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Message

From: Nathaniel Drum [nathaniel.drum@alumni.unc.edu]


Sent: 9/28/2018 4:55:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Future of Silent Sam

As an alumnus ofthe University ofNorth Carolina at Chapel Hill, it is my beliefthat the statue known
colloquially as "Silent Sam" was illegally removed and damage by a series ofuniversity students and outside
protesters against the explicit wishes ofthe University students and alumni.

Therefore, "Silent Sam" should be returned to his rightful place in McCorkle Place. In the future, it is my hope
that the University, campus police, and Chapel Hill police will actively work to discourage and prevent such
wanton acts oflawless and violence which resulted in the statue's vandalism and removal.

Regards,
Nathaniel C. Drum
University ofNorth Carolina at Chapel Hill
Class of2018
Message
From: Randy Bryar
Sent: 9/28/2018 4:58:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To the Chancellor, Administration, and Board of Trustees of UNC Chapel Hill:

I request that you place the sacred statue of Silent Sam at the exact spot it was previously located. This statue
honors brave young men who left UNC to serve bravely and die in the military. Each one of these men is an
American military veteran and should be honored as such. Students and the one professor who participated in
this felonious desecration of property should have long ago been dismissed from UNC and criminal charges
filed against them.

Respectful 1y,
David R. Bryan

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: REDACTED I
Sent: 9/28/2018 5:01:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

I am currently an undergraduate student at UNC, and I would like to see Silent S am as far out of the public eye
as the law allows. If it must be on display, I would prefer an indoor location, preferably a museum where it will
not be mistaken for a symbol honoring or memorializing the Southern Rebellion and the white supremacy
embodied by that uprising, but as a piece of history.

I would ask that, wherever it ends up being displayed, it is contextualized with the words of Julian Carr at its
dedication speak and a frank explication of the historical context of racial terrorism that surrounded the creation
of Sam and the multitude of other Confederate monuments erected across the Jim Crow South in the late 19th
and early-mid 20th centuries. I would also ask that the context includes a frank discussion of how long students
have protested this monument, and the actions or lack thereof taken by the University in response.

Finally, wherever this statue is displayed (and I would ask that it be displayed unaltered and unrestored if it has
sustained any damage), I would ask that the context includes and honors the protesters who finally brought the
statue down in an act of justified civil disobedience that will be looked back on as an assertion of the forward
march of anti-racist justice.

A museum is the best place for the monument, but as long as it is out of the public eye where it will only draw
white supremacists and their sympathizers, and as long as it has proper context, I will be satisfied.

Thank you for your time.

Best,
REDACTED
Message
From: Sean Fernandes [sfernandes@a lumni .unc.edu]
Sent: 9/28/2018 5:25:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocate Silent Sam to the Graveyard

To be clear, my personal preference would be to not erect the statue again in any form or location. But if Silent
Sam must stand on campus, I think the best place for it is the graveyard. Two of the main arguments I hear in
favor of maintaining it on campus are: (l) remembering the UNC students who fought and died for the
confederacy and (2) remembering history generally. I believe a graveyard placement should satisfy both
arguments.

In response to point 1, surely there is no better place to memorialize deceased students than in the graveyard.

In response to point 2, I agree that history ought to be remembered, but we need not celebrate it. The graveyard
would be an excellent place to foster quiet contemplation of our past, while also making clear that the white
supremacist ideology underlying both the statue and its erection have no place in the modern life of this
campus.

Sean W. Fernandes
UNG-Chapel Hill, Class of 2013
sfernandes@alumni.unc.edu I Linkedln
Message
From: Ben Williami
Sent: 9/28/2018 5:ns:Uj 1-'IVI
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

Hello,

I think Sam should be placed back on the monument. The protesters and the public don't know all of the facts.
Here is why:

Wikipedia/Silent Sam

Early history, 1909-1913


Campaign

The statue in John A. Wilson's Waban Studio, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

