 62 – MMU Fault Log screen...................................................................................................................................72
Figure 63 – Reported checksum failure screen.................................................................................................................73
Figure 64 – Cleared checksum screen..............................................................................................................................74
Figure 65 – No checksum failures detected ......................................................................................................................74
Figure 66 – Special errors reported on the Checksum Error screen..................................................................................74
Figure 67 – Mizbat Dynamic Status Screen ......................................................................................................................75
Figure 68 – Mizbat Dynamic Status Screen after a cleared override.................................................................................75
Figure 69 – Port 2 Status screen ......................................................................................................................................76
Figure 70 – Port 3 Status screen ......................................................................................................................................77
Figure 71 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to None ..............................................................................78
Figure 72 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to Protocol90......................................................................78
Figure 73 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to Stamford ........................................................................79
Figure 71 – Diagnostics Warning screen ..........................................................................................................................81
Figure 72 – Diagnostics Menu ..........................................................................................................................................81
Figure 73 – MMU Status screen .......................................................................................................................................82
Figure 74 – Locate ‘First Time Setup’ on the Main Menu ..................................................................................................86
Figure 75 – Controller default data load ............................................................................................................................86
Figure 76 – Screen indicating a default data load .............................................................................................................87
Figure 77 – Editing startup phases and intervals ..............................................................................................................88
Figure 78 – Sequence Configuration - Ring setup.............................................................................................................89
Figure 79 – Sequence Configuration - Setting Up co-phases............................................................................................89
Figure 80 – Configuring Phase Functions .........................................................................................................................91
Figure 81 – Configuring Phase Functions - page 2 ...........................................................................................................92
Figure 82 – Configuring Phase Functions - page 3 ...........................................................................................................92
Figure 83 – Editing Once-Per-Unit Recalls........................................................................................................................93
Figure 84 – Editing Once-Per-Unit Recalls - page 2.........................................................................................................93
Figure 85 – Editing phase times........................................................................................................................................94
Figure 86 – Editing phase times - page 2..........................................................................................................................94
Figure 87 – Go to the Main Menu and choose 6.First Time Setup ....................................................................................97
Figure 88 – Basic Setup Procedure screen.......................................................................................................................97
Figure 89 – Basic Setup Procedure screen - page 2........................................................................................................97
Figure 90 – Press the selection from the Quick Start menu to see topic ...........................................................................98
Figure 91 – Main Menu .....................................................................................................................................................98
Figure 92 – Dynamic Menu ...............................................................................................................................................99
Figure 93 – Change Data Menu........................................................................................................................................99
Figure 94 – Main Menu ................................................................................................................................................... 101
Figure 95 – Change Data Menu...................................................................................................................................... 101
Figure 96 – Controller Menu ........................................................................................................................................... 101
Figure 97 – Sequence/Startup Configuration Screen - page 1 ........................................................................................ 102
Figure 98 – Adding and deleting phases from preset configuration................................................................................. 103
Figure 99 – Adding/deleting co-phases to configuration.................................................................................................. 104
Figure 100 – Phase enable/disable and Ring assignment............................................................................................... 105
Figure 101 – Assigning phases to co-phase groups........................................................................................................ 105
Figure 102 – Exclusive Pedestrian phase programming ................................................................................................. 106
Figure 103 – Rings and Co-phases Example 1............................................................................................................... 109
Figure 104 – Rings and Co-phases Example 2............................................................................................................... 109
Figure 105 – Rings and Co-phases Example 3............................................................................................................... 109
Figure 103 – Ring, Barrier, and Co-phase Relationship (Sd 8 phase quad left) .............................................................. 110
Figure 104 – Example of Co-phase programming........................................................................................................... 111
Figure 105 – Altering co-phase assignments - example 1............................................................................................... 112
Figure 106 – Changing sequence order - example 1 ...................................................................................................... 112
Figure 107 – Ring assignments - example 2 ................................................................................................................... 113
Figure 108 – Co-phase assignments - example 2 .......................................................................................................... 113
Figure 109 – Ring assignments - example 3 ................................................................................................................. 114
Figure 110 – Co-phase assignments - example 3 .......................................................................................................... 114
Figure 111 – Ring assignments - example 4 .................................................................................................................. 115
Figure 112 – Co-phase assignments - example 4 .......................................................................................................... 115

3000 Series Traffic Controllers xiii


Figure 113 – Ring assignment of an exclusive ped phase .............................................................................................117
Figure 114 – Co-phase assignment for an exclusive ped phase ....................................................................................118
Figure 115 – Another co-phase assignment for an XPED phase ...................................................................................118
Figure 116 – Setting up XPED operation .......................................................................................................................118
Figure 117 – Compatibility card jumpers for an XPED phase.........................................................................................120
Figure 118 – Ring and co-phase topography for an XPED as phase 7 ..........................................................................121
Figure 119 – Exclusive ped phase in an intersection......................................................................................................121
Figure 120 – Exclusive ped with overlap programming ..................................................................................................121
Figure 121 – Phase Recalls/Modes Menu......................................................................................................................122
Figure 122 – Timing plan assignable recall modes ........................................................................................................122
Figure 123 – Phase Recalls/Modes Menu - page 2........................................................................................................123
Figure 124 – Timing plan assignable recall modes - page 3..........................................................................................123
Figure 125 – No Skip example .......................................................................................................................................127
Figure 126 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions .......................................................................................................128
Figure 127 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions - page 2 .........................................................................................128
Figure 128 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions - page 3 .........................................................................................128
Figure 129 – Phase timing configuration - page 1 ..........................................................................................................133
Figure 130 – Phase timing configuration - page 2 ..........................................................................................................133
Figure 131 – Phase timing configuration - page 3 ..........................................................................................................134
Figure 132 – Cars are counted during red.......................................................................................................................139
Figure 133 – Classic Case of Gap Reduction..................................................................................................................141
Figure 134 – Passage Timer during Gap Reduction .......................................................................................................142
Figure 135 – Dual Entry programming screen................................................................................................................143
Figure 136 – Dual Entry by Time Plan screen ................................................................................................................143
Figure 137 – Conditional Service screen........................................................................................................................145
Figure 138 – Conditional Service by Time Plan screen ..................................................................................................146
Figure 139 – Ped Options screen...................................................................................................................................147
Figure 140 – Enhanced Options Menu...........................................................................................................................148
Figure 141 – Dynamic Omits screen ..............................................................................................................................148
Figure 142 – Dynamic Recalls screen............................................................................................................................149
Figure 143 – UCF Setup screen.....................................................................................................................................150
Figure 144 – Density Setup screen ................................................................................................................................151
Figure 145 – Simultaneous Gap Out Setup screen ........................................................................................................152
Figure 146 – Max 3 Options Setup screen .....................................................................................................................153
Figure 147 – Passage Sequential/Red Revert/PE Override screen................................................................................154
Figure 148 – Phase Dimming Setup screen - page 1 .....................................................................................................155
Figure 149 – Phase Dimming Setup screen - page 2 .....................................................................................................155
Figure 150 – Lead/Lag Setup screen .............................................................................................................................156
Figure 151 – Multiple Lead-Lag pairs..............................................................................................................................158
Figure 152 – Soft Flash Setup screen ............................................................................................................................159
Figure 153 – Detector Menu ..........................................................................................................................................164
Figure 154 – Detector Assignments screen (aka ‘Veh. Assignments’) ...........................................................................164
Figure 155 – Pedestrian Detector Assignments screen..................................................................................................165
Figure 156 – Detection Modes screen............................................................................................................................166
Figure 157 – Detector Lock Setup screen ......................................................................................................................168
Figure 158 – Detector Timing Setup screen...................................................................................................................169
Figure 159 – Detector Delay Inhibits screen ..................................................................................................................169
Figure 160 – Detector Switch/Copy Setup screen..........................................................................................................171
Figure 161 – Switch Setting ...........................................................................................................................................172
Figure 162 – Detector Failure Monitoring Menu .............................................................................................................174
Figure 163 – Detector Absence/Erratic Behavior Monitoring ..........................................................................................174
Figure 164 – Locked Call Monitoring Setup screen........................................................................................................175
Figure 165 – ‘Absence of Call’ Monitoring Setup screen ................................................................................................175
Figure 166 – Minimum Presence Monitoring Setup screen ............................................................................................176
Figure 167 – Erratic Counts-Per-Minute Monitoring Setup screen .................................................................................176
Figure 168 – Detector Loop Length screen ....................................................................................................................177
Figure 169 – Failed Max Recall Time screen .................................................................................................................177
Figure 170 – Failed Detector Max Recall Settings .........................................................................................................177
Figure 171 – Pedestrian Detector Diagnostics Setup screen .........................................................................................178
Figure 172 – System Sensor Assignment screen...........................................................................................................179
Figure 173 – Simple Overlap ..........................................................................................................................................182
Figure 174 – Typical multi-ring overlap ...........................................................................................................................183
Figure 175 – Typical Load Switch assignments ..............................................................................................................183
Figure 176 – Overlap Menu ............................................................................................................................................185
Figure 177 – Individual overlap programming screen 1...................................................................................................185

xiv 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Figure 178 – Timing diagram of an overlap programmed with a delay ............................................................................ 187
Figure 179 – Individual overlap programming screen 2................................................................................................... 191
Figure 180 – Double Clearing Overlap setup screen....................................................................................................... 193
Figure 181 – Offset Intersection with Double Clearing Overlaps ..................................................................................... 195
Figure 182 – Standard Overlap settings - Example 1...................................................................................................... 195
Figure 183 – Double Clearing Overlap settings - Example 1........................................................................................... 196
Figure 184 – Double Clearing Overlap Used for a Track Clearance................................................................................ 196
Figure 185 – Double Clearing Overlap settings - Example 2........................................................................................... 196
Figure 186 — Setting pedestrian overlap modes ............................................................................................................ 198
Figure 187 — Setting Ped Overlap parent phases .......................................................................................................... 200
Figure 188 — Example of Ped Overlap operation ........................................................................................................... 200
Figure 189 — Using Ped Overlap for Carryover operation .............................................................................................. 201
Figure 190 – Double Clearing Overlap used for Advanced Warning ............................................................................... 203
Figure 191 — Setup a standard overlap ......................................................................................................................... 204
Figure 192 — Setup overlap for double-clearing operation ............................................................................................. 204
Figure 193 — Programming advance-warn logic ............................................................................................................ 205
Figure 194 — Advance warning logic screen .................................................................................................................. 206
Figure 195 — Comparison - Leading and Advance Leading Overlaps............................................................................ 207
Figure 196 – Lead Overlap setup screen - Overlap A ..................................................................................................... 207
Figure 197 – Three types of coordinated progression ..................................................................................................... 212
Figure 198 – Two intersections with the same Local Cycle length .................................................................................. 213
Figure 199 – Local Cycle Reference Point ...................................................................................................................... 214
Figure 200 – Example of Coordinated Intersection Offsets ............................................................................................. 215
Figure 201 – Typical placements of fixed force offs and permissives.............................................................................. 218
Figure 202 — Coordination Menu ................................................................................................................................... 222
Figure 203 — Coord Clear and Load Defaults Menu ...................................................................................................... 223
Figure 204 — Clearing all coord values .......................................................................................................................... 223
Figure 205 — Coord Selection Source screen ................................................................................................................ 224
Figure 206 — Coordination Basic Options screen........................................................................................................... 225
Figure 207 – Relative allocation times for an 8 phase intersection.................................................................................. 226
Figure 208 – Fixed and Floating Force Offs - Full demand on all phases........................................................................ 227
Figure 209 – Fixed and Floating Force Offs – Differing Timing on Gap Outs ..................................................................227
Figure 210 – Operation of Yield Permissives .................................................................................................................. 230
Figure 211 – Single Mode Permissives (when in coordinated phases) ...........................................................................231
Figure 212 – Multiple Mode Permissives (when in Coordinated phases) ........................................................................ 233
Figure 213 — Cycles and offset times screen................................................................................................................. 236
Figure 214 — Setting timing for 4 splits per cycle mode.................................................................................................. 238
Figure 215 — Coordinated phases screen...................................................................................................................... 239
Figure 216 — Coordinated phases screen - 4 splits per cycle mode............................................................................... 239
Figure 217 — Programming phase allocation times - example 1 .................................................................................... 241
Figure 218 — Programming phase allocation times - example 2 .................................................................................... 241
Figure 219 — Coordination plan to TOD circuits screen ................................................................................................. 245
Figure 220 — Enhanced Coordination Options Menu ..................................................................................................... 246
Figure 221 — Coordination enhanced operating modes ................................................................................................. 246
Figure 222 — Coordination enhanced operating modes - page 2 ................................................................................... 246
Figure 223 — Cycle Sync Options screen....................................................................................................................... 252
Figure 224 — Permissives and Force-offs Menu ............................................................................................................ 254
Figure 225 — Selecting a permissives mode .................................................................................................................. 254
Figure 226 — Loading manual permissives times (24 splits/cycle mode)........................................................................256
Figure 227 — Loading manual force-offs for cycle 1 ....................................................................................................... 257
Figure 228 — Adaptive Split control screen .................................................................................................................... 258
Figure 229 — Adaptive Split Control - example 1............................................................................................................ 259
Figure 230 — Adaptive Split Control - example 2............................................................................................................ 259
Figure 231 — Adaptive Split Inhibits screen.................................................................................................................... 260
Figure 232 — Split Matrix setup screen - 4 split per cycle mode ..................................................................................... 261
Figure 233 — Split Matrix setup screen - 24 split mode .................................................................................................. 261
Figure 234 — No Early Release setup screen ................................................................................................................ 262
Figure 235 — Cycle/split to timing plan screen ............................................................................................................... 263
Figure 236 — Cycle/split to timing plan screen - 24 split mode ....................................................................................... 263
Figure 237 — COS to lead/lag screen ............................................................................................................................ 264
Figure 238 — Offset to free setup screen ....................................................................................................................... 264
Figure 239 — Checking the coordination plan ................................................................................................................ 265
Figure 240 — Setting the selection source...................................................................................................................... 269
Figure 241 — Basic operating modes ............................................................................................................................. 270

3000 Series Traffic Controllers xv


Figure 242 — Setting cycle and offset times ...................................................................................................................271
Figure 243 — CNA usage example.................................................................................................................................272
Figure 244 — Phase allocations as percentages ............................................................................................................272
Figure 245 — Phase allocations in seconds ...................................................................................................................273
Figure 246 — Time of Day Menu ....................................................................................................................................276
Figure 247 — Day Plan selection screen ........................................................................................................................278
Figure 248 — Editing a day plan .....................................................................................................................................278
Figure 249 — Typical day plan example - screen 1 ........................................................................................................280
Figure 250 — Typical day plan example - screen 2 ........................................................................................................281
Figure 251 — Typical day plan example - screen 3 ........................................................................................................281
Figure 252 — Configuring circuit plans ...........................................................................................................................282
Figure 253 — Week Plans editing screen .......................................................................................................................283
Figure 254 — Year Plan Editing screen ..........................................................................................................................284
Figure 255 — Exception Day configuration screen .........................................................................................................285
Figure 256 — Circuit Override setup screen ...................................................................................................................286
Figure 257 — Daylight Savings Time setup screen.........................................................................................................287
Figure 258 — Sync Reference Setup screen ..................................................................................................................288
Figure 259 — Set Date and Time screen ........................................................................................................................290
Figure 260 – Preemption Options list ..............................................................................................................................295
Figure 261 – Erase All Preemption Runs verification screen...........................................................................................295
Figure 262 – Preemption Run 1 Menu ............................................................................................................................296
Figure 263 – Per Run Menu for preemption run 1 ...........................................................................................................296
Figure 264 – Per Run Parameters, Screen 1 ..................................................................................................................297
Figure 265 – Per Run Parameters, Screen 2 ..................................................................................................................299
Figure 266 – Per Run Times ...........................................................................................................................................301
Figure 267 – Preemption Entry Parameters screen ........................................................................................................303
Figure 268 – Per Run/Per Interval Parameters screen 1.................................................................................................305
Figure 269 – Per Run/Per Interval Parameters screen 2.................................................................................................305
Figure 270 – Per Run Exit Parameters screen ................................................................................................................306
Figure 271 – Preemption Interval Data screen 1 .............................................................................................................308
Figure 272 – Preemption Interval Data screen 2 .............................................................................................................308
Figure 273 – Preemption Interval Data screen 3 .............................................................................................................309
Figure 274 – Example of Preemption Interval Data screen 1 ..........................................................................................312
Figure 275 – Preemption Interval Data screen 2 - details................................................................................................313
Figure 276 – Preemption Interval Data screen 3 - details................................................................................................314
Figure 277 – Per Run Options screen 1 ..........................................................................................................................317
Figure 278 – Per Run Options - Enabling Coordination...................................................................................................317
Figure 279 – Preemption Flash Plan pogramming screen...............................................................................................323
Figure 280 – Open the Preemption menu for a particular run..........................................................................................324
Figure 281 – Quick Setup Options screen.......................................................................................................................325
Figure 282 – Fire Run Setup screen ...............................................................................................................................325
Figure 283 – Fire Run Interval screen.............................................................................................................................328
Figure 284 – Railroad Run Interval screen......................................................................................................................329
Figure 285 – Railroad Run Interval screen - second interval ...........................................................................................330
Figure 286 – Railroad Run Interval screen - third interval ...............................................................................................330
Figure 287 – R1 Cyclic Group A Time screen .................................................................................................................331
Figure 288 – A keyboard-entered call for preemption run 1 ............................................................................................332
Figure 289 – Preemption Status screen showing keyboard call on run 1 ........................................................................332
Figure 290 – Example preemption with typical fire runs ..................................................................................................333
Figure 291 – Preemption Example 1 - Disabling run .......................................................................................................333
Figure 292 –Preemption Example 1 - Setting duration timer ...........................................................................................334
Figure 293 –Preemption Example 1 - Setting entry times ...............................................................................................334
Figure 294 –Preemption Example 1 - Setting exit controls..............................................................................................335
Figure 295 –Preemption Example 1 - Setting interval data .............................................................................................335
Figure 296 – Preemption Example 2 - Fire runs and railroad crossing ............................................................................336
Figure 297 –Preemption Example 2 - Setting run parameters.........................................................................................337
Figure 298 –Preemption Example 2 - Setting run times ..................................................................................................338
Figure 299 –Preemption Example 2 - Setting entry times ...............................................................................................338
Figure 300 –Preemption Example 2 - Setting exit controls..............................................................................................339
Figure 301 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 1 phase colors .........................................................................................339
Figure 302 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 1 overlap colors .......................................................................................340
Figure 303 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 2 phase colors .........................................................................................340
Figure 304 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 2 overlap colors .......................................................................................340
Figure 305 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 3 phase colors .........................................................................................341
Figure 306 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 3 phase colors .........................................................................................341

xvi 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Figure 307 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 4 phase colors ......................................................................................... 342


Figure 308 –Preemption Example 2 - Interval 4 phase colors ......................................................................................... 342
Figure 309 –Preemption Example 3 - Interval 4 phase colors ......................................................................................... 343
Figure 310 –Preemption Example 3 - Interval 4 overlap colors ....................................................................................... 343
Figure 311 – Preemption Example 3 - Programming the Flash plan ............................................................................... 344
Figure 312 – Comm/System Setup menu (TS 1)............................................................................................................. 346
Figure 313 – Comm/System Setup menu (TS 2)............................................................................................................. 346
Figure 314 – Closed Loop Master/ID Setup screen......................................................................................................... 347
Figure 315 – Comm Port 2 Setup screen ........................................................................................................................ 349
Figure 316 – Comm Port 3 Setup screen with Hardware set to “Ethernet” ...................................................................... 351
Figure 317 – Setup Modem String screen....................................................................................................................... 352
Figure 318 – Ethernet Setup screen ............................................................................................................................... 353
Figure 319 – Ethernet Setup screen showing DHCP retrieval error ................................................................................ 353
Figure 320 – Modem attached to a 3000 series controller............................................................................................... 354
Figure 321 – Phone Numbers setup screen.................................................................................................................... 361
Figure 322 – Event Call-in triggers - screen 1 ................................................................................................................. 362
Figure 323 – Event Call-in triggers - screen 2 ................................................................................................................. 362
Figure 324 – Log Data Settings - page 1 ........................................................................................................................ 364
Figure 325 – Log Data Settings - page 2 ........................................................................................................................ 364
Figure 326 – Measuring the distance between speed trap detectors .............................................................................. 364
Figure 327 – Log Data Settings - page 3 (Event Log Enable settings) ............................................................................ 365
Figure 328 – Port 1 Setup - screen 1 (BIU Enables) ....................................................................................................... 366
Figure 329 – Port 1 Setup - screen 2 (MMU Secondary Enables)................................................................................... 367
Figure 330 – Port 1 Setup - screen 3 (MMU Channel Assignments) ............................................................................... 368
Figure 331 – Port 1 Setup - screen 4 (MMU Channel Assignments) ............................................................................... 368
Figure 332 – Port 1 Setup - screen 5 (MMU Channel Assignments) ............................................................................... 368
Figure 333 – Port 1 Setup - screen 6 (MMU Channel Assignments) ............................................................................... 368
Figure 334 – Port 1 Setup - screen 7 (Secondary-to-Secondary Addresses) .................................................................. 369
Figure 335 – System Name screen................................................................................................................................. 370
Figure 336 – Contact Name screen ................................................................................................................................ 371
Figure 337 – HDLC Address screen ............................................................................................................................... 372
Figure 338 – Unit Configuration Menu ............................................................................................................................ 374
Figure 339 – Security Codes screen ............................................................................................................................... 375
Figure 340 – Intersection Name screen .......................................................................................................................... 378
Figure 341 – EEPROM/Audio Adjust screen................................................................................................................... 379
Figure 342 – 3000E Series device’s screen when in Firmware Update Mode................................................................. 382
Figure 343 – First connect the PC to the 3000E device via a serial cable ....................................................................... 383
Figure 344 – Locations of Flash/EPROM chips and jumper links .................................................................................... 384
Figure 345 – Proper jumper settings on the 3000E motherboard for Flash/EPROM operation ....................................... 385
Figure 346 – Power-on Self Test Error Message ............................................................................................................ 387
Figure 347 – Power-on Self Test Error Message ............................................................................................................ 389
Figure 348 – I/O Steering setup screen - page 1............................................................................................................. 392
Figure 349 – I/O Steering setup screen - page 2............................................................................................................. 393
Figure 350 – I/O Steering setup screen - page 3............................................................................................................. 393
Figure 351 – I/O Steering - Example 1............................................................................................................................ 394
Figure 352 – I/O Steering - Example 2............................................................................................................................ 394
Figure 353 – Typical Connections to a TS 2 Type 1 controller ........................................................................................ 397
Figure 354 – Simple TS 2 Type 1 configuration .............................................................................................................. 398
Figure 356 – Peek’s BIU Card ........................................................................................................................................ 399
Figure 357 – I/O Mapping Menu (before activation) ........................................................................................................ 405
Figure 358 – I/O Mapping Menu (with mapping active) ................................................................................................... 405
Figure 359 – Warning message when Activating the User Map ...................................................................................... 406
Figure 360 – Status screen showing that the mapping has been activated ..................................................................... 406
Figure 361 – I/O Mapping Menu with the user's map activated ....................................................................................... 407
Figure 362 – Warning message when clearing the Input Map......................................................................................... 407
Figure 363 – Verification of the cleared BIU mapping ..................................................................................................... 408
Figure 364 – Input mappings .......................................................................................................................................... 408
Figure 365 – Output mapping assignments..................................................................................................................... 410
Figure 366 – Warning message when loading the default NEMA mapping .....................................................................411
Figure 367 – Verification of a successful load of NEMA defaults..................................................................................... 411
Figure 368 – Warning message when copying MMU channels....................................................................................... 411
Figure 369 – Verification of successful copy of MMU channels to output mappings........................................................ 412
Figure 370 – Warning message when EEPROM mapping data is missing or corrupted ................................................. 412
Figure 371 – Utilities Menu ............................................................................................................................................. 418

3000 Series Traffic Controllers xvii


Figure 372 – Default Data Load Menu ............................................................................................................................419
Figure 373 – Transfer Menu............................................................................................................................................420
Figure 374 – Clear Logs screen ......................................................................................................................................420
Figure 375 – EEPROM-RAM Copy screen .....................................................................................................................421
Figure 376 – EEPROM-RAM Copy screen .....................................................................................................................422
Figure 377 – Printer Menu ..............................................................................................................................................423
Figure 378 – Printing portions of database or logs ..........................................................................................................424
Figure 379 – Print-out status display...............................................................................................................................424
Figure 380 – Copy Functions Menu ................................................................................................................................425
Figure 381 – Controller Copy screen ..............................................................................................................................425
Figure 382 – Coordination Copy screen..........................................................................................................................426
Figure 383 – Time of Day Copy screen...........................................................................................................................426
Figure 384 – Preemption Copy screen............................................................................................................................427
Figure 385 – Field Requested Download screen.............................................................................................................428
Figure 386 – BIU I/O Mapping Menu (v2.0).....................................................................................................................428
Figure 387 – Setting passage time..................................................................................................................................463

xviii 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Contents

Tables

Table 1 – Documents related to the 3000 Series Traffic Controllers....................................................................................2


Table 2 – Typographic conventions used in this manual .....................................................................................................3
Table 3 – Keyboard conventions used in this manual..........................................................................................................3
Table 4 – Symbol conventions used in this manual .............................................................................................................4
Table 5 – History of the 3000 Series controllers ..................................................................................................................6
Table 6 – Communications/Optional Modules available for 3000 Series units...................................................................25
Table 7 – Phase/Overlap Indicators (in increasing order of priority) ..................................................................................32
Table 8 – Vehicle Demand codes, in order of priority ........................................................................................................33
Table 9 – Pedestrian Demand codes ................................................................................................................................34
Table 10 – Error/Failure Status Indicators .........................................................................................................................35
Table 11 – Vehicle and pedestrian demand codes ............................................................................................................36
Table 12 – Interval Abbreviations ......................................................................................................................................37
Table 13 – Max and Termination Abbreviations ................................................................................................................37
Table 14 – Normal I/O screen key .....................................................................................................................................40
Table 15 – Density Status screen key ...............................................................................................................................41
Table 16 – Outputs Status screen key...............................................................................................................................43
Table 17 – Output Status Bit definitions ............................................................................................................................44
Table 18 – Input Status screen key ...................................................................................................................................46
Table 19 – Possible Detector ‘Route’ settings ...................................................................................................................48
Table 20 – I/O Module Configuration Status screen key...................................................................................................51
Table 21 – Coordination Status screen key .......................................................................................................................56
Table 22 – TOD Dynamic Circuits Status codes................................................................................................................58
Table 22 – Key to the Preemption Status screens.............................................................................................................60
Table 23 – Key to the Voltage screen................................................................................................................................63
Table 24 – Key to the MOE Log screens...........................................................................................................................67
Table 25 – Codes that appear on the Mizbat Dynamic Status screen ...............................................................................76
Table 26 – Modem Status Messages ................................................................................................................................77
Table 27 – Minimal Requirements For A New Controller ...................................................................................................85
Table 28 – Possible Additional (But Commonly Used) Requirements ...............................................................................85
Table 29 – Typical Use Of Recall Modes ..........................................................................................................................90
Table 30 – Max Variable Initial settings ........................................................................................................................... 140
Table 31 – Lead/Lag Phasing Modes .............................................................................................................................. 156
Table 32 – Lead/Lag Activation Inputs ............................................................................................................................ 157
Table 33 – Soft Flash Modes........................................................................................................................................... 159
Table 34 – Detector configuration for Third Car Detection............................................................................................... 180
Table 35 – Type of Overlap ............................................................................................................................................. 188
Table 36 – Flash Codes .................................................................................................................................................. 189
Table 37 – Pins Used for Common TS 2 Modes ............................................................................................................. 203
Table 38 – Coordination Source Codes........................................................................................................................... 224
Table 39 – Splits under 4 splits/cycle and 24 split plans.................................................................................................. 248
Table 40 – Interval Timing Effects ................................................................................................................................... 311
Table 41 – Preemption Intervals...................................................................................................................................... 321
Table 42 – Column Codes in a Flash Plan ...................................................................................................................... 323
Table 43 – Proper ‘Hardware’ settings for various Port 2 and Port 3 devices .................................................................. 349
Table 44 – Special characters for phone numbers .......................................................................................................... 361
Table 45 – Event type codes ........................................................................................................................................... 363
Table 46 – Log Enable Codes ......................................................................................................................................... 365
Table 47 – Checksums for various 3000 series firmware (8216 series)........................................................................... 381
Table 48 – Output Steering source codes ....................................................................................................................... 393
Table 49 – I/O Mapping Codes for BIUs 1 and 2 ............................................................................................................. 400
Table 50 – I/O Mapping Codes for BIUs 3 and 4 ............................................................................................................. 402
Table 51 – I/O Mapping Codes for BIUs 9 and 10 ........................................................................................................... 403
Table 52 – I/O Mapping Codes for BIUs 11 and 12 ......................................................................................................... 403

3000 Series Traffic Controllers xix


Table 53 – Logical I/O Mapping operators.......................................................................................................................409
Table 54 – Input Mapping Abbreviations .........................................................................................................................413
Table 55 – Output Mapping Abbreviations.......................................................................................................................414
Table 56 – Input and Output Availability of BIU Pins .......................................................................................................415
Table 57 – TOD circuit assignments................................................................................................................................430

xx 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Preface — About This Manual

PURPOSE AND SCOPE


This manual introduces and discusses the 3000 and 3000E Traffic Controllers from
Peek Traffic. It covers how to operate, configure, and test these units, describing the
hardware and firmware environment used to control them. Although these controllers
can be controlled and data remotely gathered using central software systems such as
CLMATS and IQ Central, this manual does not discuss CLMATS or IQ Cenral in any
detail.

ASSUMPTIONS
It is assumed that the reader and user of this manual and the hardware described
herein are authorized to work in and around traffic cabinets by the local traffic
governing body. The reader should be familiar with the operation and wiring of traffic
control cabinets in their area, and must be aware of, and follow, all safety and security
protocols of the traffic agency. It’s also assumed that the operator of the 3000 or
3000E traffic controller knows what signal standard is being used inside the cabinet
(NEMA TS 1, TS 2, NTCIP, etc.)

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 1


Preface — About This Manual

RELATED DOCUMENTS
These documents provide additional information that may be useful when working
with a 3000 Series Traffic Controller:
Table 1 – Documents related to the 3000 Series Traffic Controllers
Document Part Number
3000 Series Operating Manual 8204C
3000 Series TS1 Firmware (8216B) Release Notes 99-331
3000 Series TS2 Firmware (8216A) Release Notes 99-332
3000 Series Protocol-90 Firmware (8216F) Release Notes 99-371
CLMATS Installation Manual 81-858
CLMATS Operating Manual 81-883
CLMATS Release Notes 99-275
CLMATS Preemption Management Module Release Notes 99-365
Double Diamond MMU Operating Manual 8314B
M3000 Operating Manual 5928
M3000 Firmware Release Notes 99-329

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
If you need assistance or have questions related to the use of this product, call Peek
Traffic’s Technical Support Group using the information listed below.

Peek Traffic — Technical Support


2906 Corporate Way
Palmetto, FL 34221
toll free in the U.S.: 1 (800) 245-7660
tel: 1 (941) 845-1200
fax: 1 (941) 845-1504
email: tech.support@peektraffic.com

Additional information is also available at the Peek Traffic website:

www.peektraffic.com

2 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Conventions Used in this Manual

CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS MANUAL


When referring to any of the product manuals from Peek Traffic, the following
typographical conventions will aid in understanding the intent of the various topics
and procedures.

Typographic Conventions
As shown in the following table, whenever text appears in the following fonts and
styles, it indicates a special situation or meaning for the user.
Table 2 – Typographic conventions used in this manual
Description Example
Commands or controls that must be In the Print dialog box, select Options.
selected by the user appear in bold.
Switches or keyboard keys appear in When finished selecting parameters, press the
SMALL CAPS. PAGEDOWN key.
Things that the user needs to type at a Type a:\setup.exe at the prompt.
prompt or entry window exactly as
shown appear in this font.
Items italicized inside slanted brackets Type c:\<install_directory>
< > are variables that need to be \product and press ENTER.
replaced while typing a command. The
slanted brackets should not be typed.

Keyboard and Menu Conventions


Some commands are accomplished with a pair or sequence of keystrokes or
command entries. The way these should be done is indicated by the way they are
shown in the instructions, as listed here.
Table 3 – Keyboard conventions used in this manual
Description Example
A series of commands that need to be Go to Start > Programs > CLMATS and
completed in sequence will be separated by select Configuration.
a right slant bracket (>)
A dash, or hyphen, ( - ) indicates keys or Press CTRL-p to print the file.
controls that need to be pressed at the
same time to activate the command
A comma ( , ) indicates keystrokes that To print the file, press ALT-f, p.
need to be pressed one after the other.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 3


Preface — About This Manual

Symbol Conventions
The following symbols are used in this manual to indicate special messages for the
user. Each indicates the level of importance that should be assigned to the
associated text.
Table 4 – Symbol conventions used in this manual
Symbol Description
Note — This icon accompanies a general note or tip about the current
topic.
Caution — This icon represents a general hazard. If the operator is
not paying attention, some action that is undesired may occur.
Warning — This icon represents a situation where some real risk
exists, whether of electrical shock or some other form of personal or
property damage. Be very careful when dealing with Warning
situations.

4 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

This chapter introduces the product and explains the layout of this manual, along with
type conventions and other topic. The following topics are discussed in detail in this
chapter:
• Overview of the 3000 Series, on page 6.
• Introduction to the hardware, on page 8.
• The purpose of the keypad keys, on page 13.
• A rundown of the features of 3000 Series controllers, on page 19.
• Configuration options, on page 24.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 5


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

OVERVIEW
The 3000 Series of traffic controllers from Peek Traffic Corporation provide
intersection control for NEMA TS 1, NEMA TS 2, 170, or NTCIP cabinets. They can
be programmed to run in either timed or free operation, and can be set up to function
in independent intersections or coordinated intersection ‘corridors.’ The controllers in
this family can be programmed locally using a keypad and display, or remotely via a
central software suite, such as Peek’s CLMATS or IQ Central systems.
These controllers can handle sensor and pedestrian calls, preemption calls, time of
day/week/month/year programming, and coordinated operation, as well as a variety of
other programmable options.

Evolution of the 3000 Series Controller


The 3000 Series controller has evolved over the past ten years. The following timeline
lists the most significant events in the history of the product line. At any given time
during this period, there was always just one 3000 series product and one official
firmware version, but with several hardware options available as add-ons.
Table 5 – History of the 3000 Series controllers
Year Event
1995 The 3000 controller was introduced by Peek Traffic Corporation.
1995-2000 Several D-Module hardware add-on modules were released for the 3000
controller. Firmware was updated several times until it reached version
3.0.
2000 The 3000E controller was released. This significant hardware update
changed the appearance of the front panel keypads, and consolidated the
front panel circuit boards to improve the ease of accessing the inside of
the unit and of performing hardware upgrades (ports, D-modules, firmware
EPROMs, etc.)
2002 Firmware v3.1.1 released. Minor improvements to Preemption operation,
preemption checking, and double clearing overlaps. Release of an
updated 3000 series operating manual.
2003 Release of Firmware v3.1.2. Minor improvements in preemption, side-
street servicing, and coordination with central software.
Release of Firmware v3.3. Improvements in lead-lag operation and
coordination with central software. Matched updates in the capabilities of
the CLMATS software package.
2004 Release of Firmware v3.4. Added the capability to update firmware to
flash memory on units that are marked ‘Flash Memory Enabled.’ Added
the boot block startup routine for administering firmware loads and low-
level hardware function changes. Added capability to Inhibit Ped
Overrides. This update fixed numerous minor issues and improved the
operation of permissives, preemption, overlaps, coordination and flash
operation. Also improved CVM (Controller volt monitoring) and CRC check
operations.
An optional Ethernet card that can be installed as Port 3 of the 3000E
controller was released.

6 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overview

Year Event
Firmware version 3.6 was released, which added dramatic new capabilities
to the controller. Full support for the new Flash Memory Enabled 3000E
controllers. Supports full TS 2 Type 1 operation with BIU Input/Output
mapping. Improved COMMS setup screens and general improvements to
communications reliability. Addition of NTCIP communications parameters.
Addition of one new Ped Overlap mode (mode 3) and two new vehicular
overlap modes (modes 7 and 8.)
Quixote Corporation of Chicago, IL purchased Peek Traffic Corporation.
After the purchase Peek Traffic and U.S. Traffic were combined to become
Quixote Traffic Corporation.
2005 The release of PC and Pocket PC based utilities that can be used to
update the flash firmware in a 3000E controller.
The release of firmware v3.6.2, which dramatically improved the reliability
of overlaps and preemption, and improved support for Ethernet operation.
2007 An Ethernet card option was added for the 3000E controller
2008 IQ Connect support for 3000E added, making the controllers compatible
with the NTCIP standard and with the IQ Central software.
Signal Group, Inc. of Houston, TX purchases the companies of Quixote
Traffic and renames them Peek Traffic Corporation.

Checking the Firmware Version


The most important fact determining how your controller operates and can be programmed
is the version of firmware that is installed within the unit. Since much work has been done
to improve the 3000 series controllers over the past several years, it may be a good idea
to update the firmware in your controllers. However, it is unwise to update firmware if you
have well seasoned controllers operating in the field which have no problems. The Peek
Traffic support team recommends that a firmware update should only be performed in
order to fix a bug that is severely interfering with the operation of the controller, or to add a
new feature that is highly needed for your application. Otherwise, it’s best to leave the
controller’s firmware alone.
Before determining whether or not your controller(s) should have new firmware installed,
you should check to see what firmware is currently installed in the hardware, as described
in the following procedure. This procedure can be used to safely determine what firmware
is installed in a 3000 series unit, even as the device is actively controlling an intersection.
1. With the unit powered up and running, press the MENU button until the Main Menu
appears.
2. Press the keypad number 1 to open the Dynamic Menu.
3. Press the number 7 * to open the Program Level and Rev screen. Write down the
current version of firmware that is installed in the unit.
4. Pressing SHIFT -ENTER returns the controller to the main status screen.
For instructions on how to update the firmware in the controller, see “Updating the
Controller Firmware” on page 380.

*
On some older controllers and firmware, the Program Level and Rev command is option 6.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 7


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

HARDWARE IN THE 3000 SERIES


There are several variants of the 3000 Series controllers, which can be identified both
by their hardware configuration and through the firmware they run. The next section
shows the most common appearance for each major type of controller in the 3000
Series, but to verify which type of unit is involved, the most direct method is to check
the version of the firmware being run in the unit.

Version 3000 Traffic Controller Hardware


The 3000 version of the Peek Traffic controller is the older variant of the series,
although it performs nearly all of the same functions of the newer 3000E unit.
Historically, the largest majority of 3000 controllers have been supplied in a NEMA TS
1 format, as shown here. In addition, they introduced the “D Module”, where an
optional Peek proprietary connector or set of connectors could be installed.

Display Keypad

Power LED

Fuses

Comm
Connectors

Cabinet
Connectors

Figure 1 – 3000 Controller D Module

The comm connectors, cabinet connectors, and D Module connectors included with
any 3000 controller will vary based on the requirements of each municipality, state, or
province.

Note 3000 controllers can have the same variety of cabinet connector ports (A, B, C,
and D) as 3000E controllers, however the most commonly shipped version of the
basic 3000 controller is shown in Figure 1, namely the 3000 TS 1 (16 Phase)
controller.

8 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Version 3000E Traffic Controller Hardware


The 3000E version of the Peek Traffic controller comes in two primary layouts:

Display Keypad

Comm
Connectors

Power LED

Fuses

Cabinet Connectors
D Module
Figure 2 – 3000E Controller, typical TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 configuration

Display Keypad

Cabinet Comm
Connector Connectors

Power LED

Fuses

TS2-Type1
units rarely
Figure 3 – 3000E Controller, typical TS 2 Type 1 configuration have a D
Module

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 9


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

The 3000E is the newer of the 3000 series controllers. As with the 3000, the 3000E
has the “D Module” available, where a proprietary Peek connector or set of
connectors may be installed.
As can be seen in the two figures, the TS 1 (and TS 2 Type 2) version of the 3000E
has three cabinet connector ports: A, B, and C. The TS 2 Type 1 version, on the other
hand, has a single Port A cabinet connector.

Note TS 1 controllers have hardwired pins in the A, B, and C connectors to physically


connect to the various cabinet signals. Refer to page 438 for pin assignments for
these three ports.
TS 2 controllers, on the other hand, communicate with the cabinet using
communications protocols rather than direct connections of electrical signals. A
Type 1 controller uses its single A connector primarily for power outputs and status
signals; most cabinet information is passed to and from the controller over Port 1,
the RS-485 connector. These communications are then routed through BIU units
in the cabinet to communicate the cabinet signals to the controller. TS 2 Type 2
controllers use the same communications protocols, but they route the comm
signals through the typical A, B, and C ports. Refer to page 443 for these pin
assignments.

As in the 3000 units, the comm connectors, cabinet connectors, and D Module
connectors included with any 3000E controller will vary based on the requirements of
each municipality and state or province.

Flash Memory Enabled 3000E Controllers


The 3000E controller line now includes a flash memory option. Previously, the
memory used to store firmware, programming and data in the controller was EPROM
memory. But flash memory has now been included as an option. Unlike EPROMS,
flash memory can be used to update the firmware in the controller without the
necessity of removing the memory chips.
All variants of the 3000E Traffic Controller are now available in a flash-memory
enabled version. Figure 4 shows the TS 2 Type 2 version.

10 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Figure 4 – Flash-enabled 3000E Controller (TS 2 Type 2 version)


The updated controllers are identifiable by the ‘Flash Memory Enabled’ logo on the
front panel. Flash Memory Enabled 3000E controllers are shipped with Flash
memory installed, however they can be switched back to use the older EPROM
memory chips. This modification requires only the repositioning of five jumpers on the
controller’s motherboard. (For details, see page 384.)

Figure 5 – ‘Flash Memory Enabled’ logo


The directions to change a flash-enabled controller from flash to EPROM operation,
and the directions to load updated firmware in a flash-enabled controller using a
laptop or a Pocket PC device, are available in Chapter 11:Unit Configuration and
Security on page 380.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 11


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

User Interface
The configuration and operation of a 3000 Series controller is managed using the
onboard keypad and display, or it can be managed remotely using a software
package like CLMATS. The onboard interface is composed of these three
components:
An 8 x 40 character LCD Display provides status feedback and configuration
options to the operator.
A 24-key keypad is used to navigate the firmware screens. This allows an
operator to view status or configure the operation of the controller. (See page
14.)
The 3000 Series firmware defines what appears on the display screen and
how the keypad is used to navigate between the various status and
configuration screens. The top level menu is called the MAIN MENU. The
firmware also handles the internal operation of the controller, defining how
inputs and outputs are processed, and basically controlling all functions of the
unit.

Note This manual does not discuss any specific version of 3000 firmware, since there
are a large variety of versions available, covering the various controller standards
(TS 1, 170, NTCIP, etc.) and local requirements.
It does, however, primarily deal with firmware that has been released in year 2004
or later (generally version 3.4.0 or higher.) For details about the specific firmware
loaded on your controller, refer to the firmware release notes that were supplied
with the unit. If you do not have the release notes for your version of firmware,
contact your Peek Technical Support Representative (page 2 of this manual) to
request a copy.

12 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Display
The front panel display of a 3000 Series controller is an 8 row by 40 column ‘super-
twist’ LCD screen with graphics capability. The LCD includes an electro-luminescent
backlight for night or low light viewing. The backlight is automatically activated by any
keypress. If no keys are pressed for 5 minutes, it automatically turns off.

Throughout this manual, we constantly refer to these screens. Rather than using
difficult-to-see images of the screen itself, text representations of the screens have
been used instead, as shown here.
11:17:38 COMM: Off-Line 1 1 1 -O/L-
PH/OL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 A B C D
INDIC r G r r r G r r - - - - R R R R
V DEMAND 0.H.0 0.0.H.0.0 - - - - |Cyc 1
P DEMAND 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - | 76%
EXTEND |EXTEND | Ofs1
MX1 30 PSG 1 |MX1 30 PSG 4 | 0%
TP 1, COORD, Time of Day |Spl 1
Figure 6 – Sample representation of a 3000 Series screen

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 13


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

Keypad
Manual data entry is accomplished with a 24 key silicone rubber tactile feedback
keypad. The 3000 and 3000E both have the same keys, but they are laid out
differently on the two devices. A 3000 controller has a vertical keypad, while the
3000E has a horizontal layout.

Figure 7 – 3000E Keypad


Audible feedback is also provided with a keypress
tone, which can be adjusted for duration. Erroneous
entries are signaled with a special tone (3 rapid beeps)
regardless of the audible feedback volume. A list of
the keys and their associated functions is given below:
1-9 The number keys are used to enter numerical
data such as timing values and modes of operation.
They are also used to select numbered menus, where
pressing the corresponding number selects that menu.
To select menus 10 - 19, press the SHIFT key and a
number 0 - 9, where SHIFT -0 = 10, SHIFT -1 = 11, etc.
0 (Y/N) The 0 key is used to enter numerical data, but
also toggles yes/no data entry fields.
ENTER This key is used to load previously entered
data into memory. SHIFT plus ENTER displays the
main controller dynamic screen regardless of which
screen is currently displayed.
CLEAR Used to clear previously entered data and
prevent it from being stored in memory in case a
mistake was made during data entry.
HOME This key returns the cursor to the beginning
(left end) of the line. When used together with the
SHIFT key, it moves the cursor to the first data entry
field on the current page. Figure 8 – 3000 Keypad

14 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

END The opposite of HOME , END moves the cursor to the right end of a line, and
when used in conjunction with the SHIFT key, it moves the cursor to the last data entry
field on the screen.
PGUP In a multi-page data entry screen, this key displays the page immediately
prior to the currently displayed page, if one exists. If the current page is the first
page, the controller will display a message to this effect.
PGDN Displays the next page in a multi-page data entry screen, if there is one. If
the current page is the last page, the controller will display a last page message.
ÏÐÍÎ The cursor control keys move the cursor up, down, left and right,
respectively. The cursor position determines which field will be edited. In general,
the cursor must first be moved to a field in order to change its data. In some screens,
SHIFT plus the Í or Î Key will display more data entry fields that are logically to the
right or left of the current page. For most data screens, pressing any cursor key will
load data that has been keyed into a data field (as if the ENTER key was pressed.)
MENU The Menu Key returns to the previous menu, i.e., the one from which the
current screen was entered. As an example, starting at the Main Menu pressing 3 will
cause the CHANGE DATA menu to be displayed. Pressing the MENU key will then
return to MAIN MENU. By pressing the SHIFT and MENU keys simultaneously, the
user can return to the MAIN MENU from any menu, data entry screen or dynamic
display.
SHIFT This key performs no function on its own, rather it modifies the function of
another key that is pressed together with it.
DISP ADJ (DIS ADJ on the 3000E) This key adjusts the contrast of the liquid crystal
display to improve the readability of the display. Successively pressing the DISP ADJ
key by itself darkens the display through the eight available settings and then back to
the lightest setting. Pressing SHIFT - DISP ADJ lightens the screen.
HELP This key, when pressed, activates the controller's help system to display one
or more pages of help related to the screen that is currently being programmed
(context sensitive). If the help description is more than one page, use the PGDN and
PGUP keys to maneuver through pages. Press HELP again to return to the original
data screen or menu.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 15


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

Using the Keypad


USE ARROW KEYS TO MOVE THE CURSOR TO THE FIELD containing the
value to be edited.
ENTER THE NEW DATA. As you enter data, the field will change to ‘reverse
video’ (white text on a black background) to indicate that a change has been
made. At this point, the data is stored in a temporary buffer and has not been
loaded into the database yet.
IF AN ENTRY MISTAKE IS MADE, press the CLEAR key to restore the original
value.
TO PERMANENTLY STORE THE DATA, press ENTER or any key that will
move the CURSOR such as HOME, END, or any ARROW key. Pressing
MENU, PGUP, or PGDN causes the controller to beep 3 times to indicate that
the data load is incomplete. Once the data is loaded (stored in memory), the
display will return to normal (no reverse video) and the original data will be lost.
CURSOR MOVEMENT AND THE TYPEMATIC MODE. The 3000 Series
Controller implements a ‘typematic’ keyboard mode. To use this feature, hold a
key down (for example, a cursor key) and after a short delay, the key will be
reentered over and over as if it had been pressed several times. This makes it
easier to move the cursor through a large number of data entry fields. All keys
except the SHIFT key behave this way, and it is especially useful when using
the cursor keys.
FOR REPETITIVE DATA ENTRY OF THE SAME VALUE, there is an
automatic entry mode. To use this feature, load a value, then press and hold
the ENTER key while pressing an arrow key to move to a new field. As the
cursor moves to each new field it repeats the last value programmed. For
example, to change the initial time for phases 1 through 8 to 6 seconds:
ENTER THE INITIAL VALUE (6) for phase 1 in the normal fashion, but
hold down the ENTER key.
NOW PRESS THE Î KEY (Enter still pressed). The Î key can be
toggled or held down. The initial value that was entered for phase 1 (6
seconds) is copied to each phase in turn as the cursor moves to the right.
When the data has been entered for all 8 phases, release both keys and
press ENTER or any cursor key once to load the last value into memory.

To Quickly Return to the Main Menu


Hit SHIFT-MENU (both keys simultaneously)

To Quickly Return to the Top Dynamic Screen


Hit SHIFT-ENTER (both keys simultaneously)

16 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

To Review the First Time Setup Menu


For a complete description of the First Time Setup screens, refer to page 97.
For many enable functions, instead of moving the cursor to each column and
enabling, simply move to the row then type in the Phase numbers (or O/L’s, etc.). For
example, to enter Max Recall for phases 1-4, go to Main Menu-3-1-2-1, then cursor to
Max Recall row and type 1, 2, 3, 4.

To Implement Security
To implement security codes, go to Main Menu-3-6-1.
To restrict access to menus, go to Main Menu-3-6-2 for instructions. Security codes
are required for this capability.
To add or delete menus as desired, go to Main Menu-3-6-3 for instructions.

To Adjust the Volume of the Keypad Beep


To adjust the keyboard beeper volume, go to Main Menu-3-6-5. A value of 0 = Off, 10
is loudest.

Communication Ports
There are, at most, three Comm ports on a 3000 series controller. Port 1 is always an
RS-485 high speed serial port. Port 1 is used by TS 2 controllers for communications
with an MMU, or to BIUs in TS 2 Type 1 operation. Port 2 is typically an EIA-232
asynchronous port (formerly known as an RS-232 port) which is used to connect to
an external modem, to a PC or laptop, to an MMU for log retrieval, or to a serial
printer. Port 3 can be configured with one of several communications options. It can
be either an DSP modem which drives local twisted pair telephone wires, a fiber optic
modem, a second EIA-232 serial port, or a Serial/Ethernet combination port,
depending on the hardware module installed in this location.
PORT 1 PORT 2 PORT 3

T
MASTER
R

T
REPEATER
R

RS-485 RS-232 COMM

Figure 9 – Ports with DSP modem installed as Port 3

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 17


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

Figure 10 – Ports with second serial port installed as Port 3


PORT 1 PORT 2 PORT 3

T
MASTER
R

T
REPEATER
R

RS-485 RS-232 COMM

Figure 11 – Ports with fiber optic modem installed as Port 3


PORT 1 PORT 2 PORT 3

T
MASTER
R

T
REPEATER
R

RS-485 RS-232 COMM

Figure 12 – Ports with serial/Ethernet card installed as Port 3


Increasingly, there is no “typical” communications setup. But some configurations are
more common than others. On a TS 1 controller, Port 1 is not used, Port 2 is usually
used to connect with a conflict monitor, and port 3 is usually used to connect with a
master. If there is no master, then port 3 is usually used as a modem or direct serial
connection to a central software system (such as CLMATS.)
On a TS 2 controller (both Type 1 and Type 2), Port 1 is defined in the TS 2 standard
to function as the main path for data flowing back and forth between the cabinet and
the controller, particularly to the MMU and to the BIUs. Port 2 might be used to
connect to the MMU for log retrieval, and Port 3 is often used to connect to a master
controller. If the controller is operating without a master, and no MMU logs are being
retrieved across by central, then either Port 2 or 3 may be used to connect the
controller to the central software system.

18 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Other Features of the 3000 Series Hardware


A 3000 Series Traffic Signal Controller is a state-of-the-art controller that is designed
to handle the needs of the traffic industry. For ease of transition, the 3000 and 3000E
are backward compatible with the Transyt Model 1880EL, TCT LMD series, and all
NEMA controllers (containing connectors MSA, B and C.)

Keyboard & Displays


Ease of programming is a major priority in the 3000, which includes a large 8 row by
40 column LCD and a 24 key keypad with tactile and audible feedback. Help screens
are included to guide the user through data entry. Also a SHIFT key is provided to
modify the operation of the other keys.

Clock
Every 3000 Controller includes a 99 year battery-backed real-time clock to provide
complete time keeping functions, including daylight savings time adjustment and leap
year corrections. The clock is fully Y2K compliant.

EEPROM Memory
Database portability is provided by the EEPROM module that contains 32 Kbytes of
EEPROM. If so programmed, data in the EEPROM is automatically updated when
the main database is changed. Also, checksum calculations are performed on both
the EEPROM and main memory to insure that no corrupt data is used. If a checksum
failure occurs, the intersection is put into flash until the error is cleared manually.

Note Peek Traffic Tech Support recommends that the EEPROM Memory feature not
be used on a regular basis. After the upload of a tested database, the EEPROM
Memory backup should be removed, labeled, and stored in the cabinet’s
document protector.

Power Supply
The power supply in the 3000 is a state-of-the-art line powered switched mode type,
which provides very cool and efficient operation with over one second of storage
capacity. The incoming line voltage is rectified and directly down converted to all the
necessary voltages, none more than 30 VDC. In this application, the switched mode
supply usually operates at least 15°C cooler than an equivalent linear supply, thus
contributing to longer life for all surrounding components. The power supply includes
an Analog to Digital (A/D) converter that the 3000 uses to monitor supply voltages
and currents inside the unit.

Communications Ports
An EIA-232 (RS-232C) serial port, Port 2, is included standard with each controller for
connecting to a printer, monitor, personal computer, or modem (including radio
modems). The data rate is programmable from 1200 to 19,200 bps.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 19


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

The optional System Interface permits FSK TDM 1200 baud communications over
twisted pair wire using a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) internal modem (3000E only).
This scheme is typical of UTCS and closed loop applications, and provides
compatibility with NEMA Traffic Standards (TS 2) Port 3. The transceiver is
compatible with the BELL-202 modem standard. Also available instead of the DSP
modem is a family of Fiber Optic Transceivers capable of baud rates of up to 19200.
The transceiver module can accommodate a variety of emitters and detectors
including, 850nm multi-mode, 1300nm multi-mode (3000 only), and 1300nm single-
mode (3000 only). A second RS-232 port is also available as an option to drive an
external modem or for connection to a CMU or an Opticom unit.
The TS 2 3000 Controller meets and exceeds the NEMA 2003 TS 2 standard and
contains a RS-485 connector in Port 1 for Bus Interface Unit (BIU) Communications.
This feature is standard for TS 2 Controllers.
In 2004, a new Ethernet/Serial port combination card was made available for slot 3 of
the TS 2 3000E controller, and the firmware was modified to include the appropriate
communications parameters for an Ethernet connection (i.e. IP address, subnet
mask, etc.) When installed, a standard Ethernet connection can be made with the
3000E controller across any TCP/IP network.

CPU
The heart of the system is a Motorola 32 bit 68302 Integrated Multiprotocol Processor
running at 16.667MHz. The processor addresses 1Mbyte of ROM and 256Kbytes of
battery-backed RAM with no wait states.

Input Filtering
NEMA control inputs in the 3000 do not use capacitors, RC networks or any other
analog filtering. All NEMA control inputs use digital sampling and filtering techniques
to reject frequencies outside the required specification.

Sequence Configuration
The 3000 Series controller employs a very flexible approach to sequence
configuration. It will support up to 16 each of vehicle and pedestrian phases plus 16
vehicle and pedestrian overlaps. Each phase may be assigned to any of 4 rings and
up to 8 barriers. Barriers (or compatibility lines) may be inserted anywhere within the
sequence. This flexibility allows the user to program very complex sequences. A
number of commonly used sequences are pre-programmed and can be loaded with a
single key.

Channel Assignments
The TS 2 Controllers (Type 1 and Type 2) contain the capability to assign
responsibilities for the 16 available channels monitored by the Malfunction
Management Unit (MMU). MMU is the TS 2 definition for a conflict voltage monitor.
The 16 channels each contain three (3) inputs (R, Y, G) that can be assigned to any
combination of vehicle movements, pedestrian movements, vehicle overlaps and/or
pedestrian overlaps.

20 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Controller Timing Plans


There are 4 sets of phase interval timing parameters, called timing plans, that can be
called by the time-of-day scheduler or by manual override. Intervals included are;
Initial, Passage, Max 1, Max 2, Yellow, Red Clearance, Walk, and Pedestrian
Clearance. Volume density parameters included are of Time to Reduce, Time before
Reduction, Last Car Passage, Minimum Gap, Added Initial per Actuation, and Max
Initial. Phase control functions included are; Minimum, Maximum, Pedestrian and
Soft Recall modes, memory Lock/Non-Lock, Phase & Pedestrian Omits, Walk Rest
mode, Max 2 by phase, Red Rest by phase, and No Skip by phase.

Lead/Lag Operation
There are 4 sets of lead/lag (phase reversal) patterns, any of which may be called by
time clock, day plan, pattern number, external input or manual entry. These lead/lag
plans provide for dynamic sequence adjustment that is often required for complex
intersection configurations.

