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University of Bedfordshire Department of Applied Social Studies

PAGE 1

Extract taken from: Littlemore, S. (2012) ‘Universities need to tell students the rules about
plagiarism, says adjudicator’, The Guardian, 11 June [Online]. Available at:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/jun/11/universities-students-rules-plagiarism-adjudicator
(Accessed: 18 October 2012)

“The OIA's chief executive, Rob Behrens, says the problem of student ‘academic misconduct’, or
cheating, appears to be growing. ‘When I go round to universities I realise they are already dealing
with significant amounts of academic misconduct that doesn't ever come to the OIA.’…Behrens
says universities should do more to communicate their rules, procedures and sanctions on
plagiarism. And Liam Burns, president of the National Union of Students agrees, especially to
avoid ‘accidental cheating’, such as when a student has been unclear about when to cite a source.
‘I'd like to see more universities use the plagiarism software for student training as well as
detection. If students can see what sets off the 'plagiarism alarm' that helps’.

‘I also worry some academics are reluctant to stir up cases of minor plagiarism in a student's first
year because they worry the repercussions might be severe, but if plagiarism goes unchecked
early on, come the final year, a student can be in really hot water.’

Behrens urges continuing investment in both detection and prevention. ‘Good students and
universities have common cause here,’ he says. ‘Where academic misconduct goes undetected it
is hard working students who are disadvantaged by a small minority of their peers. Students and
universities can be reassured we are not a soft option on this issue.’ ” (217 words)

Paraphrasing – is the following acceptable? YES or NO?

According to Rob Behrens, the QIA’s chief executive, there is an increasing problem when it comes
to student academic misconduct or cheating. He goes on to say that more should be done by
universities to let student know their rules, procedures and sanctions on plagiarism. Liam Burns,
president of the National Union of Students, is in agreement with Behrens stating that he wants to
see universities use the plagiarism software to train students as well as for detection of plagiarism.
Burns also states that he worries academics are disinclined to stir up instances of minor plagiarism
when students are in their first year because they are concerned that the consequences might be
severe, but if plagiarism goes unchallenged in the first year, in the final year a student can be in
quite a bit of trouble. Behrens urges investment in both prevention and detection to continue
because universities and good students have something in common which is that where plagiarism
goes undetected it is students who work hard that are disadvantaged by a small minority of other
students.

Sue Malherbe November 2012


University of Bedfordshire Department of Applied Social Studies

PAGE 2

Write a short paragraph – three or four sentences long – for an essay based on the two
extracts.

The first original text is taken from page 432 of an article in the journal ‘Policy & Politics’ by
Giuliano Bonoli

The welfare states of the trente glorieuses or the golden age of welfare capitalism (1945–75) had
one key objective: to protect the income of the male breadwinner. […] Of course, under normal
circumstances the male breadwinner was expected to obtain his income from labour market
participation. But if bad luck struck, be it in the form of an industrial accident, invalidity, sickness, or
unemployment, the welfare state was there, ready to step in. The male breadwinner logic extended
beyond working age, as old age income replacement programmes typically paid pensions to the
husband and included a supplement for his spouse, the so-called couple pensions.

The correct way to reference this article in a reference list would be:

Bonoli, G. (2005) ‘The politics of the new social policies: providing coverage against new social
risks in mature welfare states’, Policy & Politics 33(3) pp.431–49

The second original text is taken from page 91 Ken Blakemore’s book ‘Social Policy: An
introduction’

The Beveridge committee’s plan for social security, implemented in 1946, was built upon the
insurance principle. But it was assumed at the time that most married women would not continue
in paid work. [...] In short, early social security policy assumed that is was right for married
women’s security to be determined by their husbands’ contribution history.

The correct way to reference this book in a reference list would be:

Blakemore, K. (1998) Social Policy: An introduction, Buckingham: Open University Press

Sue Malherbe November 2012