During the American Civil War, over 1,000 students and employees of the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill (UNC) enlisted with either army.[ 19l Out of all enlisted from the university, 287 lost their
lives. [201 An appeal to the Confederacy from University president David Lowry Swain, to exclude from
conscription students in their final two years, was initially granted but soon revoked.l2 11 Swain was able to keep
the university open throughout the war by educating the few students too young to enlist, exempt because of ill
health, or discharged because of war injuries,r221 though the senior class in the spring of 1865 had only one
student. [211

In 1907, the North Carolina chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) decided that its
next major goal was to "be the erection, on the campus at the State University, of a monument to the
students and faculty, who went out from its walls in 1861 to fight and die for the South. 11 l23 l Later
meetings described the belief that UNC students and employees who served in either army "are worthy of
a monument" which "should ever be before the eyes of the present-day students" _l1 9l The re2uest for a
monument was presented to, and approved by, the UNC board of trustees on June 1, 1908.12 l
Message
From: Richard's Gmail
Sent: 9/28/2018 5:36:25 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]
Subject: Proposal for Silent Sam
Flag: Follow up

Dear chancellor Folt,


I'm writing to make a proposal related to the silent Sam monument. I imagine you are receiving a lot of
comments about this matter, so I will try to be brief.
I fall solidly in the camp of those who believe the toppling of the statue was destruction of public
property. This opinion has nothing to do with whether I am in favor or against the statue.
I believe that if the statue is removed, that we as a society and as a university are teaching that
vandalism and violent protest are the correct way to protest. This carries the risk of further unlawful
destruction; which is exactly what happened on our campus when the vandals at the Durham courthouse were
not appropriately prosecuted. In that case, the lack of consequences allowed those people to learn that
destruction of public property was allowed, if not promoted. It is my understanding that the leaders of
the Durham destruction also incited the crowd at silent Sam. It is also my understanding that many of
these leaders came here from other areas of the country.
I also believe that it is wrong to attempt to erase history. Removing statues does not change the past.
We should instead learn from our past; both the good and the bad. Especially at a university, the duty is
to teach and to learn for the betterment of the future.
Therefore, my proposal is as follows:
1. Replace silent Sam. Not to do so only rewards the vandals for their unlawful behavior. If the statue
were to be removed it should have been through peaceful protest and appropriate deliberations, not mob
violence.
2. At a closeby location in Mccorkle Place, construct a likewise, generally matching monument in memory
of Union soldiers who were either students/alumni of the University; or simply honoring North Carolinians
who served the Union.
Having a monument to both sides creates a real learning and teaching opportunity.
3. Construct a plaque between the two monuments giving historical context.
4. Use the dedication of these monuments as a learning opportunity for students as well as the general
public, to highlight the reasons for the civil War: including the issues and context of that age and the
reasons citizens chose to fight for secession or for union; the evils of slavery and our gratitude that
the Union vanquished the south so as to end slavery and to preserve our country. Have speakers such as
Bud Roberston and Freddie Kiger relate history and context.
Especially considering the continuing calls for erasing all records of our past - including Sanders, Carr
and as of this morning Kenan - we need to promote learning, tolerance, understanding and respect for one
another; across differences of opinion. And, we need to be reminded of our history - not try to erase it
- to admit our mistakes and move forward as better people and citizens.
Message
From: Blythe Devlin
Sent: 9/28/2018 6:12:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Placement of Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Foltz,


I write to you regarding the decision of where to place the silent Sam statue. I am not associated with
UNC but I hope you will consider my perspective. I have lived in chapel Hill for over 30 years and my
children were raised here and still live in the area. I was born in Macon, Ga in 1951 and segregation was
an integral part of my early years. Confederate monuments were in every town I knew and it has only been
in recent years that I have fully appreciated the pain and denigration that their presence causes to the
members of the African American population. For that, I have apologized to my African American friends.
Returning silent Sam to a place of dignity and honor on a campus that claims to foster education and
empowerment for all would be such slap in the face to all of your students of color and a misleading
message to those (whites?) who wish to see the statue returned. I urge you to seek a place in an
appropriate museum where the whole story can be told and those who wish to do so can seek out and
understand its history. To quote a dear friend who was born and raised in rural NC, "when you know
better, you do better." I think we all know better now.
Thank you and best regards,
Blythe Devlin
Message
From: Ray English
Sent: 9/28/2018 6:17:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