Max 3 (demand adjusted max time)


A dynamically adjusting phase max time, called Max 3, can be implemented in the
3000 Series controller. If this feature is enabled, each phase may independently
adjust its own Max Time depending on the traffic load (Max’s, Gap-outs) on that
phase.

Dimming
Load switch dimming is user programmable by phase and signal color. AC power
factor is automatically balanced by assigning some outputs to be dimmed on the
positive half-cycle and others to be dimmed on the negative half-cycle. Dimming may
be activated by Time of Day (TOD) circuit or an external input on the “D” Module.

Soft Flash Operation (controller flashes load switches)


Soft flash is also programmable by phase and signal color and may be called by the
time clock or external input. A two-circuit flash (Wig/Wag) is provided so that outputs
may be programmed to operate Wig or Wag flash or Dark (vehicle phases and
overlaps only). This is the primary method used to send a 3000 Series TS2 Type 1
controller into flash operation, since no CVM or UCF exists for this
controller/environment.

Detectors
Detectors may be programmed to operate in one of 5 modes of operation and may be
assigned to any phase or set of phases. The 5 modes are Call/Extend (NEMA), Call
only, Stretch/Delay and Stop Bar 1 or 2. In addition, conditional detector switching
and copying enables special sequences without requiring external detector
manipulation. Detector switching and copying takes place only when the programmed
phase-on conditions are met. This is a very useful feature for lead/lag or diamond
intersection control.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 21


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

The 3000 Series Controller monitors for and logs 4 types of detector failures. The four
failures are Absence, Locked, Erratic and Minimum Presence. Also, failing
detectors can optionally place specified phases on recall.

Dynamic recall and omits


Two other features that are used to modify the normal sequence, are Dynamic Recall
and Dynamic Omits. These allow phases to be recalled or omitted when specified
phases or overlaps are green to create special conditional sequences.

I/O Steering
The 3000 Series Controller allows certain signal outputs (vehicle or pedestrian
movements as well as overlaps) to be ‘redirected’ or “steered” to another output. This
allows access to outputs that would not normally have a physical pin associated
without a custom D module inserted. For example, the Overlap E Red, Yellow and
Green outputs can be redirected to the phase 2 Red, Yellow and Green output pins
on the MS-A connector. In TS 2 Type 1, these outputs are directed from the RS 485,
Port 1, through the BIUs to their appropriate destinations. This technique may be
useful for ‘diamond’ sequences where all output signals are actually overlaps. Also,
the ON, NEXT, and CHECK outputs are available for reassignment if they are not
otherwise needed for external logic.

Preemption
The flexible approach to sequencing has been extended to preemption giving the
user complete control to generate complex preempt sequences including the ability to
flash signals and leave signals dark if so desired.

Time of Day Control


The calendar scheduler allows the selection of operating patterns and special
conditions on a calendar basis. Patterns and conditions are known as events, and
may be selected by time of day (TOD), day of week, day of month and day of year.
The controller keeps track of the week of year so that cyclic functions most typical of
traffic control may use repeating weeks. The TOD capabilities of the 3000 Series
include 220 events, 20 week plans, 32 day plans, and 50 exception days that may be
programmed by date or by day of week and week of month. In addition, the time
clock may be reset to a specified time by an external input. Each event time may
select a timing pattern (cycle, offset and split) and control conditions through the use
of time clock circuits. There are 166 circuits available and this number can be
expanded to 255. Examples of conditions that may be controlled by time of day
include phase and ped omits, call to (CNA), timing plans 1-4, free operation and most
NEMA inputs such as ped recycle, omit red clearance, etc.

Dynamic Displays
A number of dynamic displays are included to better monitor the operation of the
controller. In addition to the main display that shows vehicle & pedestrian demand
and interval information, there are displays that indicate the status of all inputs and
outputs, density, coordination, time of day, logs, and preemption.

22 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Hardware in the 3000 Series

Security Codes
There is a two level security system available that, when implemented, allows some
users access to all data, and others access only to less critical data areas. If there is
no keyboard activity for 5 minutes, the user is required to reenter the security code to
gain access to the data programming screens if security is enabled. A security code
of 0 will disable the security system. The security system also permits a user with the
privileged security code to restrict access to sensitive data. A user with the restricted
security code will not be able to change data in these restricted areas. The privileged
security code also enables the removal of menu items that are not needed in order to
simplify the user interface.

Adding and Deleting Menus


The 3000 Series unit is shipped with its full compliment of menus available. A feature
is provided, however, that allows the user to delete menus that will not be used to
streamline and simplify the menu set. Deleted menus can be restored at any time.

Coordination
The internal coordination system provides for 6 cycles, 5 offsets per cycle and 4 splits
per cycle. Phase allocation (Split) programming may be done in seconds, or percent
of cycle length, at the user's option. Offsets may also be entered in seconds or
percent independently of the split entry mode. An automatic permissive calculation
feature is included with three modes of operation: single permissive, multiple
permissive and yield permissive. For maximum flexibility, Manual Permissives are
available for each phase per Cycle/Split combination. When offset seeking is
required, there are three ways to get back in sync: Shortway (Short Route), Add Only
and Dwell. TOD circuits and lead/lag plans may be activated by cycle, offset, split,
and free patterns.
The 3000 Series controller can be programmed to revert to free operation, if it
receives no sync pulses for a selected number of cycles. Free operation may also be
activated if no offset line is active or multiple offset inputs are active for a selected
number of seconds.

Indexing
An Index feature is available to assist in providing quick access to the controller’s
databases via the keyboard. If, for instance, an operator wishes to learn what
keystrokes would be required to configure the controller for Dual Entry operation, she
could use the Index feature to find the proper sequence of keystrokes. To access
Indexing, press SHIFT - CLEAR from within any of the Read Data or Change Data
screens. (Or you can choose option 9 on the main Read Data and Change Data
menus to access the Index feature.) Once the desired data item is located in the
index list (items are arranged alphabetically), the operator can place the cursor on the
item in question and press ENTER to go directly to the data screen where that
parameter is stored.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 23


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

CONFIGURATION OPTIONS

NEMA TS 1
The Standard I/O configuration for the 3000 Series controller includes basic 2 - 8
phase operation by utilizing the MS-A, B, and C connectors. Special I/O
requirements, such as use of phases 9 - 16, are met through the use of a number of
‘D’ connector options. ‘D’ connectors available at this time include preemption,
closed loop (which includes preempt), and 12 phase. Custom modules are available
for the states of Texas and Idaho, the cities of Las Vegas and Phoenix. A module is
also available that is compatible with the CPC connector used on the LMD line of
controllers. Custom ‘D’ modules are available by request; please contact the Peek
Traffic Sales Department for information on special I/O requirements.

Note Peek Traffic no longer produces TS1 controller firmware for the 3000 Series.
TS 1 operation can be achieved by using the TS 2 firmware in a TS 2 controller
and simply not programming the TS 2 features.

NEMA TS 2, Type 1 (TS 2-1)


Standard I/O configuration for the TS 2-1,3000 Controller includes basic 2,4, 8, and
12 phase operation by utilizing channel assignments received through the BIUs. BIU
channel assignment is programmable within controller menus. A 10 pin MS-A
Connector is installed to provide power and fault monitor output functions only. The
TS 2-1 MS-A Connector contains AC(+), AC(-), logic ground, earth ground and the
fault monitor output. The TS 2 Type 1 standard interface shall control all Inputs and
Outputs through Port 1, the high speed RS-485 serial data bus, which uses digital
addressing to assign all cabinet functions. The Port 1 physically interfaces to the
cabinet terminals and facilities and other devices via a TS 2 compatible Bus Interface
Unit (BIU). Other devices include a TS 2 compatible Malfunction Management Unit
(MMU) and TS 2 compatible detector rack(s). The controller also provides an EIA-
232 (RS-232C) terminal (Port 2) and a telemetry interface (Port 3) for systems
communications.

NEMA TS 2, Type 2 (TS 2-2)


The TS 2 Type 2 standard includes the features of the Type 1 unit plus the TS 1
standard MSA, MSB, and MSC connectors for downward compatibility with NEMA TS
1 cabinet facilities. This type also provides an EIA-232 (RS-232C) terminal (Port 2)
and a telemetry interface (Port 3) for systems communications.
The TS 2 3000 Series modularity supports NEMA TS 2 Port-3, UTCS applications,
integral Fiber Optics and radio interconnect operation for conventional narrowband and
spread-spectrum radio equipment making the TS 2 3000 compatible with existing TS 1.

24 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Configuration Options

Optional Modules
The following are optional 3000 Series modules. A brief description of the module’s
significant function is provided. Refer to Appendix C for detailed pin-out listings for
each of these modules.
Table 6 – Communications/Optional Modules available for 3000 Series units
Module Pin Count Significant Functions Provided
Port 1 Comm 15 pin (Standard, not optional) TS 2 port 1, High
Speed Serial (SDLC)
Port 2 Comm 25 pin (Standard, not optional) TS 2 port 2, RS-232
Closed Loop ‘D’ Auxiliary 37 pin User defined inputs, alarms, coord outputs,
Module opto isolated inputs, preempt outputs, detectors
29-32
Closed Loop ‘D’ Preempt 25 pin Preempt 1-6 inputs, Det’s 9-16, misc. I/O
Module
Closed Loop ‘D’ Coord Module 26 pin Det’s 17-32, FSK xmit/recv, misc. I/O
LMD ‘D’ CPC Module 63 pin Compatible with TCT LMD series ‘D’
LMD ‘D’ Auxiliary Module 15 pin Det’s 17-32, FSK xmit/recv, misc. I/O
12 phase ‘D’ Module 100 pin Provides I/O for 12 phase operation
Texas ‘D’ 57 pin Coord interconnect functions (No longer
available for the 3000E)
Texas ‘D’ Auxiliary Module 37 pin Det’s 17-24, FSK xmit/recv, misc. I/O (No
longer available for the 3000E)
Las Vegas ‘D’ Module 57 pin Pre-empt & Coord interconnect functions (No
longer available for the 3000E)
Las Vegas ‘D’ Auxiliary Module 25 pin (No longer available for the 3000E)

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 25


Chapter 1 — Introduction to the 3000 Series

Usage With Conflict Monitors & Malfunction Management Units


The 3000 and 3000E are fully compatible with NEMA conflict monitors (CMUs) and
malfunction management units (MMUs). CMUs are a TS 1 standard for monitoring
controller operation, while MMUs are a TS 2 standard that performs the same
function. The 3000 series controllers output a steady CVM signal on Pin C of the A
connector of TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 controllers. A similar call fault monitor signal is
provided on Pin F of the A connector of TS 2 Type 1 controllers. The CMU (or MMU)
monitors this signal to verify that the controller is receiving the electrical voltage it
requires. If this CVM/fault monitor signal drops, the CMU or MMU will kick the
intersection into flash as a safety precaution.
During the startup of the controller, most monitoring units are designed to give the
controller a few seconds of lee-way on the generation of the CVM, while the controller
performs its initialization and time-sync operations. This is to prevent the CMU from
immediately kicking the intersection into flash when the controller takes the time it
needs to get up and running.
The CMU typically monitors the CVM output and the outputs of the load switches in
the cabinet with no other intelligent connection to the controller. An MMU, on the
other hand, also has the CVM/Fault Monitor connection and the load switch
monitoring, but it also usually has an intelligent link with the controller via the
controller’s Port 1, a serial RS-485 connection.

26 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

This section explains the contents of option 1 of the 3000 and 3000E Main Menu: the Dynamic
Displays, as well as a few other screens that are important for the normal operation of the
controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

“Status Check Upon Startup”, on page 28


“Primary Controller Status Screen”, on page 30.
“Additional Status Screens”, on page 39
“Coordination Status Screen”, on page 54
“Time of Day Status Screen”, on page 57
“Preemption Status Screens”, on page 59
“Voltages Screen”, on page 63
“Overlap Functions Status Screens”, on page 64
“Program Level & Revision Screen”, on page 65
“Log Menu”, on page 66
“Checksum Status Screens”, on page 73
“Comm Status Screens”, on page 75
“TS 2 Dynamic Help Screens”, on page 77
“Diagnostics”, on page 81

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 27


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

STATUS CHECK UPON STARTUP


In firmware releases prior to version 3.6, the configuration databases in the controller
were tested every time the system was started using a somewhat confusing set of
Checksum tests, followed by a set of screens that could be used to override the test
results if any errors were found. But beginning with the version 3.6 firmware, the
controller’s firmware simply tests the seven controller databases upon startup and
reports immediately if any problems are found.

RUNNING POWER ON SELF TEST

Figure 13 – Self-test screen that appears upon power up


If any problems are discovered, an error screen appears, showing all of the
databases where problems were detected. This is what the screen looks like when
(for example) three of the databases have errors:

Database sections are corrupt!

[Time of Day] [Preemption] [Special]

Press the [CLEAR] key to clear the


above sections and continue.
Figure 14 – Power-on Error Message with 3 database errors detected
Previously, the tests were performed and the controller went ahead and started up,
even if it did detect a ‘Checksum’ error. As a result, the operator had to look very
carefully at the main dynamic status screen to see if there were problems, the new
system uses a CRC test (Cyclic Redundancy Check) and it won’t allow you to start
the controller unless you acknowledge that you’ve seen the error by pressing the
CLE AR key.

An error followed by a CLE AR entry also clears the database contents to a blank
state. This is judged to be safer than allowing a corrupted database to be used to run
an intersection.

28 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Status Check Upon Startup

After such an error, the controller’s database should be reset to default, or a good
database should be loaded into the controller via CLMATS, an EEPROM card, or by
using the Pocket Central software on a Pocket PC handheld device.

Note For details about the way that the CRC check is performed in
CLMATS and the 3000 series controllers, refer to the MIZBAT
Protocol Manual, available from Peek Traffic Corporation.
To be sent a copy of this document, the customer must sign a
Non-Disclosure Agreement.

Two other related version 3.6 changes to the interface are in the Dynamic Controller
Display screen and the Checksum Status screen. The Status of the controller is still
shown on the bottom line of the Dynamic Controller Display screen (MM > 1 > 1), but
since checksums are no longer tested, these kinds of errors no longer appear in this
location. (Error status is shown upon startup as described above.)
The other item is on the Dynamic Display menu (MM > 1), where the Checksum
Status option still appears (Option 9), but it now only shows this message: “NO
CHECKSUM FAILURES PRESENT”. The controller no longer allows an operator to
reset the checksum calculation so that the controller will run with a faulty database in
memory for safety reasons.

Cleaned Up Override Clearance


Prior to the version 3.6 firmware, the controller’s Central Override states could be
cleared from the Comm dynamic display screen (MM > 1 > shift-0). However, an
effort has been made to remove all data entry and modification functions from the
dynamic display screens. These areas are intended to be safe areas where controller
status is viewed, but not modified. As a result, the clearance of Central Overrides is
now performed elsewhere.

Clearing a Central Override


1. To clear a central override, go to the Coordination Menu and then into the
Enhanced Options screens. (The exact path is M M > 3 . C h a n g e D a t a >
2.Coordination > 9.Enhanced Options > 1.Operating
O p t i o n s .)
2. To clear the overrides, change the value of Central Override to N if Y is
displayed, or to Y if N is displayed..
3. Check the Dynamic Screen’s Comm option to verify that there are no overrides
still active. (M M > 1 . D y n a m i c D i s p l a y s > 1 0 [ S h i f t - 0 ) . C o m m )

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 29


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

PRIMARY CONTROLLER STATUS SCREEN


The Primary Controller Status Display screen can be accessed by pressing option 1
on the Dynamic Menu. However, a shortcut method to this screen is always available;
press SHIFT -ENTER .
The Controller Funcs display allow the user to view the real-time operation of the
controller, with emphasis on phase related items, such as interval, timing, signal head
color, detectors, etc. This Controller status screen is the primary status display for the
3000 Series, however there are a whole set of status display screens that can be
reached by paging down from it.

Note There is a method to place Vehicle and Pedestrian phase calls manually while viewing
either the Primary or the Alternate Controller Status Screens. To place vehicle calls on
Phases 1-8, press the Up-Arrow and the corresponding keypad number
simultaneously. To place Ped calls on Phases 1-8, press the Left Arrow and the
corresponding keypad number simultaneously. These controls also work on the
Coordination Status screen.

Controller Status Screen


The Controller Status screen shows phase (1-12) and overlap (A-D) indicators
(current state), phases next to be served, vehicle and pedestrian demand on all
phases, phase interval timers, the state of the phase (ring), and the mode of
termination. Coord/free status is also shown with the active cycle and offset timers.
Unused phases and overlaps are not shown.

13:10:07 COMM: On-Line 1 1 1 -O/L-


PH/OL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 A B C D
INDIC. G r r - G r - - - - - - R - - -
V DEMAND X R M - X R - - - - - - |Cyc 1
P DEMAND R X - R - - - - - - - | XYZ
MIN XY WLK XY |MIN XY WLK XY |Ofs 1
MX1 XY PSG XY |MX1 XY PSG XY | XYZ
TP1, FREE, Closed Loop |Spl 1
Figure 15 – Controller Status screen
Although the Controller Status screen only shows phases 1 through 12, rings 1 and 2,
and overlaps A through D, this is typically sufficient for the majority of applications.
However, if a particular application requires more than these, the Alternate Controller
Status screen can be used instead (Refer to Page 38.) This alternate status screen
shows all 16 phases and all 4 rings ( when used) on a single screen.
The advantage of this Controller Functions Status screen, as shown above, is that it
packs a lot of information on one screen. Once familiar with this display, there is little
need for accessing the other status screens.

Note Since this is the standard operating screen for the 3000 and 3000E Traffic
Controllers, a user can always access this screen from anywhere within the menu
structure by pressing SHIFT – ENTER .

30 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Primary Controller Status Screen

Status Screen Navigation

Figure 16 – Navigating the status screens

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 31


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Layout of the Controller Status Screen


2 3

13:10:07 COMM: On-Line 1 1 1 -O/L- 4


PH/OL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 A B C D
INDIC. G r r - G r - - - - - - R - - -
V DEMAND X R M - X R - - - - - - |Cyc 1
P DEMAND R X - R - - - - - - - | 79%
MIN 12 WLK 4 |MIN 8 WLK 2 |Ofs 1 5
MX1 4 PSG 2 |MX1 3 PSG 1 | 2S
TP1, FREE, Closed Loop |Spl 1
Figure 17 – Detail: Top three lines of the controller status screen
The following are functions of the various parts of the Controller Functions Status
screen.
1. ROW 1 LEFT, TIME OF DAY — Shows time of day in the format HH:MM:SS.
2. ROW 1 MIDDLE, COMM ON/OFF LINE —
On Line = Comm active and OK
Off Line = Not programmed for Comm, not supposed to be on
FAIL = Programmed for Comm but carrier has been lost, not working
3. ROW 1 RIGHT, “ 1 1 1 --O/L--” — (Phase/Overlap column titles)
The right side of row 1 is for the tens designation of phases 10-12, and the
“O/L” designation for overlaps (static text).
4. ROW 2 STATIC, “PH/OL 1 2 3 …” — Phase and Overlap labels
5. ROW 3, “INDIC. G r r…” — Indications/Intervals for phases and overlaps.
Table 7 – Phase/Overlap* Indicators (in increasing order of priority)
Letter code Meaning
– Phase is not used (no signal indication)
N This phase next
R Phase is in red clearance
Y Phase is in yellow interval
W Phase is in walk
D Phase is in ped clear (FDW)
G Phase is in green (no walk or ped clear)
r Phase is red, not ON (other phases are in service)

*
Only G, Y, R, and “–“ are applicable for overlaps A through D. An O/L is considered not
used if no parents are assigned to it.
32 3000 Series Traffic Controllers
Primary Controller Status Screen

13:10:07 COMM: On-Line 1 1 1 -O/L-


PH/OL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 A B C D
INDIC. G r r - G r - - - - - - R - - -
9
6 V DEMAND X R M - X R - - - - - - |Cyc 1
P DEMAND R X - R - - - - - - - | 79%
7 MIN 12 WLK 4 |MIN 8 WLK 2 |Ofs 1
MX1 4 PSG 2 |MX1 3 PSG 1 | 2S
8 TP 1, COORD, Time of Day |Spl 1 10
Figure 18 – Detail: Middle four lines
6. ROW 4, “V DEMAND” — Vehicle Demand. Shows phase input and recall
status. Codes are shown In order of priority when more than one state is true.
Table 8 – Vehicle Demand codes, in order of priority
Code Description Note

– Phase not used

P Preempt Call applied Preempt overrides Omit

O Phase omitted no vehicle call

O. Phase omitted with vehicle call

H Phase hold applied no vehicle call

H. Phase hold applied with vehicle call

R Max Recall applied no vehicle call

R. Max Recall applied with vehicle call

r Min Recall applied no vehicle call

r. Min Recall applied with vehicle call

X Vehicle detect input physically active no preemption, no omits,


no hold, no recalls
M Vehicle detect call stored in memory lock mode

(blank) None of the above phase is used, but no


preemptions, omits,
holds, recalls, or demand

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 33


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

7. ROW 5, “P DEMAND” — Pedestrian Demand. Shows pedestrian input and


recall status. Codes are shown In order of priority when more than one state is
true.
Table 9 – Pedestrian Demand codes
P Demand Code Description
– Phase not used
X Pedestrian input physically active
R Ped Recall
M Ped call stored in memory
(blank) No demand, phase is used but none of the above apply (no
calls, etc.)

8. ROW 6 & 7, left side, Phase Timers (by Ring) — There are eight positions
for timers and status, four on the left side for ring 1 and four on the right for ring
2. These are grouped into four groups of two labels side-by-side. Each position
can display a label and an associated time value, if appropriate to the label.
Other labels may appear in these positions that indicate a general status (for
example GRN REST.)
9. ROW 4 through 8, Right Side: Timing Plan and Coordination Timers —
Top row = “Free” if the controller is running in free operation (i.e. no
coordination.)
Or, if in the system is configured for coordinated operation:
Top 2 rows = “Cyc 1-6” with active local cycle timer shown below, displayed in
either seconds or a percentage.
Next 2 rows = “Ofs 1-5” (offset) and its timer shown below. However, if the unit
is offset seeking, these rows will say “SEEK” with the current offset timer value
shown below.
Bottom row = “Spl 1-24” (split, no timer).
10. ROW 8. Left Side: Controller Status — Used to indicate the unit’s current
operating state. There are two general states:
Normal Operating Status — If the unit is running normally with no special
condtions, the following status will be displayed: TP# FREE or COORD, and
TOD or CL.
Override/Fault Status Indicators — These messages indicate that the unit is
being overridden in some way (UCF, preempt, etc.,) something is incorrect in
the configuration of the controller, or the unit has failed.

34 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Primary Controller Status Screen

The information in Table 10 should help you interpret the message.


Table 10 – Error/Failure Status Indicators
Message Displayed Description
24 VOLT FAILURE The TS 1/TS 2 Controller is monitoring an internal 24 VDC
Failure. The actual voltage reading is also shown.
BAD COORD PLAN The controller is running in a Free Mode due to an error in the
requested coordination pattern.
BIU FAILURES: SEE HELP One or more BIU’s have failed. Pressing the HELP button in
this situation will open a help screen especially designed for
this situation.
CENTRAL OVER,OVR Indicates that Central has overriden the current controller
CENTRAL, OVR UCF operation.
CHECKSUM FAILURE Indicates a corrupted database (See Dynamic Menu, Item # 9,
Checksum status for specific information) (TS 1/TS 2). Check
values in indicated area. Any keyboard entry in indicated area
will clear checksum (see checksum latch below).
CHECKSUM LATCH A checksum failure has been cleared but the fault remains
latched until the unit is re-started.
CLEARING BIU FAILURES A restart has been conducted to eliminate BIU failures. This
message indicates the Controller is in the process of rectifying
all BIU failures.
COORD FAULT A coordinator failed to serve a valid phase call within two
cycles.
CONTROLLER CONFLICT The controller detects a conflict via information sent from the
FLASH MMU via Port 1, but the MMU has not entered the fault state.
CYCLING FAILURE-FLASH The TS 1/TS 2 Controller has failed to answer a serviceable
conflicting call within two times the longest path between
barriers during Free operation.
EEPROM FAILURE During the start up sequence the TS 1/TS 2 Controller did not
detect it’s required EEPROM.
EPROM FAILURE Failure during the EPROM diagnostic test.
ESTABLISHING BIU LINK At power up this message displays until communications with
all BIUs are established.
EXTERNAL START External start is active.
FLASH EXIT ERROR Indicates incompatible programming of the UCF Flash Phases
with the UCF Exit Phases. (TS 1/TS 2.)
I/O FAILURE The TS 1/TS 2 Controller cannot recognize the current
input/output configuration.
MCE Manual Control Enable input is active.
MMU FLASH: SEE HELP Occurs when the MMU puts the intersection in flash. Pressing
the HELP button will open a special screen designed for this
situation.
MMU INCOMPATIBLE: SEE
HELP
OVERLAP CARD ERROR At power up the TS 1/TS 2 detected an overlap card is
enabled in the programmed configuration (Controller >
Overlaps menu) but no card is present.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 35


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Message Displayed Description


PORT 1 FAIL: FRAME 18 Frame 18 was not sent out within 0.5 seconds.
RAM FAILURE Failure during RAM diagnostic test.
RUN ACTIVE + 1, ACTIVE
RUN IN,SEE A fault has occurred which stopped execution of the current
HELP,PREFAULT = preemption run.
RUN X ACTIVE Preempt number X is active.
SOFT FLASH The controller is flashing signals via the load-switches.
STARTUP PE RUN ACTIVE The TS 1/TS 2 Controller was powered up with a preempt
active which will keep the intersection in flash.
STARTUP, FLASH ACTIVE A flash command was called for during the power up process
(TS 1/TS 2).
STOP TIME Stop time inputs are active.
TOD-LOST COMM
TS 2 Flash Indications
TYPE 2 I/O MODE ERROR Database I/O mode does not match the I/O mode that was set
via the MS-A connector’s I/O mode bits A, B, and C.
UCF CENTRAL (if central Same as above but command received from central.
override)
UCF FLASH The TS 1/TS 2 Controller has received an enter flash
command and has entered flash.
WATCHDOG FAILURE The microprocessor's watchdog input has not been serviced
within the specified time.

TS 2 Flash Error Messages


“MMU FLASH” and “CONTROLLER CONFLICT FLASH” are TS 2 error messages
related to information received on port 1. “MMU FAULT” indicates that the MMU has
declared a fault, such as conflict, red fail, etc. and that it has placed the intersection in
flash. “CONTROLLER CONFLICT FLASH,” indicates that the controller has detected
a conflict but the MMU has not placed the intersection in flash.

Controller Status Screen Abbreviations


The abbreviations used on the Controller Status screen are listed below.
Table 11 – Vehicle and pedestrian demand codes
Code Description
V Vehicle Call (Actuation)
P Ped Call (Actuation)
M Veh or Ped Call in Memory
O Omit
H Hold
r Min Recall

36 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Primary Controller Status Screen

R Max Recall

Table 12 – Interval Abbreviations


Abbreviation Description
DCL Double Clearing Overlap

DWK Don’t Walk

GRST Green Rest


HRST Hold Rest

INIT Initial
LCP Last Car Passage
PASS Passage

PCL Ped Clearance


PHD CNA Green/Don’t Walk Rest
PREP Green Prep

RED Red Clearance


RRST Red Rest
RRVT Red Revert
WK Walk
WR Walk Rest
WRM Walk Rest Modifier

YEL Yellow Clearance

Table 13 – Max and Termination Abbreviations


Abbreviation Description
MX1 Max 1 timer value

MX2 Max 2 timer value


MX1+ Max 3 timer overriding Max 1

MX2+ Max 3 timer overriding Max 2

GAP TERM Phase term. due to gap out condition


MAX TERM Phase term. due to max out

FORCE TERM Phase forced off


RREST TERM Phase terminating to Red Rest

M ADV TERM Phase terminating due to MCE Interval Advance

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 37


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

ALTERNATE CONTROLLER STATUS SCREEN


If you page down from the top Controller Status screen, you will see the Alternate
Status screen. This is the interface that was used on the original 3000 Controller for
status display. It is somewhat less detailed than the new display, but some user’s
prefer it, since it provides information on all 16 phases on a single screen.
Status information is shown in the top left corner of the screen. During normal
operation, the current timing plan and coordination plan are shown. If coordination is
active, the local cycle counter is also displayed, otherwise, the word “FREE” is
displayed. If the controller is in an abnormal situation (e.g., preemption, UCF,
checksum failure) a message is shown in this area that describes the reason for the
abnormal operation.

TP1 1/3/1: 75 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
V DEMAND O R r V O R r r V M M M r r
P DEMAND M M O O O O O
R1 2 ON 3 NX YEL 2.1 DWK GAP TERM
R2 6 ON 7 NX YEL 2.1 DWK GAP TERM
R3 10 ON 0 NX PREP DWK MX1 0
R4 14 ON 0 NX PASS 2.6 DWK MX1 23
Figure 19 – Alternate Controller Status screen
The top line of this display is used for special messages.

Note There is a method to place Vehicle and Pedestrian phase calls manually while
viewing either the Primary or the Alternate Controller Status Screens. To place
vehicle calls on Phases 1-8, press the Up-Arrow and the corresponding keypad
number simultaneously. To place Ped calls on Phases 1-8, press the Left Arrow
and the corresponding keypad number simultaneously. These controls also work
on the Coordination Status screen.

38 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

ADDITIONAL STATUS SCREENS


All of these screens are varying ways of viewing the controller’s current status. They
can be accessed by choosing Dynamic Displays from the Main Menu, and then
choosing Controller Funcs. These pages are then accessed by paging down from
the Controller Status screen.
Refer to the following pages for details about each of these status screens:
Normal I/O Status screen, on page 40.
Density Status screen, on page 41.
Outputs Status screens, on page 42.
Inputs Status screens, on page 45.
Detector Status screens, on page 47.
I/O Configuration Status screen (TS 1 or TS 2), on page 49.
D Module Outputs Status screen, on page 52.
Coordination Status Screen on page 54.
Time of Day Status screen, on page 57.
TOD Dynamic Circuits Status screens, on page 58
Preemption Run Duration Timer screens, on page 58.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 39


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Normal I/O Screen


This screen can be accessed by paging down from the Alternate Controller Status
screen. Here is a sample of a Normal I/O screen:
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
V OUTPUT R G R R R G R R
P OUTPUT D W D D D W D D
ON/NX O O
V MEMORY M V M
P MEMORY M P M
OMITS B V
Figure 20 – Normal I/O Status screen
The Normal I/O dynamic screen shows the current status of the controller's phase
related inputs and outputs. Phase outputs, pedestrian outputs, calls, memory and
omits are all displayed.
Table 14 – Normal I/O screen key
Display Value
V(ehicle) OUTPUT R=Red
Y=Yellow
G=Green
P(edestrian) OUTPUT D=Don't Walk
W=Walk
P-C=Ped/Clear (toggling)
ON/NX O=Phase On
N=Phase Next
V MEMORY V=Vehicle Call
M=Memory
P MEMORY P=Pedestrian Call
M=Memory
OMITS V=Vehicle Omit
P=Ped Omit
B=Both Veh & Ped Omit

40 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Density Status Screen


The Density Status screen can be accessed by paging down from the Normal I/O
Status screen. It shows density information for up to four rings on a single screen.
Here’s a sample of a Density Status screen:
** DENSITY **
R1 PH 2 R2 PH 6 R3 PH R4 PH
PASS 4.0 LCP 0
MGAP 0.0 PTMR 0.0
TBR 0 TBR 0.0
TTR 0 TTR 0
PTMR 0.0 PTMR 0.0
MX 1 30 MX 1 30
Figure 21 – Density Status screen
The Density dynamic screen can be used to watch phase timing on both density and
non-density phases. For non-density phases, the initial, passage and max timers will
be displayed, as well as yellow and all red. For density phases, the passage, max
timers and all density settings will be displayed. The passage timer will show its
reduced state after reduction begins.
Table 15 – Density Status screen key
Abbreviation Description Static/Dynamic Density/Non-Density
APA Added Initial per Actuation STATIC DENSITY
INIT Initial Time STATIC BOTH
ITMR Current Value of Initial Timer DYNAMIC BOTH
LCP Last Car Passage STATIC DENSITY
MGAP Minimum Gap STATIC DENSITY
MXIN Max Initial STATIC DENSITY
MXn Current Value of Max Timer DYNAMIC BOTH
(a + indicates MX3)
PASS Passage Time STATIC BOTH
PTMR Current Value of Passage DYNAMIC BOTH
Timer
RED Red Time STATIC BOTH
RTMR Current Value of Red Timer DYNAMIC BOTH
TBR Time Before Reduction STATIC DENSITY
TTR Time To Reduce STATIC DENSITY
YEL Yellow Time STATIC BOTH
YTMR Current Value of Yellow DYNAMIC BOTH
Timer

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 41


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Example Density Status Screens


In the following example screens, phase 2 is a density phase and phase 6 is not.
** DENSITY **
R1 PH 2 R2 PH 6 R3 PH R4 PH
INIT 10 INIT 10
MXIN 20 MXIN 0
APA 2.0 APA 0
ITMR 12.0 ITMR 8.0
MX 1 19 MX 1 19

Figure 22 – Density Status screen - Example 1


** DENSITY **
R1 PH 2 R2 PH 6 R3 PH R4 PH
PASS 4.0 PASS 4.0
MGAP 20 MGAP 0
TBR 5 TBR 0
TTR 10 TTR 0
PTMR 3.2 PTMR 4.0
MX 1 19 MX 1 19
Figure 23 – Density Status screen - Example 2
** DENSITY **
R1 PH 2 R2 PH 6 R3 PH R4 PH
YEL 3.0 YEL 3.0
YTMR 2.1 YTMR 2.1

Figure 24 – Density Status screen - Example 3


** DENSITY **
R1 PH 2 R2 PH 6 R3 PH R4 PH
RED 2.0 RED 2.0
RTMR 1.2 RTMR 1.2

Figure 25 – Density Status screen - Example 4

42 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Outputs Status Screens


The Outputs Status screen can be accessed by paging down from the Density Status
screen.
PG1 ** OUTPUTS ** 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
CHECK C C C C C C
ON/NEXT O N O N
VEH HEAD R G R R R G R R
PED HEAD D W D D D D D D
VOL HEAD R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R
POL HEAD D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D
Figure 26 – Output Status screen - page 1
Outputs allow the user to see the status of phase outputs as well as per ring status
bits.
PG2 ** MACHINE OUTPUTS **
STATUS BITS DEC STAT RING
CBA CODE NAME INTERVAL
RING 1 000 0 MIN GRN INIT- DWK
RING 2 001 1 EXTENSION PASS- DWK
RING 3
RING 4
FL LOGIC ON
Figure 27 – Output Status screen - page 2

Table 16 – Outputs Status screen key


Label Value
CHECK C = Phase Check On
ON/NEXT O = On
N = Next
VEH HEAD & R = Red
VOL HEAD Y = Yellow
G = Green
PED HEAD & D = Don't Walk
POL HEAD W = Walk
P-C = Ped/Clear (toggling)

The ring interval is shown in a phase-ped pair. The different phase and ped ring
intervals are discussed in the NORMAL STATUS section. Flashing Logic should
always be switching between ON and OFF.

Status bits are defined as bits C, B and A. These bits represent a decimal code that
indicates the ring status and interval. Refer to Table 17.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 43


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Table 17 – Output Status Bit definitions


CBA Value Decimal Equivalent Description CNA Phase
000 0 MIN GRN WALK TIMING
001 1 EXTENSION WALK HOLD or REST
010 2 MAXIMUM PED CLEAR
011 3 GRN REST GRN REST
100 4 YEL YEL
101 5 RED CLEAR RED CLEAR
110 6 RED REST RED REST
111 7 NOT USED NOT USED

44 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Inputs Status Screens


The Inputs Status screen can be accessed by paging down from the Outputs Status
screen. Here is an example.
PG1 ** INPUTS ** 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PED OMIT P P
VEH OMIT V V
HOLD H H
PED CALL P P
VEH CALL V

Figure 28 – Inputs Status screen - page 1


This screen shows the status of inputs to the controller, including vehicle omits, holds,
and calls. In addition, the other NEMA input functions are shown. These screens are
very useful for observing the actual state of the inputs in relationship to the general
operation of the controller.
Paging down again will display pages 2 and 3 of the Input Status screens. For ring
and machine inputs, an ‘X’ indicates that the input is active.
PG2 ** RING INPUTS **
FUNCTION 1 2 3 4 FUNCTION 1 2 3 4
ST TIME RED OMIT
INH MAX X X PED RECY X X
MAX II FORC OFF
RED RST

Figure 29 – Inputs Status screen - page 2 - Ring Inputs

PG3 ** MACHINE INPUTS **


EX STRT WRM X TEST A MODE A
MCE CNA1 X TEST B X MODE B
INT ADV CNA2 TEST C MODE C
RCL ALL IND CTL X
REV PR1 REV PR2 REV PR3 REV PR4
CVS SPARE2 SPARE3 SPARE4
SPARE5
Figure 30 – Inputs Status screen - page 3 - Machine Inputs

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 45


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

The Input Status screens show a variety of abbreviations and labels. This table
explains their purpose and possible values.
Table 18 – Input Status screen key
Label Description
CNA1 Call to non-actuated 1
CNA2 Call to non-actuated 2
EX STRT External Start
FORC OFF Force Off
HOLD H=Hold
IND CTL Indicator Control
INH MAX Inhibit Max Termination
INT ADV Interval Advance
MAX II Max II Timer
MCE Manual Control Enable
MODE A,B and C TS 2 Mode input
PED CALL P=Pedestrian Call
PED OMIT P=Pedestrian Omit
PED RECY Ped Recycle
RCL ALL Recall All
RED OMIT Red Omit
RED RST Red Rest
REV PR1, PR2, PR3, PR4 Reverse phase pair (Lead/Lag)
ST TIME Stop Time
TEST A,B and C NEMA Test input
VEH CALL V=Vehicle Call
VEH OMIT V=Vehicle Omit
WRM Walk Rest Modifier

46 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Dynamic Detector Display Screens


The Dynamic Detector Display screens can be accessed by paging down from the
Inputs Status screens.. The number of Detector Display screens that appear depends
on two things: TS 1 controllers allow up to 32 detectors, while TS 2 controllers can
use up to 64, and the actual number of detectors being used also changes the
number of screens.
There are actually two types of screens in the Detector Display Screens. The first
screen is an overview of the detector connections. The TS 1 version looks like this:
PG1 *** DYNAMIC DETECTOR DISPLAY *** DP1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DETECTOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - 16
17 - 32

>>PGDN FOR DISPLAY AND STRETCH TIMERS<<


Figure 31 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 1 (TS 1)
The TS 2 version of this screen has places for an additional 32 detectors:
PG1 *** DYNAMIC DETECTOR DISPLAY *** DP1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DETECTOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - 16
17 - 32
33 - 48
49 - 64
>>PGDN FOR DISPLAY AND STRETCH TIMERS <<
Figure 32 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 1 (TS 2)
The second type of screen in the Detector Display screens are the detailed detector
screens. Each of these detail screens can show six detectors. The TS 1 version of
the firmware has six of these screens to display all 32 detectors. The TS 2 version
has 13 of these screens. An example:
PG2 ** DYNAMIC DETECTOR DISPLAY ** DP1
NO. IN-OUT MODE STRETCH DELAY ROUTE
1 X X NORMAL 0.0 0.0 1
2 X STR/DEL 5.0 0.0 2
3 X X NORMAL 0.0 0.0 4
4 X STR/DEL 0.0 10.0 8
5 X STP/BAR 3.0 0.0 22
6 NORMAL 0.0 0.0 20
Figure 33 – Dynamic Detector Display screen - page 2 (TS 1 or 2)
In-Out — These detailed screens display six items for each detector. The second and
third columns show the inputs to and outputs from the detector processing module.
An active detector is indicated by an ‘X’. Under normal operation, the inputs and

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 47


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

outputs will match, but when the detector is in a special mode (stretch or delay for
example), the input may be active and the output inactive or vice versa. An ‘F’ next to
one of the detectors in the IN column indicates that the detector is in a ‘Fault’
condition.
Mode — The third column shows the mode that the detector is operating in is
displayed. This value can be Normal, Stretch/Delay, or Stop Bar.

Note Pages 7 through 12 of the Dynamic Display screens are TS 2 only,


(Showing detectors 33 through 64.)

Stretch/Delay — Next to the Mode column are two timers - the stretch and delay
timers. If the detector is in the stretch mode, the stretch timer will begin to time when
the call on the detector becomes inactive. Note that during the time when the timer is
timing, the input is inactive, but the output remains active.
The delay timer is similar to the stretch timer, except that it operates in the other
direction. When the input becomes active, the delay timer begins to time and the
output does not become active until the timer expires. If a detector is operating in the
stop bar mode, the stretch timer displays the time left before the stop bar detector is
disconnected.
Route — This value indicates the phases to which the detector is assigned. The
value is a hexadecimal representation of a binary mapping to the 16 possible phases,
with each digit representing the binary state of four phases. For example ‘1’ equals
0000 0001, so the detector is mapped only to phase 1. This is a four digit hex
number, even though the leading zeros are not displayed. So ‘1’ is actually 0001. If
the detector is assigned to all four phases, it is represented by an ‘F’. So a detector
that is assigned to all 16 phases would look like this: FFFF. Some more examples:
Table 19 – Possible Detector ‘Route’ settings
Route Value Binary Representation Meaning
1 0000 0000 0000 0001 Detector is assigned only to phase 1
80 0000 0000 1000 0000 Phase 8
8000 1000 0000 0000 0000 Phase 16
4000 0100 0000 0000 0000 Phase 15
4002 0100 0000 0000 0010 Phases 2 and 15
204 0000 0010 0000 0100 Phases 3 and 10
F 0000 0000 0000 1111 Phases 1 through 4
F001 1111 0000 0000 0001 Phases 1, 13, 14, 15, and 16
FFFF 1111 1111 1111 1111 Phases 1 through 16

48 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

I/O Configuration Status Screens


The I/O Configuration Status screens are accessed by paging down from the Detector
Status screen. These screens vary greatly depending on the type of controller, and in
the case of a TS 2 Type 2 controller, the I/O mode that is selected.

I/O Configuration Status Screens for TS 1 Controllers


The 3000 Controller automatically configures itself for the input/output hardware that
is installed. The I/O Module Configuration screen provides a diagnostic tool to show
the user what hardware the controller has recognized. Four items are displayed. First
is the basic A, B, and C modules (2, 4 or 8 phase). Then the type of D module (if any)
is displayed. Finally, if an overlap card or EEPROM module is present, they are
indicated here.

I/O MODULE CONFIGURATION

BASIC A,B,C MODULE: MS A, B, & C


D MODULE TYPE: PE, COORD & TBC
OVERLAP CARD INSTALLED: NO
EEPROM CARD INSTALLED: NO

Figure 34 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 1 or TS 2 Type 2)


The above shows the most typical configuration of I/O modules.

I/O Configuration Status Screens for TS 2, Type 2 Controllers


The 3000 Controller automatically configures itself for the input/output hardware that
is installed. The I/O Module Configuration screen provides a diagnostic tool to show
the user what hardware the controller has recognized. Four items are displayed. First
is the basic A, B, and C modules (2, 4 or 8 phase). Then the type of D module (if any)
is displayed. Finally, if an overlap card or EEPROM module is present, they are
indicated here.

I/O MODULE CONFIGURATION

BASIC A,B,C MODULE: MS A, B, & C


D MODULE TYPE: PE, COORD, & TBC
OVERLAP CARD INSTALLED: NO
EEPROM CARD INSTALLED: NO

Figure 35 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 1 or TS 2 Type 2)


The above shows the most typical configuration of I/O modules.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 49


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

I/O Configuration Status Screens for TS 2, Type 1 Controllers


On TS 2 Type 1 controllers, there are three screens of I/O Configuration data rather
than just the one shown for TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 controllers.

I/O MODULE CONFIGURATION

BASIC A,B,C MODULE: TYPE 1


D MODULE TYPE: TYPE 1
OVERLAP CARD INSTALLED: NO
EEPROM CARD INSTALLED: NO

Figure 36 – I/O Module Configuration screen (TS 2 Type 1)


In addition to the slightly modified main I/O Module screen, a Type 1 controller also
shows two additional screens:

OUTPUTS: TYPE 1 (1 OF 2) (X = ON)

PE 1 2 3 4 5 6 UD 1 2 3

C2 C3 S2 S3 O1 O2 O3 FR UCF
X
Figure 37 – I/O Module Configuration screen - Page 1 (TS 2 Type 1)
This screen indicates functions not found in the TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 software.
Table 20 shows the definitions of the abbreviations used on this screen.

INPUTS: TYPE 1 (2 OF 2) (X = ON)

PE 1 2 3 4 5 6 DIM TBC LFL MMU ALM 1 2

C2 C3 S2 S3 O1 O2 O3 FR UCF

Figure 38 – I/O Module Configuration screen - Page 2 (TS 2 Type 1)

50 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Table 20 – I/O Module Configuration Status screen key


Abbreviation Description
ALM Alarm 1-2 Inputs
C Cycle outputs/inputs
DIM Dim Signal Outputs
FR Free Outputs/inputs
LFL Local Flash Input Status
MMU Monitor Flash Input Status
O Offset outputs/inputs
PE Preempt 1-6 outputs/inputs
S Split outputs/inputs
TBC Go To TOD Mode of Operation
UCF Flash outputs/inputs
UD TOD user defined 1-3 outputs/inputs

Mode I/O choice 0-7 plus free depending on I/O Mode Inputs A, B, and C as specified
by NEMA Standard Publication No. TS 2 standards. The Help screens for these
displays show each Pin # Mode, also specified by the NEMA TS 2 standards of 2003.
.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 51


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

D Module I/O Status Screens


The D Module I/O Status screen is accessed by paging down from the Alternate
Controller Status screen.
If an optional D Module is installed in the controller, the active inputs and outputs are
displayed on this screen. This can be an effective diagnostic tool if outputs are not
being activated when they should or inputs do not produce the expected results. By
examining this screen, the user can at least see which inputs the controller is
recognizing and the outputs that it is activating.
The first of the four screens show the D Module Outputs:

D MODULE OUTPUTS (1 OF 4) (X = ON)


D25# (PE01)23 (PE02)21 (UD1)22

D37# 37 3 2 1 20 21 22
UD2-UD4 PE03-6
C2 C3 S2 01 02 03 FR FL
D37# 32 34 33 24 31 5 25 30
COORD X
Figure 39 – D Module Status screen - page 1
The remaining three screens show the D Module Inputs:

D MODULE INPUTS (2 OF 4) (X = ON)

D25# 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
DET 9-16
CIR CON# A S b a Z Y M L
DET 17-24
D25# 1 2 3 4 5 17
pe 1-6
Figure 40 – D Module Status screen - page 2
D MODULE INPUTS (3 OF 4) (X = ON)
D25# (GRP2)25 (XPED)24 (CBFL)15 (UCF)14

D25# (DIM)18 (TBC)20 (FREE)19 (RTCR)16

A1 TC A5 A8 A7 A6 RC A4
D37# 10 13 12 8 11 9 15 16
ALARM
Figure 41 – D Module Status screen - page 3

52 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

D MODULE INPUTS (4 OF 4) (X = ON)

CIR CON# K L H G X W T B
D37# 28 29 35 36
DET 25-32
CIR CON# R(FL ST) P(MON FL)
D37# 4 6

Figure 42 – D Module Status screen - page 4

Note The format of these D Module Status screens vary depending on the type of
D module installed in the machine. The D module I/O can only be used by the TS 1
and TS 2-Type 2, I/O Mode 7 software. Several D Module variants are described in
Appendix C, on page 446.

NEMA standards define I/O Mode 7 as a manufacturer-specific mode.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 53


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Coordination Status Screen


If one continues to page down through the 3000 status screens, eventually the
Coordination Status screen will appear. Although not labeled as such, this screen is
designed to provide key status information when the unit is operating in a
Coordinated network of controllers.
A B

LOCAL C3/S01: 35% 50 sec. MASTER: 79


C LOCAL OFST 1: 50 (01= 60) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
COLORS r r r G r r r G D
E PERMS P P P P
F FORCES
G HOLDS
COORD STATUS: COORD, Local TOD-Keyboard H
Figure 43 – Coordination Status screen

The Coordination Functions dynamic screen allows the user to watch coordination
related functions, such as cycle counters, offset seeking, sync pulse, permissives,
force offs and holds.

Note This screen can also be accessed directly from the Dynamic Menu by selecting
option 2 , C o o r d F u n c t i o n s .

Note There is a method to place Vehicle and Pedestrian phase calls manually from the
Coordination Status screen. To place vehicle calls on Phases 1-8, press the Up-Arrow
and the corresponding keypad number simultaneously. To place Ped calls on Phases
1-8, press the Left Arrow and the corresponding keypad number simultaneously.
These controls also work on the Primary and Alternate Controller Status screens.

The LOCAL CYCLE/SPLIT (A) is the selected local cycle and split. The local cycle
timer is shown to the right of this timing in percent, then timing in seconds to the right
of that.
The MASTER cycle counter (B) is based at zero offset. The counter is displayed in
seconds if the permissives and phase allocations are programmed in seconds,
otherwise, the counter will be displayed in percent.
The LOCAL OFFSET (C) value is used to indicate the current value of difference
between the local cycle and master cycle zero points. This value will equal the
programmed offset when the unit is in sync. During transition the display will indicate
SEEK OFFSET as it seeks to the programmed offset. This display will also indicate
SYNC PULSE during a sync point. This parameter will be displayed in seconds if the
offsets are programmed in seconds, otherwise it will be shown in percent.

54 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Note that the actual offset may differ from the programmed offset (even while not
offset seeking) when using end of main street mode. This is because the displayed
offset is the offset to the main street force off point, not the end of main street green.
For example, “(01=60)” above indicates that Offset 1 is programmed for 60 seconds
and Local (or Actual) Offset in effect is 50 seconds. This difference is from CNA
Coord Phases with Ped Clear = 10 sec. in order to reference to end of green instead
of end of walk when “End of Main Street” is enabled.
The PROGRAMMED OFFSET is shown in parenthesis to the right of the dynamic
offset value.
The phase colors are indicated in real-time, along with phase and ped permissives,
force offs and holds. Permissives will indicate ‘V’ for vehicle permissive and ‘P’ for
ped/vehicle permissive. A ped permissive can only be active if a vehicle permissive is
also active at the same time for a given phase.
The COORD STATUS, the origin and mode of coordinated operation, is displayed at
the bottom of the screen.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 55


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Table 21 – Coordination Status screen key


Callout Display Definition
A LOCAL Local cycle & split in effect. Local cycle timer shown in
CYCLE/SPLIT, percent, then seconds to the right.
TIMERS
B MASTER Cycle counter. Sync Point /Zero Offset reference. Shown in
seconds or percent.
C LOCAL Local offset in effect and current offset value. Shows seek if
OFFSET offset seeking. Programmed offset shown in parenthesis, eg.
(01=10) = Offset 1 is in effect and is set to 10 secs.
D COLORS r=Red
Y=Yellow
G=Green/Don’t Walk
W=Walk
D=Ped Clear
E PERMS V=Vehicle Perm
P=Ped and Veh Perm
F FORCES F=Force Off active for these phases
G HOLDS H=Hold active for these phases
H COORD Origin/Mode of coordinated operation
STATUS COORD, TIME OF DAY
COORD, INTERCONNECT
COORD, TOD OVERRIDE
COORD, COORD FAULT
COORD, Local TOD-Keyboard
FREE, TIME OF DAY
FREE, GOING TO COORD, TOD
FREE, MCE
FREE, GOING TO COORD, INTER
FREE, INTERCONNECT
COORD, TOD REVERT
FREE, TOD OVERRIDE
FREE, TOD REVERT
FREE, PE RUN n ACTIVE
FREE, INPUT OVERRIDE
FREE, UCF (DROP CVM)
FREE, SOFT FLASH
FREE, FLASH EXIT ERROR
FREE, STOP TIME
FREE, COORD FAILURE
FREE, COORD OUT OF STEP

56 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Time of Day Status Screen


If one continues to page down through the 3000 status screens, past the Coordination
Status screen, the Time of Day status screen will appear. This screen is designed to
provide the current status of TOD operations.

TIME OF DAY STATUS 08/03/2005 17:28:56


CLOSED LOOP :C/O/S= 1/3/05
( ) ( ) ( )
CYCLE TIMER: 27 INTERRUPTER: NONE
(REFERENCE CYCLE 1 TIMER)
WEEK PLAN DAY PLAN C/O/S
4 2 5/3/2
DAY OF WEEK= WEDNESDAY WEEK OF YEAR= 32
Figure 44 – Time of Day Status screen

Note This screen can also be accessed directly from the Dynamic Menu by selecting
option 3 , T o d F u n c t i o n s .

The cycle timer is displayed counting down in seconds. The week plan and day plan
in effect are shown along with the cycle-offset-split. An interrupter counter is also
displayed if the offset interrupter has been configured to be active in the Sync
Reference portion of TOD programming (Note: Offset interrupter is used for hard-
wired interconnect systems.) The date and time are displayed along with the
currently active day of week and week of year.
If no TOD program is active, this display will indicate the default values of week plan
1, day plan 1, and c/o/s=1/3/2. In such a case, a 60 second timer is displayed for the
cycle timer.
Additional information is displayed on this screen if Closed Loop is functioning,
including the closed loop COS.

Note The reference cycle timer indicates the cycle number being used by the TOD Sync
Pulse References (Choices 1-6).

Paging down from this screen will take the operator to a set of screens that show the
current state of all of the TOD circuits.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 57


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

TOD Dynamic Circuits Status Screens


The status of all 255 Time of Day circuits can be displayed by using the PGUP and
PGDN keys in the status screen list. They start just below the main Time of Day
Status screen.
There are 16 TOD circuit status screens, each displaying 16 circuits.

TOD DYNAMIC CIRCUITS 17:30:43


CIRCUIT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
FUNCTION CY2 CY3 CY4 SL2 SL3 OF1 OF2 OF3
STATUS X X X

CIRCUIT 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
FUNCTION OF4 OF5 FRE RFL TP1 TP2 TP3 TP4
SPARE5 X
Figure 45 – Time of Day Dynamic Circuits screen - page 1

Note This screen can also be accessed directly from the Dynamic Menu by selecting
option 3 , T o d F u n c t i o n s and using P G D N to step through the 16 screens.

For each of the 255 circuits, the circuit number and a three character reference tag
are displayed. In firmware build v408 and lower, an 'X' below these indicates that a
particular circuit is currently active, while a blank indicates it is not active. This does
not include overrides. In the version 409 firmware and higher, this display has been
modified to show a bit more information. To better see the true ‘state’ of each time of
day circuit, these now display a code:
Table 22 – TOD Dynamic Circuits Status codes
Code Definition
O The circuit was set to ‘ON’ via central override

o The circuit was set to ‘OFF’ via central override

M The circuit was set to ‘ON’ manually via the keyboard

m The circuit was set to ‘OFF’ manually via the keyboard

X The circuit is ‘ON’ naturally by the TOD Day Plan selection


(blank) The circuit is ‘OFF’ naturally by the TOD Day Plan selection

Hit the HELP button or refer to Appendix A on page 430 for details concerning TOD
circuit assignment and definition.

58 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Preemption Status Screens


The three Dynamic Preemption Status screens allow the user to watch the current
preemption run in operation, including outputs, timers, and other values, and to view
the status of all six available preemption runs. There are three screens of preemption
information, labeled ‘PG 1’, ‘PG 2’, and ‘PG 3’ in the upper left corner of the screen.
The first dynamic screen shows information regarding the current preempt run. The
user will see the preempt run id #, along with the run duration timer, current interval
and interval timer. The output states of all vehicle, pedestrian, and overlap signals
are also displayed here.

PG 1 ACTIVE RUN 1 DURATION TIMER 15.4


INTERVAL: 1 INTERVAL TIMER: 4.5
QUEUE: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
VEH HEAD R G R R R G R R
PED HEAD D W D D D W D D
VOL HEAD R R R R R R R R
POL HEAD D D D D D D D D
Figure 46 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 1

Note Preemption runs can be activated from any of the three Dynamic Preemption
Status screens by holding shift and pressing the 1 through 6 buttons to activate
the corresponding preemption runs 1 through 6.

Paging down from the first Preemption status screen will take you to the other two.
The second and third dynamic screens (accessed by pressing PGDN ) show
information on the current run in progress, as well as information on the other
preemption runs. See Table 23 on page 60 for more details about the information
displayed on these screens.

PG2 PREEMPT CONTROLS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
COLORS r G r r r G r r
HOLD/FO
P/V OMIT
P/V CALL
RED REST
PREEMPT STATUS: Not In Preempt
Figure 47 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 2

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 59


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Here is a sample of page 3 of the preemption status screens.


PG 3 RUN 1 2 3 4 5 6
INPUT M K D D D D
PRIORITY 2 1 3 4 5 6
RECOGN TMR 0 0 0 0 0 0
DELAY TMR 0 0 0 0 0 0
RESERVE TMR 0 0 0 0 0 0
EXTEND TMR 0 0 0 0 0 0
FAIL TIMER IN SECONDS: 0
Figure 48 – Preemption Run Status screen - page 3

Table 23 – Key to the Preemption Status screens


Label Description
ACTIVE RUN # Which of the six available preemption runs is currently being serviced
INTERVAL The interval within the preemption run that is currently being serviced
DURATION TIMER Starts at the first non-fixed interval and counts down the time from the
Duration setting on the Per-Run Times screen. The controller must stay
in preemption at least until this time expires.
INTERVAL TIMER Countdown timer showing number of seconds until current interval ends
QUEUE A listing of preemption calls waiting, in the order they will get serviced
VEH HEAD Vehicle signal
R = Red
Y = Yellow
G = Green
VOL HEAD Vehicle overlap signal
R = Red
Y = Yellow
G = Green
PED HEAD Pedestrian Signal
D = Don’t Walk
W = Walk
P/C = Ped Clear
POL HEAD Pedestrian Overlap Signal
D = Don’t Walk
W = Walk
P/C = Ped Clear
COLORS Shows the current color displayed by the vehicle phases of the currently
running preemption.
R = Red
Y = Yellow
G = Green
HOLD/FO Indicates if a hold or force-off is active for this phase within the
preemption.
H = Hold
F = Force Off

60 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Additional Status Screens

Label Description
P/V OMIT Pedestrian/Vehicular omits.
P = Ped Omit
V = Vehicle Omit
B = Both Ped and Veh Omits
P/V CALL Pedestrian/Vehicular Calls.
P = Ped Call
V = Vehicle Call
B = Both Ped and Vehicle Calls
C = CNA (Call to Non-Actuated)
RED REST X indicates the phase is in Red Rest.
PREEMPT STATUS Displays one of the following status messages about the current
preemption run: “Not In Preempt”, “Going to Preempt Run X”, “In
Preempt Run X”, “Leaving Preempt Run X”, or “Releasing Preempt Run
X”.
INPUT Shows the input state for each run can show any of these single-
character values:
D = run disabled in database
K = keyboard preempt
X = field input active
E = input artificially extended (ie, railroad)
R = input recognition debounce (ie, railroad)
M = input locked in memory until serviced
F = failed preempt input
‘ ‘ = blank when none of the above exist, i.e. the run is enabled, but
there are no calls or special conditions on the input
PRIORITY Shows the priority level for each run that will be used to prioritize
preemption calls in the case of multiple calls at once.
RECOGN TMR Recognition Timer. A timer indicating the recognition of a debounced
input (Railroad = Y)
DELAY TMR If a delay has been programmed for this run, this shows the countdown
timer for the delay.
RESERVE TMR This shows the time count-down of the re-service timer, or the amount
of time following a preemption run that must expire before preemption
can be re-serviced.
EXTEND TMR Timer indicating the extension of an input (e.g. Railroad = Y)
FAIL TIMER IN The current value of the Fail Max Time counter. (Refer to the Fail Max
SECONDS Time setting on the second Per Run Options screen. See page 302.)

The Preemption Run Duration status screens are the bottom of the connected list of
status screens for the 3000 and 3000E controllers. The other status screens
described in the next sections can be accessed from the Dynamic Menu.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 61


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

COORDINATION FUNCTIONS SCREEN


This screen is described in the Additional Status Screens section, since it can be
accessed by paging down from the main controller status screen. Refer to
“Coordination Status Screen” on page 54.

TIME OF DAY FUNCTIONS SCREENS


This screen is described in the Additional Status Screens section, since it can be
accessed by paging down from the main controller status screen. Refer to “Time of
Day Status Screen” on page 57.

PREEMPTION FUNCTIONS SCREENS


These screens are described in the Additional Status Screens section, since they can
be accessed by paging down from the main controller status screen. Refer to
“Preemption Status Screens” on page 59.

62 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Voltages Screen

VOLTAGES SCREEN
Item 5 on the Dynamic Menu displays a set of current electrical parameters within the
3000 Series controller.

BATTERY = 3.5 VOLTS


INTERNAL 8v = 8.5 VOLTS
24V SUPPLY CURRENT = 0.1 AMPERE
UNREGULATED 25V = 29.9 VOLTS
HIGH REGULATED 25V = 25.4 VOLTS
INTERNAL 24V = 24.5 VOLTS
EXTERNAL 24V = 25.4 VOLTS

Figure 49 – Voltages screen

The electrical properties described, and the normal ranges for these, are listed in
Table 24.
Table 24 – Key to the Voltage screen
Parameter Definition Min Max
Battery Internal Battery for RAM backup and 2.5 VDC 3.5 VDC
real time clock
Internal 8V Internal 8V generated by power 7.5 VDC 9.0 VDC
supply as controller 5V source
24V Supply Current Draw on the 24 volt supply 0 amps 1 amp
Unregulated 25V Power Supply generated voltage for 28 VDC 32 VDC
24 volt supply
High regulated 25V Unregulated voltage source after the 22 VDC 27 VDC
regulator
Internal 24V 24 volt internal source 22 VDC 26 VDC
External 24V 24 volt external source 22 VDC n/a

To return to the Dynamic Menu from the Voltage screen, press the MENU button.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 63


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

OVERLAP FUNCTIONS STATUS SCREENS


Previously, Option 6 on the Dynamic Menu opened a screen that displayed the
jumper settings on an overlap card inside the controller unit. However, overlap cards
are rarely used now that overlap programming is included directly in the firmware. So
this option now displays the overlap outputs and timers, as well as the state of all
vehicle and pedestrian phase outputs.
Overlap A Timers 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
V OUTPUT R G R R R G R
R
P OUTPUT D D D D D D D
D
VOL HEAD R R R R R R R
R R R R R R R R R
Green: Ø.Ø Delay: Ø.Ø
Yellow: Ø.Ø Red Revert: Ø.Ø
Red: Ø.Ø Advance Warning: Ø.Ø
Figure 50 – Overlap Functions Status screen

The six values shown at the bottom of the screen show the current timing counter for
each parameter of this particular overlap. The three lines of status show the current
color of the Vehicle output, the pedestrian output, and the vehicle overlap head
output.
Use the PGUP and PGDN keys to navigate to the same screens for the rest of the
sixteen available overlaps. To return to the Dynamic Menu from the Overlap
Functions screen, press the MENU button.

64 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Program Level & Revision Screen

PROGRAM LEVEL & REVISION SCREEN


Option 7 on the Dynamic Menu provides information about the current firmware
running in the controller.

TS2 TYPE 2 MODE 7

3000 Series Controller


8216A 3.6.7 build 409 (c) 1993-2009
Peek Traffic Corporation
INTERSECTION: PARK AVE & BROADWAY
Figure 51 – Program Level & Revision screen

This Program Level & Revision screen is the same as the controller's start-up screen.
The Peek Traffic logo is displayed, along with the software revision level and build
number. The copyright message and intersection name, if programmed, are also
displayed.
To return to the Dynamic Menu, press the MENU button.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 65


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

LOG MENU
The Log Dynamic Menu allows a user to access the available data logs gathered
during controller operation, including: measures of effectiveness (MOE),
volume/occupancy, events, keyboard activity, detector failures, pattern changes and
MMU faults.

LOG DYNAMIC MENU

1.MOE LOG 4.EVENTS


2.VOL/OCC 5.KEYBOARD
3.DETECTOR FAILURES 6.PATTERN CHANGE
7.MMU FAULT LOG

Figure 52 – Log Menu


Logs are available as a single, rolling log over a number of days. Log sample periods
are setup under Comm/system setup, log data (MM-3-5-5). Logs are enabled to
record by TOD circuits 125 (volume) and 126 (MOE).

MOE Log
The Measure of Effectiveness log is recorded in 0 to 60 minute increments. There are
4 different types of MOE's for phases 1-8.
The heading of the first display of measures of effectiveness shows the current mode
of operation and the number of cycles during the displayed period.

MOE LOG PERIOD: 5 ENTRY 1 OF 95


MODE: SYSTEM OP 4/3/13 CYCLES: 9
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
AVG GRN 18 41 22 22 18 41 24 22
The first log shows green
MAX GRN 13 36 18 22 13 36 18 22 time operation and stop
GRN UTL% 127 58 112 93 127 58 93 93 time delay
STP-DEL 30 0 74 71 37 0 73 71
>>PGDN<< DATE: 4/20/00 TIME: 14:50
Figure 53 – MOE Log - type 1

MOE LOG PERIOD: 5 ENTRY 1 OF 95


MODE: SYSTEM OP 4/3/13 CYCLES: 9
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
WALKS 0 9 0 0 0 9 0 0
The second log shows
GAP-OUTS 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0
phase terminations and
FORCES 2 6 4 6 2 6 4 3 walks
MAX-OUTS 7 0 5 3 7 0 5 6
>>PGDN<< DATE: 4/20/00 TIME: 14:50
Figure 54 – MOE Log - type 2
66 3000 Series Traffic Controllers
Log Menu

The third type uses detector headway and occupancy calculations.

MOE LOG PERIOD: 5 ENTRY 1 OF 95


DETECTOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
OCCUP’Y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
HWAY(.1) 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0
DETECTOR 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
OCCUP’Y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
HWAY(.1) 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0
>>PGDN<< DATE: 4/20/00 TIME: 14:50
Figure 55 – MOE Log - type 3

The fourth MOE Log screen is for speed traps using two detectors.

MOE LOG PERIOD: 5 ENTRY 1 OF 95


MODE:SYSTEM OP 4/3/13 CYCLES: 9
SPEED TRAPS 1 2 3 4
LEADING DET 0 0 0 0
TRAILING DET 0 0 0 0
DISTANCE 0 0 0 0
AVE SPEED 0 0 0 0
>>PGDN<< DATE: 4/20/00 TIME: 14:50
Figure 56 – MOE Log - type 4
Table 25 – Key to the MOE Log screens
Term Description
PERIOD Number of minutes of period, based on MM-3-5-5
setup.
ENTRY The number of this entry. A different value can be
typed in to jump ahead many periods instead of
paging down.
PLAN IN EFFECT and number indicates COS if any; number of complete cycles
of cycles over period.
AVE GRN Average length of green, in seconds.
MAX GRN Green time allowed based on allocation.
GRN UTL %
STP DEL Average time to service an actuation.
WALKS, GAP-OUTS, FOR- Number of times each termination occurs over
CES, MAX-OUTS period.
OCCUPANCY % of time the detector has a vehicle in its sensor
field occupied over the period.
HEADWAY average length of time in tenths of seconds be-
tween successive detections (vehicles) over
period.

In all cases, press the MENU button to return to the Logs Menu.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 67


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Volume/Occupancy Log
The volume-occupancy log contains raw volumes and occupancy data for the first 32
detectors, averaged over 0-60 minute intervals. The user can view time intervals by
paging down to the desired date and time in the upper right corner of the screen.

VOL/OCC/LOG PERIOD: 1 PAGE 1 OF 24


DATE: 5:14/00 TIME 11:10
DET 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
V 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DET 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
V 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Figure 57 – Volume/Occupancy Log screen
Press the SHIFT and Î keys at the same time to view log data for detectors 17
through 32 (TS 1 and TS 2). (TS 2 detectors 33 through 64 are not available in
volume/occupancy logs.)
Press MENU to return to the Log Menu screen.

Detector Failure Log


The detector failure log allows the user to view the status and failures of the 32 TS 1
and 64 TS 2 detectors. Four types of failures are logged: absence (no calls for the
specified time), locked (continuous ON the specified time), erratic (chattering), and
minimum presence (pulse too short.)

DETECTOR FAILURE LOG PAGE 1 OF 3


DET#...FAILURE MODE DATE TIME
22 -- RETURN TO NORMAL 6/05/05 08:34
22 -- ABSENCE 6/04/05 17:42
16 -- RETURN TO NORMAL 5/31/05 02:19
2 -- OPEN LOOP 5/30/05 01:17
2 -- RETURN TO NORMAL 5/30/05 01:05

Figure 58 – Detector Failure Log screen


If the detector returns to normal operation, this is also logged. This log is a ‘rolling log’
as opposed to the yesterday and today type of log. This means that only the 204 most
recent events will be stored; when event number 205 occurs, it will overwrite event
number 1. The user can view any page directly by entering the page number at the
top of the screen.
Additional log failures are available in TS 2. They are retrieved directly from the
diagnostic function of the TS 2 detectors via the Detector BIU(s). Those failures are:
Open Loop, Shorted Loop, Excessive Inductance Change and Watchdog Failure. As
per the NEMA TS 2 (2003) standard, an Open Loop is reported when the terminal
inductance is greater than 2500 μH. A Shorted Loop is reported when the terminal
inductance is less than 50 μH. An Excessive Inductance Change failure will be

68 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Log Menu

reported if the inductance at the terminals changes by my than 25% in either


direction.
Press MENU to return to the Log Menu screen.

Event Log
The event log displays the last 300 events (such as monitor flash or preemption) that
have occurred in the controller. This is a ‘rolling’ log, meaning that when the end of
the table is reached, data will begin writing over the beginning of the table, i.e. event
number 301 will overwrite event number 1.

EVENT LOG PAGE 1 OF 10


S/MESSAGE DATE TIME
POWER UP 6/05/05 16:33
POWER DOWN 6/05/05 16:30
DETECTOR FAILURES LOGGED 5/31/05 15:53
EEPROM FAILURE 5/31/05 15:53
START-UP SEQUENCE ERROR 5/30/05 15:41
CABINET DOOR OPEN 5/30/05 15:35
Figure 59 – Event Log screen
To directly access a specific page of the log, enter the page number in the upper
right-hand corner of the screen. When an event has been reported to central (through
a log upload), a ‘+’ will appear in the leftmost column next to that event entry.
These types of events are logged to the Event table for both TS 1 and TS 2
controllers.
Checksum failure Bad Cabinet Door Switch
Manual Control Enable Active Watchdog Failure
Monitor Flash I/O Failure
Uniform Code Flash Startup Failure
Uniform Code Soft Flash Preemption Active at Startup
Time-of-Day Soft Flash UCF Active at Startup
Cabinet Flash EEPROM Module Failure
User Defined Alarms 1 - 8 Local (controller) Flash
Preemption Active MMU Flash TS 2 only
Detector Failure MMU Failure
Self Test Diagnostic Failure
Coordination Failure
Cycling Failure
Cabinet Door Open

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 69


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

On TS 2 controllers, these additional events are also logged:

TYPE 2 I/O MODE BAD MMU FIXED


TYPE 2 I/O MODE FIXED FRAME 18 FAILURE
MMU FRAME 128 BAD FRAME 18 FIXED
MMU FRAME 129 BAD CYCLE FAULT
MMU FRAME 131 BAD COORD ACTIVE
BIU 1 FRAME 138 BAD COORD FAULT
BIU 2 FRAME 139 BAD COORD FAILURE
BIU 3 FRAME 140 BAD MMU CVM FAILURE
BIU 4 FRAME 141 BAD MMU 24V1 FAILURE
BIU 9 FRAME 148 BAD MMU 24V2 FAILURE
BIU 10 FRAME 149 BAD MMU CONFLICT
BIU 11 FRAME 150 BAD MMU RED FAILURE
BIU 12 FRAME 151 BAD MMU FIELD CK FAULT
BIU 9 FRAME 152 BAD MMU BND FAULT
BIU 10 FRAME 153 BAD MMU DUAL-GY FAULT
BIU 11 FRAME 154 BAD MMU WATCHDOG FAULT
BIU 12 FRAME 155 FIXED MMU YEL+RED FAULT
MMU FRAME 128 FIXED MMU DIAG. FAILURE
MMU FRAME 129 FIXED MMU MIN CLR FAULT
MMU FRAME 131 FIXED MMU PORT1 FAILURE
BIU 1 FRAME 138 FIXED MMU CVM FIXED
BIU 2 FRAME 139 FIXED MU 24V1 FIXED
BIU 3 FRAME 140 FIXED MMU 24V2 FIXED
BIU 4 FRAME 141 FIXED MMU CONFLICT FIXED
BIU 9 FRAME 148 FIXED MMU RED FAIL FIXED
BIU 10 FRAME 149 FIXED MMU FIELD CK FIXED
BIU 11 FRAME 150 FIXED MMU BND FIXED
BIU 12 FRAME 151 FIXED MMU DUAL-GY FIXED
BIU 9 FRAME 152 FIXED MMU WATCHDOG FIXED
BIU 10 FRAME 153 FIXED MMU YEL+RED FIXED
BIU 11 FRAME 154 FIXED MMU DIAG. FIXED
BIU 12 FRAME 155 FIXED MMU MIN CLR FIXED
MMU INCOMPATIBLE MMU PORT1 FIXED
COMPATIBILITY FIXED MMU LOCAL FLASH

70 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Log Menu

Keyboard Log
The keyboard log is a record of the last 30 keyboard accesses.

KEYBOARD LOG PAGE 1 OF 6


SECURITY DATE TIME
RESTRICTED 5/30/05 15:36
SUPERVISORY 5/25/05 09:30
SUPERVISORY 4/28/05 11:02

Figure 60 – Keyboard Log screen


This log does not record all keystrokes, but rather only keyboard commands that
require a restricted or supervisor security code to gain access to the database. If no
security code is active, no entry is recorded to the log.
Additional pages may be viewed by using the PGUP and PGDN keys, or as with the
other logs, log pages may be accessed directly by entering the page number in the
upper right portion of the screen.
To return to the Log Menu, press the MENU button.

Pattern Change Log


The Pattern Change Log is a record of the 120 most recent changes in coordination
status, including any transitions from free to coordination.

PATTERN CHANGE LOG PAGE 1 OF 1


C/O/S-MODE FLASH DATE TIME
1/2/01-TOD BY BACKUP ----- 6/13/94 17:23
1/3/01-MASTER CONTROL----- 6/13/94 07:30
FREE-BY COMMAND ----- 6/12/94 18:30

Figure 61 – Pattern Change Log screen


For each entry in the log, the cycle, split and offset are displayed (if coordinated) as is
the reason for running this pattern (TOD, master, etc.).
Additional pages may be viewed by using the PGUP and PGDN keys, or a specific
page can be accessed by entering the page number in the field in the top right corner
of the screen.
To return to the Log Menu, press the MENU button.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 71


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

MMU Fault Log


If the controller is attached to a data-logging malfunction management unit and it has
a data retrieval path configured through the front ports, the MMU’s fault logs are
visible on the controller on this screen.

MMU FAULT LOG PAGE 1 OF 16


DATE: 8/12/05 TIME: 10:55
FAULT: +24 Volt Monitor I
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
CHANNEL: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RED
YELLOW
GREEN
Figure 62 – MMU Fault Log screen
Each fault recorded by the MMU is displayed on a single screen, the most recent fault
shown first and older faults shown on screens that can be accessed by pressing
PGDN .

The top of the screen shows how many faults are in the log, the date and time that
the fault was recorded, and the type of fault that was detected.
The bottom of the screen shows the state of all of the controller outputs at the time
the fault occured.

72 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Checksum Status Screens

CHECKSUM STATUS SCREENS


A checksum is a method that the 3000 series controllers use to verify that the
firmware and programming is still in good order. It indicates that no glitches or
tampering have occurred that would cause logical flaws in the operation of the unit.
The current state of the checksum in the device can be viewed by going to the
D y n a m i c M e n u and choosing option 9 . C h e c k s u m S t a t u s .
The checksum status dynamic display allows the user to see if any checksum failures
have occurred on data in the controller. When data is entered through the keyboard,
by transfer or by any other valid means, new checksums are generated and stored.
The controller is constantly verifying the checksums. If data changes without proper
cause, a checksum failure will occur and the controller will go to flash. “CHECKSUM
FAILURE” will appear on the NORMAL STATUS display.
Once a checksum failure has occurred, the operator needs to go to the Checksum
Status screen and clear the failure. After the checksum failure has been cleared, the
user must perform an external restart (or power interrupt) to restart the controller.
If the checksums are correct after the restart, the controller will operate. If data is bad
and the checksums are still incorrect, the controller will once again report a checksum
failure and go to flash.
Checksum failures can register individually on the controller, coordination, time of
day, preemption, and special databases.

Clearing a Checksum Failure


If a failure occurs, and a checksum error is reported, follow these steps to clear it and
restart the controller:
1. Go to the D y n a m i c M e n u and choose option 9 . C h e c k s u m S t a t u s . If
an error exists, the screen will show something like this:
CHECKSUM FAILURES PRESENT IN THE MACHINE
1. CONTROLLER 4. PREEMPTION
2. COORDINATION
3. TIME OF DAY 6. SPECIAL-OPTIONS

>>CHECKSUM CAN BE CLEARED BY SELECTING A


NUMBER FROM ABOVE, BUT DATA MAY BE BAD<<

Figure 63 – Reported checksum failure screen

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 73


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

2. Clear the checksum failures by pressing each number 1-6 as directed above.

No checksum failures present in


the machine, but the unit will
remain in flash until a restart occurs.

Figure 64 – Cleared checksum screen


3. Restart the machine. If the checksum errors have been fixed, it will report:

NO CHECKSUM FAILURES PRESENT

Figure 65 – No checksum failures detected

Special Case Checksum Errors


In addition to the normal data categories, checksum failures can occur on options
programmed under the SPECIAL Menu. An example would be programming the use
of the EEPROM without an EEPROM present in the machine. If this task was
performed, the intersection would flash and the checksum dynamic screen would
display:

NO CHECKSUM FAILURES PRESENT

EE PROM BAD OR NOT PRESENT

Figure 66 – Special errors reported on the Checksum Error screen

74 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Comm Status Screens

COMM STATUS SCREENS


The 3000 Controller also contains four communications status screens that allow the
user to understand how communications are operating between the local and a
master, and in general on Ports 2 and 3 of the controller. These are accessed from
the Dynamic Status Menu by pressing SHIFT -0 and using the PGUP and PGDN keys to
navigate between the three screens. To navigate to this screen, use this sequence:
MM > 1.Dynamic Displays > SHIFT -0.Comm.
The first screen is called the Mizbat Dynamic Status screen, which displays the last
command received, the last command transmitted, and the current count on the
master polling timer. Mizbat is the communications protocol used by 3000 Series
controllers, M3000 master controllers, and CLMATS to transmit controller status
information back and forth between the network elements.

Mizbat dynamic status

Last command received : sp


Last command transmitted : nk
Master polling timer : 23.2

Press ONE to remove circuit overrides


from central: no overrides active!
Figure 67 – Mizbat Dynamic Status Screen
The Mizbat values that appear on this screen are described in Table 26. The Master
Polling Timer indicates how long the M3000 has been waiting for a response; its
maximum value is 60 seconds.
From this display the user can also remove any circuit overrides sent from Central.
When the ‘1’ button is pressed, the screen indicates that the central override
command has been cleared, as shown in Figure 68.

Mizbat dynamic status

Last command received : sp


Last command transmitted : nk
Master polling timer : 23.2

Overrides cleared - Press clear key to


continue
Figure 68 – Mizbat Dynamic Status Screen after a cleared override
Overrides can be activated either by an M3000 Master, or by the MATS or CLMATS
central software. These refer to external overrides received via comm and should not
be confused with TOD ckt overrides which are always available through the keyboard.
As indicated on the above display, press the CLE AR button to return to the navigation
screens.
Pressing PGDN from the Mizbat Dynamic Status screen will display the Port 2 and 3
status screens.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 75


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

Table 26 – Codes that appear on the Mizbat Dynamic Status screen


Code Meaning Code Meaning
ak Acknowledge ox Override Circuit
as Send List of Active Sensors pr Program Revision Return
ca Call Accept rc Read Real-time Clock
cc Central Calling rl Restart Local and Clear Logs
cp Configure Port rm Restart Master and Clear Logs
cr Call Request (Wake up/sleep) rp Restart & Clear Logs Verification
dr Detector Failure Status Reply rr Request Program Revision
ds Detector Failurs Status Request rs Request Sensor Data
ep Restore Port sa Sensors Active
lc Local Calling sc Set Real-time Clock in Remote Unit
lp Load/Remove Password sp Closed Loop Standard Poll Request
lr Log Request to Retrieve sq Closed Loop Standard Poll Response
lt Log Transmit sr Request Status Data
ma Monitor Reply st Transmit Status Data
mb Monitor Request Data vc Request Last Min/Cyc Comp. Chnl Data
mc Master Calling - Special vd Transmit Last Min/Cyc Comp. Chnl Data
me MATS Short Data Request vr Request Last ½ Min Sensor Data
mf MATS Short Data Transmit vt Transmit Last 1/2 Min Sensor Data
mp MATS Standard Poll x7 Switch to 7 bit mode
mr MATS Data Request x8 Switch to 8 bit mode
mt MATS Data Transmit xd Initiate a Database Download
nk Not Acknowledged xe End a Database Download
oc Override Confirmation xp Transmit Password
ol Override Local xs Transmit Sensor Data
om Override Master (or Zone) xt Transfer Database (Upload or Download)
os Override Section xu Upload Database to Central

Paging down from the first Comm status screen (the Mizbat Dynamic Status screen)
will open the Port 2 and Port 3 status screens.

Status comm PORT 2

CD : No Modem : No modem
CTS : No Timer : 0
DTR : Yes Unused : 0
TXBD : 0
RXBD : 0

Figure 69 – Port 2 Status screen


Use the PGDN key to switch to the Port 3 version of this status screen. These screens
cannot be edited in any way; they are simply there to provide feedback on the status
of the two comm ports on the 3000E.

76 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Comm Status Screens

Status comm PORT 3

CD : Yes Modem : No modem


CTS : Yes Timer : 0
DTR : Yes Unused : 23
TXBD : 0
RXBD : 0

Figure 70 – Port 3 Status screen


The top three parameters on the left side of the screen show the communication
signal line states. CD stands for ‘Communications Device’. CTS stands for ‘Clear to
Send’. DTR stands for ‘Data Terminal Ready’. The bottom two (TXBD and RXBD) are
the Transmit Buffer Descriptor (which should always be 0) and the Receive Buffer
Descriptor (which rapidly steps from 0 to 7 and then wraps back to 0.)
Modem – This line displays a status message showing the current state of the device
(assumed to be a modem) connected to the port. The possible messages that can
show up here are listed in Table 27.
Table 27 – Modem Status Messages
Modem Status Notes
DTR LOW/DTR HIGH This switching tells the modem attached to the port to reset. After these
changes happen, the controller sends the modem initialization string that is
programmed. The screen to set the init string is available at MM > 3.Change
Data > 5.Comm/System Setup > 2.Comm Setup > PGDN > PGDN .
INITIALIZING After the initialization string has been sent, but before the modem is back up
and operating under the new settings.
Waiting This is the message displayed when the modem is up and running, and the
controller is waiting for an incoming call.
Answering Displayed when an incoming call has been detected, but normal
communications haven’t been established yet.
Connected Displayed after good communications have been established.
Dialing Ph#1 Displayed when the modem is calling out, using the primary phone number.
Dialing Ph#2 If the Alternate Phone Number circuit is active (TOD circuit 121:’PH2’) and a
Secondary phone number has been entered in the Phone settings screen, then
this number will be tried, but only after ‘Dialing Ph#1’ fails. When this event
occurs, the Modem status line will display this message.
No modem This message appears when no modem is attached to the port, or the modem
is off.

Timer – This countdown timer shows the timeout count when an incoming or
outgoing call is attempted.
Unused – This shows the number of ‘trash’ characters that have been detected in the
communications stream.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 77


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

UTCS Status Display


A new status display screen was added to the bottom of the Comm Status display list
in 3000 series firmware v3.6.6. This display is used when the controller is configured
to communicate with a UTCS central system. (This configuration is done on the
Comm Setup --> Closed Loop Master/ID screen, see page 347.)
a dynamic display of communications between the controller and the UTCS central
system. The U.T.C.S. Dynamic Display is the last page of the Communications
Dynamic Menu (Main Menu, 1, shift+0, and then page down 3 times). The
appearance of this screen depends on the setting that is chosen for the UTCS
Protocol parameter, on the Closed Loop Master/ID comm setup screen.
If USCS Protocol is set to None, the UTCS Dynamic Display looks like this:
No UTCS Protocol Selected

A UTCS Protocol is selected via MM, 3,5,


1 and using the Y/N key to toggle the
UTCS Protocol field to appropriate value

Figure 71 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to None


If USCS Protocol is set to Protocol90, the UTCS Dynamic Display looks like this:
Protocol90 Dynamic Status

HOL:X FLash:X Drop:X Comm: 0 Page: 0


Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Ring 1 2
Calls X X X X X X X X | Force X X
Omits X X X X X X X X | Inh Max X X
Holds X X X X X X X X | Last Cmd Rx: 0
Spfcs X X X X X X X X | Last Cmd Tx: 0
Figure 72 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to Protocol90
In Figure 72, the following items warrant clarification:
HOL — Hold-On-Line
Drop — Local drop. Activated by pressing the Down Arrow key and
deactivated by pressing the Up Arrow key.
Comm — Communication timer that resets with each valid command.
Page — Open page timer.
Spfcs — Special function outputs.
Last Cmd Rx — The most recent command received.
Last Cmd Tx — The most recent command transmitted.

78 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Comm Status Screens

If, on the other hand, USCS Protocol is set to Stamford, the UTCS Dynamic Display
will look like this:
Stamford Dynamic Status

Cmd: 01 00 00 01
Rsp: 22 33 00 00 00 00 00 00 11
Timer: 0
HOL:X Free:X Flash:X
Time Sync:X Yield:X Recall:X
Force Off:R1 R2 Sp Fcns:1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Figure 73 – UTCS Dynamic Display Screen when UTCS set to Stamford
In Figure 73, the following items warrant clarification:
HOL — Hold-On-Line
Cmd — Last command received in hexadecimal byte notation starting with the
least significant byte. Each byte starts with the most significant bit.
Rsp — Last response sent to central. Same convention as ‘Cmd’.
Timer — Communications timer that resets with each valid command.
Recall — Applies maximum recall to all phases
Time Sync — Sets controller’s clock to the hour and minute to the pre-defined
Clock Reset user parameters found in the time of day section.
Yield — Removes hold command on the coordinated phases.
Sp Fcns — Special Function outputs

Note To make it easier to view commands in real-time on the MIZBAT Dynamic Display
screen, the ‘Clear’ key can be used to clear the last command transmitted and the
last command received.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 79


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

TS 2 DYNAMIC HELP SCREENS

BIU Failure Help Screen


The BIU Failure Dynamic Help Screen will only appear if a failure has occurred.
Pressing the Help Button will reveal another screen indicating the failed (non-
responsive) BIU or BIUs.

MMU Flash Help Screen


The MMU Flash Dynamic Help Screen will only appear if the MMU has created a
flash output. Pressing the Help Button will reveal another screen which indicates the
active colors on each channel and the failure conditions.

MMU Incompatibility Help Screen


MMU Incompatibility Dynamic Help Screen will only appear if jumpers exist that are
not required or if additional jumpers are required. Pressing the help button will reveal
another screen which will delineate the specific jumper(s). The screen has limited
space to provide information, so if a large number of jumpers are incorrect, Peek
Traffic Tech Support recommends checking this screen again (after addressing the
jumpers listed first) to be sure that more jumpers are not listed.

80 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Diagnostics

DIAGNOSTICS
When selecting option 4 - DIAGNOSTICS on the Main Menu, a warning will appear.
Read this warning carefully. Diagnostics should never be performed at a live
intersection.

WARNING!!! CONTROLLER IS GOING TO RED


REST FOLLOWED BY FLASHING OPERATION.
>> HIT ENTER IF YOU WISH TO DO SO <<
>> MENU TO CANCEL <<

Figure 74 – Diagnostics Warning screen


After pressing enter, the Diagnostic Menu will appear......
DIAGNOSTIC MENU
1. INPUTS 4. KEYBOARD
2. OUTPUTS 5. RAM
3. DISPLAY 6. EPROM

>RESTART CONTROLLER TO EXIT DIAGNOSTICS<


>>WARNING,CONTROLLER CVM/FVM INACTIVE <<
SELECT TEST
Figure 75 – Diagnostics Menu
To run a diagnostic, choose the number (1-6) of the area you wish to test. After each
test is run, press the MENU button to return to this menu so you can select another
test, if necessary.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 81


Chapter 2 — Status Displays

MMU STATUS SCREEN


The MMU Status option is available only on TS 2 controllers. The screen can be
accessed by selecting option 5 on the M a i n M e n u of the 3000 Series controller.

MMU FLASH STATUS


1 1 1 1 1 1 1
CHANNELS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RED / DW X
YEL / PCLR
GRN / WALK X X

Figure 76 – MMU Status screen


The display indicates the status of a malfunction management unit (MMU), if one is
attached. The second and third lines display the reason why the MMU has put the
intersection into flash. An X next to the channel indications represent an active input
under the channel numbers. See the TS 2 section of the Event Log listing.

Note This screen will not report accurate information if the MMU option is disabled within
the 3000 Series Controller. The MMU setting is configured on the Main Menu >
Change Data > Comm/System Setup > Port 1 Setup screens. The MMU
Enabled option is on page 2 of the Port 1 settings, (press PGDN to access it).

82 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

This section explains the basic strategies of programming a 3000 Series controller for field
operation. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

First time setup of a 3000 Series controller, on page 84.


Setup procedures, on page 85.
Using the first time setup menus, on page 97.
Use of the Controller Menu for setup tasks, on page 101.
Phase recalls and modes, on page 120.
A discussion of volume density control, on page 139.
Dual entry, on page 143.
Conditional Service, on page 145.
Pedestrian options, on page 147.
Enhanced options, such as dynamic omits and recalls, simultaneous gap outs, etc. on
page 148.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 83


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

FIRST TIME SETUP OF THE 3000 SERIES CONTROLLER

Introduction
The 3000E controller has many options and features that will be explained in detail in
the sections that follow. This section, however, defines a basic procedure that is
recommended for ease of set-up. Many applications, such as isolated intersection
control, require only basic set-up and programming and can quickly be set-up by
following this procedure.
This procedure is especially useful for users that have a fundamental knowledge of
traffic controllers and are familiar with basic terminology. It provides a guide for the
order of doing things and the items that are necessary for basic set-up. Refer to the
sections that follow for detailed explanations of individual functions.

Fundamental Requirements for Operation


In order for the 3000 to operate, as a minimum, the following basic functions must be
programmed:
1. The start-up phases and interval (Red, Yellow, or Green)
2. The controller sequence and phases enabled (used), with co-phases
3. Basic phase service functions such as recall modes and lock/non-lock detector
modes
4. Basic phase timings such as initial (min grn), passage, yellow, red, walks,
max’s, etc.

Additional Commonly-Used Options


These commonly-used options may also be required:
1. Overlaps (and double clearance overlaps)
2. Ped and vehicle detector assignments other than basic defaults
3. Conditional service operation
4. Dual entry operation
5. Simultaneous gap out programming

Coordination, Time of Day, Preemption


More sophisticated applications may also require Coordination, TOD, and Preemption
functions. Basic guidelines are given for these on page 95, but will refer to more
detailed sections.

84 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

PROCEDURES TO SET UP A NEW 3000 CONTROLLER


The first portion of this section is for setting up a basic 3000E for the first time, or re-
programming from scratch. This should not be confused with editing a pre-existing
unit already running in the field.

Summarized Setup Steps


Setting up a new unit will consist of the following steps in the order shown. Note for
the keystrokes are to access the appropriate screen, where MM = Main Menu, which
can be obtained by pressing SHIFT and MENU, or by successively hitting MENU
until Main Menu appears.
Table 28 – Minimal Requirements For A New Controller
ITEM DESCRIPTION KEYSTROKES
1 Load a default program MM-3-8-1-1-(1-6)
2 Edit the start-up phases and interval MM-3-1-1
3 Edit sequence phases/co-phases MM-3-1-1-PGDN
enabled
4 Edit recall mode phase functions (CNA, MM-3-1-2-1 and/or 2
Min, Max, etc.)
5 Edit phase times MM-3-1-3

Table 29 – Possible Additional (But Commonly Used) Requirements


ITEM DESCRIPTION KEYSTROKES
6 Overlaps MM-3-1-5
7 Ped and vehicle detector assignments MM-3-1-4-1
other than defaults
8 Dual Entry operation MM-3-1-6
9 Conditional service operation MM-3-1-7
12 Simultaneous gap out programming MM-3-1-9-4

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 85


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Detailed Setup Steps for Minimal Requirements


The following section provides detail to the summarized steps above for minimal
requirements.

Load a Default For Basic Programming


The 3000E unit has a number of pre-programmed defaults for commonly used
phasing such as 2 phase sequential, 3 phase sequential, etc. to 8 phase dual ring.
These can be selected and loaded into the 3000’s operating data base from the
Utilities Menu. It is highly recommended that this approach be used when
programming a new unit. The defaults will likely not exactly match your application but
it will be easier to simply load these then edit as necessary. Use of defaults also
tends to reduce the likelihood of forgetting or leaving out necessary programming.

Finding the Default Load Menu


First find the Main menu by successively hitting the MENU key or by hitting SHIFT-
MENU (hold SHIFT key in while hitting MENU but be sure to press SHIFT first).....
Main Menu

1.Dynamic Displays 4.Diagnostics


2.Read Data 5.MMU Status
3.Change Data 6.First Time Setup

Figure 77 – Locate ‘First Time Setup’ on the Main Menu


From this screen go to the Default Data Load screen by navigating to 3.Change Data
> 8.Utilities > 1. Default Data Load. Select item 1. Controller to load a default timing
plan into the active database of the controller.

Controller Timing Plan to be Loaded 12/56 + 4


1.2 Phase Sequential 4.5 Phase Dual Ring
2.3 Phase Sequential 5.6 Phase Dual Ring
3.4 Phase Sequential 6.8 Phase Dual Ring 12/56 + 34

Figure 78 – Controller default data load

86 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

To Implement a Default
Select the phasing scheme that best fits your application by pressing the associated
number 1-6.
Don’t worry if yours is not an exact match—you can always add or delete by editing.
Upon selection the screen will indicate.....

DEFAULT DATA LOADED

PRESS MENU KEY TO EXIT THIS SCREEN

Figure 79 – Screen indicating a default data load

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 87


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Edit The Startup Phases And Interval


The start-up interval and phases per the default load may already be correct for your
application, however, you should at least access this screen to determine if this is so.
Go to Sequence/Start-up under the Controller Options Menu....
MM-3-1-1...

X = Initialization phase(s). Initialization interval (0=Red, 1=Yel, 2=Grn)


Use 0(Y/N) key to toggle
values Duration of start up flash. Note: this
should be done by the MMU or Conflict
Monitor and set to 0 in the controller.
Seq/Strt-Up (Val=Yes/No) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Start-Up 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Phases X
Interval : 2 | (0=Red, 1=Yel, 2=Grn)
Flash : 0 | (0-255 Secs)
Red : 0.0 | (0-25.5 Secs)
Sequence : 2 | (2=Sr,3=Dr...see help)
-pgdn For Seq. Config & Phase enables

Duration of start up red if initialization


interval is red.
Used only on start-up.
Normal red times after that.

Sequence type: 2 = single ring, 3 = dual ring,


see detailed section for types.

Figure 80 – Editing startup phases and intervals


You can change these values by the using arrow buttons to position the cursor, and
then entering the desired codes.

Note If a ped call is received during the startup phase, the controller only responds to
the call if real times have been entered into the phase’s Walk and Ped
Clearance timing fields. Otherwise, the controller waits to service the ped call
until a phase is reached that can safely service it and for which Walk and Ped
Clearance times have been entered.

88 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

Edit Phases Enabled If Default Is not an Exact Match


If there is no default that has the exact phasing desired, then the phasing must be
edited. To do so, page down from the Sequence/Startup screen. In this case, it is
assumed that the basic sequence type will not change (1st page).
For example, suppose it is desired that the phasing be the same as the 5 phase dual
ring default except that phase 3 will be used instead of phase 4 for the side street
(non dual ring street).
MM-3-1-1-PGDN.....
Add 3 and delete 4

SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X
Ring 2 X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PgDn for Co-PHASES/XPED
Figure 81 – Sequence Configuration - Ring setup
To do so, move the cursor under phase 3 in ring 1 and hit 0 (Y/N) to toggle it on
(X appears). Next move the cursor to phase 4 in ring 1and hit 0 (Y/N) and toggle it off
(X disappears).

Add 3 and delete 4 in co-phase group 2


Page down to co-phases... .
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0=4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC/PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 2 2
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X
CO PH 3
CO PH 4
Figure 82 – Sequence Configuration - Setting Up co-phases

Note The co-phase screen must be edited as well to delete the co-phase assignment of
the deleted phase and add it for the new phase. Failure to do so results in a start-
up error. For a more detailed explanation of co-phases, see page 108.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 89


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Edit Phase Functions (Phase Recall Modes)


In the Default mode all phases are actuated (no recalls), so if other recall modes like
min recall, max recall, ped recall, CNA, etc. are required, then they must be so
programmed.
Prior to actual programming, you may wish to review the following chart which
illustrates typical use of recall modes for many common intersections.
Table 30 – Typical Use Of Recall Modes
INTERSECTION DESCRIPTION PHASES RECALL MODE
1. Fully actuated, all phases have Main St. Min recall or Soft recall
detectors, peds actuated (or none), rest or Other ph’s No recall (actuated)
hold* in Main St. green/don’t walk.
2. Fully actuated, peds actuated (or none) Main St. No recall (actuated)
rest in last phase served green/don’t walk. Other ph’s No recall (actuated)
3. Semi-actuated, no Main St. detection, Main St. Max recall
peds actuated (or none) rest or hold* in Other ph’s No recall (actuated)
Main St. green/don’t walk.
4. Semi-actuated, Main St. peds always Main St. Ped rec or CNA (WRM off)
come-up, rest or hold* in Main St. grn/dw. Other ph’s No recall (actuated)
5. Semi-actuated, Main St. peds always Main St. CNA (WRM on)
come-up, rest or hold* in Main St. grn/walk. Other ph’s No recall (actuated)
6. Fixed-timed, no detection, no peds, Main St. Max recall ***
always cycles, hold* in Main St. green/dw. Other ph’s Max recall ***
7. Fixed-timed, no detection, with peds, Main St. Ped recall
always cycles, hold* in Main St. green/dw. Other ph’s Ped recall or max rec
8. Fixed-timed, no detection, with peds, Main St. CNA
always cycles, hold* in Main St. green/walk. Other ph’s Ped recall or max rec
*References to rest indicates how the unit acts when there are no calls. References to hold
indicate how the main street will hold during the hold period if coordination is used. The condition
for both is either in green/don’t walk or green/walk of the phase indicated.
**Operating without any recalls at all is not recommended for coordinated operation. The coord
phases (Main St.) should have some type of recall applied during coordinated operation.
***It is generally considered not good practice to invoke pre-timed operation by setting phases to
min recall and using the initial (min green) time for the full green time. Instead, use max recall
and set the initial to just a base value of 5-15 seconds and use max time I or II for green time.
This is especially important if coordinated operation is to be used.
WRM = Walk Rest Modifier. When active, a CNA phase can rest in Walk even when
hold is not applied if there are no serviceable conflicting calls.

90 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

Phase Recalls Edit Procedure


There are two menus under recall modes. One is for Timing Plan Functions like min
recall, max recall, ped recall, etc. Up to 4 sets of these can be programmed and are
selectable by TOD. The other is for once per unit recalls and are mostly for CNA
Modes.

Edit Timing Plan Recall Modes and Other Related Options


The timing plan recall modes include such modes as min recall, max recall, ped
recall, soft recall, lock/non-lock mode, etc. These tend to be the more common
modes for non-coordinated phases, or all phases at free running intersections
(no coord).
Note that these modes can programmed per timing plans 1-4. Thus, alternate
plans can be selected by Time of Day (TOD) or by combination of Cycle, Offset
Split (COS)—thereby selecting a completely new set of recall modes and other
functions.
When no alternate plans are desired, simply program the following modes for
Timing Plan 1 only.
To edit timing plan recall modes go the controller menu, then Phase Recalls/Modes
then Min/Max…;
MM-3-1-2-1.....
Phase Functions (1 of 12)
Value(YES/NO)
Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
MIN RCL X
MAX RCL
PED RCL
SOFT RCL
NON-LOCK
Figure 83 – Configuring Phase Functions

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 91


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

PGDN ....

Phase Functions
Value(YES/NO)
Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
VEH OMIT
PED OMIT
WLK REST
MAX II
RED REST
Figure 84 – Configuring Phase Functions - page 2
PGDN ....

Phase Functions
Value(YES/NO)
Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
NO SKIP

Figure 85 – Configuring Phase Functions - page 3


Enable/disable a function for a phase as desired by moving the cursor to the function
and phase and toggling 0(Y/N). When a “X” is shown the function is enabled for that
phase.

BRIEF TIMING PLAN RECALL DESCRIPTIONS


(see detailed section pg. 122 for full description)
Min Recall - Applies call for initial green only, extends by detector after that.
Max Recall - Applies call for max green. Always times max regardless of SCC∗.
Ped Recall - Applies call for pedestrian service (walk-flashing don’t walk).
Soft Recall - Similar to min recall but only applies call if no other “real” calls.
Non-Lock - Call not locked in memory, det. must be occupied for service.
Veh Omit - Phase omitted when this plan is in effect (no vehicle or ped).
Ped Omit - Ped omitted when this plan is in effect (phase can still be served).
Wlk Rest - Allows ped recall phase or ped actuated phase to rest in walk.
Max II - Calls for Max II timing on phase when this plan is in effect.
Red Rest - Calls for phase to rest in red when this plan is in effect.


SCC = Serviceable Conflicting Call – The phase has opposing call which will require it to clear.

92 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

No Skip - Phase called if phase after it is called when this plan is in effect.

Edit Once Per Unit Recalls (CNA Modes, Inh Max, Ped Options)
The first area below is largely used for CNA modes and some other special options.
Skip this section and move to standard recalls if no CNA modes or special ped
options are used.
Note that the following modes are one-time settings, there are no alternate plans
selectable by time of day like the timing plan recall modes (i.e. min recall, max recall,
etc. modes can have alternate TOD plans).
MM-3-1-2-2.....
Phase Functions (1 of 3)
Value(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
CNA 1 X X
CNA 2 X X
CNA 3 X X X X
CNA 4
WRM X X
Figure 86 – Editing Once-Per-Unit Recalls

Note This section is primarily for CNA modes.

Note that the Walk Rest Modifier (WRM) will automatically be applied to phases
enabled by the default load.
PGDN .....

Phase Functions (2 of 3)
Value(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
INH MAX X X
PED RECY X X
FL WALK
FDW->YEL
FDW->RED
Figure 87 – Editing Once-Per-Unit Recalls - page 2
Note that inhibit max (INH MAX) and ped recycle (PED RECY) will automatically be
applied to phases enabled by the default load.
Enable/disable a function for a phase as desired by moving the cursor to the function
and phase and toggling 0(Y/N).

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 93


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Editing Phase Times


The phase times required for your application may not be the same as in the Default
mode. If they are not, they must be edited.
MM-3-1-3....
TP:1 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Initial 8 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
Passage 4.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Yellow 4.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Red 2.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Walk 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ped Clr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
--pgdn for more, SHIFT-> for Ph’s 9-16--
Figure 88 – Editing phase times
PGDN .....

TP:1 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Max 1 30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
Max 2 30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mx 3 Lim 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mx 3 Adj 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

--pgdn for more, SHIFT-> for Ph’s 9-16--


Figure 89 – Editing phase times - page 2
Press SHIFT RIGHT ARROW for phases 9 through 16.

Brief Phase Times Description


(see detailed section for full description)
INITIAL -Guaranteed portion of green. Also called minimum green (see note 2)
PASSAGE -Incremental amount by which green is extended by each actuation
YELLOW -Yellow clearance interval
RED -Red clearance interval (all red before next green in ring starts)
WALK -Phase walk time (use 7 seconds or more if walk signals displayed)
PED CLR -Phase Ped Clearance (Flashing Don’t Walk) time (see note 3)
MAX 1 -Normal maximum allowed green due to extensions or max recall
MAX 2 -Alternate maximum selected by clock, input, or plan call (see recalls)
MX 3 LIM-Upper limit to max time due to adaptive max adjustment (see note 4)
MX 3 ADJ -Amount by which max extended after “X” max outs (see note 4)

94 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Procedures to Set Up a New 3000 Controller

Notes:
1. Each of the above is programmable in up to 4 plans, each plan selectable by
COS or Clock. Use only plan 1 if no TOD, COS changes are required.
2. For Initial time the typical settings are:
10-15 seconds for main street
5-7 seconds for left turns and commercial exits
6-10 seconds for actuated major side (cross) streets
3. For ped clearance time use X seconds, where X = distance in ft. curb to curb
at the ped crossing divided by 4 ft/sec, or the distance in meters divided by 1.2
meters/sec.
4. Max 3 also requires Max 3, Max/Gap-outs programming, which can be found in
the enhanced menu (Controller MM-3-1-9-5). Also see Max 3 explanation in
the detailed section, page 153.

Setting Up a Coordination Plan


1. Load a coordination default from the Utilities menu (coord only, do not load a
controller default if you have already set controller phasing, times, etc.). Use
the default coord plan that closest fits your application, but don’t worry if the
values and and/or phasing are not exactly the same as your application. These
values can be edited.
2. Use the example at the end of the detailed Coordination Section (pg. 269) as a
guide in editing for your application. Edit all coordination screens shown in the
example as necessary. Observe the CNA note at the end if CNA is required
on the coord phases. Use the Coord check function to verify your work (MM-3-
2-0).
3. Read the descriptions on other specific coordination features and implement
as necessary if the basic example does not fully meet your requirements.

Basic Procedure For Setting Up a TOD Plan


1. Determine how many day plans and week plans will be necessary. Many
applications will consist of just 2 day plans and one week plan (used all year).
This week plan (1) consists of day plan 1 Monday - Friday and day plan 2 on
Saturday and Sunday.
2. Go to the Time of Day menu and load the week and year plan. For example, if
the above case is true, program week 1 with day 1 assigned to M-F and day 2
assigned to Saturday and Sunday. Assign week plan 1 to all 53 weeks of the
year.
3. If daylight savings is used in your area, go to the Daylight Savings menu (MM-
3-3-7) and program the appropriate month and week for Spring and Fall
(program 0’s if DST not used).
4. The standard sync reference mode is the Time Dependent mode with a
midnight reference for all cycles. This is the most commonly used mode, but if

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 95


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

your application is different (sometimes reference times are different), go to the


Sync Reference Menu (MM-3-3-8) and change this now, otherwise go to
step 5.
5. Go to the Day plan menu and program each day plan as required. Use the
Typical Day Plan example in the Time of Day section (pg. 280) as a guide.
Also note that;
An event which turns the Free Ckt (11) off must be included for
coordination to operate. This is to offset the fact that the 3000 Series
controllers turn Free Ckt 11 ON every night at midnight.
Never activate INH MAX by clock event (use only COS/F to TOD CKTs
from the coordination menu if INH MAX is to be used so that it will not be
invoked in Free operation, as a cycling failure will occur.)
Each event is either a CKT PLAN, a COS, or a CKT ON/OFF (not more
than one).
In general, many functions relating to coord (e.g. Max 2, CNA, etc.) can be
either applied via COS/F to TOD CKTs in the coordination menu (MM-3-2-
8), or can be activated strictly on a time of day basis by day plan events.
When COS/F to TOD CKTs are used, the function is not actually
implemented until coordination itself is fully active. Clock event ckt’s are
activated at the designated time and may precede the start-up of
coordination. The implications of this should be considered (this is the
reason for INH MAX note above).
6. After all clock programming is complete, go to the Set Date and Time menu
(MM-3-3-9) and set the date and time. Note that for Time Based Coordination
to operate properly, the clocks of all units in he system must be the same,
within a second or two.

Setting Up a Preemption Run


Refer to the examples at the end of the detailed Preempt section (pg 332).

96 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using First Time Setup Menus

USING FIRST TIME SETUP MENUS


There is menu process in the 3000 controller that automates the much of what has
been described in this section. It is called the First Time Setup menu and is accessed
from the Main Menu.

Main Menu

1.Dynamic Displays 4.Diagnostics


2.Read Data 5.MMU Status
3.Change Data 6.First Time Setup

Figure 90 – Go to the Main Menu and choose 6.First Time Setup


First Time Setup….
Basic Setup Procedure (Begins next page)

To setup a new 3000 for basic oper-


ation, follow procedures below (Pgdn).
Procedures explain order of things that
need to be done. To go straight to the
menu described, press the number of the
procedure. Clear menu returns you here.
Figure 91 – Basic Setup Procedure screen
This menu explains how to use the procedure.
PGDN ….

1.Load a default (Utilities Menu). Find


closest controller default to your
phasing & load. Load coord if used.

2.Seq/startup (Controller, Seq/Startup


Menu). After default load, edit startup
data & phasing for your intersection.
Add & delete phases on 2nd & 3rd page.
Figure 92 – Basic Setup Procedure screen - page 2
Each procedure description explains what must be done, but the actual task must be
performed in the menu area described.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

To go right to that menu, simply press the procedure number key.


For example, press 1….
Utilities Menu

1.Default Data Load 6.Printer Menu


2.Transfer Menu 7.Copy Functions
3.Clear Logs 8.Request Download
4.EEPROM Copy
5.Restart machine

Figure 93 – Press the selection from the Quick Start menu to see topic
The referenced menu immediately appears (Utilities). Once in the menu, execute the
task required. In this case, execute the Default Data Load procedure and load the
desired defaults.
Once the task is complete, press CLE AR - MENU to return to the First Time Setup
procedure. Then go on to the next procedure. Each procedure will go to a different
menu, but CLEAR - MENU will always to return to the First Time Setup menu at the
point last exited.
Note that procedures 1 through 5 are sufficient to set up basic operations, (and 5 is
only needed if CNA is used.) Procedures 6 through 10 are for options that may be
required. More complex functions such as coordination and preemption must be
programmed using the normal menu structure.

Menu Descriptions

Main Menu
The main menu is the base menu from which all other menus are accessed. The
main menu itself can be accessed by hitting the MENU key successively or by hitting
SHIFT-MENU (both keys at the same time).

Main Menu

1. Dynamic Displays 4. Diagnostics


2. Read Data 5. MMU Status
3. Change Data 6. First Time Setup

Figure 94 – Main Menu

98 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using First Time Setup Menus

Dynamic Display Menu


The dynamic menu provides access to various unit status screens. In general, the
selected screens indicate status of various functions, timers timing, condition of
inputs, etc. The term “dynamic” is used because the screens continuously change
and update as the function status changes. Detailed Dynamic Menu descriptions
begin on page 28.

Dynamic Menu

1. Controller Funcs 6. Overlap Functions


2. Coord Functions 7. Prgm Level & Rev
3. Tod Functions 8. Log Menu
4. Preempt Function 9. Checksum Status
5. Voltages 10. Comm
Figure 95 – Dynamic Menu

Read Data Menu


The Read data menu is a “Read Only.” It is the same menu as the Change Data
menu following except that data parameters can be viewed only and not changed.
The Read Data Menu can be used in conjunction with passwords and restricting
access to menus such that some users have Read Only privileges. In that case, their
password allows access to the Read Data menu, but not the Change data menu.
See page 375.

Change Data Menu


The Change Data menu is the base menu from which all unit programming begins. It
is also called the “Program Menu” since it allows data base parameters to be
programmed.
Change Data Menu (Press 9 for Index)

1. Controller 5. Comm/System setup


2. Coordination 6. Unit Config/Sec.code
3. Time Of Day 7. I/O Steering
4. Preemption 8. Utilities

>Shift-Clear From Data Screens to Index<


Figure 96 – Change Data Menu
Each selection pertains to a related area of the 3000’s data base. Most of the
selections shown above are major categories themselves and will display another set
of sub menus when selected. Each further narrows down the specific area of the data
base. For example, the Controller Menu generally pertains to phase/overlap
sequencing & timing issues, but has 9 submenus to deal with all the related topics.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Diagnostics Menu
The Diagnostics menu is a procedure for testing the unit. It is not a field procedure
and should never be executed at an operating intersection (see page 81).

MMU Menu
The MMU menu is only available when the unit is operating in the TS 2 mode and
port is operational. This display indicates status of field channels “as seen” by the
MMU, i.e. the channel color indications shown are as reported by the MMU via port 1
comm (see page 82).

First Time Setup Menu


The First Time Setup menu is a set of guidelines and procedures for setting up a
3000 for the first time. It explains the minimal requirements to set-up a unit a provides
a direct link to the appropriate programming screens (see page 97).

100 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

USING THE CONTROLLER MENU


To access the controller menu, first select the Main Menu by successively hitting the
MENU key or by pressing the SHIFT and MENU keys simultaneously.
Select Main Menu...

Main Menu

1. Dynamic Displays 4. Diagnostics


2. Read Data 5. MMU Status
3. Change Data 6. First Time Setup

Figure 97 – Main Menu


Then Select 3, Change Data....
Change Data Menu (Press 9 for Index)

1. Controller 5. Comm/System setup


2. Coordination 6. Unit Config/Sec. code
3. Time Of Day 7. I/O Steering
4. Preemption 8. Utilities

>Shift-Clear From Data Screens to Index<


Figure 98 – Change Data Menu
Then Select 1, Controller....
Controller Menu

1.Sequence/Startup 6. Dual Entry


2.Phase Recalls/Modes 7. Cond. Service
3.Phase Times 8. Ped Options
4.Detectors 9. Enhanced Options
5.Overlaps

Figure 99 – Controller Menu

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Sequence/Start-up Configuration Screens


Select 1 from the controller menu....
Seq/Startup (val=yes/no) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Startup 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Phases X
Interval : 2 | (0=red, 1=yel, 2=grn)
Flash : 0 | (0-255 secs)
Red : 0.0 | (0-25.5 secs)
Sequence : 2 | (2=sr,3=dr...see help)
-Pgdn for seq. config & phase enables
Figure 100 – Sequence/Startup Configuration Screen - page 1

Start-Up Screen Parameter Definitions


START-UP PHASES - Toggle YES/NO under selected phases, where “X” indicates
enabled phase. Enable phase or phases (must be compatible if more than 1) that will
become active upon controller initialization or when the external start input is true.
The phase color is determined by the start-up interval setting.
START-UP INTERVAL - Code 0-2. Determines the start-up color, 0 = Red, 1 = Yel, 2
= Grn.
START-UP FLASH - 0-255 seconds. This value determines the controller start-up
flash period before the Controller Voltage Monitor (CVM) output is allowed to go to
the good state. Note, however, that it is recommended to program start up flash via
the setting on the Conflict Monitor (or MMU) and not the controller. The controller
flash is usually set to zero.
START-UP RED - 0-25.5 seconds. This red timing occurs only if the start-up interval
is red and only occurs once after initial power-up or external start. Normal red timing
occurs after that.
TYPICAL SETTINGS FOR START-UP PARAMETERS. The start up phase and
interval is usually determined by how the intersection flashes. If the intersection
flashes main street yellow and side street red, then the start-up phase(s) should be
the main street phase(s) and the interval should be yellow or green—where green is
preferable. Start up red has no effect in this case. If the intersection flashes all red,
the start up phase(s) should be the phase(s) immediately preceding the main street
phase(s) and the interval should be red. Start up red is usually set to 3-5 seconds in
this case.
SEQUENCE - 1-9 selects a specific type of sequence from the library of sequences
as follows;
1. Clear sequence. This clears all phases from ring, co-phase and
exclusive ped assignments.
2. 8 phase sequential (single ring). This assigns phases 1-8 to ring 1
and co-phase group 1. The unit will cycle phases one at a time
sequentially.