You have done a good job of hiding this comment section. If people aren't diligent in their
search they will never find it.
As for Silent Sam or anything else in NC, stop for just a moment and think ....
If you call NC home would you want a person or a group of people to come to your town or
state and tell you what you should believe?
That statue has been there for more than 100 years. This group of haters will be gone from
here in a few years.
That statue belongs to the people of NC.
NC is in The United States of America where we have a process of voting for what we want.
Just because you support hate for anything you don't like doesn't make it right.
I am open minded and believe everyone's voice should be heard not just the people that hate.
If you or your students hate NC or anything it you are free to leave.
That statue is represents history. If that upsets you or anyone else then they have to look on
the bright side.
That's the way things used to be. Look how good they have it now.
If you advocate the removal of a statue because you hate it you are sending the wrong
message.
Teach your students and everyone to respect each other and do things right. Don't act as an
illegal hate mob.

Ray English
Message
From: El len Black
Sent: 9/28/2018 6:19:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Fate of Silent Sam

To Whom It May Concern,

As a UNC alumni, I feel like I have a pretty good perspective on the majority-held attitude surrounding Silent
Sam while I attended the university from 2011 to 2015: complete indifference. I can't speak for how everyone
feels of course, but I and those around me didn't (and still don't) spend much time at all reflecting on this old
statue. That being said, there are many students, faculty, alumni and others who are deeply offended by the
statue left standing, even after its racist and problematic past has been brought out into the open. Considering
the statue holds no benefit for the people who walk by it every day (and most don't even give it a passing
glance), why not respect the wishes of the offended and have it removed? Why hang onto the hurtful message
you are sending to people of color by leaving it up? Hate is not the Carolina Way and I will be sad to see my
university hold onto this message of hate from decades and centuries passed. Please do the right thing and
remove the statue from McCorkle Place. Let us acknowledge the past without glorifying it, and let us show the
world that hatred and prejudice have no place at UNC.

Thank you,
Ellen Black
UNC Class of 2015
Message
From: Gregg Doyle
Sent: 9/28/2018 6:25:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fate of statue

Place the statue in a Confederate cemetery or the campus cemetery to honor those who lost their lives. Its
pedestal should be made much smaller to bring the statue to eye level and remove an element of its mystique.
Place it within a space including contextual information.

Gregory Doyle '77


Message
From: Daniel Lanier
Sent: 9/28/2018 6:38:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

\Vith all polite respect, Silent Sam is part of North Carolina history, the tearing down of the statue at the hands of a
mob cannot be rewarded.
If Silent Sam is moved because he was torn down, I have to ask, what lesson has been taught? Only the lesson that
mob rule and violence works, only the lesson that rather than engage in rational debate and peaceful protest, any
action can be solved by destroying property and breaking the rules.

Is this a lesson UNC wants to teach? Does UNC want not only its students but its opponents to see that violence
and mob rule are accepted in our society? Today it's tearing down Confederate Statutes, but if this is accepted then
it sets a precedent that will be followed by others, on their side and their opponent's side.

As a North Carolina Resident I urge you to replace the statue on its original location and make it clear that if it is to
be moved, it must be done through the proper methods. Otherwise I fear the escalation in violence that this could
help cause.
Message
From: Felix Colson
Sent: 9/28/2018 7:27:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re Silent Sam

Dear University of North Carolina,

I am a member of the class of 2016. Do not resurrect the monument to racism that was Silent Sam. Create art in
its place imagined by black folks, for black folks and paid to black folks. Do not resurrect the monument to
racism that was Silent Sam.

In community,

Felix Colson
Message
From: Mark Lynn
Sent: 9/28/2018 7:27:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument

Despite a minority who want the monument moved, I think it should be placed back in its original
location.