102 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


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3. 8 phase quad left (dual ring). This assigns phases 1-4 to ring 1 and 5-
8 to ring 2. Phases 1, 2, 5, and 6 are assigned to co-phase group 1 and 3,
4, 7, and 8 are assigned to co-phase group 2.
4-9 Special sequences. For a description of available sequences hit
HELP from the sequence start-up menu. Hit HELP again to return. Also see
the chart on page 107.

Note Modifications to the sequence only take affect after a controller restart.

Typical procedure for loading sequence information


Since the appropriate sequence for most intersections is a simple sub-set of one of
the Utility Menu defaults or Library sequences, the user usually will need only;
1a. Load a default from the Utilities Menu and then edit phases enabled (used)
by entering the SEQUENCE/START-UP menu and paging down to the phase
enable/disable and ring assignment screen.
or,
1b. Enter the SEQUENCE/START-UP menu directly, select a sequence from the
library and then edit phases enabled (used) by paging down to the phase
enable/disable and ring assignment screen.
2. Page down again to edit co-phases to reflect the new phasing for phases
added or deleted. Failure to do so will result in a start-up error. For many cases
of simple phase addition or deletion, the co-phase programming is simple
addition and deletion within the same co-phase group as well. Review the
detailed co-phase explanations on the next page if co-phase programming
involves more sophisticated re-structuring.

Addition & Deletion of Phases to Preset Configurations


For example, suppose it is desired that the phasing be the same as the 5 phase dual
ring default except that phase 3 will be used instead of phase 4 for the side street.

Add 3 and delete 4


MM-3-1-1-PGDN .....
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X
Ring 2 X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PGDN for Co-PHASES/XPED

Figure 101 – Adding and deleting phases from preset configuration

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

To do so, move the cursor under phase 3 in ring 1 and hit 0 (Y/N) to toggle it on (X
appears). Next move the cursor to phase 4 in ring 1and hit 0 (Y/N) and toggle it off (X
disappears).

Add 3 and delete 4


PGDN to co-phases...

SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<


VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS(Ø=4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC/PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Ø 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 2 2
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X
CO PH 3
CO PH 4
Figure 102 – Adding/deleting co-phases to configuration

Note The co-phase screen must be edited as well to delete the co-phase assignment of
the deleted phase and add it for the new phase. Failure to do so results in a start-
up error. For a more detailed explanation of co-phases, see page 108.

Enhanced Sequence Configuration and Exclusive Ped


In some cases, the required sequence may be more complex or unusual and will
require greater use of the 3000’s sequence capabilities as well as a greater
understanding of the operation.
The 3000 Controller has a library of sequences from which the user can select. Once
a configuration has been loaded, sequences can be modified as desired.
Alternatively, a sequence can be developed from scratch. The sequence library is
shown on page 107. Enter a 1 to clear the currently loaded sequence, or the number
of the desired sequence. Note that the programmed sequence only takes effect
following a restart.

When a sequence is first implemented from the library, all phases (usually 8)
associated with the sequence are automatically loaded along with ring and co-phase
assignments. This only happens when the digit (1-9) is first entered. If then edited by
any of the screens below, the last edited values will remain in effect through power
interruption even though the selection digit will remain displayed.

Caution Be careful when re-entering the sequence number—it will re-load from
library defaults and overwrite any previously edited sequence entries.

104 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Pgdn from start-up programming screen....


Phase Enable/Disable And Ring Assignment
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Ø 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X X
Ring 2 X X X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PGDN for Co-PHASES/XPED

Figure 103 – Phase enable/disable and Ring assignment


This screen allows phases to be enabled and assigned to rings. A phase is enabled if
an “X” appears below the phase in one of the four rings. A phase is disabled (will not
be used) if no “X” appears below the phase in any ring. The example is an 8 phase
quad left.
Change the phasing as desired by moving the cursor to the phase and ring position
and toggling the 0(Y/N) key to the opposite mode.
PGDN....
Phase Assignment To Co-Phase Groups
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (Ø-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Ø 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X X X X
CO PH 3
CO PH 4
Figure 104 – Assigning phases to co-phase groups

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

PGDN for Co-Phase groups 5 through 8


The above screens allow phases to be assigned to rings and co-phase groups. Note
that the ring must be assigned before a phase can be assigned to a co-phase group
or the unit will beep (see rings, barriers & co-phases definition).
PGDN....for Exclusive PED Programming
EXCLUSIVE PED 1 VALUE (YES/NO)
XPED IN N: PED 1: N PED 3: N TOD:N
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
XPED PH
OUTPUTS
SOFT RET
PGDN FOR EXCLUSIVE PED 2
Figure 105 – Exclusive Pedestrian phase programming
This screen allows exclusive ped programming (see exclusive ped definition page
114).

106 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Library of Default Sequence Diagrams


The library of default sequences are defined as follows:

R1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 R1 1 2 3 4 7 8
R2 5 6
8 phase sequential (code 2)
1234/56 + 78 (code 6)

R1 1 2 3 4 R1 1 2 3 4
R2 5 6 7 8 R2 5 6 7 8

8 phase quad left (code 3) 1234/5678 (code 7)

R1 1 2 3 4 8 R1 1 2 3 4 R3 9 10 11 12
R2 5 6 7 R2 5 6 7 8
R4 13 14 15 16
123/567 + 48 (code 4)
Dual Quad Left (code 8)

R1 1 2 3 4 7 8 R1 1 2 3 4 5 6
R2 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
R2
12/56 + 3478 (code 5)
12 phase Six-Left (code 9)

There are 8 possible co-phase groups (8 barriers). Each group contains a set of
phases that are defined as co-phases. The defaults use from 1 to 4 groups.
All necessary ring and co-phase data will automatically appear for selected default
sequences.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Phases, Rings, Co-Phase Groups and Barriers


These definitions describe some of the key concepts important in programming an
intersection controller such as the 3000/E.
Phase — A Phase is one or more movements of traffic given right-of-way at the same
time, with its own position in the sequence and a set of parameters.
Ring — A Ring is two or more phases that must be timed sequentially.
Ring Rule: All phases in a Ring conflict with each other. A phase must be assigned to
one and only one ring.
Co-phase Group — A Co-phase Group is a group of phases that determine if phases
in different Rings are compatible or conflicting.
Co-phase Rule — A set of phases, each in different Rings, are compatible if they are
in the same Co-phase Group. In all other cases, the set of phases are conflicting. A
phase may be assigned to multiple Co-phase Groups.
Sequencing — The phase sequencing process cycles through phases in ascending
order of Co-phase Groups, and by ascending phase number within each Ring of a
Co-phase Group (subject to Lead-Lag adjustments, see Lead-Lag in Enhanced
Options section). After the last Co-Phase Group serves, the sequencing 'wraps' to the
first Co-Phase Group. This process continues forever.
In the active Co-phase Group, the highest-ordered phase with a serviceable call
in each Ring is termed the "barrier phase". If a "barrier phase" is active, the ring
has cycled as far as it can (based on demand) in the active Co-phase Group.
The Phase Sequencer seeks the 'next Co-phase Group' with a serviceable call
on phases that are not in the active Co-phase Group.
When the subset of "barrier phases" that are not in the 'next Co-phase Group'
are green timed out (ie, gap out), the subset of "barrier phases" transfer to
yellow simultaneously to advance to the 'next Co-Phase Group'. The subset of
"barrier phases" that exist in the next Co-phase Group remain green because
they are compatible.
When clearance intervals finish, the new phases in the 'next Co-phase Group'
turn on.
During the "barrier phase" clearance timings, if a ring remains green because it
is in the 'next Co-phase Group', the ring may terminate to serve a newly-
identified serviceable call for a phase in the 'next Co-phase Group'.
The sequencing rules are simple when each of the phases is in one and only one
Co-phase Group. The rules become more complex when individual phases are
assigned to more than one Co-phase Group. This is best explained with three
examples in order of increasing complexity (assuming every phase has a call) shown
below.

108 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Rings and Co-phases Example 1


The key point of this example is to show a simple case where all greens must
terminate when moving to a new Co-Phase Group.

Figure 106 – Rings and Co-phases Example 1


Starting with phases 1/5, the next phases for service are 2/6. The transitions from 1-
>2 and 5->6 occur independently because they are in the same Co-Phase Group.
From 2/6, the next phases for service are 3/7. Because 2/6 are "barrier phases" and
2/6 are not in the 'next Co-Phase Group' c-2, 2/6 terminate together (after both are
timed out) to serve 3/7. The process continues.

Rings and Co-phases Example 2


The key point of this example is to illustrate how all greens do not always terminate
when moving to a new Co-Phase Group.

Figure 107 – Rings and Co-phases Example 2


Starting with phases 2/5, the next phase for service is 6. The transition from 5->6
occurs while phase 2 is timing because 2/6 are in the same Co-Phase Group. From
2/6, the next phase for service is phase 1. Because 2/6 become "barrier phases" and
phase 6 is in the 'next Co-Phase' c-2, only phase 2 terminates to advance to c-2.
From 1/6, the 'next Co-Phase' is c-3. Phases 1/6 become "barrier phases" and since
they are not in the 'next C-Phase Group' both phases terminate to transition to 3/7.
The process continues.

Rings and Co-phases Example 3

Figure 108 – Rings and Co-phases Example 3


Starting with phases 1/7/11, the next phases for service are 2/8/12. The transitions
from 1->2, 7->8 and 11->12 occur independently because they are in the same Co-
phase Group. From 2/8/12, the 'next Co-Phase Group' is c-2 and 2/8/12 become the
"barrier phases". The 'next Co-Phase Group' is c-2 with next phases 3/0/13. The next

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

transition is 2/8/12 -> 3/0/13. All 3 rings must terminate to serve 3/0/13. From 3/0/13,
the next phases for service are 4/0/14. The transitions from 3->4 and 13->14 occur
independently because they are in the same Co-phase Group. From 4/0/14, the 'next
Co-Phase Group' is c-3, with next phases 5/9/15. The process continues.
The key point of this example is when determining the next phases in the 'next Co-
Phase Group', the first phases in the Co-Phase with a call are not always the desired
next phases. The process must identify active phases in the next Co-Phase and start
checking for calls on phases after that phase. Even though phase 11 is the first phase
in c-2 r-3 with a call, phase 13 is the next phase because phase 12 is on and in both
c-1 and c-2. If there were no phases in c-2 after 12 or phases 13,14 had no call,
phase 12 would remain green during the transition from 2/8/12 -> 3/0/12.

Phase Selection Points


The next phase to be serviced is determined at the end of the green interval of the
terminating phase, unless the decision cannot be made then. If that happens, then
the decision is made at the end of all yellow and red clearance intervals. Once the
next decision is made, the controller commits to the selected phase.

EXAMPLE:
In a standard 8 phase dual ring quad sequence, Ring 1 consists of phases 1, 2, 3 & 4
and Ring 2 consists of phases 5, 6, 7 & 8. Combinations of phases 1 or 2 & 5 or 6
can all be on at the same time because they are in the same Co-Phase Group. But 1
or 2 & 7 or 8 can never be on at the same time, because the barrier separates phases
1 & 2 in Ring 1 from phases 7 & 8 in Ring 2. This is also true for 3 & 4 in Ring 1 from
5 & 6 in Ring 2. In this example, phases 1, 2, 5 & 6 are in the same Co-Phase Group.

Note In the standard dual ring controller set up as shown in the example below, phases
2, 4, 6, and 8 are normally considered the “barrier” phases. However, if there is no
call on phase 6 (or it is omitted or not used) then phase 5 becomes the barrier
phase when on. The operation is similar for phases 1, 3, or 7 in the same
configuration.

Barriers

1 2 3 4 Ring 1
5 6 7 8 Ring 2
Co-phase Co-phase
group 1 group 2

Figure 109 – Ring, Barrier, and Co-phase Relationship (Sd 8 phase quad left)

110 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

The co-phase programming screen for this example sequence is shown here:
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X X X X
CO PH 3
CO PH 4
Figure 110 – Example of Co-phase programming
Note that phases 1, 2, 5 and 6 are in co-phase group 1, while phases 3, 4, 7 and 8
are in co-phase group 2. Phases 1, 2, 3, and 4 are in ring 1 and phases 5, 6, 7 and 8
are in ring 2.
Co-phase group 1 phases are followed by co-phase group 2 phases, then back to
group 1. All phases in each co-phase group must clear before a phase in the other
co-phase group can time.
Phase 1 can time with 5 or 6 because 5 and 6 are in the same co-phase group but in
different rings. Similarly, phase 2 can time with 5 or 6, ph 3 can time with 7 or 8,
phase 4 can time with 7 or 8, etc.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Examples Using Co-Phase Groups


As an illustration of the effect of Co-Phase Group programming, review the following
examples.

Example 1: Altering the Order of Phases


Suppose it is desired to use the Co-Phase Group feature to provide a phase 1-3-2
sequence in a 3-phase controller instead of the normal phase 1-2-3 sequence
(without using the lead-lag feature).
The normal co-phase assignment for a 3 phase sequential (such as from the Utilities
Menu default load) is as follows......
1-2-3
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1
CO PH 1 X X X
CO PH 2
CO PH 3
CO PH 4
Figure 111 – Altering co-phase assignments - example 1
To change the sequence order to 1-3-2:
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1
CO PH 1 X
CO PH 2 X
CO PH 3 X
CO PH 4
Figure 112 – Changing sequence order - example 1
By moving phase 3 to co-phase group 2 and phase 2 to group 3 as shown, phase 3
will time before phase 2. This occurs because they are in different co-phase groups
where the order of co-phase group takes precedence over the order of phase
number.

112 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Example 2: Adding a 9th Phase to an 8 Phase Quad


Suppose it is desired to use the co-phase feature to add a 9th phase that will come
up between main street (1, 2, 5, 6) and major side street (3, 4, 7, 8).
First load an 8 phase quad from the Sequence Library or default load, then add phase
9 to ring 1 on the ring assignment screen:

SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X X X
Ring 2 X X X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PgDn for Co-PHASES/XPED

Phase 9 is enabled in
ring 1 row

Figure 113 – Ring assignments - example 2


Then page down to the co-phase screen and change it so that phases 3, 4, 7, and 8
are moved to co-phase group 3, and phase 9 is inserted in co-phase group 2 (and
ring 1).
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X
CO PH 3 X X X X
CO PH 4

Phases 3, 4, 7, & 8 are


shifted down to co-phase
group 3 and phase 9 is
inserted in group 2.
Figure 114 – Co-phase assignments - example 2
Thus, phase 9 will come up after 1, 2, 5, and 6 and before phases 3, 4, 7, and 8. The
sequence runs otherwise like a normal 8 phase. To actually use this sequence, an
available set of outputs would need to be determined and signal head steering used
to drive them with phase 9 (see page 380).

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

The ring structure is now the following:

Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2 Co-Phs Grp 3


Ring 1 1 2 9 3 4
Ring 2 5 6 -- 7 8

Example 3: Lagging Phase 1


This example shows how to Lag Phase 1 while preventing Phases 1 & 5 from timing
concurrently, and without activating the Lead-Lag option. Suppose the intersection
topography is such that Phases 1 and 5 cannot operate concurrently. This requires
advanced Co-Phase programming.
First load an 8 phase quad from the Sequence Library or default load:

SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X X
Ring 2 X X X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PgDn for Co-PHASES/XPED
Figure 115 – Ring assignments - example 3
Then page down to the co-phase screen and change it so that phases 2, 5 & 6 are in
Co-Phase Set 1, phases 1 & 6 are in Co-Phase Set 2 and phases 3, 4, 7, and 8 are
moved to co-phase group 3.
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2
CO PH 1 X X X
CO PH 2 X X X
CO PH 3 X X X X
CO PH 4

Phases 3, 4, 7, & 8 are


shifted down to co-phase
group 3.

Figure 116 – Co-phase assignments - example 3


Phases 1 & 5, now being in different co-phase groups, cannot be timed concurrently.
The ring structure is now the following:

114 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2 Co-Phs Grp 3


Ring 1 2 2 1 3 4
Ring 2 5 6 6 7 8

Example 4: Leading and Lagging the Same Left Turn Movement


In an 8-phase quad left, suppose the left turn storage bay for Phase 1 can only hold a
few vehicles and it is prudent to serve the left turn twice per cycle as a lead and lag
left turn. This will require adding phase 9 to the ring structure where phase 1 is the
leading left turn and phase 9 is the lagging left turn.
First load an 8 phase quad from the Sequence Library or default load, then add phase
9 to ring 1 on the ring assignment screen:

SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X X X
Ring 2 X X X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
PgDn for Co-PHASES/XPED

Phase 9 is enabled in
ring 1 row

Figure 117 – Ring assignments - example 4


Then page down to the co-phase screen and add phase 9 to Co-Phase Group 1.
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1
CO PH 1 X X X X X
CO PH 2 X X X X
CO PH 3
CO PH 4

Phase 9 is added to Co-


Phase Group 1

Figure 118 – Co-phase assignments - example 4

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

The ring structure is now the following:

Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2


Ring 1 1 2 9 3 4
Ring 2 5 6 7 8

An Overlap must be used to drive the left turn outputs when phases 1 and 9 are
timed. See Chapter 5 for information on Overlap operation. I/O Steering could be
used to bring Overlap E out on Channel 1 (assuming Channel 1 is Phase 1). See
section on I/O Steering in Chapter 12. The left turn detector(s) would also be
assigned to call and extend phases 1 and 9 (see Chapter 6 for detector details).

116 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Exclusive Pedestrian Operation


Exclusive Pedestrian Operation (Xped) provides a unique timing movement
exclusively for pedestrian movements (no Phases on during this movement, but non-
conflicting Overlaps are allowed.) An Xped movement is an integral part of the
sequence and is programmed as a special EXCLUSIVE PED PHASE. The 3000
Controller provides 2 different Xped movements, Xped #1 and Xped #2.
The ped timing and its relative order in the sequence is determined by the exclusive
ped phase, but the Walk and Don’t Walk outputs can come out on any number of
selected output phases.
Once an Xped has been enabled, a ped call on any of its output phases will activate
the Xped movement at the appropriate point in the sequence. If no enable selection
is programmed, the Xped movement cannot be activated.

XPED Example
EXAMPLE DEFINITION: The following example will provide an exclusive ped
movement for a standard 8 phase dual ring quad sequence. The exclusive ped
movement will follow phases 4 and 8.

Step 1.
Set up a unique phase to provide a position in the sequence and exclusive ped
timing. The phase can be any phase but must not be used for vehicular signals. Since
the example controller uses the first 8 phases for vehicular signals, phase 9 will be
chosen.

a.) RING ASSIGNMENT of XPED PHASE


From the second page of the Sequence/Start-up Menu (MM-3-1-1-PGDN )....
SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION
VALUE (YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Ring 1 X X X X X
Ring 2 X X X X
Ring 3
Ring 4
Pgdn For Co-PHASES X/PED
Figure 119 – Ring assignment of an exclusive ped phase
Add phase 9 to ring 1 as shown above.

b.) XPED CO-PHASE ASSIGNMENT


Next, set up the exclusive ped phase’s order in the sequence by assignment
to co-phase groups. The example definition called for exclusive ped to follow
phases 4 and 8. Thus, phase 9 is simply added to co-phase group 3 in the
standard 8 phase quad co-phase arrangement.

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PGDN ....

XPED follows phases 4 and 8:


SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X X X X
CO PH 3 X
CO PH 4
Figure 120 – Co-phase assignment for an exclusive ped phase
Had it been desired for the exclusive ped to follow phases 2 and 6, then
phases 3, 4, 7, and 8 would be shifted down to co-phase group 3 and phase
9 inserted in group 2.

XPED follows phases 2 and 6:


SEQUENCE CONFIGURATION >>PGDN FOR MORE<<
VALUE (YES/NO) RINGS (0-4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RINGS 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1
CO PH 1 X X X X
CO PH 2 X
CO PH 3 X X X X
CO PH 4
Figure 121 – Another co-phase assignment for an XPED phase

Step 2.
Set up the Exclusive PED operation screen. Chooses enable source.
Source itself then must
A pedestrian call on any output phase calls Xped. be activated, e.g. ckt 108
Soft return applied. See def. next pg. (EP1) = ON.
PGDN ...

EXCLUSIVE PED 1 VALUE (YES/NO)


XPED IN: N PED 1: N PED 3: N TOD: Y
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
XPED PH X
OUTPUTS X X X X See conflict monitor
compatibility note
SOFT RET X X
below.
PGDN FOR ECLUSIVE PED 2
Figure 122 – Setting up XPED operation

118 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Controller Menu

Note The unit must be re-booted to activate new entries when any Exclusive PED
parameter is changed.

XPED Enable Source Selection


Exclusive ped must be enabled to allow operation. The enable can be on all the time or
part time (only certain times of day). An Xped movement may be enabled by one or
more of the following enable sources: 1) ‘D’ module Xped input, 2) Ped Detector 1 or 3)
or TOD circuits 108 & 109. An input is likely to be used if Exclusive Ped was designed
into the cabinet. If not, the easiest way to enable exclusive ped for an existing cabinet
is to enable TOD then simply turn on circuit 108 (XPED 1) or 109 (XPED 2) in the clock
ckt. overrides menu (MM-3-3-6-PGDN , etc.).
Note that selecting the enable source (Y/N) on the Xped screen does not directly
enable exclusive ped—the source itself must also be activated. In the previous
example, the enable source is TOD. To actually enable exclusive ped 1, ckt 108 must
then be activated. If an input is chosen, the input must be true (DC gnd = true). Once
enabled, a ped call must also be placed for the exclusive ped to come up. The ped
call comes from any output phase ped call.

XPED Phase Selection


In the example, phase 9 has been chosen as the exclusive ped phase. An Xped
movement must be a unique phase containing Walk and Ped Clear timing,
programmed in an existing ring, and in its own co-phase group (separate barrier). The
phase must not be used for vehicular signals.

XPED Output Phases


The output phase(s) determine where the physical Walks and Don’t Walks come out.
In the example, phase 2, 4, 6, and 8 walk outputs will all simultaneously activate
when the exclusive ped walk is on (see compatibility note below). The output phases
also determine where the exclusive ped call comes from. A ped call from any output
phase calls for exclusive ped. Automatic Ped Omits are applied to Xped output
phases (2, 4, 6 & 8 in this example) to prevent the ped from normal timing with the
associated green.

Conflict Monitor (MMU) Compatibility


By definition, all exclusive walks (output phases) are compatible with each other, but
conflict with all other vehicular channels—or at least with any vehicular channels that
cross that walk’s path. It is best if all Exclusive Ped output phase walks are monitored
on their own separate channels.
It is not permissible to use Exclusive Ped operation when any of its walks are
monitored on a walk input of a channel that is shared by phase which is either
incompatible with any exclusive walk or any other phase on an exclusive walk
channel. This is because a walk channel input is part of the same channel as phase
colors and any jumpers make both walks and phase colors compatible with each
other. Thus, in most cases Exclusive Ped walks must be monitored on separate
channels.

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This is generally not a problem with the TS 2 MMU when in the type 16 mode,
because walks are all on separate channels anyway and appropriate jumpers can be
added. However, this can be a problem when trying to add an exclusive ped
movement to an existing cabinet with a TS 1 monitor (or MMU in type 12 mode) and
walks are on phase channels. If so, they must be re-wired so that the walks are
monitored on separate channels. The previous example could not be used as an
Exclusive ped if phases 2, 4, 6, and 8 walks are monitored on channels with phases.

Xped Compatibility Card Jumper Example


If the exclusive ped has been set up with the following monitor (MMU) channels;

Channel 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Movement φ1 φ2 φ3 φ4 φ5 φ6 φ7 φ8 φ2 φ4 φ6 φ8
Wlk Wlk Wlk Wlk
Figure 123 – Compatibility card jumpers for an XPED phase
The standard jumpers for the dual ring would be:
1-5, 1-6, 2-5, 2-6, 3-7, 3-8, 4-7, 4-8
The additional jumpers required if Xped operation is to be full time (always runs Xped,
never with phases) are:
9-10, 9-11, 9-12, 10-11, 10-12, 11-12 (compatible with each other)
The additional jumpers required if Xped operation is to be part time (sometimes runs
Xped, sometimes runs normal 2, 4, 6, 8 peds) are:
1-11, 2-9, 2-11, 3-12, 4-10, 4-12, 5-9, 6-9, 6-11, 7-10, 8-10, 8-12
(compatible with phases)
9-10, 9-11, 9-12, 10-11, 10-12, 11-12 (compatible with each other)

Xped Soft Return Phases


If there is no other demand, the exclusive ped phase will time walk then ped clear,
then rest in red. Thus is generally not desired, so if there are no normal recalls the
soft return feature should be used to insure the unit cycles out of exclusive ped to
some other phase (usually main street).

Note A Red Clearance Time may be programmed for the Xped Phase to provide a
period of steady don’t walk before the next greens appear.

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Xped and Overlaps


An Overlap may contain the Xped as a parent phase. The following is an application
where an Xped could be timed concurrently with a right-turn Overlap. See Chapter 5
for Overlap details (page 182).
Ring Structure: Load default sequence #5 and remove phase 8 from Ring 1 and Co-
Phase Group 2.
Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2
Ring 1 1 2 3 4 7
Ring 2 5 6 --

Figure 124 – Ring and co-phase topography for an XPED as phase 7


Intersection:

Φ3

P2
Φ2
P3 Φ5

Φ1
Φ6

Φ4 OLA OL A = 4, 5, 7; Xped Phs = 7,


Outputs = 2 & 3

Figure 125 – Exclusive ped phase in an intersection


Xped Programming:
EXCLUSIVE PED 1 VALUE (YES/NO)
XPED IN: N PED 1: N PED 3: N TOD: Y
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
XPED PH X
OUTPUTS X X
SOFT RET X X
PGDN FOR ECLUSIVE PED 2
Figure 126 – Exclusive ped with overlap programming

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PHASE RECALLS AND MODES


Phase recalls and modes define the phase service mode for each phase. The 3000
Series controller allows up to 4 unique timing plans. These plans include some of the
recall modes, others are programmed only once (not subject to TOD or Cycle-Split
timing plan changes).
From the Controller Menu, select 2, Phase Recalls/Modes...
Phase Recalls/Modes Menu

1.Rcl, Omit, Non-lock, MAXII, etc.


2.CNA, WRM, Ped Recy, Inh Max, etc.

Menu 1 items programmed per TP1-4. Use


TP1 only if no changes by TOD or coord.
Menu 2 items are one setting per unit.
Figure 127 – Phase Recalls/Modes Menu
Recall menu selection 1 area contains recall parameters that are assigned to
timing plans 1-4. These are mostly standard recalls like min recall, max recall,
ped recall, etc. Because they are assigned to timing plans, they can change by
TOD or Cycle-Split. Use only Timing Plan 1, if no TOD or Cycle-Split changes
are desired.
Recall menu selection 2 area contains recall parameters that are programmed
once per unit, and are mostly CNA modes and ped options. These do not
change by TOD or by Cycle-Split.

Timing Plan Assignable Recall Modes (Menu 1 Recall Modes)


These are programmable in up to 4 timing plans (use TP1 if no changes by TOD or
Cycle-Split are desired).....
Menu selection 1....
Phase Functions (1 of 12) Value(YES/NO)
Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
MIN RCL X
MAX RCL
PED RCL
SOFT RCL
NON-LOCK
Figure 128 – Timing plan assignable recall modes

122 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

PGDN ....

Phase Functions (2 of 12) Value(YES/NO)


Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
VEH OMIT
PED OMIT
WLK REST
MAX II
RED REST
Figure 129 – Phase Recalls/Modes Menu - page 2
PGDN ....

Phase Functions (3 of 12) Value(YES/NO)


Timing Plan: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
NO SKIP

Figure 130 – Timing plan assignable recall modes - page 3


Page down to continue to the three screens of functions for each timing plan.
Phase functions are programmed selectively for each phase by moving the cursor to
the appropriate phase and pressing the Y/N key or simply toggling the value by
pressing the associated phase number. Numbered keys 1 through 9 represent
phases 1-9. The SHIFT key plus keys 0-6 toggle phases 10-16. During entry, an ‘X’
indicates this function has been selected for this phase.

Timing Plan Assignable Phase Recall Definitions

Min Recall
Places a Minimum Recall on the selected phases. Assures phase will always be
serviced and will time Initial, but any further green is dependent on detector
extensions (can time up to max time). If there is no demand on the phase, the
controller will time the Initial interval only then will either rest (no other demand) or
advance to the next phase with demand.
Typical use:
On an actuated main street, it causes the unit to always return to and serve the main
street. It will rest in main street green when there is no demand (see soft recall
below).

Note In addition, Min Recall can be activated per phase by a TOD circuit (CKTS 145-
160) or activated for all phases using MIN (CKT 78).

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Max Recall
Places a Maximum Recall on the selected phases. This is similar to min recall except
that the phase will time the entire max time regardless of demand. Upon termination
of the max timer the phase will either rest or advance to a phase with demand. Max 1
is the default and Max 2 can be selected via an external input or TOD circuit.

Note In addition, Max Recall can be activated for any individual phase by TOD circuits
49 through 64.

Typical use:
Max Recall is typically used for any phase that is to be “pre-timed” i.e. it has no
detection but must be served. Often used on a main street with no peds (or actuated
peds) in a semi-actuated application where the side is actuated but the main street is
not. Note that Max Recall should not be applied to phases with functional detection. It
is sometimes applied to an actuated phase temporarily when detection fails.

Ped Recall
This option places a Ped Recall on the selected phases. The pedestrian movement
on this phase will be serviced once per cycle. In the normal ped recall mode the
phase will not rest in walk. The phase can be programmed to rest in walk by enabling
WALK REST (page down from this screen, see walk rest definition next page).

Note This Ped Recall operation applies a constant Ped call. As a result, in the absence
of conflicting calls, the ped alternates between Walk and Ped Clearance.

Typical use:
Main street with ped signals, see Walk Rest (Actuated Rest in Walk.)

Note Ped Recall can be activated per Phase by using TOD circuits 161 through 176.

Soft Recall
Soft Recall will only place a call on the selected phases if no calls exist and the
controller is not already resting in one of these phases. It allows the unit to cycle
between all phases, and when demand ceases, rest in the programmed phase(s).
It should be noted that there is a distinct difference between Soft and Min Recall,
even when used in a 2-Phase operation. The difference is apparent if, for example,
Phases 1 and 2 both have Max Times of 20 seconds, there is no real call on Phase 2,
and Soft Recall is applied to Phase 2. In this case, Phase 1 can extend in Passage
indefinitely. (Phase 1’s Max timer does not count down.) If Min Recall were applied to
Phase 2 in this situation, Phase 1 would max out after 20 seconds and then serve
“demand lacking” Phase 2, despite there still being demand on Phase 1.

124 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


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Typical use:
Typically used on a fully actuated intersection. Soft Recall allows the unit to always go
back to and rest in main street Green when there is no demand (or recalls)—but
without interfering with other phase service.
For example, at a 3 phase intersection say that phase 2 is the main street with Soft
Recall mode set. If there is demand on Phases 1 and 3 only, the controller will cycle
between Phases 1 and 3 only, without servicing Phase 2*. It is only when there is no
demand at all that Soft Recall will be applied to Phase 2. If Min Recall had been
applied to Phase 2, the unit will always cycle through Phase 2 when going from
Phase 1 to 3.

Note In order for Soft Recall to work properly, the Soft Recall programmed phase(s)
must have detection.

Non-Lock (memory off)


Non-Lock disables vehicle call memory on selected phases. The phase only
recognizes vehicle presence so that the detector must be continuously occupied in
order to maintain a call for service. Note that the default mode is non-lock disabled
(no “X”), which means that memory is on. Program an “X“ for phases to operate in
Non-Lock mode (i.e. memory off, presence mode).
When Non-Lock is not enabled (locking mode), if the phase terminates with time
remaining in the Passage Timer (i.e. Max, Force Off, Interval Advance), a call will be
left on the phase and the unit will cycle back to it.
Typical use:
Non lock enabled (X) should be used for phases where the detection zone is
sufficient for presence type detection and vehicles must occupy the detector zone to
be served. If these vehicles leave before phase service, the call is forgotten, (ie,
Right Turn on Red or Permissive Left Turn completed). Non-Lock disabled (no “X”)
should be used when the detector call must be retained until phase service, such as
when the detection zone is set back from the stop bar, or when it is easy for a vehicle
to overrun the stop bar detector.

Veh Omit
Places phase omit on the selected phase(s). The phase(s) will no longer be served
regardless of demand.
Typical use:
Time of day phase omitting. Typically where two or more timing plans are used and
the phase is allowed in some plans but omitted in others. Say for an advance left turn
into a factory entrance that operates mornings only. It is not recommended to use this
feature to disable phases never used in a sequence, especially if operating in
coordinated mode. Instead, a better approach is to edit the sequence to remove any
unused phases altogether.

*
Phase 2 will be served normally if there is real demand. (Cars are actually on the detector.)

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Alternate use:
Another usage of Veh Omit is for phases used exclusively for preemption. The
preempt phase is omitted so that it will not service during normal operation.

Note Do not use Veh Omit on Exclusive Ped (X-Ped) phases.

Ped Omit
Places ped omit on the selected phase(s).
Typical use:
Time of day ped omitting. Typically where two or more timing plans are used and the
phase ped is allowed in some plans but omitted in others.

Walk Rest (Actuated Rest in Walk)


Allows selected phase(s) to rest in Green-Walk instead of Green-Don’t Walk. Walk
Rest is similar to the WALK REST MODIFIER used in conjunction with CNA mode
except that it applies to standard actuated walks. Walk Rest does not automatically
put in another PED call to re-time the phase if a conflicting call clears before the end
of the current phase’s Ped clearance. (Also see Walk Rest Modifier, page 130.)
Typical use:
When it is desired that the main street rest in Walk, but not as a CNA phase. Perhaps
the main street is vehicle actuated and extendible, but it is desired to rest in Ped-
recalled Walk, in the absence of conflicting demand. Once demand arrives, the Ped
clears and the phase may extend in Green/Don’t Walk. CNA mode does not allow
vehicle extensions.

MAX II
Selects MAX II operation without the MAX II input being active.
Typical use:
Time of day Max II timing on selected phases only. Typically two or more timing plans
are used. Max II is applied to some phases in some plans but not in others.

Note If all phases are to go to max II timing, then simple activation of the Max II input, or
clock circuit, will suffice without the need for multiple timing plans.

Red Rest
This option causes the controller to rest in red for the selected phases when no
conflicting calls are present. (The Ring 1 Red Rest and Ring 2 Red Rest inputs need
not be active; this function has precedence.)
Typical use:
To accomplish a specific special requirement. It is not recommended in normal
practice to rest in red at an operating intersection.

126 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

No Skip
This option forces the controller to service phase(s) if a call comes in on a phase
normally serviced after that phase. For example, if the controller is resting in Phase
2, No Skip is enabled for Phase 3 and a call comes in on Phase 4. Thanks to No
Skip, Phase 3 will be serviced for its minimum time before the controller proceeds to
Phase 4.
Typical use:
Sometimes used in coordinated operation, to insure service to certain phases. Also
may be used when an intermediate phase serves as a special clearance of some
kind, perhaps an inside clearance. (Also see the discussion of Double Clear Overlaps
on page 192.)
Example:

Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2


Ring 1 2 3 4
Ring 2 6 6 7

Φ4 Φ7

Φ2 No Skip is enabled for


phase 3. Phase 3 is a
dummy phase that
provides downstream
clearance for Phase 2
Φ6 before Phase 4 begins
timing.
Figure 131 – No Skip example

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions


These are the functions on Menu 2 under the Recall Modes menu. These phase
functions are configurable once-per-unit, and apply to all four timing plans. Except for
Flashing Walk, Ped Clear Thru Yellow and Red, and Conditional Ped, they must be
enabled by an external input or TOD circuit (e.g. CNA I, etc.). Per phase
programming activates the function for selected phases only if the function is enabled.
Menu Selection 2 From The Recall Modes Menu (MM-3-1-2-2)....
Phase Functions (1 of 3) Value(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
CNA 1 X X
CNA 2
CNA 3
CNA 4
WRM X X
Figure 132 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions
This section is primarily for CNA modes.
PGDN .....

Phase Functions (2 of 3) Value(YES/NO)


1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
INH MAX X X
PED RECY X X
FL WALK
FDW->YEL
FDW->RED
Figure 133 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions - page 2
PGDN .....

Phase Functions (3 of 3) Value(YES/NO)


1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
COND PED X X

Figure 134 – Per Unit Assignable Phase Functions - page 3


Enable/disable phases as desired by moving the cursor to the function and phase and
toggling 0(Y/N).

128 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

Per Unit Phase Recall Definitions

CNA Definition
CNA stands for “Call to Non-Actuated”. CNA mode applies non-actuated operation to
selected phases. Min Recall and Ped Recall are automatically activated and phase
detectors are disabled for these phases. The most significant aspect of the CNA
mode is that, during the hold period while in coordination, the CNA phase will hold at
the end of walk instead of the end of green. Ped Clear then follows just before phase
termination. The advantage of using CNA for coord phases is that the length of walk
is determined by the coord phase split time. In this way, the walk duration varies
depending on the cycle and split selection, i.e. walk time = split time - (pcl + yel +
red).

Typical Uses for CNA Mode


CNA may be used for any phase for which it is desired to recall the ped then rest in
green/walk in absence of conflicting calls (WRM must be ON). This could be for a
main street with walk signals operating in a semi-actuated mode, i.e. there are no
detectors on main street, but there are detectors on side street.
CNA is most often used when it is desired to hold (main street) coord phases in walk
during coordination.
CNA 1 - Selects phases for CNA I operation.
CNA 2 - operates the same as CNA I, but it provides an alternative phase
selection for Call to Non-Actuated operation, perhaps for cross-arterial
coordination.
CNA 3, 4 - identical in operation to CNA 1 & 2, but can also be activated by an
external input or TOD circuit.
A CNA phase contains four Green states, defined by NEMA as States A, B, C and D.
State A is Walk Timing, State B is Walk Rest or Walk Hold, State C is Ped Clearance,
and State D is Green Dwell/Select.
State A: Walk Timing – Upon initial entry into phase, Walk times provided Ped
Omit is not on.
State B: Walk Hold – Upon completion of Walk Timing, the phase “holds” in
walk if Hold is applied.
State B: Walk Rest– The phase “rests” in Walk if Hold is not applied, the Walk
Rest Modifier (WRM) is applied, and no serviceable conflicting calls exist.
The phase leaves the Walk Rest/Hold state and advances to Ped Clearance
when:

a.) The phase is in Walk Rest and a serviceable conflicting call is


registered, or

b.) The phase is in Walk Hold, a serviceable conflicting call exists and
Force Off is applied, or

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c.) Hold is released and the WRM is not active, regardless of the presence
of a serviceable conflicting call.
State C: Ped Clearance – The phase times the Ped Clearance setting, and
then advances to the Green Dwell/Select state.
State D: Green Dwell/Select – This is the state in which the controller does
one of the following things, based on the current conditions:
a.) Immediately selects the next phase to be serviced and proceeds to yellow
clearance, or

b.) it rests in Green/Don’t Walk if a call exists and concurrent timing constraints
exist, or if WRM and Ped Recycle are not active, or

c.) it returns to Walk if no serviceable conflicting call exists and either WRM or
Ped Recycle are active, and Ped Omit is not active.

Once a CNA phase has left Walk, Hold and Force Off do not have an effect
on the termination of the phase. That is, Force Off does not have to be
maintained throughout Ped Clearance in order to terminate the green, nor
will Hold maintain the phase in Green/Don’t Walk.

WRM (Walk Rest Modifier)


As described above, CNA phases rest in walk during the hold period when in
coordination. When Hold is removed, if there are no alternate (side street) calls, Walk
Rest Modifier allows the controller to continue to rest in green-walk instead of ped
clearing to green-don't walk. It also allows the CNA phase to re-time walk if the call
from the conflicting phase goes away (lock = off) before Ped Clearance has
completed and yellow starts. Note that if WRM is not applied, the unit will not rest in
walk without hold applied.
Typical use. Non-actuated main street phases that are to rest in walk without hold
applied when no conflicting calls exist.

Inhibit Max
Inhibit Max prevents any phase in its ring from terminating due to a Max Timer (but
can gap out or force off). Max Timer times as normal, but the phase cannot terminate
when the Timer = 0. Inhibit Max termination is sometimes used for actuated phases
during coordinated operation. During coordinated operation, phases are typically
terminated either due to a gap condition or by a force off as applied by the
coordinator. The basic idea behind ”Inhibit Max” during coordination is to prevent
phases from maxing out before being forced off, thus allowing the coordinator to
determine the length of green—rather than the max times doing it.
Typical use:
During coordination by use of COS/F to TOD CKTS such that INH MAX is not applied
until the coordinator and associated force offs are in effect. (See the notes in the next
topic.)

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Phase Recalls and Modes

Inhibit Max Warnings


1. Using Inhibit Max during non-coordinated operation is not recommended.
Inhibit max with no other constraints would allow a phase to extend indefinitely.
A busy street or malfunctioning detector (constant calling) would then lock up
the controller in green. It could also prevent the controller from entering
coordination correctly since the controller requires the termination of all greens
before a coordination sequence can begin.
2. Using Inhibit Max during non-coord operation may also cause a Cycling
Failure. The operator should use the “COS/F to TOD CKTS” option in the
COORDINATION MENU to activate this feature.

Note In controller software versions 2.0 (TS 1) and 3.0 (TS 2) and higher, activating
Inhibit Max only affects operation during Coordination (ignored during FREE
operation).

3. Another way (and perhaps a better one) to accomplish the goal of preventing
phases from maxing out before forcing off is to use Max 2 timing during
coordination, where Max 2 times are set high enough to prevent this. Max 2
can then selected by the “COS/F to TOD CKTS” option as mentioned in 2.
above.

Ped Recycle
Ped Recycle operates on both CNA and actuated phases. A “ped recycle” shall be
defined as any start of walk after the parent green has already started. It can refer to
a late start, or a second (or third, etc) service within the same green interval.
For CNA phases – If the phase has finished timing Ped Clearance and no
serviceable conflicting call exists, the phase returns to Walk if Ped Recycle is active.
If WRM is applied, Ped Recycle is trivial because WRM does the recycling. The
effects of Ped Recycle are only seen if WRM is off.
For non-CNA phases – Activated Ped Recycle allows a pedestrian movement to be
‘re-serviced’ during the same cycle if Hold is applied to the phase when a ped call
comes in, regardless of the presence of a serviceable conflicting call.

Note In the absence of a serviceable conflicting call without Hold applied, a phase
in the actuated mode will always recycle the Ped, regardless of the setting of
this function (provided that Ped Omit is not applied).

Typical use:
Non-CNA Coordinated phases with Peds and Ped push buttons. Allows a late (after
start of green) service to walk. One case in which ped recycle can be used is in fully
actuated applications where the yield point (release of hold) is well before the coord
phase force off. This is the “extendible green band” (EGB) operation where the
coordinated phase can either gap-out any time after the yield point, or extend up until
the force off. Hold can then be set to release early enough to allow late ped service
without serious disruption to other phase timing. If it is a relatively large coord phase
ped interval, the EGB Period will probably not satisfy the above case.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Alternate use:
For CNA Coordinated phases in which WRM is OFF and Ped Recycle is ON. This
results in all coord phases advancing to Ped Clearance upon release of Hold
regardless of calls on non-coord phases.
In this situation, the controller is in a favorable position to serve any subsequent non-
coord phase call (all Ped Clearances are timing regardless of calls) that may arrive
without having to terminate the coord peds at different times if initially a call arrives on
a non-coord phase able to be served by the termination of just one coord phase walk,
then cross-barrier calls arrive late.

Note The “Alternate Use” above is seen primarily with Multiple Permissive Mode.

Flashing Walk
This option allows flashing of the walk signal on selected pedestrian signals. The
Flashing Walk feature does not require an external input or TOD circuit. Any phase
selection of this function will automatically activate the function for the selected
phases.
Typical use:
Use of this feature is no longer common in the United States.

Ped Clearance Through Yellow


This option allows the ped clearance interval to remain active through the yellow
clearance interval of the parent phase, i.e., the Don’t Walk continues flashing through
yellow.
Typical use:
This feature should be used with caution. In the normal mode, the Don’t walk
indication goes solid during yellow and red clearance—which is a good signal to
pedestrians that they should be out of the street and have a few more seconds to do
so.

Ped Clearance Through Red


This option allows the ped clearance interval to remain active through the all red
clearance interval of the parent phase, that is, the Don’t Walk continues flashing
through red. If this operation is desired, Ped Clearance Through Yellow must be
programmed active as well.
Typical use:
See Ped Clearance Through Yellow use. When both these options are applied, the
indications go right from flashing Don’t Walk to opposing green.

Conditional Ped
This is a function that is available only in the TS 2 version of the 3000 Series
controller.

132 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

This option allows a late start or second service to the pedestrian movement (walk) if
there is enough time. Normally a ped call must be registered before the start of green
or it will not be serviced until the next cycle. Also, only one ped can normally time per
cycle. When Conditional Ped is enabled, walk can start after green has started or be
serviced a second time if the Max timer value (time left) of the active phase is greater
than WALK + PCL when the call is registered. On second calls, the FDW (Ped clear)
will complete before the second walk comes up.
Typical Use:
Whenever the ped is push-button actuated and late or second time service to the ped
will not be particularly disruptive to coordination or other phase timing. It is a feature
that is well appreciated by pedestrians (though they do not necessarily understand
the underlying operation) and helps to encourage them to wait for the walk signal.

Phase Times
Phase Times are the basic timing values that operate each phase. Phase times are
programmed by entering a value of 0-255 for parameters where no decimal point is
displayed or 0-25.5 for parameters where a decimal point is displayed.
From the Controller Menu, Select 3, Phase Times (MM-3-1-3)....
TP:1 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Initial 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Passage 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Yellow 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Red 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Walk 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ped Clr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
--PgDn for Max, SHIFT-> for ph’s 9-16--
Figure 135 – Phase timing configuration - page 1
PGDN .....

TP:1 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Max 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Max 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mx 3 Lim 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mx 3 Adj 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

--PgDn for Dens, SHIFT-> for ph’s 9-16--


Figure 136 – Phase timing configuration - page 2

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

PGDN .....

TP:1 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
TBR 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TTR 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Min Gap 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
AI/ACT 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Max In 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

--PgDn for Additional Timing Plans.


Figure 137 – Phase timing configuration - page 3
Use SHIFT – RIGHT ARROW for Phases 9 through 16. Use PGDN For Timing Plans 2
through 4.

Note If passage, yellow, or red exceeds 9.9 on these screens there will be no space
between value fields. It is quite rare, however, to use values greater than 9.9 for
these functions.

Timing Plans
The phase timings as above are per timing plan 1 (TP1). They are also
programmable in Timing Plans 2-4 (TP2-4), accessed by paging down. Individual
timing plans can then be selected by an external input or TOD circuit. This flexibility
allows basic timing parameters to change by TOD or a cycle and split (CS)
combination to better respond to known traffic patterns. If no TOD or CS changes
are desired, only program TP1 timing parameters. TP1 is the default plan.

Terms Used in Phase Timing

Initial
Initial is the first portion of green, often referred to as Minimum Green. The controller
must time the Initial Interval any time the phase is served. Further green time is
dependent on the recall mode and extensions.
Typical settings: 10-15 secs for main street
5-7 secs for left turns and commercial exits
6-10 secs for actuated side (cross) streets
Initial timer notes:
1. It is not recommended to use less than four (4) seconds for initial timing for any
phase unless the phase itself does not determine the actual minimum length of
a signal green.
2. Avoid using the Initial time value as the total “phase green” time. If a phase has
no detection and is to operate in a “fixed time” (pre-timed) mode, use either
max recall, ped recall, or CNA. The phase green time will then be determined
by max time or walk + ped clear.

134 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

Passage
A vehicle detector input calls for phase service when an actuated phase is red, but
serves to extend the phase once it is green. Passage is the increment of time by
which the phase green is extended. The passage value sets to full value when a
detector input is present and times down when no input is present. If vehicles keep
hitting the detector before time out, the phase extends. If it times out, the phase
“gap’s out” and terminates. The phase can extend until either a gap occurs, a force
off is applied or the max timer times out. The passage interval will time concurrently
with initial unless passage sequential mode is enabled (see enhanced options).
Typical settings: 2.5 – 5.0 seconds for loops of 30’ or less
0.5 – 5.0 seconds for loops of 30’ or more
Passage value notes:
1. Because the passage timer is held at full value while the loop is occupied (start
to end), the length of the loop effectively adds to passage value. Thus, very
short passage times can be used with long loops, while still providing effective
passage values that are quite acceptable. The combination of long loops and
short passage values have the advantage of allowing the phase to immediately
gap out as soon as the last car passes over the loop. It is one the reasons why
many agencies have tended toward longer loops in recent years
2. The passage timer value settings in general have a significant effect on the
timing and operation of the intersection. A tendency toward shorter passage
values will make the intersection run “snappier” with less waiting for green.
Values that are too short, however, particularly if the loops aren’t very long, will
cause driver irritation and initiate complaints. A tendency toward long passage
times will reduce “the green is too short” complaints, but after a point will cause
the intersection to run “sluggishly” and thereby reduce efficiency.

Note In the presence of a continuous vehicle actuation, the phase will not gap out even
if Passage Time is set at zero. Gap termination requires Passage Timer timed out
and no vehicle actuation present.

Yellow
The yellow clearance interval.
Typical settings: 3.5 - 4.5 seconds. Based on travel speed and width of
intersection. Note that the minimum tme allowed by the 3000 to be entered for yellow
is 3.0 seconds.

Red
The red clearance interval when all phases in a ring are red before the next phase
green starts.
Typical settings: 0 - 2.5 seconds. Note: Use of 1 second or more is
recommended.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Walk
The pedestrian Walk movement time. The controller will remain in the Green interval
during Walk.
Typical settings: 7 - N seconds. Note: MUTCD requires a minimum of 7 seconds.

Ped Clearance
The Pedestrian Clearance interval (flashing don't walk). The controller will typically
remain in the Green interval during Ped Clearance; however, the Ped Clearance can
be optionally extended throughout the Yellow and Red clearance intervals, though not
recommended.
Typical settings: ‘N’ seconds where N = distance in ft. curb to curb at the ped
crossing divided by 4 ft/sec, or the distance in meters divided by 1.2 meters/sec.

Max 1
Max 1 timing is the default value used for max timing. Max time is the upper limit for
phase timing when the phase is actuated or in Max Recall mode.
Max Timer Operation:
For an actuated phase with Max Recall inactive, the max timer times down
only when a serviceable conflicting call is present. The phase remains green
until it gaps out or the max timer reaches zero, whichever comes first. The max
timer will cease timing and reset if all serviceable calls go away. The max timer
will re-start if a new call arrives and the active conflicting phases are in the
Passage interval.
For Max Recall phases, the phase is always served and the max timer always
times, regardless of demand. It will rest only when the max timer has timed out.

Note Max timing will not override initial or ped timing (walk + ped clear) should those
values be longer that max time itself. Also note that max timing is ignored by the
CNA mode. (WLK plus Hold State Duration plus Ped Clearance determine the
green time for CNA , provided the initial interval is satisfied.)

Typical settings: 5 - N seconds, where N the maximum allowed green duration.


These can vary widely, but to give a feel for the range, they might typically be 8 - 17
seconds for left turns, 12 - 25 seconds for side street, and 22-40 seconds for main
street.

Note If the Max time value is set to a very low number (such as zero) then minimum
timing requirements for the phase, such as Min Green, will override it.

136 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Recalls and Modes

Max 2
Max 2 is an alternate value for max timing. Max 2 is activated by ring by an external
input or TOD circuit. When Max 2 is active the Max timer will be loaded with the Max
2 time instead of the usual Max 1 time.
Typical settings: same concept as Max I except an alternate value used. Max 2 is
sometimes used during peak traffic periods (longer times), and is sometimes used
during coordination so phases won’t max out before forcing off (also longer values).

Note If the Max time value is set to a very low number (such as zero) then minimum
timing requirements for the phase, such as Min Green, will override it.

Max 3 Limit
The maximum value that Max 3 can attain. Used in conjunction with the Max 3 adjust
amount, which allows max time to vary based on demand. The Max 3 Limit is then the
“Max” Max (see max 3 definition previous).
Refer to the Max 3 Options section under Enhanced Options, on page 153.
Typical settings: Some value higher than the normal max time.

Max 3 Adjust
The amount of time to adjust the Max 3 timer based on successive Max terminations
or Gap terminations. The Max 3 timer will be incremented by this amount after
successive Max terminations, and decremented after successive Gap terminations
(see max 3 definition below and enabling max 3 timing).
Refer to the Max 3 Options section under Enhanced Options, on page 153.
Typical settings: 1 - 10 seconds.

TBR (Time Before Reduction)


Enter the amount of time before the controller can begin reducing the gap to the
minimum gap. Time Before Reduction (TBR) starts timing when a conflicting call is
received, which is often the beginning of green. If all conflicting calls are removed
before TBR has completed timing, the TBR timer will reset. Range: 0-255 seconds.
Also refer to the Volume Density Discussion on page 139.
Typical settings: 8 - 20 seconds. Allow enough time for queued vehicles to begin
moving. It should be at least initial (min green) plus 1 second.

TTR (Time To Reduce)


Time to Reduce establishes the time frame in which the controller will begin a linear
reduction of the phase gap (passage time) down to the minimum gap time. The
range is 0-255 seconds. If all conflicting calls are removed before TTR has completed
timing, the TTR timer will reset.
Also refer to the Volume Density Discussion on page 139.
Typical settings: 4 - 12 seconds. Depends on how quickly the operator wishes to
close the timing gap.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Minimum Gap
The minimum gap value establishes the lowest acceptable gap (passage time) in
traffic. The gap will not be reduced below this amount. Range: 0-25.5 secs. Also
see Last Car Passage in the Enhanced Options menu under Density Enables.
Also refer to the Volume Density Discussion on page 139.
Typical settings: 1 - 3 seconds. This will effectively determine the lowest passage
value.

Note In the presence of a continuous vehicle actuation, the phase will not gap out even
if Minimum Gap is set at zero.

Added Initial per Actuation


Also known as ”AI/Act”, Added Initial is a calculated value based on demand during
the non-Green intervals of a phase. The Added Initial Per Actuation value for a phase
is multiplied times the number of cars (detections) that are received while the phase is
in the Yellow and Red states (non-Green). The initial timing for a phase will be the
Added Initial if (and only if) it is greater than the Phase Initial and less than the
Maximum Initial.
Also refer to the Volume Density Discussion on page 139.
Typical settings: 2 - 3 seconds. About enough to move each vehicle.

Maximum Initial
Maximum Initial sets a limit on the amount of Added Initial. Added Initial can never
exceed the maximum initial value. Also known as Max In, or Max Variable Initial.
Also refer to the Volume Density Discussion on page 139.
Typical settings: Refer to Table 31 on page 140. The Max Initial setting is normally
set equal to the Initial interval that would be used if Volume Density were not used.

138 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Volume Density Discussion

VOLUME DENSITY DISCUSSION


Volume Density operation is a broad term which actually combines two functions
which are not necessary related, Variable Initial density management, and Gap
Reduction density management. Variable Initial is used in situations where a phase
has set-back detection. Gap Reduction can be used with either set back or stop bar
detection.These methods are described in more detail in the next two sections.
For additional details, refer to the description of Density under the Enhanced Options
menu as described on page 151.

Variable Initial Function


Allows the normal initial green (min green) setting to be increased by counting cars
and adding the corresponding time increments when the phase is not green. The
parameters associated with this operation are called Added Initial per Actuation (AIA)
and Max Variable Initial (MVI). Variable Initial is normally associated with set-back
loops when there is no stop bar loop. Because vehicles can queue on the set-back,
the initial green must be long enough to exhaust that queue (it cannot be assumed
that other vehicles will arrive and extend). Thus, rather than just setting the initial at
the maximum requirement, it is allowed to vary by counting cars as they cross the set-
back during non-green. This increases efficiency and reduces delays.

Figure 138 – Cars are counted during red

Typical Settings for Variable Initial


Added Initial per Actuation (AIA) is usually set at in the range of 2.2 - 3.0 seconds.
Note that the initial green is only varied when the sum of Added Initial Actuations is
greater than normal initial. For example, if the initial setting is 5 seconds and AIA is
2.2, then it will take 3 actuations (3 x 2.2 = 6.6) before the initial setting is varied.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Max Variable Initial (MVI) can be set according to the table below. Note that the
purpose for max variable initial is to prevent an oscillating detector from causing an
extreme initial. To use the chart, estimate the number of vehicles that can be stored
on the stop bar side of the set-back detector and look up the value in the chart.
Table 31 – Max Variable Initial settings
Possible # (n) vehicles stored Max Variable Initial setting
1 5
2 7
3 9
4 12
5 14
6 16
n =7 and over 16 + [(n-6) x 2.1]

140 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Volume Density Discussion

Gap Reduction Function


Gap reduction allows the normal passage time value to be reduced linearly during the
green portion of the phase. The parameters associated with this operation are called
Time Before Reduction (TBR), Time To Reduce (TTR) and Min Gap—which is the
minimum passage value allowed. Thus, the longer demand holds a phase green with
a conflicting call present, the closer the vehicles must be spaced to retain the existing
green interval.
The last car detected at the time of gap out at the reduced level can be provided with
the full value of the normal passage. This is called the Last Car Passage option. Last
Car Passage is enabled in the Enhanced Options menu (see p. 151). Gap reduction
can be used with set back or stop bar loops.
The following are the two typical uses of gap reduction:

Classic Case Gap Reduction


In this case set back loops, perhaps as far as several hundred feet are used to extend
the phase. There may or may not be stop bar detectors as well (it is recommended
that there are).

Figure 139 – Classic Case of Gap Reduction


The passage time value is set based on the travel time from the set-back detector to
the intersection. This value could be fairly long and left alone would tend to cause the
intersection to run sluggishly because the phase would constantly extend even with
widely gapped traffic. By using gap reduction, the passage value can be reduced
down enough to provide good gap control. Then by using Last Car Passage, after gap
out at reduced level, a value equivalent to the amount by which the passage has
been reduced will be added to the last vehicle extension. This allows that last vehicle
to get through the intersection if no max out or force off occurs. Note that Last Car
Passage is enabled under Density which is found in the Enhanced options section.

Gap Reduction as an Efficiency Tool


Even with normal stop bar detectors, Gap Reduction can be an effective way to
increase efficiency without getting “the green is too short” complaints. The idea is to
begin the phase with a fairly long passage time when vehicles are moving slow, then
move to a shorter time later when they are moving at the flow rate. Gap reduction is
thus a good way to obtain “snappy” operation so that phases cycle crisply without
long waits, but also without complaints.which is often the case if passage values are
simply set low.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Possible settings to use gap reduction for efficiency:


Passage = 4-5 seconds
TBR = Min Green value + 2-15 seconds
TTR = 4 - 15 seconds
Min Gap = 1.2 - 2.2 seconds
Last car passage = off

Gap Reduction Timing Diagram


The diagram below illustrates the changing value of the passage timer during gap
reduction.

Figure 140 – Passage Timer during Gap Reduction


The mechanism for gap reduction is detailed on the diagram. When the phase gaps-
out at reduced gap, one of two things occurs:
If Last Car Passage (LCP) is in effect, the controller commits to gaping out,
but will time one full passage timer for that last car.
If LCP is not in effect the phase gaps out with the “in-progress” reduced gap
value.
The control for Last Car Passage mode (Y/N) is set under the Enhanced Options
Menu (MM-3-1-9-3).

142 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Dual Entry

DUAL ENTRY
Dual Entry will place calls on the selected phase when going to a specific phase next
only when “crossing a barrier” and only one ring has a call. This ensures that there
will always be a phase on in each ring when the sequence permits it. Dual Entry
requires only phase selection to be activated.
The first 4 screens provide standard Dual Entry for phases 1-16.
Dual Entry (1 Of 12) VALUE (YES/NO)
Dual Entry Enable: Y
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH 1 X
PH 2
PH 3
PH 4 X
Figure 141 – Dual Entry programming screen
PGDN for more dual entry programming.
Typical use:
For Dual Ring controllers, to prevent a single phase from being served. In an 8 phase
quad, typically 4 calls 8 and 8 calls 4. This assumes the main street phases 2 and 6
are on some type of recall and don’t require Dual Entry.

Dual Entry by Time Plan Screens


Dual entry screens 5-12 provide alternative dual entry programming selectable by
Time Plan. The dual entry programming on these screens goes into effect when
normal Dual Entry is disabled and the appropriate time plan is selected.
Dual Entry (5 Of 12) VALUE(YES/NO)
Enable: Y TP1 Activated By Time Plan
when normal Dual Entry disabled.
PH\CALLS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
PH 1 X
PH 2
PH 3
PH 4 X
Figure 142 – Dual Entry by Time Plan screen
Note that these Dual Entry plans only include phases 1-8.

Dual Entry Example


In the above screen, phase 5 is programmed for Dual Entry when going to phase 1
and phase 8 is programmed for Dual Entry from phase 4. In the phase 5 case, if
phase 1 is served (real call) and no real call exists on phase 5 or 6, a call will be
placed on phase 5. Phases 1 & 5 will then both be served instead of only phase 1.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

However, if a call exists on phase 6, the controller will proceed to phases 1 & 6. The
operation would be similar for phase 8 when 4 is served.

Dual Entry Misconception


A common misconception about Dual Entry is that the phases associated with the
Dual Entry programming will always time together. As an example, consider the case
where Dual Entry is programmed for Phase 4 when going to phase 8, and phases 3
and 7 are green, with calls on Phases 1, 2, 5, 6, and 8, and no call on Phase 4. In
such a situation, a Dual Entry call will not be applied to phase 4 when phase 7 clears
to phase 8 because there is already a phase on in Ring 1 and a barrier is not crossed.
In this example, the controller would move from 3/7 to 3/8, then to 1/5, and on to 2/6.
To serve Phase 4 with Phase 8, Dynamic Recalls would also be required in addition
to Dual Entry.

Single Entry Mode


Single Entry Mode occurs when Dual Entry is disabled. In multiple ring configurations,
it allows a single phase to be selected and timed alone if there is no demand in the
other ring(s).

144 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Conditional Service

CONDITIONAL SERVICE
Conditional Service is a function that enables selected phases to be serviced if the
conflicting co-phase in the same ring has gapped or maxed out and time is available
in all rings to service the phase. For a leading left turn phase, Conditional Service
can allow that phase to be re-serviced within the same cycle.

Conditional Service(1 OF 12)) VALUE(Y/N)


Conditional Service By Input: N
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH 1 CSV
PH 2 CSV X
PH 3 CSV
PH 4 CSV
Figure 143 – Conditional Service screen

Criteria for Conditional Service


1. The controller unit is in Free Mode.
2. There must be a call on the actuated phase to be conditionally serviced.
3. The conflicting co-phase in the same ring must be gapped or maxed out.
4. There must be sufficient time remaining on the Max Timer(s) of the concurrent
phase(s) to time the yellow and red clearance of the conflicting co-phase and
the Initial interval of the phase to be conditionally serviced.

Conditional Service requires an external input or TOD circuit to enable the function.
The controller must be restarted after changing conditional service programming
before the change is implemented by the controller.

Note Conditional Service requires input or clock CKT 80 = ON to operate. Use time of
day circuit overrides for full time operation. Conditional Service is not operable in
Coordination Mode.

As shown in the screen above, the columns are the conditionally serviced phases, the
phases on the left are the phases that must clear for the conditionally serviced phase
(both must be in same ring, co-phase group).
Typical use:
In dual ring controllers where protected-only left turns are to be allowed second
service when there is enough time. Note that conditional service should never be
used for protected/permissive left turns such as 5 section heads.

Conditional Service Example


In a standard 8 phase dual ring quad, assume that the controller has already serviced
(or skipped) Phases 1 & 5 and is currently timing Phases 2 & 6. Phase 2 has gapped

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

out and a call exists on Phase 1 (Phase 1 & 2 are co-phases within the same ring). If
enough time is available (based on the Phase 6 Max Timer in this case) to service
ring 2 and to ‘re-service’ Phase 1, then phase 1 will be conditionally serviced. The
appropriate programming is shown above for phase 1.

Note For Conditional Service to work properly, the two phases associated with the “X”
entry must be in the same ring and same co-phase set.

Conditional Service by Time Plan Screens


Conditional service screens 5-12 provide alternative conditional service programming
selectable by Time Plan. The conditional service programming on these screens goes
into effect when normal Conditional Service is disabled and the appropriate time plan
is selected.
Conditional Service(5 Of 12) Value (Y/N)
Enable: Y TP1 Activated By Time Plan
when Normal Condtional Service disabled
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
PH 1 CSV
PH 2 CSV
PH 3 CSV
PH 4 CSV
Figure 144 – Conditional Service by Time Plan screen
Note that these conditional service plans only include phases 1-8.

146 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Ped Options

PED OPTIONS
There are several options which modify pedestrian operation as determined by the
ped options screen.
Auto Ped Clear, Enhanced Ped

Auto Ped Clear with MCE: N |Val (yes/no)


Enhanced Ped: N |Val (yes/no)

Auto Ped clr = Ped Clr Protected by MCE


Enhanced Ped = Uses Max times for walks
on CNA Ph’s When CNA=OFF
Figure 145 – Ped Options screen

Auto Ped Clear With Manual Control Enable (MCE)


MCE normally protects only the Yellow and Red Clearance intervals by refusing
Interval Advance actuations from a police pushbutton, timing the Yellow and Red
automatically. Therefore, Ped Clearance is under control of Interval Advance and not
automatically timed. However, when enabled (i.e. set to ‘Y’), Auto Ped Clear adds all
pedestrian clearance intervals to this protected group so that they are automatically
timed.

Enhanced Pedestrian Operation


Enhanced ped is a feature that modifies the ped timing for phases programmed for
CNA and Walk Rest Modifier. For these phases, when Enhanced Ped is enabled but
CNA is not active, the normal walk times are replaced with the Max times for those
phases. When CNA is active, the normal walk times are used on all phases in
accordance with NEMA. Ped clearance times are not affected. Recycling of the ped
movements always uses the normal walk times. To enable this function, enter a ‘Y’ in
the field provided.
Application note: If varying the walk time is the principal goal in the decision to use
Enhanced Ped operation, a better choice might be to use the multiple timing plan
capability (see page 134).

Dual Ped Control


Dual Ped Control is enabled via TOD circuit “EDP CKT 129”.
There are ped calls on both even numbered compatible phases and they start at
different times, the first walk interval that times out will rest in walk and wait for the
other walk to time out and the two peds then enter Ped Clearance together. For this
to be seen, ped calls must exist on both compatible even phases.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

ENHANCED OPTIONS
The Enhanced Options menu contains a number of miscellaneous remaining
controller features and options. They are not necessarily for the enhanced user, but
perhaps just less frequently programmed than the features listed previously.
Enhanced Options Menu
1.Dynamic Omit/Rcl 5.MAX 3 Setup
2.Ucf (TOD Flash) 6.Psg Seq/RedR/PE Ovr
3.Density Enables 7.Dimmming
4.Simult. Gap Out 8.Lead/Lag
9.Soft Flash
Figure 146 – Enhanced Options Menu

Dynamic Omits
Dynamic Omit plans are used to omit selected phases when other phases/overlaps
are on/green. The programmed phases/overlaps that are on/green must exactly
match the current state of the machine to omit the selected phases.
Dynamic Omit GRP 1(1 OF 8) VALUE(YES/NO)
Enable: N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
OMIT PHS X
IF PH ON X X
OR
IF O/L A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P
GRN
Figure 147 – Dynamic Omits screen
In the example below, phase 1 is to be omitted during phases 2 & 6. Please note that
phase 1 will only be omitted when both 2 and 6 are active. It will not be omitted when
just phase 2 or phases 2 & 5 are active.
There are a total of 16 Dynamic Omit plans available. Dynamic Omit Enable must be
programmed ‘Y’ to enable any Dynamic Omit plan (Group 1 or Group 2). The first 8
plans are referenced as Dynamic Omits Group 1 plans 1-8 and only require the
enable function to be programmed. The second 8 plans are referenced as Dynamic
Omits Group 2 plans 1-8 and will be activated upon programming of the enable
function and the activation of an external input or TOD circuit (Circuit #96 GR2).
To access the Group 2 plans, the user may page down until the desired plan is
displayed or enter a ‘2’ in the data entry field provided at the top of the screen (GRP
x). Also to access a given plan directly (without the need to page down to it) the user
may enter the plan number in the next field (x of 8). Group 2 plans, when enabled,
will override Group 1 plans.
Typical use:
For dual ring controllers to prevent “backing up” on protected/permissive left turns
used (5 section heads) from main street through’s. For example, phase 2 would
dynamically omit phase 1 and phase 6 would dynamically omit phase 5.

148 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Dynamic Recalls
Dynamic Recall plans are used to recall selected phases when other phases/overlaps
are on/green. The programmed phases/overlaps that are on/green must be an exact
match to recall the selected phases.
If Phase 1 is to be recalled during Phases 2 & 6, phase 1 will only be recalled when
both 2 and 6 are active. It will not be recalled when just phase 2 or phases 2 & 5 are
active.
Dynamic RCLS GRP 1(1 0F 8) VALUE(YES/NO)
Enable: N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
RCL PHS X
IF PH ON X X
OR
IF O/L A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P
GRN
Figure 148 – Dynamic Recalls screen
There are a total of 16 Dynamic Recall plans available. Dynamic Recall Enable must
be programmed ‘Y’ to enable any Dynamic Recall plan (Group 1 or Group 2). The first
8 plans are referenced as Dynamic Recalls Group 1 plans 1-8 and only require the
enable function to be programmed. The second 8 plans are referenced as Dynamic
Recalls Group 2 plans 1-8 and will be activated upon programming of the enable
function and the activation of an external input or TOD circuit (Circuit #96, GR2).
To access the Group 2 plans, the user may page down until the desired plan is
displayed or enter a ‘2’ in the data entry field provided at the top of the screen (GRP
x). Also to access a given plan directly (without the need to page down to it) the user
may enter the plan number in the next field (x of 8). Group 2 plans, when enabled,
will override Group 1 plans.
Typical use:
When a certain phase or set of phases must be followed by another phase or set of
phases—such as “inside clearance” phases.
Alternate Use:
A semi-actuated “tee” intersection where the main street left is phase 1 (no detection),
main street thru is phase 2 (no detection) and side street is phase 3 (detection) and
the left lane on main street is for left turn protected/permissive or thru movement. It is
desired to introduce a short “fixed time” lead left turn that would only serve after
phase 3. A Dynamic Recall to call 1 when 3 is green would be used to always serve
phase 1 after phase 3, but not serve phase 1 directly from phase 2..

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Uniform Controlled Flash


Uniform Controlled Flash (UCF) operation, also known as “Automatic Flash”, allows
the controller to place the intersection in flash on a scheduled, orderly basis. This
section deals with setting up the controller to enter and exit flash. Refer to the time
clock section for how to call for flashing operation by TOD. UCF programming
consists of Entry and Exit phases for entry into and exit out of UCF. In addition, there
are other options for entry into UCF.
TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 Controllers may use UCF for planned flash operations by
manipulation of Controller Volt Monitor (drop CVM). TS 2 Type 1 Controllers must use
Soft Flash for planned flashing operations discussed on Page 178.

UCF Setup VALUE(YES/NO)


UCF Override Hold: N
UCF Test A or B: 2 (0=Neither, A or B,
1=A. 2=B) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
UCF Last X X
UCF Exit X X
(TOD, CL, Inter, under Coord Basic Op)
Figure 149 – UCF Setup screen
UCF Override Hold
This option, when programmed active (‘Y’), will defeat Hold applied to any phase to
allow the controller to advance quickly to the UCF entry phases (rather than waiting
for the Hold to be released). This feature is useful for transferring an entire arterial
from Coordination into Flash at the same time.

UCF Test A or B (TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2)


Test A and Test B are alternate controller inputs that can be programmed to activate
UCF. A zero entry indicates that UCF will be activated via the standard UCF Controller
input on the ‘D’ Module. Program ‘1’ to utilize the Test A input or a ‘2’ to utilize the Test
B input on the ‘A’ connector. Test A and B may be applicable in controllers that do not
have a ‘D’ module that require a Uniform Code Flash input.

UCF Test A or B (TS 2 Type 1)


Test A and Test B are alternative controller inputs that can by programmed to activate
UCF by dropping CVM to the Conflict Monitor or MMU. But since TS 2 Type 1
controllers do not have CVM, the controller has to flash using a programmed Soft
Flash. The UCF setup does still need to have flash entry and exit phases. UCF Test A
or B needs to be set to the zero value (‘Neither’). A zero entry indicates that Soft
Falsh will be activated via the first terminals and facilities (T/F) BIU, which is BIU #1.
This information is processed through the RS-485, Port 1.

Note Soft Flash is typically called for by internal time clock and usually needs no
external input such as Test A or B. For more details, refer to page 159.

150 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

UCF/Soft Flash Last Phases (Entry Phases)


UCF/Soft Flash will begin immediately following the clearance intervals for these
selected phases. These are the last phases served prior to UCF, and are also known
as Flash Entry Phases.

Note There does not have to be a real call for the “Last Phases” in order to transition
into UCF/Soft Flash. The controller will place artificial calls for these phases, serve
them for Initial interval only, and transition into UCF/Soft Flash in accordance with
the TOD setting.

UCF Exit Phases


These phases will be served immediately following UCF/Soft Flash.

Density Enables and Last Car Passage


Density VALUE(YES/NO)
Density Enable: Y
Last Car Passage: N
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Enable X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

(Density times found under phase times)


Figure 150 – Density Setup screen
The density functions of TTR, TBR, MIN GAP, and Added Initial can be
enabled/disabled on a per unit or phase basis. Note that the default setting is enabled
per unit and for all phases. The actual functions, however, are not activated unless
non-zero values are programmed in the phase times menu. Thus, in the default
mode, simply programming values into TTR, TBR, etc. will enable the function.
To enable density on a per unit basis, change Density Enable to Y. To disable,
change Density Enable to N.
To enable/disable density on a per phase basis, program Y for Density Enable, then
individually enable/disable specific phases.

Last Car Passage


Last Car Passage (LCP) will extend the green for a Density phase by the Passage
(Gap) amount to insure that the last car before the Gap termination has adequate
time to proceed through the intersection. LCP is programmed with a Y/N value. The
LCP value is used by all timing plans and is not unique to each timing plan (it is only
programmed once).

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Simultaneous Gap Out


The condition for Simultaneous Gap Out (SGO) is that the controller is timing phases
concurrently with the next serviceable call in another Co-Phase Group (about to cross
a barrier.) When enabled (with a ‘Y’), SGO allows a phase’s passage timer to re-start
if it has timed out and the phase is waiting to cross a barrier. With SGO enabled and
calls on Phases 2 and 6, the Phase 4 passage timer can start again if a new vehicle
arrives. If Phase 4 then extends and Phase 8 gaps out, Phase 8 can start its passage
timer again. This operation can continue back and forth until both phases max or
they both “simultaneously gap out” (thus the term).
Simultaneous Gap Out Setup VALUE(YES/NO)
Simultaneous Gap Out Enable: Y

1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Sim Gap X X X X X X

Figure 151 – Simultaneous Gap Out Setup screen


When Simultaneous Gap Out is disabled (i.e. set to ‘N’), the phase passage timer
cannot restart once it times out for the selected phases and is waiting to cross the
barrier. If phase 4 goes to rest while 8 is extending, then 4 cannot start its passage
timer again. Both phases will then gap out as soon as phase 8 does. The phases will
thus tend to gap out sooner with SGO disabled than when it is enabled.
Typical use:
SGO is used in any situation where the operator wants the controller to recognize any
demand during the green state and extend the phase accordingly. Disabling SGO
generally produces “snappier” cycling at the expense of a reduction in throughput by
not allowing new demand to extend.
To fully understand the operation, it is important for the user to know whether a given
state is an SGO Condition or not: (for these two examples, assume SGO is enabled
on phases 3 and 7.)
Non-Simultaneous Gap Out Condition: In an 8-phase quad left, if Phases 3 and 7
are green with calls on all phases, as soon as Phase 3 gaps out, Phase 4 is the next
phase decision; Phase 3 terminates while Phase 7 continues timing until it terminates,
and Phase 8 is the next phase decision (no barrier is crossed, so no SGO).
Simultaneous Gap Out Condition: In the above scenario, if no calls exist on Phases
4 and 8, then if Phase 3 gaps out, it will rest waiting for Phase 7 to gap or max. While
waiting, new demand on Phase 3 will restart passage timing, provided the Max Timer
not timed out. When Phases 3 and 7 simultaneously terminate, the barrier is crossed
with Phases 1 and 5 being the next phases.

152 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Max 3 Options
Max 3 is an override max timer that will increase the current max timer after a
specified number of successive max terminations. Max 3 operation is activated by
assigning non-zero values to the Max 3 parameters for selected phases.

Max Outs to Adjust MX3 VALUE(0-255)


PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Gap Outs to Adjust MX3


PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16
Figure 152 – Max 3 Options Setup screen
More information about Max 3 timing is available in the Phase Timing section on page 133.

What is Max 3?
Max 3 timing provides the ability to vary max times dynamically at Free running
intersections or for those Coordinated intersections that do not use Inhibit Max. The
basic concept is that if a phase max’s out a specified number of times in a row (max
outs to adjust) then the normal max time value will be increased by one value of the
adjustment amount (Max 3 Adjust). If it max's out the specified number in a row again,
it increases by one more adjustment amount. This can continue until the Max Limit
value is reached. Once the max has been increased by successive max outs, it can
be decreased in the same way by successive gap-outs (gap outs to adjust), until it
gets back down to the normal value. Refer to page 137 for details about the Max 3
Limit and the Max 3 Adjust values.
The “normal” max time is the routinely selected maximum values of 1 or 2. This is the
base value from which to start, and Max 3 will never be less. It can only be more,
since successive max's adjust it up to the limit, and successive gap-outs decrease it
back to the base value (normal max).

Enabling The Max 3 Feature


1. Max 3 Limit must be set to a value higher than the normally selected max*
2. Max 3 Adjust must be set to a reasonable value (6-10 secs is typical)*
3. Max-outs to adjust Max 3 must be set (typically 1-4)
4. Gap-outs to adjust Max 3 must be set (typically 1-4)*
Typical use of Max 3:
When it is desired to “ramp-up” a phase’s overall green time slowly as demand
increases, then slowly ramp back down as it decreases. This would result in a more

*
Max 3 Limit and Max 3 Adjust are set in the Phase Timing section, while max-outs and gap-outs are set
in this section (Max 3 Options).

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

gradual transition than say, simply setting the max timer to the highest required value
and letting demand use the available green time immediately as needed.

Passage Sequential, Red Revert, Preempt Override


These are some miscellaneous remaining options that have been consolidated onto
one screen under the Enhanced Options menu.
Passage Seq/Red Rev/PE Overrides

Red Revert Time: 0.0|(0-25.5 Sec)


Passage Seq. Enable: N |(Y Or N)
Min Red Revert= 2 sec: Y |(Y Or N)
Ext Start Override PE: N |(Y Or N)
PE Override Stop Time: N |(Y Or N)

Figure 153 – Passage Sequential/Red Revert/PE Override screen

Red Revert Time


Red Revert provides a special minimum red time when a phase clears, then goes
right back to the same phase green. Red revert time will override normal red
clearance if the normal red clearance is shorter. The Red Revert time range is 0-25.5
seconds. Also see the Minimum Red Revert Enable definition below. Red revert most
often comes into operation during Preemption or when Red Rest is enabled. When
red resting, a phase can be served, clear to red rest, then get a call right back to the
same phase again.

Passage Sequential
When Passage Sequential is enabled (set to ‘Y’), the Passage Timer will begin timing
upon completion of the Initial interval. In this mode at least one Passage interval is
always timed after Initial, regardless of traffic demand (provided Max Out or Force Off
does not occur first.) If Passage Sequential is disabled (i.e. set to ‘N’), otherwise
known as Passage Concurrent, the Passage Timer is timed during the Initial interval.
If a gap exists at the end of Initial, the controller will immediately proceed to the
Yellow Clearance Interval.

Note The phase will not gap until Passage times out, if Passage is longer than Initial.

Minimum Red Revert = 2 Second Enable


When enabled (Y), the Red Revert time will be the greater of 2 seconds or the red
revert programmed value. When disabled (N), the Red Revert time is the
programmed value regardless of length (including 0).

154 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Dimming
The Dimming operation provides a ‘half-wave’ signal output to achieve 50% power
reduction (in accordance with NEMA recommendations). Dimming can be selectively
chosen for each Phase, Pedestrian, Overlap and Ped Overlap output (Red, Yellow,
Green, Don't Walk, Ped Clear and Walk) by selecting Y under the desired phases or
overlaps.

Phase Dimming VALUE(Y/N) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Red
Yellow
Green
Dont Wk
Ped Clr
Walk
Figure 154 – Phase Dimming Setup screen - page 1
Press the PGDN key to bring up the overlap programming screen:
Overlap Dimming VALUE(Y/N)
FUNC\OL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P
Red
Yellow
Green
Dont Wk
Ped Clr
Walk
Figure 155 – Phase Dimming Setup screen - page 2
Note that this screen applies to both vehicle and pedestrian overlaps.
Dimming operation is activated by a TOD circuit or an external input. When
activated, the selected phase, ped, overlap, and ped overlap indication outputs will be
dimmed. Dimming is intended for night time operation in intersections with
incandescent signals, when signals need not be as bright. Dimming both reduces
nighttime glare and saves energy. Dimming is not intended for signal heads with
LEDs installed.
Typical use:
To illustrate the energy saving benefits of dimming, say an intersection has 8 heads,
all using 135 watt bulbs. Also say the energy rate is 12 cents per kilowatt hour. Each
bulb then uses .135 x .12 or $.0162 (1.62 cents) per hour. While dimmed, the same
bulb will cost half that for a savings of $.0081 per hour. If the intersection can be
dimmed 8 hours a day, each bulb will save $06.48 a day. For 8 bulbs this is $.5184 a
day, or $15.77 a month (30.42 days ave.) or $189.22 saved per year per intersection.
This is not bad for a couple of minutes of programming.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Lead Lag Phasing


Lead Lag Phasing is also known as Phase Reversal or Alternate Sequence phasing.
This feature allows the user to reverse the rotation of selected pairs of phases. By
using combinations of lead-lag phasing, leading and lagging turning movements can
be achieved.
There are eight lead-lag patterns that can be individually programmed and selected.
Each pattern consists of a pattern mode and up to 4 phase pairs for reversal. When a
pattern is chosen, all four of its lead/lag pairs are implemented.

Note The two phases associated with the lead-lag entry must be in the same ring and
the same co-phase group.

In the example below the controller will reverse phases 1 & 2 and 5 & 6 when pattern
1 is selected. Pattern 2 will reverse phases 3 & 4 only. Values set to “1--1” are
default values and indicate that no reversal will be performed.

Lead/Lag Patterns VALUE(1-16= PHS 1-16)


(Mode: 0=TOD/Coord, 1=Coord, 2=TOD
3=by Input, 4=Always On, 5=Always Off)
Patt Mode PH_S PH_S PH_S PH_S
1 1 1--2 5--6 1--1 1--1
2 0 3--4 1--1 1--1 1--1
3 0 1--1 1--1 1--1 1--1
4 0 1--1 1--1 1--1 1--1
Figure 156 – Lead/Lag Setup screen
The mode determines the means of pattern selection, as described in the following
table.
Table 32 – Lead/Lag Phasing Modes
Mode Function Description
0 TOD/COORD Activated either by coord or TOD ckt
1 COORD only Activated by coordination C/O/S combination only
2 TOD only Activated by TOD ckt only
3 By Input Activated by input (see input table below)
4 Always On Always activated
5 Always Off Never activated

Lead/Lag also sets a flag telling the coordinator that it is active. (This feature was
added in firmware v3.3.6.) This flag survives power outages, so that the coordinator
recognizes that the intersection was in Lead/Lag operation before the interruption,
and can return the intersection to the normal phase rotation after power is restored.

156 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Defining a Lead/Lag Pattern


To define a lead lag pattern, program the mode for each pattern and all phase pairs to
be reversed (up to 4). To implement a lead lag pattern, go to the appropriate areas as
defined by the mode (coord, clock etc.) Note that detector switching can be useful in
conjunction with lead/lag.

Lead Lag Selection by Input

TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2 (MODE 7)

Lead-Lag patterns may also be programmed for activation by inputs on the MS-B
connector, when operating in TS 2 Type 2 mode with mode 7 selected and/or using a
TS 1 3000 controller. The following table identifies which lead-lag pair is activated by
input. Lead-lag pair 1 is the leftmost pair on the programming screen, and pair 4 is
the rightmost.
Table 33 – Lead/Lag Activation Inputs
TS 1 / TS 2 Type 2 TS 2 Type 1
Lead/Lag Pair MS-B Pin Label RS-485 T/F BIU #3 - Alternate Sequence
1 B A
2 W B
3 X C
4 v D

TS 2 Type 1
The above listed BY INPUT is the same for TS 2-1 with all inputs coming from RS-
485, Port1.

Note When Lead-Lag is used, phase concurrency is not affected. For example, in an
8-phase quad left, if Lead-Lag is used to reverse Phases 1 & 2, Phases 1 & 5 are
still allowed concurrently. Lead-Lag only reverses the ring rotation.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Multiple Lead-Lag
Lead-Lag patterns can also be applied in order to reverse more than a single pair of
phases within a co-phase group. For example, if the normal sequence is:
Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2
Ring 1 1 2 3 4 8
Ring 2 5 6

and you want to cycle 8, 4, 3 rather than the normal 3, 4, 8, you can either modify the
sequence to use four cophase groups, such as:
Co-Phs Grp 1 Co-Phs Grp 2 Co-Phs Grp 3 Co-Phs Grp 4
Ring 1 1 2 8 4 3
Ring 2 5 6

OR, you can use three Lead-Lag pairs to perform the same function, as shown in
Figure 157.
Lead/Lag Patterns VALUE(1-16= PHS 1-16)
(Mode: 0=TOD/Coord, 1=Coord, 2=TOD
3=by Input, 4=Always On, 5=Always Off)
Patt Mode PH_S PH_S PH_S PH_S
1 1 4--8 3--8 3--4 1--1
2 0 1--1 1--1 1--1 1--1
3 0 1--1 1--1 1--1 1--1
4 0 1--1 1--1 1--1 1--1
Figure 157 – Multiple Lead-Lag pairs

158 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Soft Flash
Soft Flash is an alternate method of flashing operation performed entirely by
controller outputs to the load switches.

Soft Flash under TS 1 and TS 2 Type 2


The standard UCF mode is performed by the controller by dropping CVM (Controller
Volt Monitor). This causes the Signal Monitor to put the intersection into flash. There
are mechanical flash transfer relays within the cabinet involved in this process to
transfer from load switch control to the cabinet flasher.

Soft Flash VALUE(0= DARK, 1= FL Y WIG


2= FL Y WAG, 3= FL R WIG, 4= FL R WAG)
UCF Soft Flash: Y 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Mode 1 4 1 4

Overlap A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P
Mode
Figure 158 – Soft Flash Setup screen
Since Soft Flash is implemented through load switches, there is no need for the flash
relay transfers to be utilized. Since it is controlled by software, there is flexibility to
provide different flash patterns. When Soft Flash is enabled and programmed
properly, it will be used for remote flash.

Note Standard UCF entry and exit must also be programmed (refer to UCF on page
150) . Enabling UCF Soft Flash simply tells the controller to use the Soft Flash
mode instead of dropping CVM to the monitor. Thus, to activate Soft Flash, enter a
‘Y’ for UCF Soft Flash.

Then select a Soft Flash mode value for each phase and overlap as follows:
Table 34 – Soft Flash Modes
Soft Flash Mode Description
0 or blank Dark
1 Flash Yellow WIG
2 Flash Yellow WAG
3 Flash Red WIG
4 Flash Red WAG

WIG-WAG operation provides alternating flashing signals (i.e. wig and wag are 180
degrees out of phase with each other).
If an invalid Soft Flash mode-phase/overlap configuration is programmed, the
controller will not go to UCF. An example of an invalid program is a program
containing conflicting flashing Yellow movements.

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Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

Typical Uses Of Soft Flash


Soft flash is typically used for one (or both) of the following reasons:
To reduce wear and tear on mechanical relays. This is especially true if the
intersection is placed in flash every night and comes out every morning.
To provide a different signal flash display when in UCF mode vs. cabinet
flash. For example, if the intersection fails and is placed in flash by the monitor,
an all red flash mode may be preferred. For nighttime UCF however, the
preferred flash mode might be flashing yellows and reds. This can only be
accomplished with soft flash because conventional UCF (dropping CVM) uses
the same flash as cabinet flash.

Soft Flash Limitations under TS 1


Unfortunately, it is not always possible to use Soft Flash in TS 1 if certain outputs are
set Dark. Examples include Peds that are monitored on separate channels that are
set to go Dark, or left turn phases set to go Dark. Additionally, not all monitors,
especially older ones, can tolerate soft flash. The problem in each case has to do with
the Red Fail recognition time of the conflict monitor.
Since Soft Flash is implemented strictly through the load switches, and no relay
transfers are involved, the monitor runs normally and must continue to “think”
everything is OK. The red monitoring function of the monitor typically remains
active.If a “red failure” is recognized by the monitor it will place the intersection in
cabinet flash and soft flash will be useless (the monitor will also require a reset).
Fortunately, most newer monitors can tolerate channels that flash because the signal
is off for less than the red fail recognition time. Some older ones, however, cannot.
Peds only present a problem when monitored on a separate channel and both Walk
and Don’t Walk are monitored. Red fail will then occur if the ped is turned completely
off. Peds are not a problem if the Walk only is monitored, either on a separate
channel where the red is tied high or in TS 1 Mode where the walk is the 4th input per
monitor channel. In these cases, the Ped channel can go dark without causing red
fail.

Note Some monitors do have a DC input that inhibits Red Fail monitoring. If this is the
case, the controller can drive this input with a clock output to defeat red fail
monitoring during soft flash.

Soft Flash under TS 2 Type 1


Soft Flash must be used in TS 2 Type 1 controllers. The TS 2 Type 1 3000 Series
controller does not have a CVM output; therefore, a selection of ‘N’ causes the
controller to think it has dropped CVM when, in fact, the controller has no such output.
Therefore, Soft Flash is a necessity.
Careful attention must be paid to programming requirements when programming UCF
Soft Flash.

160 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Options

Port 1 Communications for TS 2 Soft Flash


The Type O Command Frame from Controller to MMU via the RS-485 port will inform
the MMU that the controller is in planned flashing operation (i.e. Soft Flash or
Preemption Flash). This is done so that Red Failures (absence faults) do not occur
when the controller is in No Fault Flash operation when outputs are to be set Dark, or
if the controller’s flashing output does not satisfy the MMU’s Red Fail recognition time.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 161


Chapter 3 — Programming Instructions

162 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 4 — Detectors

This section explains how to configure and use a variety of traffic and pedestrian detectors with
the 3000 Series controllers. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

The Detector Menu, on page 164.


Assigning vehicle and pedestrian detectors to phases, on page 164.
Available detection modes, on page 166.
Detector timing, on page 169.
Switch and copy functions for detectors, on page 171.
Detection failure monitoring, on page 174.
System sensor assignments, on page 179.
Third car detection, on page 180.

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Chapter 4 — Detectors

DETECTOR MENU
The Detector Menu allows the user to define and configure various features of
Vehicle Detectors for a controller. The 3000 Controller allows 32 (64 with TS 2)
assignable detectors.
From the Controller Menu Select 4, Detectors....
Detector Menu

1. Veh. Assignment 6. Switch & Copy


2. Ped. Assignment 7. Fail Monitoring
3. Modes 8. System Sensor
4. Detector Times Assignments
5. Delay Inhibits

Figure 159 – Detector Menu

DETECTOR ASSIGNMENTS
Each of the 8 pedestrian and 32 (64 for TS 2) vehicle detectors can be selectively
assigned to 1 or more phases. Detector assignment is made by selecting one or
more phases for each detector by moving the cursor to the phase number and
pressing the Y/N key, or by simply pressing the phase number (1-9 = Phases 1-9,
SHIFT + 0-6 = Phases 10-16).
Selection 1, Vehicle Detector Assignments....
Detector Assignments Value(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X
2 X
3 X
4 X
PGDN FOR MORE DETECTORS
Figure 160 – Detector Assignments screen (aka ‘Veh. Assignments’)
PGDN for detectors 5-32 (TS 1) or 5-64 (TS 2)

164 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Assignments

By default, detector 1 is assigned to phase 1, detector 2 to phase 2, etc. However,


operation is not limited to just these assignments. A detector can be assigned to any
phase or combination of phases.
Ped Det. Assignments
Value(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X
2 X
3 X
4 X
PGDN FOR MORE DETECTORS
Figure 161 – Pedestrian Detector Assignments screen
Ped detectors can be assigned in similar fashion.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 165


Chapter 4 — Detectors

DETECTION MODES
Each of the 32 (64 for TS 2) detectors can be assigned to operate in one of five
modes. The user programs a detector mode for each detector and Delay, Stretch and
Stop Bar Times for detectors requiring these parameters.

Detector Mode (0-4=CALL/EXT, CALLING,


STR/DELAY, STOP BAR 1/2) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Mode 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3
DET 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
Mode 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Figure 162 – Detection Modes screen
PGDN for detectors 33-64 (TS 2 only).

Call/Extend – Mode 0
A call/extend detector is a normal NEMA detector. The detector calls its programmed
phases when the phases are not green, and extends when they are green (passage
interval).
Typical use:
For normal stop bar detectors which are allowed to both call and extend.

Call – Mode 1
A call detector will call its programmed phases when the phases are not green, but
will not extend the passage timer during the phase greens.
Typical use:
Where the detector is to call only. Typically used when there are both stop bar and
set back loops. This can be done in one of two ways:
The first way is to set the passage time based on the stop bar loop and set it to
a normal call and extend, then set the set back loop as a call detector. The set
back is then used to simply place an early call for service but does not extend.
The second way is to set the passage time based on the set back loop and set it
to a normal call and extend, then set the set stop bar loop as a call detector.
The stop bar loop is then used as a fail-safe to ensure that a vehicle gets a call
for green, but does not extend.

Stretch/Delay – Mode 2
A Stretch/Delay detector extends the detector call by a programmed stretch value
when the programmed phase is green and delays the detector call by the delay value
when the programmed phase is not green. This type of detector mode requires

166 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detection Modes

programming of the stretch (0-25.5 sec) and delay (0-255 sec) times. A detector can
be just stretch or just delay (or both) by the time value settings (a zero value for
stretch and a non-zero value for delay = a delay detector).

Note Stretch and delay can be disabled via TOD circuits (See Appendix A). If Delay
Detector Disable is active, the controller uses ZERO for all detector delay times.
Likewise for stretch times if Stretch Detector Disable is active.

Typical use:
Delay is typically used for side streets with right on red allowed or for protected/
permissive left turns (such as 5 section heads). Delays placing of call so that when
the controller is resting in main street green, it will not immediately clear for vehicle(s)
that could have proceeded anyway, or vehicle(s) that have already proceeded by the
time the left turn starts.
Delay can also be used to prevent momentary calls from being locked in memory
(Non-Lock = N) when wrong-way vehicles pass over the detector (left turners make a
sharp turn and pass over left turn detector). Rather than enable Non-Lock to stop
wrong-way calls and risk stranding vehicles that stop beyond the stop bar, the delay
can be used to stop wrong-way false calls.
Stretch is typically used when there are detectors of varying distances from the stop
bar but on the same phase. Since there is only one passage timer in effect at any
one time per phase, the passage time can be set based on the closer detectors and
stretch can be used to add time to detectors that are farther away.

Stop Bar – Modes 3 and 4


Mode 3 is the Stop Bar 1 detector mode. Stop Bar 1 operates as follows:
1. When the phase associated with a Stop Bar detector turns green, the stop bar
timer will begin timing. As long as there is a call present on the detector, and
the stop bar timer has not reached zero, the phase will be extended (the
passage timer will remain reset).
2. If there is any break in demand (no call active on the detector) or the stop bar
timer reaches zero, the detector will be disconnected for the duration of green
on that phase.
3. When the phase is not green, the detector will place calls on the phase.
Typical use:
For stop bar detectors which are fairly long* and are used in applications where there
are both stop bar detectors and set back loops. The passage timer is then set based
on the set back loop and tends to be fairly long. Gap reduction may be used (and
probably should be). The stop bar is used to place calls and then to exhaust the
queue. Once the queue exhausts or the stop bar timer times out, the stop bar
detector is disconnected and only the set back detector can extend. This increases

* Loops long enough so that there is usually no break in demand while exhausting the queue.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 167


Chapter 4 — Detectors

efficiency, since the last car will not initiate yet another extension while crossing the
stop bar and adding unnecessary green time.
Mode 4 is the Stop Bar 2 detector mode. Stop Bar 2 is the same as Stop Bar 1
except that detector actuations will reset the timer. It therefore does not require
continuous calls to stops itself from being disconnected.
Typical use:
Same as Stop Bar 1 except the loops are typically shorter and there would likely be
breaks in demand even while exhausting the queue.
Stop Bar operation can be disabled by a TOD circuit. When disabled, all STOP BAR
detectors will function in the normal CALL/EXTEND mode.

Detector Lock Mode


It may be desirable to provide detector locking at the detector level rather than at the
phase level as programmed in the Phase Recalls Menu. This might be the case
when there are several detectors calling a phase and some require lock mode
operation and some require non-lock mode. Program ‘Y’ for lock mode for each
desired detector. The call is locked upon actuation until the assigned phase goes
green.
When providing lock vs. non-lock mode at the detector level, the phase level (Phase
Recalls Menu) must be set to the Non-Lock Mode. Otherwise all calls are locked
regardless of detector level programming.

Note If a detector calls more than one phase, the lock is cleared as soon as the first of
any of the assigned phases go green.

Detector lock screen (MM-3-1-4-3-PGDN -PGDN )…..


Detector Lock VALUE(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Lock X

1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3
DET 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
Lock
Figure 163 – Detector Lock Setup screen
PGDN for detectors 33-64 (TS 2 units only).

168 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Times (delay, stretch/stop bar)

DETECTOR TIMES (DELAY, STRETCH/STOP BAR)


When operated as a stretch, delay, or stop bar detector, there are associated times
that must be programmed as well.
MM-3-1-4-4….

TP:1 Det Delay, Stretch/Stop Bar Times


Det 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Delay 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Str/Stp 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Det 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Delay 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Str/Stp 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Figure 164 – Detector Timing Setup screen
PGDN for detectors 17 through 32 (17 through 64 for TS 2 controllers), and continue
paging down for timing plans 2 and 3.
Program appropriate values for delay, stretch or stop bar. The value fields are the
same for stretch or stop bar, the function of the value is determined by the mode
setting. A detector can be just stretch or just delay (or both) by the time value
settings. For example, a zero value for stretch and a non-zero value for delay results
in a delay detector only.
Note that delay and stretch/stop bar times are per detector timing plan 1-3. These
are independent of the phase timing plans and can be used for implementing
alternate stretch and delay times as well as delay inhibits via the time of day
scheduler or by assignment of clock ckts. to Cycle/Split combinations. Detector plan 1
is by default and plans 2 and 3 are called by clock ckts 122 and 123. Program only
TP1 if no TOD or COS changes are desired. Plans 2 and 3 only apply to detectors 1-
12.

Detector Delay Inhibits


The Delay Inhibit feature allows detector delay to be defeated when certain phases
are active. For each detector, enter the phase or phases that will deactivate delay for
that detector by placing an ‘X’ in the column for the phase.
MM-3-1-4-5….
Detector Delay Inhibits VALUE(YES/NO)
Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X
2
3
4
PgDn FOR More Detectors
Figure 165 – Detector Delay Inhibits screen

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 169


Chapter 4 — Detectors

Note The Delay Inhibit feature is provided only for Detectors 1-12 (for each of the
three detector plans.)

Typical use:
On protected/permissive left turns where the side street phase inhibits the left turn
phase delay. For example, say in a 3 phase controller, phase 1 is the main street left
turn, phase 2 is the main street thru, and phase 3 is the side street. The goal is to
provide delay only when resting in the main street (ph 2), but not when in the side
street (ph 3).
If delay is unconditioned by inhibits, the left turn will often be skipped even at busy
times if the left turn vehicles arrive towards the end of phase 3. By inhibiting the delay
during phase 3, this will not occur. The programming in this case would be as shown
on the above example screen.
Delay Inhibits are per detector timing plan 1-3. These are independent of the phase
timing plans and can be used for implementing alternate inhibit combinations by the
time of day scheduler or by assignment of clock ckts. to Cycle/Offset/Split
combinations. Program only TP1 if no TOD or COS changes are desired.
Also note that detector delay inhibits are not provided for all 32 detectors (64 for TS 2)
in detector plan 1. Detector plans 1, 2, and 3 only include delay inhibits for detectors
1 through 12.

170 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Switch and Copy

DETECTOR SWITCH AND COPY


Detector Switch and Copy allows calls on a specific phase to be switched or copied to
a different phase during the green interval(s) of a specified group of phases. There
are 16 such unique detector switch and copy plans.
Detector Switching disconnects calls from the original phase and transfers them to
the secondary phase.
Detector Copy is similar to Detector Switching, except that the original call is kept on
the ‘copy from’ phase and an additional call is placed on the ‘copy to’ phase.
Det Switch/Copy Enables (Value Yes/No)
Detector Switching Enable : N
Detector Copy Group 1 Enable : N
Detector Copy Group 2 Input Enable : N

Det Copy Grp 2 plans 1-16 used instead


Of Gp1 if enable = Y and input active.
--PgDn for Det sw & copy patterns 1-16--
Figure 166 – Detector Switch/Copy Setup screen

Switch And Copy Enables


The first screen sets the enable modes of switch and copy.
For Detector Switching, there is one set of enable phases for each of the 16
switch/copy patterns. Set Detector Switching Enable = “Y” to allow detector
switching to operate. The Actual switching is then determined by the pattern
screens that follow.
For Detector Copy, there are two groups of enable phases for each of the
16 patterns. The first is enabled by setting Detector Copy Group 1 Enable = “Y”
The second is enabled by setting Detector Copy Group 2 Input Enable = “Y” and
the activating the input (or clock circuit). Thus, to operate alternate copy
patterns, set both = “Y” and activate the input (or clock circuit) when Group 2 is
desired (only one is in effect at a time). The actual copying is then determined
by the pattern screens that follow.

Detector Switch and Copy Clock Disable


Both detector switching and detector copy can be disabled by TOD circuit. When the
corresponding circuit is active, no switch or copy functions will be performed.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 171


Chapter 4 — Detectors

Switch And Copy Pattern Screens


Each screen defines a set of phase patterns and “FROM” and “TO” phases. The
phases enabled (X) on the switch row determine the set of greens that are required
for calls to switch from the “FROM” phase to the “TO” phase under the “Swtch”
column (lower right portion of the display.) The machine state must exactly match the
programmed phase greens for the switching to occur (except for TS 2 units which
only require “From and To” phases for switching.) The Switch and Copy pattern
number must match the number of the detector’s assigned phase. For example, to
switch from Phase 1 to Phase 6, detector pattern number 1 must be used. To switch
from Phase 6 to Phase 1, detector plan number 6 must be used. This pattern
assignment also applies to the Copy feature, but for patterns 1 through 16 only.

Does not appear for TS 2. Switch phase greens do not have


to be specified--only From & To phases.

Det Sw & Copy 1 of 64 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Ph Grns 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Switch Important Note:
G1 Copy Number corresponds
G2 Copy to detector number
Sw or Copy Per --> |(Ph’s) Swtch G1C G2C
When Above Are grn |From Ph: 0 0 0
(Pgdn For More) | To Ph: 0 0 0
Figure 167 – Switch Setting

Note If a Phase 2 Switch to Phase 5 is programmed on Pattern page 2, no switch will


occur.

Use PGDN to see patterns 2 through 16.


The copy patterns are programmed in the same way except that there are two
possible groups of enable phases and two possible “FROM” and “TO” phase sets per
screen (G1C = Group 1 copy phases, G2C = Group 2 copy phases.) The group in
effect is determined by the enables and the state of the copy input (see enables
description above). Only one copy group from each pattern screen is in effect at any
one time.
Multiple Patterns Active: It should be noted that the each of 16 pattern screens
represents a unique set of conditions that result in a certain switch and/or copy
outcome. These outcomes are then simply determined by the state of controller
phases and all patterns are taken into account simultaneously. It is then possible that
more than one pattern may match at any one time. In this sense, they are not like
“plans” where only one is active at a time. The copy group selection simply
determines which copy pattern set is used within each pattern screen.
Detector Switching Example: Say that a left lane is a protected/permissive left turn
lane, where phase 1 is the protected phase and phase 6 is the permissive phase (a 5
section head signal is typically used). Detector switching can be used to switch the

172 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Switch and Copy

demand from phase 1 to phase 6 after phase 1 clears. Thus, the left lane detector
calls phase 1 and extends phase 1, but switches to extend phase 6 after phase 1 is
completed. This allows the permissive portion of the movement (phase 6) to be
extended by the left turn lane detection.
Note that the TS 2 controller unit does the detector switching simply when the “from”
phase is not active and the “to” phase is active (selecting phase greens not required).

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 173


Chapter 4 — Detectors

DETECTOR FAILURE MONITORING


Failure Monitoring allows the controller to monitor the 32 (64 for TS 2) detectors for
possible failure conditions. Detectors are monitored for Absence of Calls, Locked
Calls, Minimum Presence failures and Erratic Operation.

Detector Fail Monitor Menu

1. Abs/Erratic Enab 4.Detector Loop


2. Lock, Absence Times Length
3. Minimum Presence/ 5.Failed detector
Erratic Counts/Min Phase
Recall/Max
6.Ped Det Diag

Figure 168 – Detector Failure Monitoring Menu

Absence Monitor Time Of Day, Erratic Monitor Enable


Absence of Call monitoring checks for no activity on detector inputs. Since this might
be a normal occurrence in the early morning hours, a start hour and stop hour can be
programmed. Absence monitoring is only performed between these times. These
values are programmed with the military hour only (i.e. 6 = 6AM, 23 = 11PM)

ABSENCE/ERRATIC ENABLE

START ABSENCE MONITORING HOUR(0-23): 6


END ABSENCE MONITORING HOUR(0-23): 23

ERRATIC ENABLE: Y
VALUE (YES/NO)

Figure 169 – Detector Absence/Erratic Behavior Monitoring


Erratic enable (Y) allows erratic (chattering) input detector monitoring on all detectors.
For TS 1 the condition is fixed; if the count volume exceeds 8 counts in a 10 second
period of time, the detector is considered to be chattering and will be logged as a
failed detector. For TS 2 the condition is user definable—see Erratic Counts per
minute.

Note Absence of Call, Locked Call and Minimum Presence Monitoring can be disabled
for any detector by programming a zero value for that function.

174 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Failure Monitoring

Lock Times
Program a value between 0 and 255 minutes for Locked Call Monitoring. If a detector
is active continuously for this many minutes, a locked call failure is recorded. Thirty
minutes is a common value for this function.
LOCK 1: 0 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
TIMES: 5: 0 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
(0-255 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
MIN) 13: 0 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0
17: 0 18: 0 19: 0 20: 0
21: 0 22: 0 23: 0 24: 0
25: 0 26: 0 27: 0 28: 0
29: 0 30: 0 31: 0 32: 0
Figure 170 – Locked Call Monitoring Setup screen
PGDN for more Lock times and Absence of Call times.

Absence Of Call
Program a value between 0 and 255 minutes for Absence of Call Monitoring. If a
detector does not receive a single detection within this time period, an absence of call
failure is recorded (also see absence monitor time of day programming above). Thirty
minutes is a common value for this function—depending on the Absence Monitor
Time Of Day setting above.
ABSENCE 1: 0 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
TIMES: 5: 0 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
(0-255 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
MIN) 13: 0 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0
17: 0 18: 0 19: 0 20: 0
21: 0 22: 0 23: 0 24: 0
25: 0 26: 0 27: 0 28: 0
29: 0 30: 0 31: 0 32: 0
Figure 171 – ‘Absence of Call’ Monitoring Setup screen

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 175


Chapter 4 — Detectors

Minimum Presence
Program a value between 0 and 255 milliseconds for Minimum Presence Monitoring.
If call is received for a shorter time period than this value, a minimum presence failure
is recorded.
For example, a small car traveling 70 mph over a 6 foot loop will generate a pulse of
somewhat less than 200 ms or so. This is about as short a pulse as should be
detected, so the range of about 50 - 150 ms is good value range for minimum
presence. Minimum Presence is only available for detectors 1 through 32. This is
true for both TS 1 and TS 2 controllers.

MINIMUM 1: 0 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
PRESENCE 5: 0 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
(0-255 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
MILLI- 13: 0 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0
SECONDS) 17: 0 18: 0 19: 0 20: 0
21: 0 22: 0 23: 0 24: 0
25: 0 26: 0 27: 0 28: 0
29: 0 30: 0 31: 0 32: 0
Figure 172 – Minimum Presence Monitoring Setup screen

Erratic Counts Per Minute (TS 2)


Program a value between 0 and 255 for the minimum number of erratic counts in a
minute to register an Erratic failure. This applies to TS 2 mode only.
PGDN from Minimum Presence times…
ERRATIC 1: 0 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
COUNTS/ 5: 0 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
MIN 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
(0-255) 13: 0 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0
17: 0 18: 0 19: 0 20: 0
21: 0 22: 0 23: 0 24: 0
25: 0 26: 0 27: 0 28: 0
29: 0 30: 0 31: 0 32: 0
Figure 173 – Erratic Counts-Per-Minute Monitoring Setup screen
PGDN for more Erratic Counts per minute (TS 2 only).

176 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Detector Failure Monitoring

Loop Length
Program the Loop length for each detector to be monitored. The Loop length is used
in Speed calculations, as well as in Headway determination and other MOE's. The
Loop Length range is 0 to 255 feet. Note that the single loop speed calculation is
approximate and is not as accurate as two detector speed trap measurements. These
values only apply to the first 32 detectors of a TS 2 controller.
Detector 1: 0 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
Loop 5: 0 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
Length: 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
(0-255 13: 0 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0
FT) 17: 0 18: 0 19: 0 20: 0
21: 0 22: 0 23: 0 24: 0
25: 0 26: 0 27: 0 28: 0
29: 0 30: 0 31: 0 32: 0
Figure 174 – Detector Loop Length screen

Failed Detector Phase and Fail Max Recall Times


Fail Max Recall Times can be placed on selected phases as a way to prepare for a
future failed detector. The sixteen different timing periods can be programmed on
the following screen. Valid values run from 0 to 255 seconds.
FAIL MAX 1: O 2: 0 3: 0 4: 0
RCL TIME 5: O 6: 0 7: 0 8: 0
(0-255) 9: 0 10: 0 11: 0 12: 0
13: O 14: 0 15: 0 16: 0

PGDN FOR MORE RECALLS


Figure 175 – Failed Max Recall Time screen

To use this feature, first program the fail max recall max times used for each phase....
FAILED DET MAX RECALL PHS VALUE(YES/NO)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
DET\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X
2
3
4
PGDN FOR MORE DETECTORS
Figure 176 – Failed Detector Max Recall Settings
Then page down to the detector to phase assignments.....

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 177


Chapter 4 — Detectors

The 2nd page assigns the phases that are to be placed on fail max recall for up to 32
(64 for TS 2) detectors, should the detector fail. If the detector recovers from the
failed mode, the controller will resume normal operation (fail max recalls will be
removed and normal max times used).
Use of Fail Max Recall and times:
If a detector fails it is prudent to place the associated phase on Max Recall. However,
since the normal max may be undesirably long, a special “Fail Max Recall” time is
provided. The Fail Max Time is only used if the phase is placed in Fail Max Recall.

Pedestrian Detector Diagnostics


PED DETECTOR DIAGNOSTICS
(VALUE: 0-255 SECS)
DETECTOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ABSENCE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
LOCK 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
(VALUE: 0-255 COUNTS/MIN)
ERRATIC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Figure 177 – Pedestrian Detector Diagnostics Setup screen


Pedestrian detectors 1-8 can also be programmed for failure monitoring. Pedestrian
detector diagnostics involves the same parameters as previously discussed for
vehicle detectors, but they are provided all on one screen due to the limited number
of ped detectors.
Note that the ped will be placed on recall if the associated detector fails. The call is
removed if the detector returns to normal.

178 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


System Sensor Assignment

SYSTEM SENSOR ASSIGNMENT


The 3000 Controller has 16 system sensors available for closed loop operation. A
system sensor is a detector that is used to collect volume, occupancy and speed
data. These data collections are reported to the master and/or central system and can
be used for traffic responsive calculations, capture incident detection, etc.

System Sensor Assignments


Local Detector Value(0-32)
SYS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
17 0 18 19 0 0 0 0

SYS 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Figure 178 – System Sensor Assignment screen


These 16 sensors can be allocated from any of the first 32 detectors. To assign a
detector to a system sensor, enter the detector number under the sensor number it is
assigned to. Assigning a detector to a system sensor does not prevent it from
functioning as a normal detector. If the 3000 Series controller is used in a closed loop
system with the 3800EL master, sensors 1-8 are used for system sensors, and
sensors 9-16 are used for graphics channels.

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Chapter 4 — Detectors

THIRD CAR DETECTION FEATURE


This is a feature implemented on Time of Day timing circuit 124. There is no
programming screen in the 3000 Series controller interface for this feature.

This feature uses “detector pairs” to place a call for left turn phases when both
detectors are occupied at the same time. Once the left turn phase is green, both
detectors extend the phase. Time of Day Circuit “3CD” (CKT 124) activates Third Car
Detection when the appropriate detector configuration is programmed as described in
this table:
Table 35 – Detector configuration for Third Car Detection
Detectors Phase Assignment
1, 13 1
3, 14 3
5, 15 5
7, 16 7

Note The controller must be power cycled for Circuit 124 to go into effect.

Typical Use:
This feature is used to prevent a call being registered for a protected left turn until
three vehicles are queued. One detector is at the stop bar and the other is placed
three car lengths back. The idea behind this feature is that one or two cars can be
served from just the permissive left turn indication, rather than having to time out a
protected left turn.

180 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

This section explains the configuration and usage of overlaps, or signal outputs resulting from
a combination of phases rather than any single phase or detector state. The following topics
are discussed in detail in this chapter:

A general description of the use of Overlaps, on page 182.


How to program vehicle overlaps, on page 185.
Double-Clearing overlaps, on page 192.
Pedestrian overlaps, on page 197.
The use of advanced warning logic in TS 2 controllers, on page 202.
Using Leading and Advance Green overlaps, on page 207.
Inhibiting overlaps using TOD circuits, on page 209.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 181


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
An Overlap is a set of G-Y-R outputs that are associated with one or more phases.
The overlap forms a separate movement that derives its operation from its assigned
phases, commonly called “parent phases” or “included phases.” A typical overlap will
be active during two or more parent phases such that if any parent is green, the
overlap is green as well.
If the controller makes a “phase next” decision to clear from one parent phase to
another, the overlap will remain green throughout. If the controller decides to clear
from a parent to a non-parent, the overlap will clear with the parent using the parent’s
yellow and red duration. Furthermore, in multiple ring configurations, more than one
parent phase may be active at a given time. If a “phase next” decision is made to
clear from a parent to a non-parent, and a parent phase is green in another ring, the
Overlap remains green.
The figure below illustrates an overlap that may be used in controllers with only
single-ring capability:

Figure 179 – Simple Overlap


The overlap is “A” which would be programmed as a simple 1 + 2 overlap. In special
cases, overlaps can be used to provide double clearing capability on a phase. Also,
the 3000 Controller has the capability of providing pedestrian overlaps.

182 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


General Description

phase 2
phase 5
phase 4
phase 7

phase 3
phase 8

(OL A = φ6 + φ7)

phase 1

overlap A
phase 6

Figure 180 – Typical multi-ring overlap


Overlaps can either be generated by an overlap card which plugs into the I/O board
or internally by programming the interface. The card can only control overlaps A
through D, and is rarely used any more.

Overlap Channels and Compatibility


Overlap operation is sometimes a source of confusion for users, especially when it
comes to overlap compatibility. To help clear this confusion, the figure below shows a
typical assignment of phases and overlaps to monitor channels for the example
phasing as applied in a typical cabinet. Load switches 1-5 are shown with typical
assignments.

Figure 181 – Typical Load Switch assignments


Note that the overlap is on a separate load switch which is driven by OVERLAP A,
which in turn has been assigned phases 1+2 as parents. CH1-CH5 indicates the
Conflict Monitor (or MMU) channel assignments.
Note also that the appropriate channel compatibilities are:
1-5
2-5

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 183


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

The channel compatibilities are definitely not 1+2 as is sometimes thought. It is


important to be able to make the distinction between the overlap and its
compatibilities vs. its parents and their compatibilities. The overlap is a separate
movement and its parents are not necessarily compatible with each other (and are
usually not).

184 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overlap Programming

OVERLAP PROGRAMMING
Overlaps include a variety of modes of operation and uses. To get to this menu, go to
the Controller menu and choose option 5. Overlaps. The full path is MM > 3.Change
Data > 1.Controller > 5.Overlaps.

Overlap Menu

1. Assignments & Types


2. Startup, Card & Alternate Flash
3. Double Clear (Trailing)
4. Pedestrian Overlaps
5. Advanced Warning Logic
6. Leading/Advance Green Overlaps
Figure 182 – Overlap Menu
This menu is used to set up and modify all of the parameters for vehicle and
pedestrian overlaps. The operation of these controls are described in the next
sections.

Assignments & Types


Basic overlap parents and modes are programmed from this menu. The 3000 Series
controller is capable of providing 16 overlaps. To distinguish from Phases 1-16, these
overlaps are referenced as overlaps A through P. Each page of the Overlap
programming section contains all of the information needed to program one Overlap.
To access a specific overlap screen, move the cursor to the top by pressing the
SHIFT and HOME keys together, and enter the number that corresponds to the
overlap to be programmed (1 for A, 2 for B and so on). For example, to see overlap
12 (aka overlap ‘L’), place the cursor in the ‘1’ field and enter 1,2 and press ENTER .
Or you can press the PGUP and PGDN keys to navigate between the 16 available
overlaps.

Assign O/L A (1 Of 16) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Parents
Fl Enab
MOD PHS
Del Enab
O/L Type: 0 STANDARD Fl Code: 0
Grn: 0 Yel: 0.0 Red: 0.0 Del: 0.0
Figure 183 – Individual overlap programming screen 1
To program the parent phases of an overlap, move the cursor to the appropriate line
and select the phases by either pressing the phase numbers or by moving the cursor
under a phase and pressing the Y/N key. An ‘X’ indicates that a phase has been
selected. For standard overlaps, this is all the programming required.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 185


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

The signal outputs for overlaps A through D are available on the standard MS-B
connector. Overlaps E through P are generally made available by use of I/O Steering
(see page 380), or by BIU Mapping on a TS 2 Type 1 controller (page 400).

Overlap Assignments and Types Parameters


PARENTS—Phases during which the overlap is allowed to be green (see Overlap
general description previous). For standard overlaps, only the parent phases need to
be programmed. The flash code and type are both set = 0. Standard overlaps behave
in the basic overlap mode with no special logic or timing.
FL ENAB—Flash Enable and the Flash Code (near the bottom of the screen) work
together. The Flash Enable row determines which parent phases will trigger the
overlap to flash. These are called the overlap’s ‘flash parent’. The way that this trigger
occurs is determined by the selected Flash Code. The flash code defines how the
overlap will synchronize with this ‘flash parent.’ (See Flash Codes on page 189.)

Phase Modifiers Row


The row of settings on this screen just beneath “FL Enab” is used to display per-
phase on-off settings that change depending on the type of Overlap selected. The
label for the row changes to indicate what is being set here. This row can contain
values for Phase Modifier (MOD PHS), Not Ped settings (NOT PED), Left-turn
adjustment (ADJ LT), or Through adjustment (ADJ Thru). Each modifier type is
described below:
MOD PHS—This is the label on the phase modifier row when the overlap type is set
to 0 (Standard) or 9 (Include All). It has different functions for Standard and Include
All operation.
In Standard mode, a selection in this row under a parent phase causes special
overlap operation for (1) 5-Section “Dallas-style” Protection-Permissive Left Turn
operation, and (2) 4-Section Flashing Yellow Left Turn Arrow Protected-Permissive
operation. Contact Peek Tech Support for setup details. (Refer to page 2.)
In Include All mode (Overlap mode 9), a selection in this MOD PHS row under a
parent phase tells the overlap to follow this phase off even if one or more of the
other parent phases are still green. If the selection is under a non-parent phase,
this modifier tells the overlap to darken whenever this phase is on, even if one
or more of its parent phases are green.
NOT PED—The modifier row shows this label when the overlap type is set to Mode 2
(Not Ped). This row then determines which parent phases are treated as Not Ped
parents. When this condition is set for a phase, it is disabled as a parent when its Ped
movement is active (during Walk and Ped Clearance.) Typically used when a right
turn overlap turns into pedestrian movements (i.e. the ped phase is the Not Ped
parent.) To program for Not Ped mode, set the overlap type to 2, then program the
overlap parents normally—including any that will operate as Not Ped parent phases.
Then add ‘X’s to the Not Ped modifier row under these Not Ped phases to condition
the overlap during the normal parent. In addition, Green, Yellow, and Red times are
used to clear the overlap and serve ped calls on the “Not-Ped Phase” while the
parent phase’s vehicle movement remains green.

186 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overlap Programming

ADJ LT—This modifier row label appears when the overlap type is set to either 3
(Five-section Left Turn, single indication only) or 4 (Five-section Left Turn, single
indication, red over arrows.) The settings in this row then determine which parent
phases will allow the overlap to operate with ‘Five-section head’ logic. All overlap
parents are programmed normally, including any that will enable five-section head
logic. These five-section head modifiers are added to condition the overlap during the
normal parent.
ADJ THRU — This modifier row label appears when the overlap type is set to either 5
(Five-section Left Turn, dual indication except yellow) or 6 (Not Right Turn On
Through Green.)
Type 5 is commonly known as the Illinois Left Turn configuration, which requires that
the overlap drives the left turn movement on a five section signal. To accomplish this,
the adjacent through phase must be specified using this modifier setting.
Type 6 is commonly known as the Illinois Right Turn configuration, which requires
that the overlap drives the right turn movement. In this mode, the green right turn
arrow is not allowed to be active when the adjacent through phase is green. So this
modifier row is used to specify which of the parent phases is this adjacent through
phase.

Delay Enable
The DEL Enab row on the Overlap programming screen determines if a delay is
applied to the start of the overlap. The delay would be relative to the parent phase
turning Green. The delay value set at the bottom of the screen determines how many
seconds the overlap green will wait before starting each time it is triggered by that
parent phase.
If an overlap is set up for both delay and leading timing on a given phase, the delay
timing will occur and the leading time will be ignored.

Note Delay timing is only available for overlaps A through H. Overlaps I through P
do not have the DEL Enab row, nor the Del time at the bottom of the screen.

1 GRN 1 YEL 1 RED 2 GRN


A RED A DELAY A GRN
Figure 184 – Timing diagram of an overlap programmed with a delay

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

Overlap Type
The type mode determines the logic that will be used by the overlap. The options are
shown in . Each type is described in more detail below the table.
Table 36 – Type of Overlap
Mode Overlap Type
0 Standard
1 Not Vehicle (Not available in the current firmware)
2 Not Ped
3 Five-section Left Turn, single indication only
4 Five-section Left Turn, single indication, red over arrows
5 Five-section Left Turn, dual indication except yellow
6 Not ‘Right Turn On Through Green’ (Illlinois right turn)
7 Walk Overlap Red
8 Walk Overlap Dark
9 Include All

Mode 0 — This is the Standard overlap mode. The phase modifer row displays MOD
PHS and has different intents for parent and non-parent phases, as described in the
‘Phase Modifiers Row:MOD PHS’ topic.
Mode 1 — This is the Not Vehicle overlap mode, but it is not currently implemented.
Mode 2 — This is the Not Ped mode. When a phase is conditioned as a “not ped”
parent, that phase is disabled as a parent when its ped movement is active (Walk +
Ped clearance.) See the ‘Phase Modifiers Row: NOT PED’ topic, as described above.
Mode 3 — This option only allows one signal in the five-section head to be active at a
time. In this mode, it is assumed that an overlap drives the five-section ball
indications, and the left turn phase that is adjacent to it must be specified on the ADJ
LT line by enabling that phase. The overlap operates as a Standard Overlap, except
when the ADJ LT phase is Green or Yellow, in which case the overlap is Dark.
Mode 4 — Mode 4 is similar to mode 3 except that the red indication is allowed to be
active with either of the yellow or green left turn arrows. The adjacent left turn phase
must be specified as in mode 3. Modes 3 and 4 are also known as Oklahoma left
turn logic.

Note In Modes 3 and 4, the MMU Red Input associated with the Overlap
must be tied to 120 VAC to prevent Red Failure when Overlap goes
Dark. Dual Indication must also be disabled so that G or Y with R
does not cause a fault.

Mode 5 — This mode allows dual indications except in the case of dual yellows. In
other words, any of the through indications are permitted with either of the left turn
arrows except for the yellow left turn arrow and the through yellow. This case
requires that an overlap drive the left turn. Therefore the adjacent through phase must

188 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overlap Programming

be specified on the ADJ THRU modifier line. This is commonly known as Illinois left
turn logic.
Mode 6 — This is also called Illinois right turn logic. In this mode the green arrow is
not allowed to be active when the adjacent through phase is green. The overlap is
assumed to be the right turn (generally the adjacent through and a left turn across the
barrier are parent phases) and the ADJ THRU modifier line is used to specify which of
these is the adjacent through phase.

Note In Modes 5 and 6, the MMU Channel associated with the Overlap
must have Yellow Monitoring Disabled, because the Overlap goes
straight from Green to Red.

Mode 7 — This O/L Type was added to the firmware in version 3.6 and is the WALK
OL RED mode. Mode 7 operates the same way as the Not Ped Overlap, except that
during the Ped Clearance interval of any phases programmed with the “MIN WALK”
entry, the Overlap will turn green. (The Not Ped (Type 2) Overlap does not turn the
Overlap green until the Ped Clearance finishes.)
Mode 8 — This O/L Type was added to the firmware in version 3.6 and is the WALK
OL DARK mode. Mode 8 operates in the same manner as Mode 7, except that during
the Walk interval of any phases programmed with the “MIN WALK” entry, the Overlap
signal will go dark.
Mode 9 — This is the INCLUDE ALL overlap type, which was added to the controller
in the version 3.6.2 firmware. This mode tells the overlap not to turn green until ALL
of its parent phases are green. The phase modifier row displays MOD PHS and
serves different functions for parent and non-parent phases. (See the Phase Modifier
Rows:MOD PHS topic for more details.)

Flash Codes
For an overlap to flash, it must first have a flash parent selected. This is done by
placing an X in the FL Enab row below the desired flash parent. When the overlap
phase matches the color of the flash parent phase, the overlap flashes. The color in
the flash parent that determines if the overlap flashes is set using this Flash Code.
The flash codes are defined in the table below.
Table 37 – Flash Codes
Code Flash (this color) if the Flash Parent is (this color) and the overlap
matches (this color):
0 None
1 Green
2 Yellow
3 Green or Yellow
4 Red
5 Red or Green
6 Red or Yellow
7 All (Red, Yellow, or Green)

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

For example, a flash code of 2 means to flash the overlap in yellow if the parent
phase is yellow AND the flash parent is yellow. The color of the overlap is determined
by the parent phase, NOT by the flash parent phase. So, in this scenario, if the parent
phase is green, the overlap will be a steady green; the overlap will not flash even if
the flash parent is yellow.
Note that the overlap flash rate is 1 Hz unless an alternate flash rate is specified on
the Green, Yellow, Red Timings screen. (See page 190.)

Hint: Using Overlap Flash Enable and Flash Codes


You may wish to set an overlap to flash during some parent phases, but not during
others. To program the overlap for this, set the flash code as desired, then program
the overlap parent phases as you normally would, but include any that you want to
use to enable overlap flashing. Then add ‘X’s to the Flash enable row to further
condition the overlap during the normal parent.

Note Phase enables do not pertain to Flash Code 4, since code 4 is the red flash
code. In such a situation, the overlap is red only when none of its parents are
active anyway.

Green, Yellow, Red Timings


The timers at the bottom of the screen determine how long (in seconds) the overlap
spends in green, yellow, and red, at a minimum. If these values are left at 0 seconds
(or 0.0 seconds in the case of Yellow and Red) then the parent phase’s timings will be
used for these overlap segments.
The Green time value is the minimum number of seconds that the overlap must
spend in green, and the parent phase cannot leave its green until this period has
ended. The yellow and red are also minimum times for these signals on the overlap
movement, but unlike the green value, they do not impact the operation of the parent
phase.

Delay Time
The Del: control at the bottom right corner of the screen specifies how many seconds
of delay will be applied to those overlap phases where a delay is enabled, (i.e. the
delay timing is only used if one or more of the parent phases has an X in the DEL
Enab row on the screen above.)

190 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overlap Programming

Start-Up, Card, Alternate Flash


This section deals with some per unit choices relative to overlap operation.
--O/L Startup, Card, Alt Rate--

Start Up Interval: 0 | 0=R, 1=Y, 2=G


O/L Card Enable: N | Y=Card, N=K’brd
Alternate Fl Rate: 0 | 0-300 FPM

(Alternate flash rate used for Canadian


fast flash overlaps)
Figure 185 – Individual overlap programming screen 2
Start-Up Interval Color—If an overlap is active upon start-up of the controller, in
theory, this value indicates its initial color. However in practical reality, this setting is
ONLY useful if the parent phase starts in Yellow. If the parent phase starts in Green
or Red, the overlap will follow the parent and ignore this setting.
So, back to the only case where this setting works; if the parent phase starts in
Yellow, the overlap will also start in yellow (i.e. it will follow the parent phase as it
normally does), unless this setting is set to Red. So, to sum up the situation, a Red
Start-up Interval color when the parent phase starts in yellow is the only case where
this setting changes the output on the overlap. In that case, the overlap will start in
red.
O/L Card Enable—If enabled, overlaps A-D must be programmed through the use of
a plug-in overlap card. When not enabled, A-D are programmed strictly through
programming screens. Overlaps E-P are always defined through the programming
screens since the overlap card only supports overlaps A-D.
Alternate (Fast Flash) Rate—Alternate flash allows selected overlaps to flash at the
programmed alternate flash rate. This is used primarily for 'fast flash' operation which
is widely used in Canada, or any “in-cycle” flashing requirement such as for left turns.
Enter the number of flashes per minute if this feature will be used. The overlaps to be
flashed are defined on the overlap set-up screens . Note that a rate value of 0 defaults
to a 1 Hz flash rate (60 FPM). Values commonly used are 120, 150, and 180 FPM.

Note “In-Cycle” flashing signals are accomplished with Overlaps.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 191


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

DOUBLE CLEARING OVERLAPS


A Double Clearing Overlap provides a delay period of green between the start of its
yellow and its parent’s yellow. The start of any next non-parent phase will also be
delayed until the overlap is cleared. This is done by adding a Red Rest period to the
end of the parent phase. The following two timing diagrams show how a double
clearing overlap is different from a normal overlap.
Normal Overlap
1 Green 1Y 1R 2 Green

Overlap A Green O/L A Yellow O/L A Red

Double Clearing Overlap


1 Green 1Y 1R Red Rest 2 Green

Overlap A Green O/L A Doubleclearing Green O/L A Yellow O/L A Red O/L A Red Rest

Because the parent phase would have already cleared, a double clearing overlap
must time its own yellow and red. So in addition to the overlap delay green time,
these overlap yellow and red values must be programmed in on the Double Clearing
Overlap screens. In addition to these double clearing parameters, any double
clearing overlap must also be programmed for its standard overlap settings, i.e.
parent phases, leading time, delay time, etc.
Double clear overlaps are sometimes called “trailing” overlaps and are typically used
to provide additional green clearing time to a downstream signal when an approach
has multiple signals. Such operation provides what is called an “inside clearance” and
prevents traffic from getting trapped in a zone between two sets of signals. The first
signal is usually controlled by a standard phase and the second signal by a double
clearing overlap. The first signal’s phase is usually the parent of the double clearing
overlap, and may be the only parent, although other parent phases may be included
as well.
To accommodate special sequences and requirements, a double clearing overlap can
also be conditional upon a certain set of phase yellow and phase next values. The
double clearing part of the operation will then be activated only when the state of the
controller meets these programmed values; otherwise, the overlap will function as a
normal overlap.

192 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Double Clearing Overlaps

Double Clear Overlap Programming


To access the double clearing overlap parameters of the 3000 series controllers,
select 3.Double Clear (Delayed/Trailing) from the Overlaps Menu. The full path to this
screen is MM > 3.Change Data > 1.Controller > 5.Overlaps >3.Double Clear
(Trailing). It is important to remember that unlike ped overlaps, which are sixteen
separate entities from the regular sixteen overlaps, double clearing is just an extra
parameter that can be assigned to the regular sixteen overlaps. Any of the sixteen
overlap phases can be set to be double clearing.

Note In addition to the double clear programming shown on these screens, a Double
Clearing Overlap also must be programmed with standard Overlap settings as
well, using the ‘Assignments and Types’, and ‘Startup, Card, & Alternate Flash’
screens on the Overlap menu. Those are where the parent phases and other
basic paremeters of the double clearing overlap are configured.

When you first enter the programming screens, you will see Overlap A. To navigate to
the overlap you wish to configure as a double clearing overlap, either use the PGUP
and PGDN buttons, or place the cursor on the ‘1’ in the “(X of 16)” field at the top of
the screen and type in the number of the overlap you want. (Press ENTER to go to the
selected overlap.)

Double Clear O/L A ( 1 OF 16) Enable: Y


Grn: 5 Yel: 9.9 Red: 8.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH YEL X X
PH NXT X
GRP YEL
GRP NXT
RELEASE
Figure 186 – Double Clearing Overlap setup screen
Enable — This setting turns double clearing timing on or off for this overlap. The
general settings for each overlap are set in the
Grn, Yel, Red — These are the times, in seconds, used by the overlap. The green
time is the amount of extra green that the overlap extends beyond the parent phase.
The yellow and red timings are necessary because a double clearing overlap must
time its own clearance separate from the timing of the parent phase.

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

Triggering Conditions
The next four lines on the Double Clearing Overlap screen (PH YEL, PH NXT, GRP
YEL, and GRP NXT) set up additional conditions that can be used to limit when the
double clearing feature of this overlap is triggered. These define the logic of the
double clearing overlap by monitoring the ‘yellow’ and ‘phase next’ signals from the
selected phases. (An ‘X’ indicates a selection.) The following rules apply:
USING PH YEL & PH NXT ROWS. If any yellow from the PH YEL row is ON at
the same time as any phase next from the PH NXT row, the double clear is
triggered.
USING GRP YEL & GRP NXT ROWS. If all the yellows from the GRP YEL row
are on with all the phase nexts from the GRP NXT row, the double clear is
triggered.

Release Modifier
The Release option at the bottom of the Double Clearing overlap screen can be set
ON or OFF for each phase. Normally, when a Double Clearing Overlap is active,
phases will wait in red for the overlap to finish timing. (In these timing examples,
overlap A is double clearing and linked to Phase 8 as its parent phase.)

Double Clearing Overlap


3 Green 3Y 3R Red Rest 2 Green

8 Green 8Y 8R Red Rest 6 Green

Overlap A Green O/L A Doubleclearing Green O/L A Yellow O/L A Red O/L A Red Rest

The Release modifier is a per phase entry that allows the selected phase or phases
to start at their normal times while the double clearing overlap finishes. So if the
Release modifier is ON for phase 2 in our example, the intersection timing will change
and operate like this:
Double Clearing Overlap with Release on Phase 2
3 Green 3Y 3R 2 Green

8 Green 8Y 8R Red Rest 6 Green

Overlap A Green O/L A Doubleclearing Green O/L A Yellow O/L A Red O/L A Red Rest

194 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Double Clearing Overlaps

Double Clearing Overlaps–Example 1


This example is an offset intersection with two double clearing overlaps. Overlap A is
a 1+2 overlap and overlap B is a 2+3 overlap. When phase 1 is clearing to phase 2,
the overlap remains green (normal overlap operation). However, when phase 2 clears
to phase 3, overlap A will double clear.
The double clear would also occur from phase 1 to 3, but since phase 2 is the main
street, if it is on Min, Max, or Ped Recall this transition would not occur. Overlap B
double clears when clearing from either phase 3 to 1 or from phase 2 to 1. Both these
transitions are likely if 1 and 3 are actuated.

Figure 187 – Offset Intersection with Double Clearing Overlaps


The Overlap set-up programming screen for O/L A for example 1 would look like this:

Assign O/L A ( 1 of 16) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Parents X X
Fl Enab
MOD PHS
Del Enab
O/L Type: 0 STANDARD Fl Code: 0
Grn: 0 Yel: 0.0 Red: 0.0 Del: 0.0
Figure 188 – Standard Overlap settings - Example 1

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

The Double Clear programming screen for O/L A for example 1 would look like this:

Double Clear O/L A ( 1 OF 16) Enable: Y


Grn: 1 Yel: 4.0 Red: 2.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH YEL X X
PH NXT X
GRP YEL
GRP NXT
RELEASE
Figure 189 – Double Clearing Overlap settings - Example 1
Overlap B would be programmed in similar fashion except the parents would be 2 and
3, the double clear PH YEL’s would be 2 & 3, and the double clear PH NXT would
be 1.

Double Clearing Overlaps–Example 2


This example of double clearing is a railroad crossing where overlap A is simply a
Phase 4 Overlap. When Phase 4 is clearing to Phase 2 and/or Phase 6, the Double
Clearing Overlap is timed to allow traffic on the track to clear.

Figure 190 – Double Clearing Overlap Used for a Track Clearance


The example 2 double clearing programming screen would be as follows:
Double Clear O/L A ( 1 OF 16) Enable: Y
Grn: 1 Yel: 4.0 Red: 2.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH YEL X
PH NXT X X
GRP YEL
GRP NXT
RELEASE
Figure 191 – Double Clearing Overlap settings - Example 2

196 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Pedestrian Overlaps

PEDESTRIAN OVERLAPS
Ped Overlaps allow a pedestrian movement to be active with more than one phase.
A ped overlap will be serviced any time a phase that is designated a parent phase is
serviced. The ped overlap timing is generated from the active parent phase's ped
timing (Walk and Ped Clearance.) There are sixteen Ped Overlap phases available in
a 3000 series controller and all of their parameters are programmed in this area of the
interface. The Ped Overlap programming screens can be accessed by choosing
option 4.Pedestrian Overlaps from the Overlaps Menu. The full path to the screen is
MM > 3.Change Data > 1.Controller > 5.Overlaps > 4.Pedestrian Overlaps.
Note that ped overlaps do not drive any physical outputs in the default mode. To use
a ped overlap, it must be assigned as shown in this section, then I/O steering must be
used to get the outputs to drive accessible pins. Standard pedestrian outputs of a
specific phase are typically used (if not needed in their normal mode). See I/O
Steering (on page 380) for TS 1 or TS 2 Type 2 operation, or BIU I/O Mapping
(starting on page 400) for TS 2 Type 1 operation.
There are three types of ped overlaps:
Mode 1 Ped Overlaps — If a parent phase is clearing to another parent phase, the
ped overlap will clear prior to servicing the ped for the next parent phase, but will then
come up in Walk again when the next phase’s Walk does.
Mode 2 Ped Overlaps — If a parent phase transitions to another parent phase that
also has a ped call on record, the ped overlap remains in Walk instead of switching to
Ped Clearance. Mode 2 Ped overlaps are similar to vehicle overlaps. Ped overlaps
are typically used in Diamond or other special sequences where a walk is compatible
with two or more phases that use Peds.
Mode 3 Ped Overlaps — This ped overlap mode was added in firmware version 3.6
and is a slight variation on the previous two. If a parent phase transitions to another
parent phase that also has a ped call on record, the ped overlap goes into Ped
Clearance when the first parent phase enters clearance, and the ped overlap stays in
Ped Clearance all the way through the second parent phase’s Walk and Ped
Clearance period.

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

Ped Overlap Mode Screen


There are five screens of Ped Clearance settings, accessible by paging down from
the first screen. The first screen in this section defines which of the three modes will
be used by each of the sixteen Ped Overlap phases.

Pedestrian Overlaps VALUE(YES/NO)

FUNC\OL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P
MODE 3 2 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Use Y/N Key to toggle between modes


PgDn for Ped Overlap Enables
and Parent Phase Programming
Figure 192 — Setting pedestrian overlap modes
A ‘1’ in the column below an overlap phase letter indicates that that overlap will use
Mode 1 logic. Program any ped overlap to operate in mode 2 by placing a ‘2’ in the
corresponding column. And to program an overlap for mode 3 operation, place a ‘3’ in
the column. Toggle between the 1, 2, and 3 values by pressing the Y / N button.
Press PGDN to go to the rest of the Ped Overlap programming screens.

198 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Pedestrian Overlaps

Difference Between Ped Overlap and Ped Compatibility


Ped Overlaps are one method to assign a pedestrian phase to more than one vehicle
phase. Ped compatibility is another. However, they do not function in quite the same
way, which is an important thing to understand. The following timing diagrams show
how a pedestrian phase times relative to the parent (or compatible) vehicle phases. In
all of these diagrams, the vehicle phases are phases 1 and 2. The overlap method
shows a pedestrian overlap A. The compatibility method shows pedestrian phase
number 6, which is in a separate ring.

Ped Overlap Method (Mode 1 logic)


1 Walk 1 Ped Clear 1Y 1R 2 Walk 2 Ped Clear 2Y 2R 3G

Ped Overlap A Walk A Ped Clear A Dnt Walk A Walk A Ped Clear A Dnt Walk

Ped Overlap Method (Mode 2 logic)


1 Walk 1 Ped Clear 1Y 1R 2 Walk 2 Ped Clear 2Y 2R 3G

Ped Overlap A Walk A Ped Clear A Dnt Walk

Ped Overlap Method (Mode 3 logic)


1 Walk 1 Ped Clear 1Y 1R 2 Walk 2 Ped Clear 2Y 2R 3G

Ped Overlap A Walk A Ped Clear A Dnt Walk

Ped Compatibility Method


Now compare this to the ped phase compatibility method, as shown here:
1 Walk 1 Ped Clear 1Y 1R 2 Walk 2 Ped Clear 2Y 2R 3G

6 Walk 6 Ped Clear 6 Dnt Walk

The most important difference between the pedestrian overlap method and the
compatibility method is how the ped movement is timed relative to the vehicle
movements. When using an overlap, the ped phase is strictly timed with the parent
phases. But when using the compatibility method, the timing of the ped phase is
independent of the compatible vehicle phases. It is an important distinction.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 199


Chapter 5 — Overlaps

Pedestrian Overlaps VALUE(YES/NO)


Ped Overlaps Enable: Y
(1 OF 4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
O/L A X X
O/L B
O/L C
O/L D
Figure 193 — Setting Ped Overlap parent phases
Press PGDN to program the parent phases for the ped overlaps.....
Enable each of up to 4 ped overlaps by entering a ‘Y’ for enable. Once the function
has been enabled, assign parent phases for each ped overlap. Parent phase
selection is performed by moving the cursor to a Ped overlap and selecting the parent
phases by either pressing the Phase number or by moving the cursor under a phase
and pressing the Y/N key. An ‘X’ indicates that a phase has been selected for an
overlap.

Ped Overlap Application

Φ3 Ped Overlap A = P1 + P2
Ped Overlap B = P2 + P3
POL A

OL A Φ2
P3 P1

Φ2 OL B

POL B

Ped Push Button


Φ1
calls phase 2

Figure 194 — Example of Ped Overlap operation

200 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Pedestrian Overlaps

Using Ped Driver for “Carryover” Operation

Co-Ph Grp 1 Co-Ph Grp 2


Φ4 Ring 1 1 2 3 4
Ring 2 6 --

P6
OL A = 1 + 2

Φ1

Φ2

Φ3

1 GRN 1 CLR 2 GRN 2 CLR 3 GRN 3 CLR 4 GRN 4 CLR


6 WK 6 PED CLR 6 DWK

Figure 195 — Using Ped Overlap for Carryover operation


After a quick glance, the above may seem like Ped Overlap operation, but it is quite
different than Ped Overlap modes 1, 2, or 3. Ring 2 is used to drive ped 6, which
carries over between phases 1, 2 and 3. Since phase 3 is “left turn only”, ped 6 times
while the controller cycles between phases 1, 2 and 3, thereby reducing delay on
these phases and maximizing the efficiency of the intersection.

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

ADVANCE WARNING LOGIC (TS 2 ONLY)


This feature provides an advance warning system for overlaps A-H. Advanced
warning has a special set-up screen, but must also be used in conjunction with
Standard Overlap Assignment and Double Clear timing for the overlap. Signal
head (output) steering can be used to substitute an overlap for phase to provide
advance warning when the phase itself drives the signal (instead of the overlap).
Advance warning consists a special output for each overlap that activates when the
normal movement decides to terminate by gap-out, max-out, force-off, etc. The actual
termination of the movement green is then delayed by Double Clear Timing for a user
definable period during which the advance warning output is active. The output
remains active through yellow and red until the overlap once again returns green and
the Advance Warning De-activation Delay times out. The advance warning outputs
are the normal cycle, offset, split, free, and flash outputs, enabled when the overlap
has been enabled for Advance Warning mode. Internal selection of time of day
coordination functions would be unaffected by this operation, as only the physical
outputs would be used.
Typical use:
Since the output activates some time before the movement goes to yellow, advance
warning is typically used to drive a “Prepare to Stop” or a flashing beacon sign. It
might be used on a blind or high speed approach. The De-activation delay feature
allows some time at the beginning of green before the output goes off to allow for
queued vehicles to get moving.

Advance Warning Example


Since Advance Warning Logic involves some choices, and uses other features
(Double Clear Timing), it is best understood by going right to an example and
procedure.
For the example intersection below, it is desired to provide a 6 second advance
warning signal on a blind approach. The signal is a “Prepare to Stop” light board
signal placed at point prior to the bend. It is also desired that the Advance Warning
sign remain on for 7 seconds into phase 4 green.

202 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Advance Warning Logic (TS 2 Only)

O/L A
1) Is assigned with phase 4 only as its parent
in the O/L assignment screen.
2) Is enabled as a double clear overlap with 6
second delay green timing.

“Prepare to Stop” sign board. The sign will


come on 6 seconds before phase 4 goes to
yellow and will remain on until 7 seconds into
the next phase 4 green.

Figure 196 – Double Clearing Overlap used for Advanced Warning

Advance Warning Set-Up Procedure


1. Choose signal drivers for the movement. Advanced warning logic must be
implemented via one of the overlaps A-H. There are two ways of
accomplishing this;
a.) Use the overlap outputs directly. For the example, overlap A drivers would
be used to drive the phase 4 movement.

b.) Use the phase outputs directly and use signal head (output) steering to
substitute an overlap for the phase. For the example, phase 4 drivers would
be used to drive the phase 4 movement, but signal head steering would be
used to bring overlap A out on phase 4 drivers.
2. Determine the advance warning output. Refer to the table below:
Table 38 – Pins Used for Common TS 2 Modes
AW Designation TS 2 Mode 1 Mode 7 Idaho Mode 7 CL Normal Function
O/L or 2 Pin ‘D’ Module Pins ‘D’ Pin
A AW1 A-d D-55 D-30 Flash out
B AW2 C-N D-59 D-32 Cycle 2 out
C AW3 -- -- D-33 Cycle 4 out
D AW4 C-GG D-57 D-31 Offset 2 out
E AW5 C-CC D-60 D-34 Cycle 3 out
F AW6 C-NN D-56 D-24 Offset 1 out
G AW7 C-M D-58 D-5 Offset 3 out
H AW8 A-u D-47 D-25 Free out

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

The table lists the associated pins for commonly used TS 2 modes. If mode 7
is used with some other “D” module variation, cross reference the listed normal
function to the appropriate pin of the D module per Appendix B. For the
example, since Overlap A is to be used, the Advanced Warning Output is on
‘D’ module, pin D-30 (normal function = Flash out).

Note It may be prudent to avoid using O/L C for Advanced Warning unless one
of the “D’ option modules that support Cycle 4 are inserted.

3. Set-up the standard overlap. The overlap must be set-up by Assignment &
Type. The Overlap A set-up for this example would appear like this:
Assign O/L A (1 Of 16) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Parents X
Fl Enab

O/L Type: 0 Flash Code: 0 (See help)


Green: 6 Yellow 4.0 Red: 1.0

The information on this line


is a result of the double clear
programming in step 2
Figure 197 — Setup a standard overlap
The overlap is a simple phase 4 overlap, indicating that, other than the Double
Clear and Advance Warning Logic to follow, it behaves as if it is phase 4.

4. Set-up the overlap up for double clear. The overlap must also be set-up as a
double clear overlap in the double clear screen for Overlap A. The Double
Clear O/L A set-up for this example would look like this:
Double Clear O/L A (1 0f 16) Value(Y/N)
Delay Grn: 6 O/L Yel: 4.0 O/L Red: 1.0
Enable: Y 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH YEL X
PH NXT X X
GRP YEL
GRP NXT
Figure 198 — Setup overlap for double-clearing operation
The Delay Green time (6 seconds) is the Advance Warning time. Overlap
yellow and red time must be provided as well. As with any double clear
overlap, the overlap must provide its own clearance timing.

204 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Advance Warning Logic (TS 2 Only)

5. Set-up advanced warning. The overlap must finally be set up for Advanced
Warning. For this example, it would look like this:
Advanced Warning Logic
Overlap A B C D E F G H
Enable X
Adv Deact-Delay 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
(0-99 Sec)
Cond Overlap
Cond Overlap
VALUE (0-8, 0= none, 1-8= Overlap A-H)
Figure 199 — Programming advance-warn logic
Overlap A is enabled for advanced warning with a 7 second de-activation delay
(Advance warning output doesn’t go off until 7 seconds into green). Note that
the Advance Warning time is determined by the green delay time in the double
clear overlap programming.

Advanced Warning Definitions


ENABLE—Enables the overlap for Advanced Warning Logic and the corresponding
Advanced Warning output. Note that standard and double clear programming must
also be applied.
ADV DEACT-DELAY—Advanced Warning De-activation Delay. The period of time
after the overlap goes green before the output goes off. Allows for queued vehicles to
get moving.
COND OVERLAPS—Conditional Overlaps. Up to two per overlap, entered below the
subject Advance Warning Overlap by entering 0-8, where 0 = none, 1-8 = Overlap A-
H. Conditional Overlaps would typically be used for applications where two Advance
Warning movements terminate together but have different warning periods. An
example of this would be when AW overlaps are assigned to phase 2 and phase 6,
but with different warning periods.

Note The conditional overlap double-clearing green time must be larger than the
parent overlap. (Overlap A in this case.)

When the two are about to terminate, the longer (conditional) overlap starts its
warning timing but the shorter waits until the first times down to a value equivalent to
its own delay. It then activates its own warning output and then times out and clears
with the conditional overlap. If this programming were not applied, the warnings
would incorrectly start together.
Note that the original overlap warning (delay) timer only waits if the conditional
overlap warning (delay) timer is timing or has been enabled to time, i.e. it is going to
terminate. A delay timer may be enabled to time but not actually timing if that
movement has its own conditional phase and is waiting as well. This allows cascading
of advance warnings. The only time the original timer does not wait is if the
conditional overlap is not going to terminate.

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

Overlap A (shown below) is a phase 2 overlap with Advanced Warning. It has been
set-up for a case in which Overlap B is a phase 6 overlap with a longer warning time
(double clear green time).
Advanced Warning Logic
Overlap A B C D E F G H
Enable X X
Adv Deact-Delay 10 15 0 0 0 0 0 0
(0-99 Sec)
Cond Overlap B
Cond Overlap
VALUE (0-8, 0= none, 1-8= Overlap A-D)
Figure 200 — Advance warning logic screen
As shown above, overlap B is a double clearing overlap conditional upon overlap A.

206 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Lead/Advance Green Overlaps

LEAD/ADVANCE GREEN OVERLAPS


A special modifier to overlap timing was added to the 3000 series controllers in
firmware v3.6.2. Leading Overlaps and Advance Green Leading Overlaps allow
overlaps to start before their parent phase goes green. A ‘leading’ overlap adds a red
rest period before the parent phase to accomodate this lead timing. An ‘advance
green leading’ overlap starts even earlier, at start of the previous phase’s yellow.
Leading Overlap
Next Phase is Phase 2

1 Green 1Y 1R Red Rest 2 Green

Overlap A Red (Phase 2 is parent) Overlap A Leading Green Overlap A Green

Advance Green Leading Overlap


Next Phase is Phase 2

1 Green 1Y 1R Red Rest 2 Green

Overlap A Red Overlap A Leading Green Overlap A Green

Figure 201 — Comparison - Leading and Advance Leading Overlaps

Leading and Advance green leading timing can be assigned to any of the first eight
vehicle overlaps. It is not available for overlaps I through P. To set up such timing on
an overlap, first configure the overlap as desired using the normal overlap setup
screens, then choose option 6.Leading/Advance Green Overlaps on the Overlap
Menu to add the early timing. The full path to this screen is: MM > 3.Change Data >
1.Controller > 5.Overlaps > 6.Leading/Advance Green Overlaps.

Lead Overlap O/L A ( 1 OF 8) Value(Y/N)


Lead Overlap Green Time: 14
Enable: Y 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
FUNC\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
PH NXT X
GRP NXT X X

Advance Green Enable: Y


Figure 202 – Lead Overlap setup screen - Overlap A
Enter these screens and use either the PGUP and PGDN keys to switch between the
eight available leading overlaps, or place the cursor over the ‘1’ in the ( 1 OF 8) item
at the top of the screen and type in the number of the overlap you wish to edit. (Press
ENTER to go to the desired overlap.)

Lead Overlap Green Time — This is the amount of time that the leading or advance
green leading overlap will be green ahead of the parent phase. If this is a Leading
overlap, this time will be created by adding a red rest period to the end of the previous
phase’s red segment. If, however, this is an Advance Green Leading overlap, this
time is compared to the Yellow and Red of the previous phase. If the Yellow and Red
timing is longer than this setting, the normal Yellow and Red timing is used. If the
Yellow and Red timing is less than this setting, however, an extra red rest period is

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

added to the end of the red segment. In all cases, the time spent in the leading green
overlap is at least this value.
Enable — This settings turns ON (Y) or OFF (N) leading and advance green leading
timing for this particular overlap.
PH NXT — Phase Next and Group Next are used together to decide when to start
timing ahead of a parent phase. The Phase Next signal comes on when a phase
reaches its yellow segment and the controller must decide which phase will be served
next. If, for example, phase 2 will be served next, then the Phase 2 Phase Next
signal will go ON. In this screen, this setting tells the leading overlap to watch these
particular Phase Next signals and turn the overlap green based upon them. (At the
same time, for Advance Green Leading overlaps, but for simple Leading overlaps, the
overlaps comes on some time after the Phase Next signal, during the red segment.)
GRP NXT — The Group Next is used to determine which previous phase will start to
time the leading overlap. Group Next is a logical AND signal built out of the Phase
Next signals of all of the items checked on this row. So, if phases 2 and 12 are
checked on the GRP NXT row, the Group Next signal will only go ON when the
Phase Next signal goes ON for both phase 2 and phase 12. So the leading overlap
will not start timing until this Group Next signal goes active.

Note Group Next and Phase Next are either-or decisions for when to start the leading
overlap. So if the Phase Next condition is met, the leading overlap will start,
even if the Group Next condition is not met. The Phase Next condition is tested
first, and then the Group Next condition is tested.

Advance Green Enable — This setting determines whether this is a regular Leading
overlap (N) or an Advance Green Leading overlap (Y). If set to NO, then the leading
overlap starts during an added ‘red rest’ segment added on to the previous phase’s
red segment. If Advance Green Enable is set to YES, on the other hand, the leading
overlap starts with the yellow segment of the previous phase.

Note If an overlap has both a lead time and a delay time assigned for the same
parent phase, the delay timing will be used and the leading time will be ignored.
This is true for both Leading overlaps and Advance Green Leading overlaps.

208 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Inhibiting Overlaps

INHIBITING OVERLAPS
It is possible to inhibit the operation of overlaps by using a Time of Day circuit. TOD
circuits 177 through 192 will prevent overlaps A through P (respectively) from
occuring.
An overlap inhibit circuit forces the overlap to stay red. It does not take effect until the
overlap is red. The overlap will clear using the yellow and red timings assigned to the
overlap, unless those happen to be set to 0 (zero). If the yellow time is set to zero, as
it probably will be unless this is a double-clearing overlap, the overlap will use a value
of 3.0 seconds to transition to the inhibited state.
See page 430 for more details.

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Chapter 5 — Overlaps

210 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

This section introduces the basic concepts of multiple-intersection traffic flow coordination. The
following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

An overview of traffic coordination, on page 212.


Signal timing in a coordinated environment, on page 213.
Synchronization methods, on page 216.
Coordination using actuated controllers, on page 217.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 211


Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

GENERAL OVERVIEW OF COORDINATION


Coordination of traffic signals is a term used to describe a process in which two or
more intersections are synchronized so that vehicles can pass through each
intersection without stopping. Coordinated Operation is then a system mode of traffic
management. Each controller within the system will operate with a cycle length,
offset and split (set of phase allocations). The cycle length will typically be at any
one time common to all intersections in the coordinated system, but each intersection
will use its own offset and split.
Intersections set up this way will establish what is called progression of signals.
There are three basic types of coordinated progressions. For example, consider the
following 4 intersections with the indicated progressions.

Figure 203 – Three types of coordinated progression


Differences in the offset values of each intersection determine the type of
progression. In order for synchronization and therefore the progression to be a
continuous process, the return to the main street green of each intersection must be
on a cyclical basis. This cycle, or time to serve all phases, must be the same as, or a
multiple of, the common cycle for all intersections within the system. A technique
called “double cycling” is sometimes used such that multiphase intersections might
use a 90 second cycle while the 2 phase intersections use 45. Each 2 phase
intersection then cycles twice for each one multi-phase cycle.

212 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Signal Timing in a Coordinated Environment

SIGNAL TIMING IN A COORDINATED ENVIRONMENT


The terms defined in the following section explain how coordination is achieved
across multiple intersections, each being timed by its own controller unit.

Cycle Length
The cycle length is the total time to serve all phases, i.e. the time from the start of
phase n green until the next start of phase n green. All intersections coordinated at
any one time must use the same cycle length or a multiple thereof.

Local Cycle
This term refers to the cycle timer active in each unit that actually controls phase
timing. This differs from the Master Cycle, which is used as a common reference, but
does not control phase timing. The zero point of the local cycle is then referenced to
the master cycle by an offset value. The offsets at each intersection may differ, but
the master cycle zero point should be the same for all.
The first two intersections in the system for the inbound progression are shown
below. Both intersections have the same local cycle length (90 seconds).

Figure 204 – Two intersections with the same Local Cycle length

Split (Phase Allocation)


A split plan is the allocation of times within the cycle for each phase. The sum of all
of these split times, including the green, pedestrian, yellow, and red intervals, creates
the full cycle time. Note that the splits of the various intersections that make up a
coordinated corridor do not need to be the same. In the above example, the number
of phases and the split times of intersection #2 are not the same as intersection #1.
But since both have the same full cycle length, synchronization can still be
accomplished.

Local Cycle Reference Point


Each intersection has a reference point within its local cycle that has to remain
synchronized with a master reference. This master reference is transmitted
throughout the entire coordinated corridor, keeping all of the intersections in sync.

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Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

Usually the local reference point for each intersection is the start or end of the Main
Green phase. That is the point that is used to reference to the master reference
signal.

Reference point...
End of Main Street Green (φA).

Figure 205 – Local Cycle Reference Point

Master Cycle
This cycle issues the common reference signal and therefore establishes
synchronization between all of the intersections in the coordinated corridor.

214 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Signal Timing in a Coordinated Environment

Offset
An offset determines where the local reference at each intersection (beginning or end
of coord phase green) should occur relative to the common master cycle. For
example, for the inbound offset, intersections 1 and 2 would be set up as follows:

Figure 206 – Example of Coordinated Intersection Offsets


Intersection #1 has zero offset. It is the intersection from which all others are
referenced. The end of its phase A (main street) occurs at the same time as the
master cycle zero point.
Intersection #2 is offset 7 seconds to allow for travel time. The end of its phase
A (main street) occurs 7 seconds after the master cycle zero point.
Each successive intersection has a unique offset value as determined by the travel
speed and distance.

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Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

SYNCHRONIZATION METHODS

Historical Sources of Sync Pulses


The traditional master cycle used for referencing in years past was a 3-second pulse
of zero volts from a 115VAC signal via a hardwire interconnect. All intersections
would reference and synchronize themselves to these "Sync Pulses” as generated by
a master dial unit. Over the years, however, other methods of providing referencing
sync pulses have been incorporated and have for the most part replaced the 115VAC
hardwire interconnect.
One of the more popular methods today is Time Based Coordination in which there is
no interconnect at all, but each controller internally generates its own master cycle
based on its internal clock and the time of day. This is a very popular technique
because no interconnect system has to be installed.
Another method is through a communications link such as 2 twisted pair wire, radio,
or fiber optics. Under such communications links, far more sophisticated information
can be passed to and from each intersection, not just simple sync pulse commands.

Offset Seeking
The local cycle timer is not always at the proper offset relative to the master cycle. It
can be “out of step” upon system start-up, if cycle or offset changes are made, or
after preemption. Offset seeking describes the process of getting the local cycle back
into step with the master cycle. The local cycle can either time a percentage faster,
slower, or stop until the proper reference is achieved.
Each method avoids abruptness, so as not to disrupt traffic. Offset seeking can
sometimes take five cycles to get back in step. This seeking process is necessary to
ensure a smooth transition from one pattern to another without skipping, over-timing
or short-timing phases.

216 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit

COORDINATION OF AN ACTUATED CONTROLLER UNIT


In this discussion of Coordination thus far, no mention has been made of the various
types of controllers, specifically pre-timed controllers versus actuated controllers. In a
pre-timed controller the cycle length is fixed and does not vary from cycle to cycle.
Thus, if any point within the cycle is synchronized, the entire cycle must be
synchronized as well. Therefore, to synchronize a pre-timed controller, one need only
to worry about the synchronization process (offset seeking) and the cycle length
selection of each controller.
When an actuated controller is considered, however, just the establishment of a cycle
length is a considerable process in itself. This is because the cycle length of an
actuated controller will normally vary from cycle to cycle depending on vehicle
demand. A cycle length must then be artificially imposed on an actuated controller to
achieve coordinated operation.
To accomplish this, there are certain functions that the controller uses, such as
permissive periods, holds, and force offs. These functions force the controller to
operate within the constraints of a background cycle while still allowing the controller
to operate in the actuated mode and allowing basic intervals such as initial (minimum)
greens, walk, ped clear, yellow, red, etc., to time normally.

Functions Used to Coordinate an Actuated Controller


HOLD - Holds the coordinated phase (main street) during a specific period of the
cycle (when no permissive periods are active.)
PERMISSIVES - Allow a "window of time" in which the phase can be serviced.
Permissives have a “start” and “end” time, and prevent a phase from being serviced
too late to be properly forced off. A phase cannot be forced off during its initial
(minimum) green or ped timing, thus the permissive must take this into account, i.e. a
given phase permissive will end sufficiently before the force off so that if the phase is
serviced, it will be able to time at least its initial green and/or ped before force off
occurs.
FORCE OFF - Terminates a phase at the designated point in the background cycle.
Note that Force Off is a rather mild command and can only terminate an actuated
green that has timed past the Initial or ped times. It cannot force out of initial, walk or
ped clear. It has no effect on yellows or reds.
It is important to note that the coordinator only uses the above commands to
constrain the controller phasing and phase next decisions. It does not interfere with or
modify intervals such as minimum greens, walk, ped clear, yellow, red, etc. This is a
common misconception.

Example of Force Off And Permissive Placement


This example shows how an actuated controller may be set up using the Force Off
and Permissive functions in an 8 phase dual ring.
Shown is a 90 second “background” cycle with the typical placement of “fixed” force
offs and permissives. Each force off establishes the point at which the phases will be
terminated and move on.

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Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

Phases can “gap-out” before they “force off”. If a phase does gap out, the next phase
can get more time*. Notice that each permissive ends somewhat before the force off
for the indicated phase pair. Under full demand on all phases, permissives generally
don’t do much. However, under light demand, particularly if the coordinated phase is
likely to “rest” or if other phases are likely to be skipped (no demand), permissives
make sure that phases are only allowed service at such a point that they can be
forced off at their designated time.

Figure 207 – Typical placements of fixed force offs and permissives


Coordination of actuated controllers can be tricky business. Two seemingly
contradictory concepts are employed at once. On the one hand, because the
controller is actuated, the benefits associated with an actuated controller are desired,
i.e. a controller that is responsive to traffic, skips phases with no demand, varies the
green appropriately for phases with demand, and finally, one that rests in the main
street in absence of any demand. On the other hand, to accomplish coordination, one
must constrain the timing so that the controller operates within the confines of the
background cycle.
Coordination of actuated signals is often a complex matter, and requires a great deal
of effort on the part of the responsible agency to provide the analysis (traffic studies,
etc.) required for proper programming and subsequent operation.
Coordination of actuated signals can often be controversial as well. This is primarily
due to the nature of their operation. In the case of pre-timed controllers, signal
progression tends be well behaved and each signal “nicely” displays its green in just
the proper order. Actuated signals, however, do not always seem to behave so nicely.
For example, if at a given intersection, all the side street phases do not use all their
green time (they "gap-out" before they "force off"), then there will be an "early return"
to the main street. The "platoon" of vehicles at that intersection will then be released
and may arrive at the next intersection too early, before the green appears. These
vehicles will have to stop, which, of course, defeats the purpose of coordination.
There are, however, a couple of things to consider relative to this issue. Firstly,
despite the lack of appearance of coordination under such circumstances, the system
may actually be more efficient. Even though the pre-timed system may be well
coordinated, it often does so by arbitrarily holding the main street red as the side

* The 3000 controller has an optional feature in which “fixed” force offs are disabled and the force offs are
allowed to “float.” This operation disallows any phase but the coordinated phase (usually main street)
from getting more than its allocated time. Thus, when a phase gaps-out early, the next phase doesn’t get
any additional time since its force off is based on when it starts rather than a fixed point in the cycle.

218 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit

streets are provided with a fixed duration green time, whether needed or not.
Conversely, the actuated machine returns to the main street as soon as it can. Since
some main street vehicles may turn off before they reach the next intersection, an
early return is certainly beneficial to them. For those that proceed through the next
intersection, although they may be hampered by arriving too early, they may also
have the luck that the next intersection returns to main street early as well, and can
proceed unimpeded. This type of operation provides maximum efficiency although it
can occasionally appears sporadic and unpredictable.
This leads to the second point: proper coordination using actuated controllers
requires that the responsible agency provides the proper cycle and split settings for
the level and distribution of traffic at any given time of day. If the cycle length and split
times are appropriate for the conditions at all times of the day, non-beneficial early
returns to the main street can be minimized.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 219


Chapter 6 — The Basics of Coordination

220 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

This section explains the details of how to configure coordination on a 3000 Series controller.
The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

The Coordination Menu, on page 222.


How to load and clear coordination defaults, on page 223.
Specifying a coordination source, on page 224.
Basic options, on page 225.
Cycles and offset times, on page 236.
Working with coordinated phases, on page 239.
Allocating times to phases, on page 240.
Setting up offset seeking, on page 243.
Activating Time of Day circuits from coordinated operation, on page 245.
Enhanced options, on page 246.
Using the check coordination plan, on page 265.

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 221


Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

UNDERSTANDING THE COORDINATION MENU


To open the Coordination Menu, start at the Main Menu and select option 3. Change
Data to open the Program Menu. Then select item 2. Coordination to open this menu:

Coordination Menu

1.Clr/Load Defaults 6.Phase Allocations


2.Selection Source 7.Ofst Seeking Mode
3.Basic Options 8.COS/F To TOD Ckts
4.Cycles & Offsets 9.Enhanced Options
5.Coord Phases 10.Check Coord Plan

Figure 208 — Coordination Menu


The controls available in this menu are described in detail in the rest of this chapter.

222 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Clear/Load Defaults

CLEAR/LOAD DEFAULTS
Before programming Coordination for the first time in a new unit, or to completely re-
program an existing unit, it is generally a good idea to clear the data base or set it to
defaults.
Coord Clear and Load Defaults Menu
(see Utilities to copy splits)
1.Clear all Coord values
2.Set all Coord options to defaults
3.Set Enhanced Options to defaults
4.Set Coord Phases to Ph 1 all cycles
5.Set Coord Phases to Ph 2 all cycles
6.Set Coord Phases to Ph 2, 6 all cycles
Figure 209 — Coord Clear and Load Defaults Menu
Clearing all coord values sets all cycles, offsets, phase allocations and perms to
zero. It does not affect Y/N, numeric options or enabled phases (e.g. coord phases).
Loading defaults only affects those items as specified per screen descriptions.
These do not clear or modify cycles, phase allocation, etc.
If you choose option 1, Clear all Coord values, you will see:

All coord values will be cleared

--Press ENTER to execute


--Press CLEAR to cancel

Figure 210 — Clearing all coord values


Such a verification screen will also appear if you choose any of the other Coord Clear
and Load Defaults options (2 through 6) except that the screens will display,
respectively:
All Coord Options will be set to defaults (ENTER/CLEAR?)
All Enhanced Coord Options will be set to defaults (ENTER/CLEAR?)
All Coord Phases will be set to phase 1 (ENTER/CLEAR?)
All Coord Phases will be set to phase 2 (ENTER/CLEAR?)
All Coord Phases will be set to phases 2, 6 (ENTER/CLEAR?)

3000 Series Traffic Controllers 223


Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

SELECTION SOURCES
The Selection Source specifies the “source” or means of selecting various
coordination values - Cycle, Offset, Split, Free and Flash. Each can be selected
independently, though they are usually the same for any given application.
Coord Selection Source

(0= TOD, 1= CL, 2= INT)


Cycle Source: 0 Free Source: 0
Split Source: 0 Flash Source: 0
Offset Source: 0 Inter TOD Revert: 0
(0-255 SEC)

Figure 211 — Coord Selection Source screen


The values shown are from execution of Set All Coord Options to Defaults. Not
affected by Clear All Coord Values or Set Enhanced Coord Options to Defaults.
In the example screen shown above, all coordination parameters are selected by the
local TOD plan.
INTER TOD REVERT—A time-out value (0-255 secs) for interconnect mode. If no
sync pulses are received for this period, the unit will revert to TOD control.

To program coordination sources, simply enter a value (0-2) for each coordination
feature.
Table 39 – Coordination Source Codes
Code Coordination Source
0 Time of Day (TOD), time-based coordination
1 Closed Loop (Master)
2 Interconnect (hard wire)

Notes about Selection Sources


1. The unit will automatically revert to TOD control if it’s in closed loop mode and
the carrier is lost for 15 seconds.
2. Split Matrix (when enabled, see definition) will override the split sourcing
option.
3. If the master is taken off-line or carrier (comm) is lost, all of the values (cycle,
offset, split, free, & flash) would be selected by the local TOD plan.
4. When NOT in interconnect mode, the inputs normally associated with Cycle 2
and Split 2 can be used for TOD Override and time Clock Reset inputs,
respectively.

224 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

BASIC OPTIONS
Option 3 on the Coordination menu, the Basic Options screen provides for
programming of commonly used coordination options, i.e. functions that are likely to
be programmed and not just set to defaults.
Coordination Basic Options

Reference to end (vs. beg) of Main St.: Y


Use % (vs. secs) for Phase Allocation: Y
Use % (vs. secs) for Offset Entry: N
Use fixed (vs. floating) Force Offs: Y
Permissive Type: 2
(Perm type: 0=Yield, 1=Single, 2=Mult.)
Figure 212 — Coordination Basic Options screen
Values shown are from execution of Set All Coord Options to Defaults. Not affected
by Set Enhanced Coord Options to Defaults or Clr All Coord Values.

Reference to End of Main St.


This programming establishes the Local Zero reference point. The Local Cycle Zero
Reference point is the point that offsets are referenced to. It is also the basis for
computing permissives when the Auto Perm mode is enabled.
Enabled (Y) = The end of main street (coord phases) will be the Local Zero point
reference within the local cycle. The end of main street service occurs at the yellow
clearance for standard coordinated phases or at the beginning of the ped clearance
interval if the coordinated phases are CNA phases with WRM applied.
Disabled (N) = The beginning of main street green(coord phases) will be the Local
Zero point reference within the local cycle.

Use % for Phase Allocation (Splits)


This option specifies whether permissive and phase allocation entry is to be in
percent (Y) or seconds (N). If %, the total allocations must add up to 100% regardless
of cycle length. If seconds, the allocations must add up to the cycle length in seconds.
Also see the phase allocation menu (page 240) .

Offset Entry in %
This option specifies whether offset values are to be entered percent (Y) of cycle or
seconds (N). If programmed in percent, the offsets will occur as a percent of the
cycle. If programmed in seconds (‘N’), the offsets will always occur at that number of
seconds, regardless of cycle length. If programming in seconds, an offset should
never be programmed larger than the cycle length or else the controller will never
reach the offset value. The offset shown in the coordination dynamic screen will
reflect the way this parameter is programmed.

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Use of Fixed vs. Floating Force-Offs


This option determines how Force Off values will be automatically calculated based
on the programmed phase allocations (split) and clearance interval timing.
When enabled (Y), Force Offs are computed in the “fixed” mode where the force off
point within a cycle for any phase n is given by the equation:
FOn = FOn-1 + CLRn-1 + PHASE ALLOCATIONn – CLRn
Where CLR = Yellow plus Red for an actuated phase, and Yellow plus Red plus Ped
Clearance for a CNA phase.
Force Off for the coord phase (FOCP) = ZERO or (PHASE ALLOCATION – CLR)
depending on the “End of Main Street” setting.
A fixed-point value within the local cycle is then computed for each phase.
When Fixed = enabled (Y), Fixed Force Offs operation tends to distribute unused
cycle time to all other phases—if needed, and also discourages an early return. This
occurs because if one phase gaps out the next will start early, but its force remains
fixed at the same position in each cycle. The phase then gets more time if it extends
up to its force off.
When Fixed = disabled (N), the force off point is based on the start of the phase
green. The Phase Allocation times act like Max times, and are referred to as
“Floating” Force Offs. This operation allocates unused time only to the main street
because if a side street phase gaps out, the next phase in sequence will time its
phase allocation beginning at that point and will force off after it has been timed.
It should be noted that only early-starting phases are affected by the Fixed Force Offs
(Y/N) entry. When Fixed is disabled (N), both the Fixed and Floating Force Off points
are in effect and whichever occurs first will “force off” the phase. This is done to “lock”
phases to the background cycle.

Example of Fixed and Floating Force Offs

Figure 213 – Relative allocation times for an 8 phase intersection


If there is full demand on all phases, then there is no difference between fixed and
floating force offs, as indicated below.

226 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

Figure 214 – Fixed and Floating Force Offs - Full demand on all phases
However, if phase ‘3 & 7’ gaps out, then there will be a difference in timing as follows:
In the fixed mode, assuming all other phases have full demand, they can each
extend up to their fixed point. The main street will start early only if the side
streets don’t use all their time and the last of the side phases gap out early.
In the floating mode, the extra time from the ph 3 & 7 early gap out will surely be
given to the main street because each subsequent phase can time no more
than its allocation.
The following diagram illustrates this difference:
Phase ‘4 & 8’ gets all of the extra time
If phase ‘3 & 7’ because it starts earlier, then it gets
gaps-out early… extended up to the fixed force-off time

φ3 & 7 φ4 & 8 φ1 & 5 φ2 & 6


FIXED

φ3 & 7 φ4 & 8 φ1 & 5 φ2 & 6


FLOATING

These phases end early The coordination phase receives


because they started all of the extra time
early

Figure 215 – Fixed and Floating Force Offs – Differing Timing on Gap Outs

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Typical Reasons for Selecting Fixed vs. Floating Force Offs


This decision should be based on which provides maximum benefit to the
intersection. If the best thing to do is give the main street every spare second it can
get, then choose Floating (N). If the best thing to do is give the side street, especially
thru’s, any extra time that might occur from skipped phases or early gap outs, then
use fixed (Y).
Questions to ask are, “Is there much benefit in starting the main street early?” or
“Where are volumes presenting a problem (if any)?” “Where is storage most
critical?” Answers to these will give insights as to which mode is best.
Note that in the case of multiphase intersections, use of both floating force offs and
Single Permissives can provide unused time to both the beginning and end of main
street where Floating force offs and Multiple Permissives will provide all unused time
to the beginning of main street only (see permissives definitions). Fixed Mode is
usually a better choice when the cross street through is coordinated (as in a grid)
because it will not force the cross street to end early when it starts early.
Phase MAX TIME settings also play an important role in phase timing during
coordination. If the max time in effect for a phase during coordination is about the
same as its phase allocation, then the operation will be much like Floating Force-Offs
— even if fixed mode is programmed. This is because if the phase starts early it will
max out before being forced off, (unless it is a coordination phase.)

Note When Fixed Force Offs are enabled, without the Max Timer influencing termination
a phase that starts early with no Gap Out will use all of the unused time from the
previous phase. This leaves none of the unused time for subsequent non-
coordinated phases. A phase’s Max Time can be used to control the distribution of
unused time to subsequent non-coord phases (Inhibit Max unused.)

228 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

Permissive Type
This entry selects the type of permissive to be used when Auto Permissive operation
is enabled (enabled in Enhanced Modes menu, default mode = enable). The choices
are; Yield (0), Single (1) and Multiple (2) as described below.

General Discussion Of Permissive Types


A permissive period is a window that defines when a specified phase or group of
phases are allowed service. Permissives are bounded by a start and end value.
Permissives may be simple, short, and one period for all, like yield permissives, or
they may be more sophisticated like single and multiple permissives which extend the
end of permissives as much as possible. These are usually associated with
multiphase actuated control where the permissive attempts to accommodate late
arriving calls, allowing each phase to service its minimum times and still be able to
force off on time.
Note that the single and multiple permissives have their greatest effect during less
than peak demand times. During peak times, when calls are likely present
everywhere, the coord phase will leave at the beginning of the first permissive
anyway—there is little difference between these and yield permissives. During off
peak times, however, demand may be absent or late arriving and the more
sophisticated permissives become useful.

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Yield Permissives
Typically used for pre-timed mode, if the cycle is short, for simple phasing, or to
heavily favor main street. Yield Permissive operation opens one relatively small (0-
10%) window in which all non-coord phases are allowed service. Once the window
closes, no side phase service is allowed until the window re-opens during the next
cycle. Yield Operation tends to give preferential service to the Coordinated Phases.
The yield percent must also be programmed for this mode, as found in the Enhanced
Operating Modes, second screen (set to 10% by default).

F.O. F.O. F.O. F.O.


2&6 3&7 4&8 1&5

End main street green One Yield period for all non coord
phases (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8)

Figure 216 – Operation of Yield Permissives


The closing of a yield permissive period actually occurs only if there is no side street
demand and the unit rests in the coord phase. In that case, the period will end as
scheduled and no other phases will be served until the next cycle. If another phase
has demand and is served, however, the yield permissive will remain open for all
successive phases until each are served. If the unit did not do this, the yield
permissive period would end during the first phase served and would not allow any
other phases besides the coord phase. This would not be desirable, particularly in
multiphase operation.
Typical use:
Yield permissives are often used when the unit is operating in a pre-timed mode
where there is some type of recall on each phase (such as for urban grid systems.)
Yield permissives are adequate in this case because there is no need to extend the
end of permissive periods to accommodate late calls. Yield permissives can also be
used when it is desired to heavily favor the main street (coord phases) by allowing
only one small permissive for all phases. If they do not get their calls in before or
during the yield period, they simply wait until the next cycle. Floating Force-Offs with
Yield Permissives encourages early return.

230 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

Single Permissives
Typically used with multi-phase actuated controllers. As the name implies, single
permissive operation allows 1 permitted phase per ring to be active at any one time.
The first period starts at the end of the coord phase and allows only the phases that
directly follow the coordinated phase. This period then ends and the next period starts
for the phases after that, etc. For each non-coord phase, if the controller yields to the
phase from the coord phase at the Start Permissive Point, the phase will begin at its
normal time in the “background cycle”.
When the AUTO PERM mode is enabled, the coordinator automatically enables
Enhanced Permissive operation for Single Mode Permissives. This function modifies
typical Single Perm operation by dropping the start permissives back to the end of
Main Street once a side street phase has been serviced (see Enhanced Permissives
discussion).

F.O. F.O. F.O. F.O.


2&6 3&7 4&8 1&5

End main street green Perm 1 & 5


Perm 3 & 7
Perm 4 & 8

Figure 217 – Single Mode Permissives (when in coordinated phases)


Also note that In the event that true or “strict” single permissive operation is desired,
permissives must be entered manually, without the Enhanced Perm mode enabled
(both Auto Perm and Enhanced Perm are disabled). Keep in mind that if this done,
the unit will return to the coord phase any time a phase gaps out before the next perm
starts.
Typical use:
Single mode permissives are beneficial if any or any combination of the following are
true (or similar):
1. When the side street has an advance left turn (or dual ring pair) and there is
some benefit in providing extra green time to the end the coordinated phase.
Because they are the only phases allowed during the first permissive, absence
of demand on the left turns will cause the unit to rest in the coord phase green
until the side st. through phase permissive starts, increasing green-band
throughput. The Side St. through phases cannot start early in place of the left
turns.
2. There is advance left turn phasing on the side street as above and it is desired
to provide a “window” of opportunity for left turn demand. The idea is to allow
slightly late arriving left turn demand to still be serviced instead of immediately
proceeding to the side street through (as in the case of multiple permissives).
3. Again the same phasing as above and there is some disadvantage to starting
the side street through phases very early. Again, a very early start would be
the case if there is no demand on the left turns and the thru’s could start

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immediately in their place (multiple). The desire to use single permissives and
wait might be the case in a grid environment where the side street is also
coordinated with other intersections. Note that the side street thru’s can still
start somewhat early if the left turns are served but gap out. If this is not
desired, the No Early Release feature can also be applied to left turn phases
so they cannot not gap-out early. Single permissives and No Early Release on
the left turns will then fully ensure that the side street thru’s do not start at all
early.
The appropriate formulas for single permissives are shown below:
FOn = FOn-1 + CLRn-1 + PHASE ALLOCATIONn - CLRn
EPn = FOn - INITn - MSCLR
EPPn = FOn - WALKn - PED CLRn – MSCLR
SPn = FOn - (PAn - CLRn) - MSCLR
SPPn = SPn
The Main Street clearance term is appropriate when the coordinated phases are
on. But for any phase “i” in the ring that is on, the clearance time sum of that
phase is placed in the two equations above yielding the following:
EPn = FOn - INITn - CLRi
EPPn = FOn - WALKn - PED CLRn – CLRi
Where:
n = The phase in question INIT = Initial
n-1 = The previous phase. EP = End permissive
i = The phase on in the associated Ring EPP = End pedestrian permissive
FO = Force Off SP = Start permissive
MSCLR = Main St. Clearance (Yel + Red + PCL) SPP = Start pedestrian permissive
PA = Phase Allocation WALK = Walk
CLR = Phase Clearance PED CLR = Pedestrian clearance

232 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

Multiple Permissive
Typically used with multi-phase actuated controllers. Delays on late arriving non-
coord phases are minimized when this type of perm is used. Multiple Permissive
operation allows all phase/ped permissives periods to begin at the main street force
off point but end at different points within the cycle depending on the relative position
of their force off(s). This operation allows the controller to go to any phase with
demand following the main street force off. After time, if the controller continues to
rest in main street green, phases will be denied service during that cycle in order of
their occurrence (3 & 7 first denied, then 4 & 8, etc.)

Figure 218 – Multiple Mode Permissives (when in Coordinated phases)


The appropriate formulas for multiple permissives are shown below:
FOn = MSCLR + FOn-1 + PAn - CLRn
EPn = FOn - INITn - MSCLR
EPPn = FOn - WALKn - PED CLRn – MSCLR
Actually, the Main Street Clear term is appropriate for coordinated phases, but
when any phase “i” in the ring is on, the clearance time sum of that phase is
placed in the two equations, above yielding the following:
EPn = FOn - INITn - CLRi
EPPn = FOn - WALKn - PED CLRn – CLRi
SPn = FO COORD PHASE
SPPn = SPn
Note that other than start of permissives, these are the same as single mode
permissives. It should be noted that multiple permissive operation tends to effectively
reduce the permissive “window” down to a permissive “point” for all but the last of the
permitted phases. This is because the unit is allowed to immediately proceed from the

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coord phase(s) to the next set of phases with demand since all perms start at the end
of the coord phase green.
Typical use:
Review the single mode typical use cases. Given similar phasing and there is no
significant benefit from any of those cases, then multiple mode might be the correct
choice. This is particularly so if the side street thru’s have fairly heavy demand while
there is no major advantage to remaining in main street green.
It might also be that the side street left turn is protected/permissive (e.g. 5 section
head) and the need for extending a permissive “window” to the left turns is not critical.
The desire then is to simply get to the side street thru’s as soon as possible. Fixed
Force offs would be the likely choice in this case as well so that the side street thru’s
can get extra time if started early.

234 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Options

Computation Of Force Offs And Permissives

Force Offs
Force Offs are applied by the coordinator to terminate a phase if the phase has not
already terminated due to a gap or a max. If the yield point in the cycle (Local Zero)
is referenced to the end of main street green, then the main street force off is
calculated to occur at the cycle zero point. If the yield point is referenced to the
beginning of main street green, the main street force off will be calculated as cycle
zero + (main street phase allocation - main street clearance). In the fixed mode, side
street force off points are then computed sequentially from the coord phase force off
point. In the Floating Force Off Mode (Fixed Mode = N) the force off’s are more like
max times.

Permissives
Permissives are applied by the coordinator to allow the main street to terminate and
serve other phases. They are computed based on the type of permissive mode only
and not whether Fixed Mode force offs are enabled or not. Permissives are then
essentially fixed (cycle dependent) in both modes. Thus, such permissives are
calculated as if the force offs are fixed so that phases are allowed service from the
coord phase at the same specified points within the cycle. The floating aspect comes
into play mainly when the phase is served early due to a previous phase gap-out or
skip. The phase can then only get its allocated time amount based on its starting
point, and all accumulated extra time goes to the coord phase.

Phase Re-Service and Early Coord Phase Return


If the coordinated phases return early and perms are open with calls for associated
phases, the coordinator will attempt to re-service those phases.
CNA Coord Phases:
If the coord phases are in CNA Mode, the re-servicing will occur regardless of traffic
demand on the coord phases because they are in the non-actuated mode. To defeat
the re-service operation, No Early release can be programmed on the coord phases.
Actuated Coord Phases:
If the coord phases are in the Actuated Mode and return early, re-service will occur
only if the coord phases gap out before the perm closes. No Early Release can be
used to defeat re-service.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

CYCLES AND OFFSET TIMES


There are a maximum of 6 cycles available in the TS 1 mode. The TS 1 cycles and
offset screen appears as follows....

‘s’ = offset values are seconds


‘%’ = offset values are in percent

Cycle # 1 2 3 4 5 6
Length 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 1 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 2 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 3 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 4 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 5 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Min Length 0 0 0 0 0 0

Changes to ‘MAX DWELL’ if dwell offset seeking. See


Offset Seeking modes, page 101.

Figure 219 — Cycles and offset times screen


Values shown are from execution of Clear all Coord Parameter Values. These are not
affected by Set All Coord Options to Defaults or by Set Enhanced Coord Options to
Defaults.
CYCLE LENGTH—The cycle is the amount of time required to service all phases.
There are 6 unique cycles that each have a value range of 0-255 seconds.
It is often beneficial to program cycle lengths such that the Cycles 1 through 6 are of
ascending order. This is particularly useful for traffic responsive systems where the
3000 Master selects a particular cycle based on volume or occupancy, then and
issues the cycle (along with offset and split) command to all local intersections.
OFFSETS—Up to 5 offset values, ranging from 0 to 255 seconds, can be assigned to
each cycle (cycle 1 offset 1, etc.) Offset represents the amount of time that Local
Cycle Zero follows Master Cycle Zero. The Offset at any given point is determined by
Master Cycle Timer Value minus Local Cycle Timer value. If this yields a negative
number, add this number to the Cycle Length to yield a value between 0 and Cycle
Length –1.
Offsets determine the relative position of main street green with respect to other
intersections within the system. Offsets can be programmed in either percent or
seconds depending on the USE % FOR OFFSET ENTRY parameter setting (Basic
Operating Modes). There is a unique value for each offset (1-5) for each cycle (1-6).

236 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Cycles and Offset Times

When programming offsets in percent, any offset can be used with any cycle because
the offset value will always be a percentage of the cycle length. When programming
offsets in seconds, if the offset is greater than the cycle length, the controller will use
modulo arithmetic to determine the proper offset. In other words, it will divide the
offset by the cycle length and use the remainder as the offset. For example, if an
offset of 90 seconds is programmed, and the cycle length is 80 seconds, the
controller will use an offset of 10 seconds.
It is often beneficial to program offsets in a consistent manner where each offset
represents a specific objective. For example, at each intersection offset 1 might
always be heavy Inbound, offset 2 might be light inbound, 3 is average, 4 light
outbound, and 5 heavy outbound. A consistent theme like this is particularly useful for
traffic responsive systems where the M3000 Master selects a particular offset based
on volume and direction of traffic, then and issues the offset (along with cycle and
split) command to all local intersections.

Adjusting Offset Times in the Field


Offset values determine relationship of the phase timing to other intersections within
the system. As a result, offset values tend to be a frequently adjusted parameter set.
Offset values are typically adjusted when a specific green (often the coord phase, but
could be any phase) is observed to be either early or late relative to other
intersections.
For example, suppose it is observed that the coordination phase green is a little late
in starting, i.e. cars in the coordinated platoon arrive then usually wait 6 or 7 seconds
for green. The offset then needs to be “moved up.’’ To do this, the coord plan actively
operating first needs to be determined. To do this, go the 1st Controller Dynamic
Display. From this determine the active cycle, and local offset. Say that Cycle 3,
offset 2 is in effect (split doesn’t matter in this case).
Now go to the Cycle and Offset programming data screen and find the Cycle 3, Offset
2 value. Say that this value is 24. To move it up by 7, change the value to 17, (or 24
minus 7). If it were desired to move it back by 7 to get the green to occur later,
change it to 31 (or 24 plus 7.)
The cycle length has to be taken into account if subtracting would be a negative
number or adding would be greater than the cycle. For example, say the current
offset is 5 for a 70 second cycle and you wish to subtract 10 seconds. A negative
number of 5 -10 = -5 will result. To get the new offset value, add the negative value to
the cycle (or subtract the absolute value). Since the cycle is 70, then 70 + (-5) = 65 is
the right offset in this case. In the other case, if adding would result in a number
greater than the cycle, use the sum minus the cycle length as the offset. For
example, for the same 70 second cycle, say 16 seconds is to be added to a current
offset of 60, then 60 + 16 = 76. Since this is greater than 70, then 76 - 70 = 6
becomes the offset.

Minimum Cycle Length or Max Dwell


One of these two parameters will appear on the line below cycle length depending on
the offset seeking mode programmed.

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Minimum Cycle Length—This parameter set appears if the offset seeking mode is
short route. The values programmed determine the shortest cycle than can result
from fast timing the cycle to get in step. If a shorter cycle would be required, the 3000
will instead use add only offset seeking (cycle is longer only).
Max Dwell Times—This parameter set appears if the offset seeking mode is dwell.
The values limit the time the unit can “dwell” in the coordinated phases in any one
cycle when trying to get in step. If the unit is not in sync at cycle zero, it stops the
local cycle timer and begins to dwell until sync is achieved or the max dwell period
times out. The local cycle timer then begins timing again. If still not in sync at the next
cycle zero point it will dwell again until in sync or the max dwell period times out. This
process continues until sync is achieved.

4 Splits Per Cycle Mode


Data screens for Cycle, Dwell, and Offset times appear differently when in 4 Splits
Per Cycle mode. If 4 Splits/Cycle is set to ‘N’, the Menu appears as described in the
previous topics. However, if 4 Splits/Cycle is set to ‘Y’, the unit will display 4 splits for
each of the 6 cycles as indicated below.
Cycle # 1/1 1/2 1/3 1/4 2/1 2/2
Length 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 1 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 2 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 3 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 4 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 5 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Min Length 0 0 0 0 0 0
Figure 220 — Setting timing for 4 splits per cycle mode
1/1 is cycle 1, split 1, etc. Page down for the remaining cycle/split combinations, up to
6/4.

238 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Coordination Phase Programming

COORDINATION PHASE PROGRAMMING


Coordination phases (or just “Coord phases”) are those that are to be coordinated
with other signals in the system. Coord phases are usually “main street” phases.
Because of their special status, these phases need to be specified.
A different set of coordinated phases can be specified per cycle. This option allows
for different main street phases during different times of the day (by using cycle-offset
combinations).
For example, cycle 5 and cycle 6 may both be 110 seconds long, but when cycle 5 is
active, the main street phases are 2-6 and when cycle 6 is active the main street
phases are 4-8. The user can then alternate the coordinate phases by selecting cycle
5 or 6 per TOD plan.
Coord Phases VALUE(Y/N) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X X
2 X X
3 X X
4 X X
5 X X
6 X X
Figure 221 — Coordinated phases screen
The values shown are resultant from executing Set Coord Phases To Ph 2, 6 All
Cycles. They are not affected by Clr All Coord Values, Set all Coord Options to
Defaults or Set Enhanced Coord Options to Defaults.
To individually program the coordinated phases, simply select which phases are the
coordinated phases for each cycle. Select the phases by moving the cursor to a
cycle and pressing the associated phase key or by moving under the number and
pressing the Y/N key. An ‘X’ indicates that the phase has been selected.
The screen changes if the controller is using TS 2 operation with four (4) splits/cycle
selected. The screen would then appear like this:
Coord Phases VALUE(Y/N) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
CYC/SPL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1
1 2
1 3
1 4
2 1
2 2
Figure 222 — Coordinated phases screen - 4 splits per cycle mode
Progressive Menu Screens display the remainder of cycle 2-6 with split 1-4 allocated
for each cycle. In TS 2, this function allows the user to select the coordination
phases on each cycle with its respective splits.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

PHASE ALLOCATION
Phase allocations determine the “split times” or amount of cycle time available to
each phase during coordinated operation. If a phase has not “gapped out” by the end
of its allocation time, the coordinator will apply a force-off to proceed to the clearance
interval of that phase.
A set of phase allocations for all 16 phases is called a split plan. There are 24
available split plans. Each split plan consists of a phase allocation for all 16 phases.
Phase allocation/split plan entries depend on USE % (VS SECS) FOR PHASE
ALLOCATION as set in the Basic Operation Modes section and 4 SPLITS/CYCLE
programming as set in the Enhanced Operating Modes section.

Entering Phase Allocation Times


Percent — In this mode the 3000 requires that total sum of the phase allocations for
all rings must equal 100% provided there are no vacant Co-Phase Group-Ring cells.
Co-Phase Group-Ring cells that contain vacancies are allowed to be less than 100%.
A major benefit of programming in percent is that any split plan can be used with any
cycle. Since the phase allocation is a percent, the actual time allocated (in seconds)
will be adjusted as a percent of cycle.
Seconds — In this mode the total sum of the phase allocations for all rings must
equal the Cycle Length if all phases in sequence are used. Rings that have phases
omitted are allowed to be less than the Cycle Length. If a split plan is used with a
cycle whose length is greater than the sum of the phase allocations across a ring, a
coordination failure will occur.
EXAMPLE:
A. If sequence is 12/56 + 34/78, then Phases 1+2 must equal Phases 5+6, Phases
3+4 must equal Phases 7+8 and Phases 1+2+3+4 and 5+6+7+8 must equal Cycle
Length or 100%.
B. If sequence is 12/56 + 34, then Phases 1+2 must equal Phases 5+6 and Phases
1+2+3+4 must equal Cycle Length or 100%. In this case it is not possible to satisfy
Ring 2 summing to 100%.
Coord allocation screens are shown below. Note that these screen are examples with
appropriate values for 8 phase dual ring operation. Had Clr All Coord Values been
executed, all allocations would be set to 0’s. Allocation screens are not affected by
Set All Coord Options to Defaults or Set Enhanced Options Only to Defaults.

240 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Phase Allocation

Example 1, allocation mode in percent:


Shows cycle 1-6 if in Not an entry, shows value from
4 splits/cycle mode cycles & offsets screen (blank if not
or split 1, 5, 9, 13, 4 splits/cycle mode).
etc. if 24 split plans. Shows ‘%’ if in percent mode or
‘sec’ if in seconds mode.

Cycle 1 = 90 Totals: R1: 100 R2: 100


Not an entry, shows
Phase Allocations in % R3: 000 R4: 000
running total per ring
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
from split 1-4. Split
Split 1 20 35 18 27 20 35 18 27 shown depends on
Split 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 which split row cursor
Split 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 is currently in.
Split 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16 The values shown are
0-100% if in % mode,
or 0-255 secs if in
Phase allocation entries
seconds mode.
Figure 223 — Programming phase allocation times - example 1
Page down for cycles 2-6 if 4 splits/cycle mode, or splits 5-24 if the controller is set to
the 24 split plan mode.
For the example above, assume the cursor is in the split 1 row. Note that the
allocation values add up to 100% in each ring as indicated by the totals display (only
rings 1 and 2 are used).
Example 2, allocation mode in seconds:
Cycle 1 = 90 Totals: R1: 90 R2: 90
Phase Allocations in sec R3: 000 R4: 000
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Split 1 18 32 16 24 18 32 16 24
Split 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Split 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Split 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16
Figure 224 — Programming phase allocation times - example 2
Again, assume the cursor is in the split 1 row. Note that in this case the allocation
values add up to 90 seconds in each ring as indicated by the totals display (only rings
1 and 2 are used). These are the same relative values as example 1, only in seconds.

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Additional Details Concerning Phase Allocation


1. Phase allocations include the phase green + yel + red clear time (not just
green). The green time thus provided is the equivalent allocation value in
seconds minus (yel + red).
2. Phase allocations must be sufficiently large to provide at least basic phase
timing. As a minimum, the allocation must equal the phase INITIAL + YEL +
RED CLEAR + 1 second. If insufficient time is provided to meet this
requirement, the value will be accepted but will result in a “Bad Coord Plan”
failure when the plan is activated. If the phase has ped timing, substitute WLK
+ PCL for INITIAL above. Ped timing can be excluded from the check coord
plan algorithm (see Check Coord Plan description page 265).
3. When in the 4 Splits Per Cycle Mode (Enhanced Options) there are 4 splits
(1-4) per cycle. When 4 Splits Per Cycle is disabled, there are 24 splits (1-24)
total for all cycles.
4. Specific data fields can be selected for any specific split (4 Splits/Cycle=‘N’) or
cycle (4 Splits/Cycle=‘Y’) by entering the split or cycle number at the SPLIT or
CYCLE menu item in the upper left corner of the screen. The PGUP and
PGDN keys also move the cursor through the different splits and cycles.
5. Phase allocations must be entered for all active phases. Unused phases may
be left with zero allocation values.

Adjusting Allocation Times in the Field


Phase allocations determine each phase’s green time during coordinated operation.
Thus, along with offset values, phase allocations tend to be a frequently adjusted
value set. Such adjustment is typically required when it is observed that a phase or
phase pair have too much or too little green time. When adjusting an allocation time
for a given phase, however, the time for another or several phases must also be
adjusted as well so that the total split plan time remains the same. Each ring must
equal either the cycle length if in seconds mode, or 100% if in percent mode.

242 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Offset Seeking

OFFSET SEEKING
This option specifies which type of Offset Seeking to use during transition from Free
to Coordination, between patterns such as Cycle or Offset changes, or after
Preemption. Sync pulses may be physically received in a hardwire interconnect
system or they may be internally generated by a time base reference (a function of
the time of day and current cycle length).
In either case, when the cycle or offset changes, the controller must usually adjust the
local cycle timer to the new reference. Since the controller cannot simply jump to any
percent within the cycle (if so, phases and permissives could be skipped), the
controller utilizes an Offset Seeking method to gradually seek the new sync point with
minimal disturbance to the signal operation.

Offset Seeking Mode: 2

Mode determines how cyc timer seeks ofst


0 = Add only, times 20% slow only.
1 = Dwell, stops at cyc 0, but no more
than max dwell setting per cycle.
2 = Short Route, times 20% fast or slow
depending on which syncs fastest

Offset seeking mode is set to 2 (short route) by execution of Set All Coord Options to
Defaults. The offset seeking mode is not affected by Clr All Coord Values or Set
Enhanced Options Only to Defaults.

Types of Offset Seeking


There are 3 types of offset seeking that can be selected, as described below.

Add Only (Program ‘0’)


This procedure moves Local Zero to the offset by lengthening the cycle only. This is
accomplished by actually timing 1.2 seconds for each second in the cycle that
elapses until the new offset is reached (local times slow). This represents a 20
percent increase in cycle time and is evenly distributed among all phases in the cycle.
Because the seeking is in one direction only, it may take up to five cycles to get in
sync. See the Short Route method, described on the next page.
However, phases can only time longer and never shorter than their allocation time.
Short route is generally preferred in most cases, but Add Only may be preferred when
phase timing is critical, such as with long pedestrian phases.

Dwell (Program ‘1’)


Dwell seeking allows the controller to rest in the coordinated phases until the new
offset point is reached. If dwell offset seeking is chosen, a maximum dwell time
should be programmed in the cycle length programming screen. If the dwell timer for
the coordinated phases times out before the new offset point is reached, the
controller will leave the coordinated phases, cycle around and then will begin dwelling

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again during the coordinated phases. Dwell mode is similar to the technique
electromechanical controllers use to get in step and is not widely used anymore.

Short Route (program ‘2’)


Short Route offset seeking moves Local Zero to the offset by a process that either
shortens or lengthens the cycle time by 17 and 20 percent, respectively - whichever
achieves sync fastest. The +20% long or –17% short is evenly distributed among all
phases in the cycle. Because it can seek in either direction, the most out-of-sync the
unit can be is 50% of the cycle. The unit accomplishes this by actually timing either
0.83 or 1.2 seconds for each second in the cycle that elapses until the new offset is
reached.
Although similar in operation to Add Only, the ability to shorten the cycle can
considerably speed up the seeking process. For example, say that the Local Zero
point arrives a few seconds late relative to where it should be. With dwell or add only,
since the cycle can only be increased, the unit has to essentially seek “all the way
around” the cycle to get in step. With short route, it can simply speed up the cycle for
a brief period and get in step quickly.
If short route offset seeking is enabled, a Minimum Cycle Time may be defined in the
Cycle Time programming screen. That time is recognized when offset seeking in the
shorten direction is considered. If such seeking would cause the cycle to time less
than the minimum, add only offset seeking will be used instead.

244 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Coordination Plan (COS/F) to TOD Circuits

COORDINATION PLAN (COS/F) TO TOD CIRCUITS


This option provides for activation of TOD circuits when the status of current cycle,
offset, split or free operation matches the specified combination. A “wildcard” value
(don’t care state) for any of the entries can also be specified to activate the circuit for
any value of that entry. For example, 7/6/25/1 is a typical combination that activates
the associated circuits whenever the unit is in coordination, regardless of the
particular cycle, offset or split. (7, 6, 25 = activates for all for cycles, offsets, and splits
respectively).
There are 10 C/O/S/FREE plans with 5 available circuits.

Programming a Plan
1. Enter non-zero values for the desired combination of cycle, offset, split and
free status (0=free, 1=coord, 2=either) to activate the circuits. Programming a
“don’t care” cycle value of 7 indicates all cycles, 6=all offsets, 25=all splits,
2=free or coord.
2. Once the C/O/S/FREE values have been entered, program up to 5 TOD circuit
numbers for activation. Refer to Appendix A for a detailed listing of available
TOD circuits.
Upon entering a circuit number, the display will show a 3 character
representation of the selected circuit (e.g., Max Recall Phase 8 = MR8). A zero
circuit number will erase any existing circuit number.
Cos/Fre To TOD Ckts Value: Ckts 0-255
0= No Ckt, Dont Care C/O/S/Free=7/6/25/2
# C/O/ S/FRE Ckt Ckt Ckt Ckt Ckt
1 1/3/2 /1 VO3
2 7/6/25/1 IM1 IM2 CN1 WRM
3 / / /
4 / / /
5 / / /
Figure 225 — Coordination plan to TOD circuits screen

Note Because TOD circuits 1 through 11 are the COS/Free circuits themselves,
they cannot be used as activated circuits. Such use would result in
“circular” logic.

The screen above shows an example where ph 3 vehicle omit will be applied during
Cycle 1, Offset 3, Split 2 of coordinated operation. The second line tells the system
that Inhibit max 1 & 2, CNA I, and the Walk Rest Modifier (WRM) will be applied when
in coord operation for any cycle, offset, and split. All three are set to ‘don’t cares’
except the “1” for coord).
The COS/F to TOD ckts are all cleared by execution of Set All Coord Options to
Defaults. However, this programming is not affected by Clr All Coord Values or Set
Enhanced Options Only to Defaults.

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ENHANCED COORDINATION OPTIONS


The Enhanced Options menu covers a variety coordination functions that are
somewhat less frequently programmed, i.e., they are less frequently used or are less
likely to be changed from the default value.

Coordination Enhanced Options Menu

1.Operating Options 5.No Early Release


2.Cycle Sync Options 6.C/S To Time Plan
3.Man/Auto/FO. Perms 7.COS To Lead Lag
4.Local Split Modes 8.Offset to Free

Figure 226 — Enhanced Coordination Options Menu

Operating Options
These are miscellaneous per unit parameters that affect coordinated operation.
Coordination Enhanced Operating Modes

Enhanced Perm: N Invert Free In: N


Central Override: N Split Matrix: N
No PCL Ofst Adj: N 4 Splits/Cycle: Y
No Early Coord Ped: N

Pgdn For More Enhanced Operating Modes


Figure 227 — Coordination enhanced operating modes
To see the rest of the options, press PGDN :
Enhanced Operating Modes Continued...

Yield Percent: 10 (0-10%)


EGB%: O (0-100%)
RGB%: O (0-100%)
# of Cycles To
out of step: 0 (0=disable)

Figure 228 — Coordination enhanced operating modes - page 2


The enhanced screens above reflect the state as set by execution of Set All Coord
Options to Defaults or Set Enhanced Options Only to Defaults. Not affected by Clr All
Coord Values.

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Enhanced Coordination Options

Enhanced Perm
Enhanced Permissive operation modifies Manual Perm operation by dropping the
start of permissives back to zero once a side street phase has been serviced. This
mode should be enabled in most cases whenever permissives are programmed
manually—and especially if programmed in a sequential fashion similar to single
mode permissives, where not all perms start at the same time.
Purpose: The purpose of this function is to insure that downstream phases don’t get
skipped if the first phase after the coord phase gaps out before the next permissive
starts. Under such a circumstance the unit would see no other phases permitted and
would cycle back to the coord phase (this is undesirable). This will not occur if perms
go back to zero once a side street starts.
Enhanced Permissive operation has no effect on Yield and Multi Perms because the
permissives for all phases start at the same time. Auto Perm Single Permissives
always drop the start of permissives back to zero once a side street has been
serviced regardless of enhanced perm programming (see permissive types page
229).

Central Override
This parameter controls the ability to override coordination patterns (including Flash
and Free operation) from a central computer. If a ‘Y’ is programmed, central overrides
will be allowed. If it is programmed with an ‘N’, an operator at central will not be able
to remotely control coordination patterns or other features. If a Central Override is in
effect when this value is changed, control will revert to the normal coordination plan (if
any) as defined by the sourcing parameters at the end of the current cycle.

No PCL Offset Adj


This feature applies when the coord phases are in CNA Mode and End of Main St
referencing is used. Normally when this feature is disabled (N), the offset value is
internally adjusted so that the end of green is the offset reference point even though
the unit rests in walk while permissives start at the end of walk (zero). No Ped
Clearance Offset Adjust prevents this adjustment forcing the coordinator to reference
the Offset to the end of Walk.
This feature is used only in very specific applications, where Offsets may have been
previously established and have already taken Ped Clearance timing into account.
EXAMPLE: Offset is Zero, Coord Phase Ped Clearance = 20 seconds and Cycle =
100 seconds, End of Main St = (Y). If No PCL Offset Adj is disabled, Master Zero
occurs at Local 20 (end of green) and “Actual Offset” = 80. However, if it’s enabled,
Master Zero occurs at Local Zero (end of Walk.)

Invert Free In
This option allows the ‘free’ signal in a hardwire interconnect system to be inverted.
Typically a ground (0 volts) on the free input (D-module) initiates free operation (not
coordinated). This option allows a ground to be the default (coordinated) and a
120VAC signal to initiate free. It can also be used as a way to manually initiate
coordination.

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Split Matrix
The split matrix is a matrix of split plan values for each cycle-offset combination.
When enabled, the controller will reference this matrix based on the current cycle and
offset to determine which split plan to implement. Any other source of split (Master,
TOD, etc.) is ignored by the controller.

4 Splits/Cycle
This option enables 4 split plans per cycle, rather than 24 split plans. If this option is
enabled, splits 1-4 are associated with cycle 1, splits 5-8 with cycle 2, etc., but are
referenced as splits 1-4 for each cycle n. If this option is not enabled, all data entry
dealing with splits will be displayed in a split 1-24 for all cycles format. If the user
changes the value of 4 Splits/Cycle, the programmed values will automatically be
adjusted to the new format.
Table 40 – Splits under 4 splits/cycle and 24 split plans
4 SPLITS/CYCLE=“NO” 4 SPLITS/CYCLE=“YES”
SPLIT 1 SPLIT 1 for CYCLE 1
SPLIT 2 SPLIT 2 for CYCLE 1
SPLIT 3 SPLIT 3 for CYCLE 1
SPLIT 4 SPLIT 4 for CYCLE 1
SPLIT 5 SPLIT 1 for CYCLE 2
SPLIT 6 SPLIT 2 for CYCLE 2
SPLIT 7 SPLIT 3 for CYCLE 2
SPLIT 8 SPLIT 4 for CYCLE 2
SPLITS 9-12 SPLITS 1-4 for CYCLE 3
SPLITS 13-16 SPLITS 1-4 for CYCLE 4
SPLITS 17-20 SPLITS 1-4 for CYCLE 5
SPLITS 21-24 SPLITS 1-4 for CYCLE 6

No Early Coordinated Phase Ped Service


This option applies only to actuated mode on the coordinated phases.
If it is enabled, the peds will not be serviced until the point in the cycle at which the
coordinated phases would have been serviced had all phases been extended to their
force off points.
If it is disabled, pedestrian movements on the coordinated phases will be serviced at
the same time as the vehicle movements on those phases.
Typical Use:
To prevent coord peds from defeating “phase re-service” during actuated coordinated
phases. If the coord phase returns early with a ped call in memory, the ped call will be
stored until all perms are timed out, giving an opportunity to re-service permitted
phases if the coord phases gap out.

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Ped Override Mode (TOD Circuit Activated)


There is no programming for Ped Override mode; it is activated by TOD circuit 97
(labeled POM). If this circuit is active and an actuated ped is serviced, the local cycle
counter is ‘frozen’ at the force off point of that phase until the end of the pedestrian
clearance interval. Then the counter resumes timing from where it left off and the
controller immediately begins offset seeking until it gets back into step. The
coordinator also sets EPPn equal to EPn when this feature is active.
There is also a TOD circuit available to inhibit such Ped Overrides. Time Of Day
circuit #133 Is labeled ‘IPM’ and prevents the local cycle timer from pausing when a
phase cannot be forced off due to a large pedestrian movement. This circuit also
allows the coordinator to run a pattern that has an actuated ped phase that is longer
than the time allocated to the phase.
Typical use:
Ped Override Mode is typically used for any actuated Ped that is seldomly used. The
split plan timing then is set-up for normal vehicular demand and does not take into
account ped timing. When the occasional ped occurs, the cycle timer stops to
accommodate it, a late return occurs, then offset seeks to get in step.
Ped Override must be ON if (Walk + Ped Clearance + Yellow + Red) is greater than
the Phase Allocation and when executing “Check Coord Plan”, answer N to “Include
Ped Times”. If Ped Override is not ON in this case, the 3000E will not run in
Coordination (a Bad Coord Plan error will be generated.)

Note Ped Override works best when Short Route Offset Seeking is selected. Many times
the relatively small offset error can be corrected in one cycle versus up to 5 with
Dwell or Add Only Modes.

Yield Percent
The yield percent determines the percent of cycle the yield permissive period will be
open. The period starts at the main street force off point. For example, if the yield
percent value is 10% and the cycle is 100 seconds, the yield permissive will last for
10 seconds from the main street force off point. This value must be non-zero and less
than 11 if the yield type auto permissive calculation is chosen, otherwise Check
Coord Plan will not pass.

EGB% (Extended Green Band Percent)


Extended Green Band (EGB) percent (of cycle) is used to allow the coordinated
phase to extend beyond the normal yield point in the presence of coordinated phase
demand without regard to side street demand. The extension capability does not
occur when CNA is active. The extension period is ended if the coord phase(s) gap
out. Max timing is usually not a factor because the Max Timer does not start until the
coord phase yield point occurs. EGB% should be used cautiously because the extra
time “cuts into” the non-coordinated phase’s allocation time, and can even cause
phases to be skipped.
Typical use:

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This function must be used carefully because the EGB time extends into the non-
coordinated phase’s time. It may even skip phases if the percent (of cycle) is large
enough to time past the end of the first permissive. For this reason, the amount of
time that EGB% will encroach into the next phase(s) must be accounted for so that
phases will not be skipped or short timed. It is generally recommended that EGB%
only be used when the next phase(s) in service has a large enough relative allocation.
This is most likely with 2 phase operation and least likely with multi-phase operation
like 8 phase quad.
EGB Compensation:
One way to compensate for EGB% is to set the normal coord phase allocation times
so that they are based on less than peak periods and then slightly over-allocate the
first non-coord phases. EGB% can then be used to extend the coord phase so that it
cuts into the non-coord phase over-allocation. If necessary, Max Times on the first
non-coord phases can be used to limit their green time when they start early due to
lack of coord phase demand. This will help to distribute the extra time to downstream
phases.

RGB% (Reduced Green Band Percent)


Reduced Green Band (RGB%) percent (or cycle) is used to allow the coordinated
phase gap out some time prior to the normal yield point when there is lack of demand.
The coordinated phase in effect is allowed to gap out early.
Typical use:
This function can be used more confidently because the coordinated phase will not
time past its normal allocation, only less. There is not the problem of inadvertently
short-timing or skipping non-coord phases.
Many times in a given cycle, the “tail end” of the green band may contain no demand
and it is more efficient for this time to be used by demanding phases. This reduces
delays on all phases and avoids wasting green time (compared to CNA or Max Recall
methods.) Floating Force Offs and RGB maximizes early return, which can be
beneficial to clear standing queues in preparation for the green band. Fixed Force
Offs and RGB also allows the first phases (i.e., 3 & 7) after the coord phases to
receive extra time. With CNA, these phases will never start early and therefore the
Force Mode used has no effect on these phases.

EGB% and RGB% General Notes


Either or both of these options can be used when the main street has detection and
there is a desire is to allow the main street green to vary somewhat based on
demand. This might be the case when the coord phase demand surges during peak
demand (EGB%) or slacks off during off-peak periods (RGB%). Note that in the
normal mode (zero EGB% & RGB%), the coord phase cannot extend beyond or
terminate before the yield point regardless of demand.
The yield point is the time in the cycle is when the coord phase(s) (main street) is
permitted to serve other phases. The yield point is local cycle zero if the offset is
referenced to the end of Main Street Green (Basic Options Menu), or it is cycle zero
plus the coord phase allocation time less clearances if the offset is referenced to the
beginning of Main Street Green. In the normal mode the coord phase(s) cannot

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Enhanced Coordination Options

terminate early because hold is applied until the yield point occurs. Conversely, the
coord phase(s) cannot extend beyond the yield point because it is forced off.

Number of Cycles to Out-of-Step


This feature will check for the coordinated phases being ON each cycle around the
Local Zero mark. If the coordinator has determined that the above is not satisfied for
the consecutive number of cycles programmed, the coordinator reverts to Free with
“Free: Coord Out of Step” displayed. Setting Zero disables this monitoring feature.
Once in Free, the controller must be powered down to clear the fault.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

Cycle Sync Options


Sync Options

Sync Source: 0 (0=TOD/CL/Inter, 1=City


Zero, 2=Absolute)

(0-Cycle time-1 for City Zero/Absolute)


Cycle 1: 0 Cycle 2: 0 Cycle 3: 0
Cycle 4: 0 Cycle 5: 0 Cycle 6: 0
Figure 229 — Cycle Sync Options screen
There are two programming screens in this section; the first deals with the sync
source mode which determines how sync pulses are referenced to the clock. The
second screen deals with setting up sync pulse monitoring to establish criteria for
going free based on problems with sync pulses or offset lines.
The programming of the sync screens above reflect the state as set by execution of
Set All Coord Options to Defaults or Set Enhanced Options Only to Defaults. Not
affected by Clr All Coord Values.
SYNC SOURCE programming provides the time clock sync reference during
coordinated operation. Note that this referencing determines how the master cycle is
to be referenced to the clock. The local cycle then references itself to the master
cycle by offset seeking. There are 3 sync reference options: TOD/CL/INTER (0), CITY
ZERO (1), or ABSOLUTE (2).
If City Zero or Absolute are selected, the City Zero or Absolute adjustment factor must
also be programmed. The sync reference is automatically calculated upon entry of
this data. City Zero and Absolute sync reference programming also require that valid
cycle lengths be entered for all cycles used.

Sync Source Terms


TOD/CL/INTER—Time of Day, Closed Loop or Interconnect. This mode is based on a
once per day reference point. The controller finds the master cycle sync point by
calculating where the current cycle should be currently by determining the number of
cycles that would have elapsed from the reference point.
For example, if the cycle is 60 and reference point is 00:00 (midnight), then the unit
would compute a master sync point each minute on the minute. For a 70 second
cycle with the same time reference, the first master cycle would be at midnight, then
00:01:10, then 00:02:20, etc. The cycle is reset each day at this same point no matter
where it is in its current cycle. This is a once per day referencing scheme.
The reference point is entered in the Sync Reference programming under Time of
Day. The INTER mode refers to hardwire interconnect systems and the sync point is
a physical sync pulse received by the controller.
CITY ZERO—City Zero sync reference calculates the sync point by using a
programmed reference from midnight. The first time a value is entered (or edited) for
each cycle for City Zero, it becomes the reference from the previous midnight. From
this reference point, the controller calculates the sync points by cumulatively adding

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cycle lengths. Upon reaching the subsequent midnight’s, new sync reference values
are calculated by finding the first sync point past midnight at the end of the whole
cycle. The value entered for each cycle must be less than the cycle length.
ABSOLUTE—Absolute sync reference is similar to City Zero except that the sync
reference is calculated based on the current time. When the value is entered for
Absolute sync reference, the controller adds that value to the current time and then
calculates the cycle length backwards to midnight to find the first sync point after
midnight. This value becomes the sync reference for the current day. Subsequent
days are calculated on a moving sync reference the same as City Zero.
When data is entered for absolute, the value on the screen will change to show the
actual sync reference point (past midnight). The data entered for absolute is the
number of seconds past the current time until the next sync point. The controller then
calculates back to midnight to obtain the sync reference.

TOD/CL/Inter vs. City Zero Or Absolute Modes


The TOD/CL/INTER mode references once per day at the same time every day. The
master cycle thus gets reset at this point every day regardless of where it is at the
time. This is the preferred method if synchronizing with all digital units of similar
capability, but is not if attempting to synchronize with a non stopping, free running
reference like a dial unit. This is particularly the case for cycles that do not divide
evenly into 24 hours like a 70 second cycle. A TOD/CL/INTER type reference would
drift away from a 70 second dial after the first day because it would re-sync each day
while the dial would not.
The CITY ZERO and ABSOLUTE methods are designed to accommodate free
running referencing systems by finding the reference at a point in time, then
continually re-computing the reference each day based on the cycle length. These
methods can be used to sync with free running electromechanical dial units.

Typical Uses of the Various Sync Referencing Modes


TOD/CL/INTER mode. This mode is the most commonly used mode of sync
referencing, with midnight as the most common reference point (although 2 AM and 3
AM are also relatively common). This mode should be used unless one the of other
two modes below are specifically required.
City Zero Or Absolute mode. These two modes basically accomplish the same
thing; to sync to a free running dial or city wide tone system. The mode is chosen by
preference. The Absolute Mode is, however, generally easier to use.

How To Use The City Zero And Absolute Modes


City Zero—To use this mode, the offset from midnight must first be determined for
that day. For example, suppose it is 08:11:55 AM when the tone (or end of observed
cycle) occurs. This represents (8 x 3600) + (11 x 60) + (55) = 29,515 seconds from
midnight, or 29515 / 70 = 421.6429 cycles from midnight. The product of the fractional
portion only, times the cycle is .6429 x 70 = 45 seconds. This means that if the cycle
had been midnight referenced, it would have been 45 seconds into its last cycle at the
observation point. Since it should be 0 at that point, it needs to be moved up by 45
seconds. The programmed reference value thus becomes 45 in this case.

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Absolute—To use this mode, simply enter a zero into the Absolute Cycle Time value
for the desired cycle, but do not hit Enter or an Arrow key yet. Listen for the tone or
observe the end of the reference cycle (say the main street yellow at the reference
intersection) then hit Enter (or an Arrow key) at that precise moment. The 0 value will
then change to the computed offset reference from midnight for that cycle.

Manual/Auto Mode of Force Offs and Permissives


This option menu allows force offs and vehicle and ped permissives to be set to the
manual mode rather than auto-calculated by the unit based on allocation values. The
default mode is AUTO.
Permissives & Force Off Menu

1. Set Manual/Auto Mode (FO. Perm. Ped)


2. Load Manual Permissives
3. Load Manual Force Offs

Figure 230 — Permissives and Force-offs Menu


Choose option 1. Set Manual/Auto Mode (FO. Perm. Ped)

Permissives Mode

Auto Perm
& Fo: Y (N For Manual Perm & Fo)
Ped Perm: 0 (0 = Auto, Or 1-255 Secs)

Note: Man Perm % vs sec mode set by Ph


Allocation setting in Basic Options

Figure 231 — Selecting a permissives mode


The screens above reflect the state as set by execution of Set All Coord Options to
Defaults or Set Enhanced Options Only to Defaults. Not affected by Clr All Coord
Values.

Auto Perm (Manual vs. Auto Mode for Vehicle Perms & Force Offs)
This option determines whether Force offs and Permissives will be automatically
calculated from the Phase Allocation settings or manually programmed. When
enabled (Y), the automatic mode is chosen and the subsequent calculations are
based on the user defined Phase Allocation values (see page 240) and the relative
position of force offs within the cycle. The calculations are also based on various
control settings in the Basic Options menu, such as Reference to End (vs. Beginning)
of Main St., Fixed vs. Floating Force Offs, and Permissive Type.
When the Auto Mode is used (Y), the user is saved the effort of computing, then
manually entering permissives and force offs. When the manual mode is chosen (N),

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the user must individually program each force off and permissive, but can do so
according to his/her own preferences.

Ped Perm (Manual vs. Auto Mode for Pedestrian Permissives)


This option defines Auto or Manual Permissives for pedestrian movements. If Auto
Ped is selected by programming a ‘0’, then the permissive periods will be calculated
automatically from the Manual or Auto Force Offs. If a positive value (1-255 seconds)
is programmed, the Ped Permissive will start with the phase permissive (SPPn =
SPn) and then end after this programmed value (SPPn + value = EPPn). Note that
the start of ped permissive is dependent on the phase permissive, which may vary
depending on the type perm selection. Also note that Auto Perm calculations may be
used for the vehicle permissives (AUTO PERM: Y) and Manual Permissives for Peds,
or vice versa.

Time of Day Activation of Auto and Manual Perm Mode


Time of Day Circuit 130 “APM” Auto Permissive Enable, when active, causes the
Auto Permissive Mode to determine permissive and force off points. Time of Day
Circuit 131 “MPM” Manual Permissive Enable, when active, causes the Manual
Permissive entries to determine the permissive and force off points. These circuits
have priority over the “Auto Perm & FO” entry in the above screen. If both APM and
MPM Circuits are active, APM will have priority.

Note Per pattern Manual or Auto Perm & FO can be achieved by using “C/O/S to TOD
Circuits” programming using 130 and 131 as noted above.

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Load Manual Permissives


Manual Permissive entry is only required if AUTO PERM & FO operation is
programmed ‘N’ (not auto). Select 2 from the Permissives And Force Offs Menu
above to manually program permissives. Note that a detailed description of
permissives operation can be found earlier in this section. Recall that if demand
occurs on a phase during that phase’s permissive window (between start and end in
the cycle), that phase may be serviced during the current cycle; otherwise, the phase
will not be serviced (not “permitted”).
For manually entered permissive operation, the start and end permissive values for
each used phase for each split plan must be entered. Data Entry will be different
depending on the Use % (Vs Secs) For Phase Allocation setting from the Basic
Options screen. If the setting is in percent, then manual permissive must be in
percent as well. If seconds, then they are loaded as seconds.
Choose option 2 from the Permissives And Force Offs Menu
Cycle 1 Perms (0-255 Secs)
SPL 1/PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Start 10 0 0 5 10 0 0 5
End 50 0 7 30 50 0 7 30
SPLIT 2
Start 10 0 0 4 10 0 0 4
End 48 0 4 30 48 0 4 30
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16
Figure 232 — Loading manual permissives times (24 splits/cycle mode)
Shown in the 24 Splits/Cycle mode, with time in entered in seconds. Had the Use %
(vs. seconds) for Phase Allocation been set to ‘Y’, the values would loaded as
percents and the upper right corner would display VALUE (%:0-100) instead of 0-255
seconds.
Remember, these values are cleared to zero by Clear all Coord Parameters.

Note Permissive values for the coordinated phases are ignored. Other phases are
permitted from the coord phases (coord phase are always permitted).

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Enhanced Coordination Options

Load Manual Force-Offs


Manual Force off entry is only required if AUTO PERM & FO operation is
programmed ‘N’ (not auto). Select item 3 from the Permissives And Force Offs Menu
above to manually program Force Offs.

CYCLE 1 (0-255 secs)


Force Off Points 4 Slits/Cycle: Y
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Split 1 63 0 19 46 63 0 19 46

Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Split 2 60 0 15 44 60 0 15 44
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16
Figure 233 — Loading manual force-offs for cycle 1
Shown in the 4 Splits/Cycle mode, with time entered in seconds. Had the Use % (vs.
seconds) for Phase Allocation been set to ‘Y’, the values would loaded as percents
and the upper right corner would display VALUE (%:0-100) instead of 0-255 secs.
For each split and phase, program the appropriate force off point based on where the
coord phase ends and the relative position of the phase. In the example above, the
coord phases are 2 and 6 and force off at cycle 0. The next phases are 3 and 7, then
4 and 8, then 1 and 5.

Note Manual Force Offs with Fixed Force Offs do not require the user to enter Phase
Allocations.

Phase Allocations must be entered when Floating Force Offs are used regardless
of whether Manual or Auto Perm is used.

Local Split Modes


The Local Split Modes screens provide for two special means of selecting local split.
The first is an adaptive split mode, which is a demand based means of split selection.
The second uses a matrix that filters split selections.

Adaptive Split
Adaptive split allows various splits to be automatically selected based on demand.
Each split is assigned a set of selective phases which apply to selection of that split.
The selection technique is based on choosing the split with the greatest number force
offs occurring on its selected phases for a defined number of cycles. Ties go the
lower number split. The minimum number of total force offs required to make a
change is also specified. The concept is derived from the fact that, if a phase (or
phase pair) is constantly being forced off, then it is using all its split time in the base
split (typically split 1).

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

The split associated with those phases would typically be programmed to favor them
in terms of phase allocation.
Adaptive Split Control Value (0-255)
Cycles/Period: 0 MIN FORCE OFFS: 0
VALUE YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Split\Ph 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1
2
3
4
Figure 234 — Adaptive Split control screen

Enabling Adaptive Split


Adaptive split must be enabled by clock ckt. 127 in addition to the above
programming. For full time adaptive split, go to the Time of Day Menu, Circuit
overrides, and set ckt 127 ON. For time of day adaptive split, leave ckt. 127 in the
TOD mode and program ckt 127 ON/OFF by time of day in a day plan.
Cycles/Period—This setting determines the number of cycles the sample will be
based on. Typical values are 1-5 cycles. Each split will then tally the total force offs
occurring on its selected phases for this number of cycles. The number of cycles also
determines how often the split can change.
Min Force Offs—This setting determines the minimum number of force offs that must
occur for an adaptive split to be selected. Typical settings are from 1 up to the highest
number of force-offs possible over the period. The highest number possible would be
the number of phases assigned to each split times the cycles/period setting. For
example, if 2 phases are assigned to each split (dual ring) and the number of
cycles/period is 3, then 6 would be the highest number of force offs that could occur.
The Min Force Offs setting could be no more than 6 in this case or adaptive split
could never occur. If the Min Force Offs equals the maximum possible number, then
every phase must force off every cycle for its split to be selected. They must then
continue to force off every time to remain in that split or it will go back to the default
split (1).

Split 1 as Base Split


Split 1 is typically set up to be the base split. This is done by simply not assigning any
phases to split 1. Operation will then default to split 1 as long as no other split
exceeds the minimum number of force offs (based on its assigned phases) over the
number of cycles period.

258 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Coordination Options

Assigning Phases to Splits


Typically for splits 2 - 4, assign each a phase or compatible phase pair (e.g. 1 & 5, 3
& 7, 4 & 8). The coordinated phases are usually not included because the base split
(1) is set up to accommodate them. Adaptive split is then used for side phases. In
simple cases, only one adaptive split (split 2) will be assigned.
Example 1: Simple 2 phase, where Phase 1 is Main Street and 2 is a side street
Adaptive Split Control VALUE (0-255)
Cycles/Period: 2 MIN FORCE OFFS: 2
VALUE YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
SPLIT\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1
2 X
3
4
Figure 235 — Adaptive Split Control - example 1
In this case only one adaptive split is used based on a 2 cycle period. Split 1 is the
base split and has no phases assigned. Split 2 is the adaptive split and is assigned
phase 2. Split 2 is set up to allocate more time to phase 2. As long as phase 2 doesn’t
force off every time (min force offs = max possible force offs), then split 1 will remain
in effect. If phase 2 forces off both sample cycles, then split 2 is selected. Split 2 will
remain in effect as long as phase 2 keeps forcing off every time. If not, it returns to
split 1 at the end of the 2 cycle period.
Example 2: 8 phase, where Phases 2 and 6 are Main Street
Adaptive Split Control VALUE (0-255)
Cycles/Period: 2 MIN FORCE OFFS: 4
VALUE YES/NO) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
SPLIT\PH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1
2 X X
3 X X
4 X X
Figure 236 — Adaptive Split Control - example 2
In this case all adaptive splits are used, but again based on a 2 cycle period. Split 1 is
the base split and has no phases assigned. Split 2 is assigned phase 4 and 8, split 3
is assigned 3 and 7, and split 4 is assigned 1 and 5. This order is chosen based on
the fact that ties go to the lower numbered split and, in this case, 4 and 8 are deemed
the most important adaptive split phases. Thus, if all phases force off all the time,
then split 2 will be selected, which would favor 4 and 8.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

Adaptive Split Inhibits (2nd page Local Split Modes)


If you page down from the Adaptive Split Control screen, you will see this screen:

Adaptive Split Inhibits


VALUE(YES/NO)
CYC 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6
SPL 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4
OFF1 X
OFF2 X
OFF3 X
OFF4
OFF5
Figure 237 — Adaptive Split Inhibits screen
Adaptive split selection of splits 2-4 can be inhibited when certain combinations of
cycle and offset are in effect. In the example screen above, split 2 cannot be selected
by Adaptive Split* if Cycle 1, Offset 1 is in effect. Similarly, split 3 cannot be selected
if Cycle 1, Offset 2 is in effect, and split 4 cannot be selected if Cycle 1, Offset 3 is in
effect.

Note The inhibited split may still be selected by the Normal Split Source. These inhibits
only apply to Adaptive Split selection.

260 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Coordination Options

Split Matrix
The Split Matrix (on the third page of Local Split Modes) is a table of split values that
covers all of the possible cycle-offset combinations. This option gives the user full
control of specifying split plans regardless of the pattern source. When Split Matrix is
enabled, the controller will always use the split specified here.
For example, the controller may be operating traffic responsive per a closed loop
master. The master is calling for cycle 3 - offset 2 - split 3. If the split matrix is
enabled, the controller will ignore the split 3 from the master and will look to see what
split is specified for cycle 3-offset 2 in the split matrix.
To enable the split matrix, enter a ‘Y’ for Enable Split Matrix. The programming
of 4 Splits/Cycle will alter the data entry within the split matrix itself.
If 4 Splits/Cycle is active, then specify a split 1-4 for each cycle n-offset
combination.
If 4 Splits/Cycle is not active, then specify a split 1-24 for each cycle-offset
combination.
The value of the 4 Splits/Cycle option can be changed from this screen without having
to return to the Operating Modes screen by entering a ‘Y’ or a ‘N’ for the 4
Splits/Cycle menu option. The data entry format will change automatically for this
screen as well as for all other screens relative to 4 Splits/Cycle.
To use the Split Matrix option, page down from the Adaptive Split Inhibits screen.
It looks like this in 4 Split/Cycle Mode:
Enable Split Matrix: Y VALUE(0-4)
4 Splits/Cycle: Y
Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6
OFFSET 1 1 2 2 2 1 2
OFFSET 2 2 1 4 1 2 1
OFFSET 3 4 2 1 1 2 2
OFFSET 4 3 2 2 1 2 2
OFFSET 5 1 1 2 1 1 1
Figure 238 — Split Matrix setup screen - 4 split per cycle mode
And like this in 24 Split Mode.
Enable Split Matrix: Y VALUE(0-24)
4 Splits/Cycle: N
Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6
OFFSET 1 1 2 2 2 1 2
OFFSET 2 23 16 6 6 2 1
OFFSET 3 18 2 11 7 2 2
OFFSET 4 2 2 2 1 2 2
OFFSET 5 2 2 2 1 1 1
Figure 239 — Split Matrix setup screen - 24 split mode

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

No Early Release
No Early Release provides non-gap operation for selected phases by applying a
constant Hold. When no Early Release is activated for a phase it cannot gap out. If
served, the phase will remain in service until the Force Off occurs, regardless of traffic
demand.

No Early Release VALUE(YES/NO)


Cycle 1 4 Splits/Cycle: Y
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Split 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X X
2
3
4
Figure 240 — No Early Release setup screen
No Early Release can be selected by phase on a per split plan basis. To program no
early release on a per split or split/cycle basis, move the cursor to a split plan and
select the phases for no early release by pressing the associated phase number or by
moving to that phase and pressing the Y/N key.
The value of the 4 Splits/Cycle option can be changed from this screen and new split
screens can be selected as in other similar screens as previously described.
Typical use:
This feature is typically used when an early start of the phases that follow is
detrimental. For example, say that in a 8 phase quad, 2 and 6 are the coord phases
and for specific reasons it is very undesirable for phases 4 and 8 to start early. Single
permissives could be used to prevent 4 and 8 from starting in place of 3 and 7 if they
are skipped, but 3 and 7 could be served then gap-out early. No early release on 3
and 7 as shown above would prevent this.
Alternate Use:
No Early Release can also be applied to the coord phases to prevent multiple
terminations in the same cycle if perms are relatively long and the coord phases
return early and subsequent demands arrive. By applying a constant Hold to the
coord phases, upon early return, it must remain until it is forced off in the next cycle.

262 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Enhanced Coordination Options

C/S to Timing Plan


This option allows selection of timing plans based on the current cycle, offset, and
split patterns.
If 4 Splits/Cycle is activated, then a timing plan is assigned to each split from 1
to 24.
If 4 Splits/Cycle is programmed ‘Y’ then a timing plan is assigned to each
Cycle/Split from 1 to 4.
The selected timing plan will be used when in coordination (not free) and the
corresponding Cycle-Split is in effect, regardless of the timing plan currently in effect.
The 4 Splits/Cycle option can be changed from this screen without having to return to
the Operating Modes screen by entering a ‘Y’ or a ‘N’ for the 4 Splits/Cycle menu
option. The data entry format will change automatically for this screen as well as for
all other screens relative to 4 Splits/Cycle.
4 Splits per cycle mode....
Cycle/Split To Time Plan VALUE(0-4)
4 Splits/Cycle: Y
Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6
Split 1 1 1 3 2 4 0
Split 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Split 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Split 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
pgdn for COS To Lead/Lag
Figure 241 — Cycle/split to timing plan screen
24 splits mode......
Split To Time Plan VALUE(0-4)
Splits 4 Splits/Cycle: N
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 1 3 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
pgdn for COS To Lead/Lag
Figure 242 — Cycle/split to timing plan screen - 24 split mode

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

COS to LEAD/LAG
This option allows assignment of any of the 8 lead/lag patterns to a specific cycle-
offset-split. The lead lag patterns must first be assigned in the controller programming
area under controller options (MM-3-1-8-6). The mode and phases to be reversed are
specified there. The mode needs to be 0 or 1 to be enacted by C/O/S.
Cycle/Offset/Split To Lead/Lag
Don't Care C/O/S = 7/6/25, L/L Patt= 0-8
# C/O/ S L/L Patt # C/O/ S L/L Patt
1 1/3/2 1 6 / /
2 2/6/25 2 7 / /
3 / / / 8 / /
4 / / / 9 / /
5 / / / 10 / /
Figure 243 — COS to lead/lag screen
There are up to 10 C/O/S TO LEAD/LAG entries. Use only as many as are required
and leave the remaining blank.
For each combination needed, specify the C/O/S and associated lead lag pattern to
be activated. When the C/O/S in effect matches one of the programmed C/O/S TO
LEAD/LAG C/O/S patterns, the specified lead/lag pattern will be activated.
Cycle, offset and split “Don’t Care” values can be used to allow all instead of a
specific value. A cycle value of 7 indicates all cycles, 6=all offsets, and 25=all splits.
The above programming will invoke lead/lag pattern #1 when cycle 1, offset 3, and split
2 are active. The “Don’t Cares” on line 2 will invoke lead/lag pattern #2 all other times.
Offset to Free
The 3000 Controller has the capability of forcing its operation in the coordinator to
free when any of the three below listed limits are exceeded:
0 = Disabled

# Sync Pulses : 0 (1-255 Cycles Without


Pulses to Free)
No Offset Line : 0 (1-255 Secs Without
Active Line to Free)
Multi Offsets : 0 (1-255 Secs Multiple
Offsets to Free)
Figure 244 — Offset to free setup screen
# Sync Pulses—This entry defines the number of cycles the controller will run
without receiving a sync pulse before it reverts to Free operation.
No Offset Line—This entry defines the number of seconds the controller will wait for
the receipt of an Offset Line input from T/F BIU #4, before it reverts to Free operation.
Multi Offsets—This entry defines the number of seconds the controller will tolerate
Multiple Offset inputs received from T/F BIU #4, before it reverts to Free operation.

264 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Check Coordination Plan Feature

USING THE CHECK COORDINATION PLAN FEATURE


The 3000 Controller automatically tests the validity of the selected coordination plan
when it is in the coordinated mode of operation. If a problem is detected, the
controller will operate in the free mode and a ‘BAD COORD PLAN’ message will be
displayed in the coordination dynamic screen. The check coordination plan screen
allows the user to test a coord plan in advance to make sure it is legitimate. This
feature can also be used to find out why a faulty coord plan has failed.
To check coord plan, load value & ENTER
->: (0=Current, 101-624 = C1S1-C6S24)

...Results Of Check Displayed Here......


Options: Include Pedestrian Times: Y
CNA Used On Coord Phases: N
Check Timing Plan 1-4 Or 5=All : 1
Load Perms & Force Offs W/ Check : N

To execute, enter XYZ for a specific


CS to be tested (e.g. 101 = C1S1).
Or,
Enter ‘0’ for current plan in effect
Enter ‘725’ for all cycles & splits

Figure 245 — Checking the coordination plan

Setting Up a Check Coordination Plan


After timing and coordination plans have been programmed, they may be checked
after first determining the following set-up parameters;
Include Pedestrian Times—This parameter controls whether or not the walk and
pedestrian clearance times will be considered when testing the coordination plan. If
an Actuated Mode Ped is greater than the phase allocation, this question must be
answered “N” and Ped Override Mode (Circuit 97) must be turned on. Ped Times on a
CNA Mode phase must be less than the phase allocation time.
CNA Used On Coord Phases—Enter a ‘Y’ only if the coord phases are to operate in
the CNA mode.
Timing Plan 1-4—This selects the timing plan to be used for the test. Enter a value of
1 through 4 for timing plans 1-4, or a value of 5 to examine all 4 timing plans.
Load Perms & Force Offs W/Check—This feature will convert the phase allocation
values to equivalent manual permissive and force off values and load them into the
respective manual entry fields (see “Manual/Auto Mode of Force Offs and
Permissives” on page 254). This may be useful for those that prefer the manual
technique of adjusting force offs and permissives in the field, but would like to initially
set them up by allocation.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

To do this:
1. Set up all desired cycle lengths & basic coord options
2. Enter phase allocations
3. Set “Load Perms & Force Offs W/Check” to Y
4. Load 725 in check plan field
5. Execute check coord plan (Enter)
6. Once check is complete and satisfactory Set “Load Perms & Force Offs
W/Check” back to N*
7. Enable Manual Mode of Force offs and Permissives (disable Auto) on the
Enhanced Coord Options menu. This will cause the unit to operate on manual
values instead of directly from allocation values.

Note If the intent is to initially (once) load the manual force off and permissives areas
and then field adjust them after that, then it is important to set “Load Perms &
Force Offs W/Check” back to N. Otherwise, the field adjusted values will be written
over if coord check is ever executed again.

266 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Using the Check Coordination Plan Feature

Executing the Check Coordination Plan


To execute the check coord plan once it has been set up, specify the cycle and split
to be tested. Enter data to the right of the colon after the arrow. Specify “0” for the
current plan in effect or a cycle and split in the in the form XYY, where X is the cycle
number to be tested and YY is the split number to be tested (e.g. 101 = C1S1). A
cycle value of 7 will select all 6 cycles and a split value of 25 will select all splits.
The 3000 Controller checks for 8 possible errors:
1. YIELD PERM selected but YIELD % equal to 0 or greater than 10
2. Cycle Time = 0
3. Coord Phases NOT compatible
4. No Coord Phase in ring
5. Ring allocation GREATER THAN 100%
6. Ring allocation NOT EQUAL to 100%
7. Minimum phase time GREATER THAN or EQUAL TO phase allocation
8. Co-phase/Ring allocations NOT EQUAL
Error #1 occurs when the operator selects YIELD Permissive operation but has entered ‘0’ or a
value greater than 10% for the Yield Percentage.
Error #2 occurs if the selected cycle has a length of ZERO.
Error #3 occurs when the user selects incompatible coord phases. (i.e. phases 2 and 8, rather
than 2 and 6 in a typical 8-phase quad).
Error #4 occurs when only one coord phase has been selected. The user must select a coord
phase from each ring, provided there is a phase to select. For example, if the sequence is
12 + 34/78, either Phase 1 or 2 can be the only coord phase, because there is no eligible phase
in Ring 2.
Error #5 occurs when the user has allocated more than 100% of the cycle time for a particular
ring. For example, in a standard 8 phase quad, ring 1 = phases 1, 2, 3, 4; ring 2 = phases 5,
6, 7, 8. If the phase allocations for phases 1 through 4 are programmed 20%, 40%, 20% and
30%, respectively, then the total for ring 1 would be 110%.
Error #6 occurs when the user allocates less than 100% of the cycle time for a particular ring (at
least one ring must total 100%), and all co-phases across the ring must contain phases.
Error #7 occurs when the minimum time assigned to a phase is greater than or equal to the
maximum phase allocation. For example, if phase 4 has the following parameters:
Initial (Min) GRN = 5 seconds
YEL = 4 seconds
Red Clearance = 1 seconds
Total = 10 seconds
If the total phase 4 allocation (split) is 10 secondsor less, then the 3000 Controller would flag
this as a Bad Coord Plan.
Error #8 occurs when co-phase sets do not have equal phase allocations. A typical 8-phase
quad intersection can be represented as follows:
1 2 | 3 4 Co-phase set 1 = 1-2/5-6
5 6 | 7 8 Co-phase set 2 = 3-4/7-8
If the phase allocations (splits) for phases 1+2 are NOT EQUAL to phases 5+6 or phases 3+4
are NOT EQUAL to phases 7+8 then the 3000 Controller will flag a Bad Coord Plan.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

Note Version 1.15 of the 3000 Series firmware allows unequal Co-Phase Allocations if a
phase is in more than one Co-phase Set.
For example, to lag Phase 3 and disallow Phases 3 & 7 concurrently, without using
Lead/Lag:

1 2 | 4 I_3_ Co-phase set 1 = 1-2/5-6;


5 6 | 7 8I 8 Co-phase set 2 = 4/7-8;
Co-phase set 3 = 3/8
In this example, Phases 7 and 8 do not have to equal Phase 4, nor does Phase 3
have to equal Phase 8, but each Ring must sum to the Cycle length.

268 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Coordination - An Example

BASIC COORDINATION - AN EXAMPLE


This section provides a concrete example of coordination programming.

Overview of This Example


The following example is based on values obtained by executing the Coordination
Default Data Load from the Utilities Menu for an 8 Phase Dual Ring. The example
discusses operation directly based on those values as well as alternative operation by
making changes to certain values. The example is intended as guide for users to
follow to set their own basic coordination. Many applications can be satisfied by
simply loading the appropriate default then following this example and making
changes as necessary.
Only the basic required menus will be discussed, others are either not needed for
basic operation or are left to default values. Thus, this example also serves as a
guide as to which screens really need to be visited in order to accomplish basic
coordination. Your application may, of course, require more sophisticated use of
features which can be determined from detailed explanations given previously.

Note Only screens that are likely to have changes made are shown. All others remain
as set with default values.

Defining the Selection Source


The defaults are set up for TOD operation (0’s) and will remain so for these
examples.
Coordination Selection Source

(0= TOD, 1= CL, 2= INT)


Cycle Source: 0 Free Source: 0
Split Source: 0 Flash Source: 0
Offset Source: 0 Inter TOD Revert: 0
(0-255 SEC)

Figure 246 — Setting the selection source

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

Basic Operating Modes


Change this to ‘N’ if it is desired to start Main St.
green at cycle 0 (i.e. the offset reference point).

Coordination Basic Options


Change this to ‘N’
to load allocations
Reference to end (vs. beg) of Main St.: Y
in seconds. (Also
Use % (vs. secs) for Phase Allocation: Y see notes below.)
Use % (vs. secs) for Offset Entry: N
Use fixed (vs. floating) Force Offs: Y
Permissive Type: 2
(Perm type: 0=Yield, 1=Single,2=Mult.)

Permissive Type is set to “multiple.”


This opens up permissives for all other phases at end of
coord ph green. See brief perm definitions below.

Fixed Force offs are fixed to the cycle. If a side (non-coord) phase starts
early it can get more green if it doesn’t max out. Change this to ‘N’ if
“floating” force offs are desired. Floating force offs mean the allocation
times are like max times & start with green. Side phases can’t time more
than their allocation. All unused green time goes back to coord phases.

Figure 247 — Basic operating modes


When the allocation entries are in % as shown above, then the phase allocations
must be in % and must add up to 100% for each ring.
When the allocation entries are in seconds, then the phase allocations must be in
seconds and must add up to the cycle length for each ring.

Brief Permissive Type Definitions


(Detailed discussions of this were included in the previous chapter.)
Yield—One short permissive to all phases, starting at end of coord phase green.
Must specify yield percent (0-10%).
Single—Permissives start at the end of coord phase green in sequential fashion and
each has only one phase or compatible phase pair associated with it. The first
permissive is open only to phases that immediately follow the coord phases (say 3 &
7 in a standard 8 ph quad). The second is to the next set (say 4 & 8), etc. The
permissives end based on when their associated phase force off occurs, less
allowances for initial and clearances. Single permissives tend to provide occasional
extra green time at end of the coord phase when there is no call on the first set (3 &
7) because the second set (4 & 8) can’t start until later when their permissive does.
Multiple—Permissives all start together at the end of coord phase green. Any phase
with demand can start at this point. The permissives end based on when their
associated phase force off occurs, less allowances for initial and clearances. Multiple

270 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Basic Coordination - An Example

permissive are useful when there is no great need to try to provide extra green time at
the end of the coord phase when the next set of phases (say 3 & 7) have no demand.
Instead it is more beneficial to get to the next set (say 4 & 8) as soon as possible.
Set these to the desired offset values.
Cycle and Offset Times
Cycle # 1 2 3 4 5 6
Length 90 100 110 120 0 0
Offset 1 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 2 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 3 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 4 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Offset 5 s 0 0 0 0 0 0
Min Length 30 30 30 30 0 0

s = values in seconds
Min Length is shortest cycle allowed % = values in percent
due to short route offset seeking.

Max Dwell will appear here if Dwell


offset seeking used.

Figure 248 — Setting cycle and offset times

CNA Usage
The 3000 will automatically adjust for CNA coord phases, assuming the phase
allocations are sufficient for walk and ped clear. The NO PCL OFST ADJ setting in
the enhanced options menu does deal with CNA. If set to ‘N’, it adjusts the offset for
CNA coord phases only to adjust for ped clear time when the reference is set to the
end of MSG. WRM and Ped Recycle both also deal with CNA.
The main effort in CNA usage is implementing it. This is a two step process:
1. Select the CNA phases in the Controller Phase Recalls menu and then,
2. Activate the CNA mode. CNA phases can be activated by assigning CKT 73
(or 74-76) in the Coordination, COS/F to TOD CKTS menu, or by a clock event
in the Time of Day menu.
In the first case CNA is activated by a specific COS or any time coord is active
(COS/F = 7/6/25/1). In the second case CNA is activated strictly by time of day.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

Change these to the appropriate coord phase(s)


for your application, as necessary.

Coord Phases VALUE(Y/N) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 X X
2 X X
3 X X
4 X X
5
6
Figure 249 — CNA usage example
CNA Application Note 1: If CNA is applied to the coord phases, either Walk Rest
Modifier or Ped Recycle must be activated, otherwise the permissive period operation
will not operate as expected due to the nature of the end permissive logic when a
CNA coord phase leaves walk.
CNA Application Note 2: If CNA is used with a sequence where the coord phases
are the “barrier phases” and the field-adjusted coord phase Ped Clearance times are
unequal, the full progression is not guaranteed on the lesser-timed coord ped
(assuming two rings) if calls only exist in the coord phase Co-Phase Set. Therefore it
is wise to use actuated coord phases when this condition exists.

Phase Allocations
These are the direct Default Data Load values that are in percent as is the allocation
mode setting in the Basic Options screen.
Because phase allocations are in percent, total
values for each ring must add up to 100%.

Cycle 1 = 90 Totals: R1: 100 R2: 100


Phase Allocations in % R3: 000 R4: 000
Note: Only load
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
values for phases
Split 1 19 40 19 22 19 40 19 22 enabled (used).
Split 2 20 30 20 30 20 30 20 30 Unused phases
Split 3 21 30 24 25 21 30 24 25 are left 0. This
Split 4 22 30 25 23 22 30 25 23 example uses 8
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16 phases.
Figure 250 — Phase allocations as percentages
Seconds Mode—The Default Data Load values are changed to the equivalent values
in seconds after changing Use % (Vs Secs) For Phase Allocation to ‘N’ in the Basic
Options screen.

272 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Because allocations are in seconds, each ring must
add up to the cycle length (90 sec. in this case).

Cycle 1 = 90 Totals: R1: 90 R2: 90


Phase Allocations in sec:R3: 000 R4: 000
Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Totals show the
Split 1 17 36 17 20 17 36 17 20 values for the Split
Split 2 18 27 18 27 18 27 18 27 row where the cursor
is currently located.
Split 3 19 27 21 23 19 27 21 23
Split 4 20 27 22 21 20 27 22 21
SHIFT-RT.-> TO VIEW OR ENTER PHASES 9-16
Figure 251 — Phase allocations in seconds
Times are based on using the version 1 allocations as a percent of 90 seconds and
rounding appropriately.

Note Whether in percent or seconds, the allocation time includes the entire phase
time, including yellow & red clearances.

Also note that the default mode for Auto Perm and FO mode is Y = ON. When in the
auto mode, force offs and permissives are computed automatically and there is no
need to program them. This option can be found in the Enhanced Options Menu. If
Auto Perm and FO mode is set to N, then all permissive periods must be manually
entered (also see Coord Check page 265).
General note about defaults. This example is based on the back up plan default which
sets many of the coord options to their default values. It should be understood that,
unless you are going to actually program them all, it is important to get all options to
their default state. One way to do this is to load one of the Utilities Menu default plans
as in this example.
Another way is to use the clear and default codes from the Coordination Menu. The
order to do this is, before programming;
1. Execute Clear All Coord Parameter Values. This sets all cycles, offsets,
allocations to zero.*
2. Execute Set All Coord Options To Defaults. This will set the options in the
basic default mode.

*
Obviously, do not Clear All if there are pre-existing values to be saved.

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Chapter 7 — Coordination Programming

274 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

This section explains Time of Day (TOD) programming of the 3000 Series of controllers. TOD
is an alternative to coordinated programming. The following topics are discussed in detail in
this chapter:

An overview of TOD operation, on page 276.


Data entry modes for TOD data, on page 277.
Using day plans, on page 278.
Typical example of a day plan, on page 280.
Configuring circuit plans, on page 282.
Configuring week plans, on page 283.
Configuring a yearly plan, on page 284.
Defining exception days, on page 285.
Using circuit overrides, on page 286.
Daylight savings time, on page 287.
Working with synchronization references, on page 288.
Setting the controller’s date and time, on page 290.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

OVERVIEW
Time of day (TOD) functions provide for scheduling a variety of events to occur at
fixed times during the day. These events include changing patterns (cycle, offset and
split), enabling or disabling controller functions such as dimming or volume density,
and activating user defined outputs.
A TOD program is composed of a hierarchy of plans from the year plan at the top to
the day plan at the bottom. A year plan consists of 53 week plans, a week plan
consists of 7 day plans, and a day plan consists of a set of change points which
activate or deactivate individual functions at specific times of the day. In addition,
there are up to 50 exception day plans for special ‘one time only’ days such as
holidays or special events.
The TOD menu is shown below, denoting the various programming options.

Time Of Day Menu

1.Day Plans 1-32 6.Circuit Overrides


2.Circuit Plans 1-50 7.Daylight Savings
3.Week Plans 1-20 8.Sync Reference
4.Year Plan,53 Week 9.Set Date And Time
5.Except Days 1-50

Figure 252 — Time of Day Menu

Note The available TOD circuits in the 3000/E controllers is listed in Table 58, on
page 430.

276 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


TOD Data Entry Modes

TOD DATA ENTRY MODES


There are two modes of data entry for programming TOD events. These are called
INSERT and EDIT, where EDIT is the default mode. To toggle modes, press the
SHIFT key and the mode indication in the upper left corner of the screen will change to
reflect the current data entry mode. The primary difference between the two modes is
that in EDIT mode, if a change point is modified, the original data in the change point
is replaced by the new data. In INSERT mode, modifying an event stores a new
event.

Insert Mode
The INSERT mode is useful for initially entering change point (event) data. The insert
mode basically allows entering over the top of previously entered CIRCUIT PLAN,
COS, or CKT-ON/OFF fields to create new change points (events) when the times
are the same. For example, when initially programming a day plan, say it is desired to
activate circuit plan 1 at 7:00 am and begin running C/O/S pattern 3/2/3 at the same
time. SHIFT is first pressed to enter insert mode, then the circuit plan is entered at
7:00 AM normally including the time. Now instead of re-entering the time again, the
cursor is simply moved to the C/O/S column on the same line and the pattern is
entered. After pressing ENTER, a new change point (event) line is created while the
original one remains intact.

Edit Mode
The EDIT mode is best used to change events that have previously been
programmed. Typing over the top of any field changes that change point (event) field
and no new event is created.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

DAY PLANS (EVENT PROGRAMMING)


Option 1 on the Time of Day Menu takes you to the Day Plan configuration screen.
The first page allows an operator to select one of 32 day plans and to specify what
action is to be taken. A day plan can be accessed for editing, or one or all day plans
can be deleted.

To View or Enter Day Plan Change Points


Enter 1-32: _

To Erase One Day Plan


Enter 1-32:

To Erase All Day Plan Change Points


Enter 99:
Figure 253 — Day Plan selection screen
The minimum requirements for successful TOD control of events: the 3000 Controller
requires a Year Plan with at least one Week Plan, and a Day Plan with some TOD
events. Week Plan 1 all year with Day Plan 1 assigned all week are the defaults if
nothing else is programmed. Refer to the explanations that follow for details.

Erasing A Day Plan


This option will clear all events in the Day Plan. Move the cursor down to the second
row and enter the plan number to clear, followed by the ENTER key. A prompt will
ask for the Y/N key to confirm the operation, or the MENU key to cancel it.

To Erase All Of The Day Plans


Move the cursor to the last row and enter 99. A prompt will ask to confirm or cancel
the operation as above.

Editing a Day Plan


To edit a Day Plan, enter the plan number at the top of the Day Plan screen and
press the ENTER key.
If Day Plan 1 is selected, the following screen will appear.
Day Plan 1 Hour: 0 HH=99 To Erase Event
Edit (1-50) (6/5/4) (1-255)
HH:MM Circuit-Plan C/O/S CKT-ON/OFF
**:** / /
**:** / /
**:** / /
**:** / /
Use (YES/NO) to Toggle ON/OFF
Figure 254 — Editing a day plan

278 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Day Plans (event programming)

This screen is where the actual events that make up a Day Plan are defined. In this
case, the screen is shown as it appears before any change points are programmed
(no events). On the left side of the screen are the times at which a TOD event will
occur.

Deleting Events
To erase (delete) a TOD change point (event), move the cursor to the HH field for the
event, enter a value of 99, and press ENTER.

Event Times
Event times determine the hour and minute that the event will be activated. To enter a
time, move the cursor to the change point to be edited, enter the hour, move the
cursor to the right, then enter the minute. Note that the event times are programmed
on a 24 hour clock basis where 08:00 = 8 AM and 20:00 = 8 PM.

Types Of Events
There are three types of events that may be programmed, each with their own field.
These are Circuit Plans, C/O/S coordination patterns, and individual Circuits. One
(and only one) of these event types can be programmed on each change point line,
however, there may be multiple change points at the same time of day. The available
TOD circuits in the 3000/E controllers is listed in Table 58, on page 430.

Circuit Plan Events


Circuit plans are user defined groups (1-50) of up to 4 circuits each that are to be
activated or de-activated together, instead of individually activating them as in the
case of the CKT-ON/OFF field. Circuit Plans are activated in this menu (Day Plans)
but the circuits are assigned to plans under the CIRCUIT PLAN menu. To activate a
previously assigned circuit plan, move the cursor to the column labeled CIRCUIT
PLAN and enter the number of the plan that is to be activated. As the plan number is
entered, a description of the plan appears on the bottom row of the display. If this is
the correct plan number, pressing the ENTER key will load the data into memory.

C/O/S Pattern Events


A cycle, offset and split combination defines the coordination pattern to be activated
at the event time. To program a pattern, move the cursor to the column labeled
C/O/S. Enter the desired cycle, offset and split into the appropriate spaces and load
the data by pressing the ENTER key.

Circuit ON/OFF Events


A circuit is a function that can be activated (or deactivated) by TOD. In some cases a
circuit can be a physical output from the machine. Most circuits, however, are “virtual”
circuits in the sense that they activate an internal function but produce no physical
output. For a list of available circuits, refer to Appendix A. Pressing the HELP key will
also display a list of the TOD circuits.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

To program a circuit, move the cursor to the column labeled CKT and enter the circuit
number. As the number is entered, the abbreviation for that circuit is printed above
within the parenthesis. After the circuit is selected, move the cursor one column to the
right to define the state of the circuit (ON or OFF). Pressing the Y/N key will toggle the
state between ON and OFF. At this point, ENTER will load the data into memory and
the circuit abbreviation replaces the circuit number. Note that the FREE circuit (11) is
activated by default at midnight. To run in coordinated mode by TOD, this circuit must
first be turned off by a change point on or before the first coordination plan change
point.

Event Screen Selection Shortcut


At the top of the screen, there is an entry field labeled HOUR. This allows a shortcut
method of accessing a change point that may be several pages down. For example,
suppose it is desired to modify a change point at 10:00 PM, and this change point
happens to be 3 or 4 pages down. The PGDN key could be pressed until the change
point appears, but a quicker method would be to enter 22 (for 10PM) in the HOUR
field and the correct page will be displayed immediately.

Automatic Circuit Reset At Midnight


A very important property of TOD programming is the fact that the scheduler
automatically resets (de-activates) all active circuits at midnight every day. The
exception to this is the FREE circuit (number 11) which re-activates at midnight. If it is
desired for a circuit to remain active through the midnight transition, it must be
reactivated at time 00:00. Conversely, the Free ckt (11) must be de-activated at time
00:00 if coordination is to remain in effect through midnight.

TYPICAL DAY PLAN EXAMPLE


A set of screens as they might appear for a typical Day Plan are shown here:
Day Plan 1 Hour: 6 HH=99 to Erase Event
EDIT (1-50) (6/5/4) (1-255)
HH:MM Circuit-Plan C/O/S CKT-ON/OFF The SHIFT key toggles
06:30 1/1/1 between EDIT and
06:30 / / FRE OFF INSERT modes.
06:30 / / M21 ON
06:30 / / M22 ON
Use (YES/NO) to Toggle ON/OFF
Figure 255 — Typical day plan example - screen 1

280 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Typical Day Plan Example

P G D N to see this screen:


Day Plan 1 Hour: 6 HH=99 To Erase Event
EDIT (1-50) (6/5/4) (1-255)
HH:MM Circuit-Plan C/O/S CKT-ON/OFF
20:00 1/1/1
23:00 / / FRE ON
23:00 / / M21 OFF
23:00 / / M22 OFF
Use (YES/NO) to Toggle ON/OFF
Figure 256 — Typical day plan example - screen 2
P G D N to see this screen:
Day Plan 1 Hour: 6 HH=99 to Erase Event
EDIT (1-50) (6/5/4) (1-255)
HH:MM Circuit-Plan C/O/S CKT-ON/OFF
07:00 3/1/1
09:00 2/1/1
15:30 3/2/2
18:00 2/1/1
Use (YES/NO) to Toggle ON/OFF
Figure 257 — Typical day plan example - screen 3
The FREE circuit (ckt 11) must be turned OFF to activate coordination. This is
equivalent to Coord = ON. The M21 and M22 circuits (ckt’s 93, 94) call for Max II
timing, rings 1 & 2. It is a common practice to call for Max II timing during coordinated
operation, because Max II times are typically longer. Their phases don’t tend to max
out before forcing off.
However, there are several other ways to accomplish this same operation. One way
would to be to use a circuit plan for all three circuits (see sample screen under Circuit
Plans). Another would be to use only the Free circuit in the day event screen, and
assign the Max ckts (ckt’s 93 & 94) in the coordination COS/F to TOD CKT’s
assignments. These would operate whenever the unit is in coordination (set
C/O/S/FRE = 7/6/25/1).
One consideration is the fact that C/O/S to TOD CKTs are not invoked until
coordination is actually running, while clock circuits may slightly precede the actual
start of coordination. If it is not disruptive to do so (like Inh. Max), however, clock
events do consolidate circuit programming in one area. In this way, the clock events
show everything that is occurring without having to refer to other menus.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

CONFIGURING CIRCUIT PLANS


There are 50 circuit plans available in the 3000 controller for activation by day plan
event. Each plan may contain up to 4 circuits to be activated or deactivated in any
combination at once.

Circuit Plans 1-50 VALUE:Ckts 0-255


0= No Ckt, use (Yes/No) to Toggle ON/OFF
Plan Ckt-on? Ckt-on? Ckt-on? Ckt-on?
1 FRE OFF M21 ON M22 ON
2 FRE ON M21 OFF M22 OFF
3
4
5
Figure 258 — Configuring circuit plans
The PGUP and PGDN keys move through the list of available circuit plans by page, but
a faster method is to simply move the cursor to the column labeled PLAN and enter
the desired plan number. Pressing the ENTER key will display the page containing the
plan.

Programming a Circuit Plan


1. To program a plan, move the cursor to any column labeled CKT across from
the plan that is to be modified.
2. Enter the plan number (a list of circuits can be found in Appendix A or by
pressing HELP) and move the cursor to the right.
3. Now use the Y/N key to set the state of the circuit to either ON or OFF.
4. If more circuits are to be included, simply move the cursor right or left to an
empty column and repeat the procedure until all the desired circuits have been
defined.
It is not necessary to program all four circuits in each plan.
Circuit plans are typically used in pairs, where there is one plan which sets circuits to
one state and another plan which sets them to the other. For example, the sample
screen above has been set up to provide the same operation as the typical day
program example on the previous page. In this case, circuit plan 1 would be invoked
at 6:30 in the morning and plan 2 at 23:00 at night.

282 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Configuring Week Plans

CONFIGURING WEEK PLANS


The Week Plan data screen is accessed by pressing 3 from the TIME OF DAY menu.

Week Plans 1-20 VALUE:Day Plans 0-32


(0 & 1 = DP 1)
Plan SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2
2 3 1 1 1 1 1 2
3 4 1 1 1 1 2 3
4 1 14 14 14 14 14 1
5
Figure 259 — Week Plans editing screen
There are 20 week plans available in the controller; each plan consists of 7 day plans,
one for each day of the week. To program a week plan, move the cursor to the plan
and enter a day plan for each day of the week, SUN through SAT. Note that if a day
plan is blank, day plan 1 will be used as a default. Entering a value of 0 will clear a
day plan.
The PGUP and PGDN keys will display plans above and below the currently displayed
plan. Week plans may also be accessed directly by entering the plan number in the
top location underneath the PLAN heading.

Note At least one week plan must be assigned for TOD control to operate. A zero
(blank) is considered day plan 1.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

CONFIGURING A YEAR PLAN


A year plan is a set of 53 week plans over the course of an entire year. There are 53
because usually there is a partial week at the beginning and end of the year. This
screen is accessed by entering a 4 in the TIME OF DAY menu.
Year Plan VALUE:Week Plans 1-20
Week Of Year
1: 1 2: 1 3: 1 4: 1 5: 1
6: 1 7: 1 8: 1 9: 1 10: 1
11: 1 12: 1 13: 1 14: 1 15: 1
16: 1 17: 1 18: 1 19: 1 20: 1
21: 1 22: 1 23: 1 24: 1 25: 1
26: 1 27: 1 28: 1 29: 1 30: 1
Figure 260 — Year Plan Editing screen
To enter a week plan, move the cursor to the week to be edited, and enter the
number of the week plan (1 through 20). Pressing the ENTER key or a cursor key
loads the data. The first 30 week plans are on the first page. To access week plans
31 - 53, press the PGDN key.

Note Although blanks in the year program are interpreted as “week 1”, it is a good idea
to assign all 53 weeks to a week program. This will avoid confusion even if the
year plan consists of week program 1 all 53 weeks.

The repetitive data entry procedure as described on page 16 is very useful for loading
the year program.

284 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Defining Exception Days

DEFINING EXCEPTION DAYS


To enter the exception day programming screen, enter a 5 at the TIME OF DAY
menu.
Exception Days 1-50 WOM=5 is Last Wk
EXC (0-12) (0-31,0-7) (0-5) (0-32)
Day Month DOM-DOW WOM Day Plan
1 1 1 2
2 5 2 5 2
3 7 4 2
4
5
Figure 261 — Exception Day configuration screen
There are 2 types of exception days as follows,
Date specific exceptions days are intended for holidays or events that occur
on the same date every year. Examples are Christmas, New Year’s day, or U.S.
Independence day. Exception day 1 in the screen above is New Year’s day
which obviously occurs on January 1st every year.
Day of week, week of month, month of year exception days are for holidays
that occur on a specific day of a specific week of a specific month (many of
these are the so-called “Monday” Holidays). Examples are U.S. Memorial Day
which is the last Monday in May, or Canadian Thanksgiving which is the first
Monday in October. Exception day 2 above is for U.S. Memorial Day, which is
the last Monday of May. A value of 5 in the week-of-month field (WOM)
denotes the last week of the month.
No value appears in the WOM column, the value in the DOM-DOW column is
assumed to be a day-of-month (1-31) and the exception day is date specific. If there
is a value in the WOM field, the DOM-DOW value is taken to be a day-of-week (1-7,
where Sunday = 1, etc.).
Entering a ‘0’ in any particular field clears the previous entry.
There are 50 exception days available. PGUP and PGDN will display plans above or
below the current one. Also, by moving the cursor to the field directly below the
EXC DAY heading, the user can enter a number and display the page containing that
exception day plan.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

CIRCUIT OVERRIDES
Any circuit that can be activated by TOD can also be manually turned on or off. This
screen is accessed by entering a 6 from the TIME OF DAY menu.

Circuit Override (Y/N) Æ On/Off/TOD


Circuit 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Function CY2 CY3 CY4 SL2 SL3 OF1 OF2 OF3
State TOD TOD TOD TOD TOD TOD TOD TOD

Circuit 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Function OF4 OF5 FRE RFL TP1 TP2 TP3 TP4
State TOD TOD ON OFF TOD TOD TOD TOD
Figure 262 — Circuit Override setup screen
To override a circuit, move the cursor to the appropriate circuit and use the Y/N key
to rotate the state of the circuit from TOD to ON to OFF and back to TOD.
TOD = Default state. The circuit automatically turns ON and OFF per the TOD
program.
ON = The circuit is manually forced to ON (TOD commands are ignored).
OFF = The circuit is manually forced to OFF (TOD commands are ignored).
The circuit will remain in a manual state until changed by the user.
More circuits can be viewed by using the PGUP and PGDN keys to scroll up and down
through the list. Go directly to the page containing a given circuit by entering the
circuit number in the first field in any screen. The cursor can be moved to this field by
pressing the SHIFT and HOME keys simultaneously.
A list of available circuits and their functions can be viewed by pressing the HELP key
and paging up and down. Pressing HELP again will return to the programming screen.
This list can also be found in Appendix A of this manual.

286 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Daylight Savings Time

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


When programmed to do so, the 3000 Controller automatically adjusts its internal
clock for daylight savings time. The programming screen for this function is found
under option 7 of the TIME OF DAY menu.

Daylight Savings WOM=5 is Last Wk The default for


daylight savings is
Spring Fall OFF (blanks=off),
(0-12) (0-5) (0-12) (0-5) so it must be
Month WOM Month WOM programmed if DST
4 1 10 5 is used in your
area.
WOM= Week Of Month
Figure 263 — Daylight Savings Time setup screen
Daylight savings is programmed for Spring and Fall by month and week of month (5 =
last week of month). The 3000 assumes Sunday morning at 2:00 AM of the specified
week. To program the daylight savings parameters, move the cursor to the
appropriate field and enter the desired values. Press the ENTER key or a cursor key
to load the data. The sample screen above is the typical programming for daylight
savings areas (1st Sunday in April, last Sunday in October). Program ‘0’ s if daylight
savings is not used in your area.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

SYNC REFERENCE
This screen performs several functions. It allows the operator to set up the reference
time for syncing to the master cycle timers, and it also allows the user to define the
time to use when the controller’s internal clock is reset, and to set Interrupter mode.

Sync Reference HH:MM


Mode: 0 Time Clk Rst: 00:00
0 = Time Dependent Interrupter Y/N: N
1 = C/O/S Event Pulses/Cycle: 0
Time Dependent Cycle References
HH:MM HH:MM HH:MM
CYC 1: 00:00 CYC 2: 00:00 CYC 3: 00:00
CYC 4: 00:00 CYC 5: 00:00 CYC 6: 00:00
Figure 264 — Sync Reference Setup screen

Sync Reference Modes


The Sync Reference determines how the coordinator’s master cycle timers are
referenced to the internal clock of this controller. The sync reference programming
screen is selected by entering 8 at the TIME OF DAY menu. This screen defines the
mode and times that sync pulses will be referenced to.
There are two modes for sync reference: time dependent and C/O/S event.
In the time dependent mode (0), a fixed time is used for the reference point for
each cycle. Each cycle may have a different reference point. Note that these
times apply only when the SYNC SOURCE mode is programmed for
TOD/CL/INTER on the 4th page of the coord operating modes (MM-3-2-1-PGDN
3 times). These times do not apply to City Zero & Absolute modes which define
their own reference times.
In C/O/S event mode (1), a pattern change generates a new reference point for
that pattern. That reference will remain in effect until another pattern change
occurs. The reference time values do not apply to this mode though they remain
displayed if programmed.

Comparing Time Dependent And C/O/S Event Modes


The time dependent mode tends to be the most widely used mode because it is not
sensitive to event history. Since each cycle has a specific reference time, and
assuming all intersections in the system use the same reference times, then any two
intersections calling for the same cycle will be in sync regardless of previous event
history. This especially comes into play when intersections are zoned and perhaps
one group goes to a different cycle for a period, then later comes back to the same
cycle with the main group.
The C/O/S event mode is event history sensitive. As a result, all intersections must
have the exact same C/O/S changes and at the exact same times. If not, depending
on cycle lengths, there may well be differences in reference points and intersections

288 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Sync Reference

may be out of sync. This, of course, depends on the C/O/S change points and the
cycle length. One advantage the C/O/S event mode has is that it does not necessarily
have to offset seek when cycle only changes are made (as does the time dependent
mode).

Sync Reference Times


At the bottom of the screen are six fields for entering the sync reference times for
each cycle when using the time dependent sync reference mode. If not using this
mode, these times are ignored. The most widely used time is midnight (00:00) for all
cycles, which is the default. Times of 02:00 AM and 03:00 AM are also common.

External Clock Reset Time


The field In the upper right corner defines what the time clock will be set to when the
external time clock reset input is activated and then deactivated (trailing edge). Enter
the time in 24 hour format. Note that if the controller is NOT in interconnect mode, the
SPLIT2 input can be used as the Time Clock Reset Input.

Interrupter Mode
Below the clock reset time field is a field to enable interrupter pulses. If a Y is entered
in this field, the controller will superimpose extra pulses each cycle on the offset lines
in addition to the master sync pulse. Interrupter pulses are distributed over the cycle
and each is 1.5 seconds in duration. If INTERRUPTER (Y) is selected, a choice of 0-6
additional sync pulses may be added to the cycle. This feature allows regional
programmability in place of the older standard of four.
Interrupter pulses are typically used when the 3000 is used as a master to drive an
interconnect with electromechanical controllers as secondaries (slaves). Interrupter
pulses prevent a mechanical dial from excessive dwelling because the time between
interrupters establishes the max dwell time. The interrupters are asynchronous with
the master cycle timer so the slaves will not sync on an interrupter.

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Chapter 8 — Time of Day Functions

SETTING THE DATE AND TIME


This screen is used to set the date and time; it is accessed from option 9 from the
TIME OF DAY menu.

Set Time And Date

Time Date
HH:MM:SS MM/DD/YYYY
14:20:54 07/15/1993

Day Of Week= THURSDAY Week Of Year= 29


Figure 265 — Set Date and Time screen
To set or change the time, enter values for the hour (HH), minute (MM) and seconds
(SS) in 24 hour format. Hit ENTER or a cursor key for each value.
The time of day is critical when time based coordination is used. This time must be
exactly the same for all intersections within the system. To do so, set a watch to one
of the existing intersections, then set the time in this unit slightly ahead of the watch
and then wait before hitting ENTER after loading the seconds until the precise time.
To set or change the date, enter values for the month (MM), day of month (DD) and
year (YYYY). Hit ENTER or a cursor key for each value. When the date has been
entered, the day-of-week and week-of-year are displayed at the bottom of the screen.
There is no need to enter day-of-week or week-of-year; this information is calculated
automatically.

290 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Chapter 9 — Preemption

This section explains the usage and configuration of Preemption in a 3000 Series controller.
The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter:

An overview of preemption, on page 292.


Key concepts of preemption operation, on page 293.
Basic preemption run programming, on page 295.
Editing Per-run settings, on page 296.
Programming Interval data, on page 308.
Setting up preemption run flash plans, on page 323.
Using the pre-programmed runs in the Quick Setup screens, on page 324.
Examples of preemption programming, on page 332.

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Chapter 9 — Preemption

OVERVIEW
Preemption describes a process in which the normal operation of the controller is
suspended so that it can immediately (in most cases) cycle to a specific phase set, a
special sequence, or to the flashing state. Preemption occurs in response to special
preempt inputs and is typically used to prepare the intersection for emergency
vehicles or to clear tracks for trains.
Preemption may also be used to clear an exit ramp off a highway when it backs up.
Internal preemption executed within the controller has largely replaced older style
external logic preemption devices (e.g. ‘phase selectors’). A modern controller like the
3000E only needs a signal input to indicate that preemption is required, and will do
the rest itself.

Basic Description of Preemption Operation


When a preempt input becomes active:
1. If a preempt has previously occurred and the minimum re-service timer is still
timing (if used), the preempt input will be refused until this time period is
complete.
2. If a Delay is programmed for the preemption run, the delay must time-out
before the run will activate. (However, unlike a vehicle detection delay, the
preemption demand is recognized as soon as it appears.)
3. Once the run begins, the unit will proceed to interval #1, clearing any active
phases as necessary and acknowledging any preempt entry times as it does
so.
4. Starting with interval #1, each interval will:
time its TIME amount if it’s a fixed interval
time its TIME amount, then hold on the PE input if it’s a dwell interval
cycle between cyclic intervals, using the TIME as max times (or using
normal phase max times if TIME is set to zero (0))
generate flashing operation on phases, peds, overlaps, or PE outputs if any
of these are assigned to a flash plan
5. Intervals will activate, in order, after interval 1. Dwell or fixed intervals must be
served, unless preempt exit occurs first. Cyclic intervals are only served if
normal phase calls are present. The unit cycles between cyclic intervals until
the exit criteria is met. (Cyclic intervals are usually the last intervals of the run.)
6. If a higher priority preempt input becomes active and the current run is enabled
to Go to Higher PE, it will exit this run to go to the higher run. To make this
transition, the controller will execute any appropriate clearances.
7. Once the preempt input goes away and the preempt Duration Timer has timed
out, the unit will exit preemption as soon as it reaches an interval for which the
‘Exit’ parameter is enabled. The unit will exit according to its exit control
programming, which defines the next phases to be served and the placement
of exit calls.

292 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Overview

Key Concepts Used in Preemption


PE — Throughout this section, the terms ‘preemption’, ‘preempt’, and ‘PE’ are used
interchangably to refer to the preemption process. This is the situation when the
normal operation of the controller is temporarily suspended by an external signal,
during which time the controller provides an alternate sequence of signals. This
alternate sequence is known as a ‘preemption run’.
Run — A preemption sequence that consists of some number of intervals and
parameters that defines the way the sequence is executed. There are six preemption
runs available in the 3000E, each activated by a separate hardware input. Each run
may consist of as many as 32 of the 72 available intervals. When a run becomes
active the intervals are executed in sequence until the criteria for exiting the
preemption run are satisfied.
Interval — An interval defines a period of time in which the machine outputs are
programmed to be in a given state. There are several types of intervals:
Fixed interval — An interval that is timed for a specified amount of time, the
controller then advances to the next interval. An example of a fixed preempt
interval is a track clearance at the beginning of a railroad type preemption.
Dwell interval — An interval in which the controller rests until the criteria for exit
are satisfied, at which time it will terminate the preemption run and return to
normal operation.
Cyclic interval — An interval that will only be executed if there is demand on the
phases served by the interval. Normally, a cyclic interval would not be used
alone, but in conjunction with several other cyclic intervals. An interval is
considered cyclic if it is programmed as neither fixed nor dwell. Cyclic intervals
derive their timing from the normal phase timing associated with the phases that
are serviced in the interval. Intervals may include definitions for flash plans,
which are sets of flashing or dark outputs. Also, an interval may define a set of
outputs (sign power, for example) that are to be activated while the interval is in
effect.
Preemption operation and service control — These are any of a number of
miscellaneous set up times and controls relative to each preempt run. These include
items like the number of intervals required, input priorities, input lock and non-lock
mode, delay before preempt, how long before the preempt can be re-serviced, etc.
Preemption entry control — This defines how the normal control will be interrupted
to go to preemption. For example, preempt minimum green determines the minimum
amount of green will be serviced on a phase before interruption by the specific
preempt run is allowed. These times can be different from the normal phase times
and apply to entry into preempt only.
Preemption Call/Input/Demand — These terms are used interchangably in this
section to describe the electrical signal that appears at the controller’s physical pin or
BIU input connector showing that a preemption signal has been received at the
controller. This source of the call/input/demand, for example, could be a train
approaching a crossing or an emergency vehicle that has triggered a preemption
sensor at an intersection. There is no difference between a preemption call, a
preemption demand, and a preemption input.

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Chapter 9 — Preemption

Flash plan — This is a programming set that can be associated with an interval. It
modifies the interval when one wants it to flash some or all signal outputs based on
some condition. Flash plans are not required if the preemption plan does not involve
any flashing signals.
Exit interval — A specific interval to which the controller will exit after the last
preempt interval. It is optional to use a specific exit interval, or to exit to the next
phase with demand, or to the last phase served prior to preemption.

294 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Preemption Programming

PREEMPTION PROGRAMMING
The Preemption programming area is accessed from the Program Menu by selecting
option 4.Preemption. The full path to this screen is: MM > 3.Change Data >
4.Preemption.

To View/Prog Preempt Run Enter 1-6:

To Erase One Preempt Run Enter 1-6:

To Erase All Preempt Runs Enter 99:

To Load Default Values Enter 1-6:

Figure 266 – Preemption Options list


Viewing and Programming a Single Preemption Run
The process of viewing and editing a preemption run is described in much greater
detail starting on the next page. However to get started, just place the cursor in the
first row of this Preemption Options list and enter the number of the preemption run
(between 1 and 6) that you wish to edit. Press ENTER to proceed.

Clearing a Single Preemption Run


To clear the current values for any one of the six preemption runs, move the cursor
down to the second row and enter number of the run to be cleared. Then press the
ENTER key. A prompt will then ask to press the Y/N key to confirm the operation, or
press the MENU key to cancel it.

Clearing All Preemption Runs


Move the cursor to the third row and enter 99, and then press the ENTER button. A
prompt will then ask to confirm or cancel the operation as above.

Are You Sure You Want to Clear


All Preemption Runs?

Use (Y/N) to Execute, MENU to Cancel


Figure 267 – Erase All Preemption Runs verification screen
Loading Default Values to a Single Preemption Run
To set values and options in a run to standard defaults, move the cursor to the last
row in the Preemption Options list. Enter the number of the run you wish to revert to
defaults. A prompt will then ask to confirm or cancel the operation.

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Chapter 9 — Preemption

EDITING A PREEMPTION RUN


After you’ve selected a particular preemption run to view or edit on the Preemption
Options list and pressed enter, the Preemption Menu will be displayed for that run.
Preemption Run 1 Menu

1.Per Run Data


2.Interval Data
3.Flash Plan for Run 1 Intervals
4.Quick Setup Procedures

When Changing Run Data, 1st Disable Run


Figure 268 – Preemption Run 1 Menu
The first three options in this menu are considered part of the “Detailed Setup.”
Option 1, “Per Run Data” is used to program parameters that apply to the run as a
whole. The second item, “Interval Data” is used to program the timing intervals that
make up the preempt run. And the third command, “Flash Plan for Run # Intervals” is
used to establish flash plans for the run, if this option is required.
The fourth option, “Quick Setup Procedures,” provides a simpler set of programming
options that can be used if one is setting up one of two specific types of preemption
runs: ‘Basic Fire’ and ‘Railroad’. For more information about the quick setup
procedures, see page 324.

Per Run Data


Each preemption run has five screens of per-run parameters that can be accessed
using the Per Run Menu.
Per Run 1 Menu

1.Per Run Parameters


2.Per Run Times
3.Entry Parameters
4.Per Interval Parameters
5.Exit Parameters

Figure 269 – Per Run Menu for preemption run 1

296 3000 Series Traffic Controllers


Editing A Preemption Run

Per Run Parameters


This screen is displayed when a 1 is entered from the Per Run Menu. It allows the
programming of various parameters that control how the overall preemption run that
is currently being edited will operate.

Run 1 Enable, RR, Lock, Priority


VALUE(YES/NO)
Run Enable: N Override FLASH: N
Railroad: N Go To Higher PE: Y
PE Input Lock: Y NEMA Priority: Y
Early PE Out: Y Hold Only: N
Max Intervals: 6 User Priority: 1
VALUE(0-32) VALUE(1-6)
Figure 270 – Per Run Parameters, Screen 1
Paging down from this screen will display one more screen of Per Run Parameters.
(See page # for details.)

Note The Preempt Run must be disabled before editing. The 3000 unit will not allow a
preempt run to be edited while it is enabled. It must then be re-enabled after
programming to allow preempt to operate (see description below).

Run Enable
Each preempt run has an input associated with it, but for the input to activate its run,
the run also has to be enabled. Otherwise, the input will be ignored. Program a ‘Y’ to
enable this preempt run. The 3000 does not allow a preempt run to be programmed
without first disabling the run. Conversely, a run cannot be disabled while the
associated input is active.

Railroad
When enabled (Y) the preempt is considered a railroad run. This affects input
operation (debounce criteria) such that the input must remain active for 1.5 seconds
before it is recognized. It must then remain inactive for 3 seconds before it is
considered gone. When disabled (N), the run input operates the same as any other
input (NEMA). This parameter also modifies the way that the preempt re-service time
is treated, see below.

PE Input Lock
This parameter is only meaningful when a preemption delay is used. (See the
description of ‘Delay’.) If enabled with a ‘Y’, the preemption call is retained in memory
during the preemption delay, until the run is activated, even if the input is already
gone. This mode might be used for something like a fire house pushbutton where the
run is called for, but delayed for a period after the button is pushed. When lock is not
enabled (N), the input must still be present when the Delay Timer has timed out for
the run to be activated. This mode might be used with a ramp spill back detector at
the top of the ramp where a steady active input throughout the delay period is an

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Chapter 9 — Preemption

indication that the ramp is backed up (presence detector, input stays active when
vehicles are not moving).

Early PE Out
Early preemption output tells the controller to turn ON all Interval 1 outputs associated
with this preemption run as soon as the controller begins clearing the active phases.