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: E-Scrap
Sent: 9/28/2018 7:44:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent SAM

y'all need to put it back up an Lock up the ones who distoryed it! get
a set of balls an Don't give in to One who want to distory history
before they learn it!
P.S. spelling might be bad, using system older than your school is!
A Loyal Confederate
Message
From: Judy P Smith
Sent: 9/28/2018 7:51:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put silent Sam exactly where he was before the criminals torn him down.
Judy Smith
Message
From: Bear Brown
Sent: 9/28/2018 8:26:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument Location

Put the silent Sam back where he belongs. That statue represents many people who served their country and
fellow student body and never returned. It is an honorable memorial and your seeking to stifle its
meaning by relegating it to some campus corner basement is NOT ACCEPTABLE. You are failing your state and
your people simply by asking and I strongly believe that your continuing this charade will come back to
haunt you at the expense of the state.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Judy & Ed Holland
Sent: 9/28/2018 8:40:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocation of Silent Sam

Chancellor Folt,

I believe the Silent Sam statue should be moved to the NC Museum of


History. It does not belong on the grounds of a state university. If it is
displayed at the museum, the text describing its history can be displayed
and would be accessible to many citizens of North Carolina.

Thanks for the chance to give my opinion.

Judy Holland, MPH


UNC School of Public Health
Message
From: huntlawncare
Sent: 9/28/2018 9:11:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put it back where it was and more secure so it can't be tore down.
Message
From: Lee Thompson I
Sent: 9/28/2018 9:15:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Slient Sam

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Dear Sis or mama
It would be very appreciative if Silent Sam would be restored to his property place .he is part of our history and
deserves respect & honor. thank you for your time
Lee Thompson
Message
From: Will Al len
Sent: 9/28/2018 9:16:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition and preservation of Silent Sam

I have a master's in city and regional planning from UNC, live in Chapel Hill, work in Chapel Hill for a
NGO, and am an occasional volunteer lecturer in IDST 184 on the UNC campus. I am appalled that I
feel the need to provide a comment about this situation, but since all emails are subject to public
records law, I suspect some with the same concerns I have will be reluctant to comment.

First and foremost, I find it abhorrent that UNC did not take swift action to try to remove Silent Sam
from Mccorkle Place when it became extremely clear recently from the historical records that the
provenance of the statute was a symbol of white supremacy and oppression, which the Julian Carr
speech confirmed . And even though I did not support the methods that resulted in the recent removal
of Silent Sam, it is abundantly clear that returning Silent Sam to its location on Mccorkle Place is
completely unworkable.

To me, Silent Sam needs to remain in storage until one of two things happens: 1) a museum in
Raleigh is able to find a secure location where it can be reviewed in its historical context with other
Confederate materials, or 2) a private donor wants to pay to locate it somewhere on private property
subject to local zoning laws somewhere in North Carolina.

Will Allen
Message
From: Jane Norris
Sent: 9/28/2018 9:36:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To chancellor carol Fort and the UNC chapel Hill Board of Trustees
I would suggest placing silent Sam in the cemetery on UNC campus. He will be in a safe place with
those who attended UNC and fought during the civil War. I attended UNC chapel Hill during 1952-1956. I
always considered silent Sam a fixture on campus as is the old Well. Never in my wildest dreams did I
consider the statue a symbol of white supremacy. But now I realize times have changed and the younger
generation looks at the statue with different eyes. I do think the cemetery would be a comfortable and
accepted place for him and he would be among those for whom he was placed on campus to memorialize.
Thank you for the opportunity to publicly express my feelings about silent Sam.
Janes. Norris
BSN 1956
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Tim Duskin
Sent: 9/28/2018 10:02:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear UNC :

I say put the monument back up where it was. If you do not, you are giving in to and encouraging mob rule . Most of the
rabble who vandalized the monument were shipped in from out of town.

Another thing, though, is that you should check out what is being taught at UNC. I went to the University of Oklahoma for
my MA, and four of my five professors openly stated at the start of the class that they were teaching from a Marxist
viewpoint. One boasted at the end of the class that he was glad to have had the opportunity to spread Marxism and
Leninism . And it was the Workers World Party, a breakoff of the Revolutionary Communist Party, which was behind the
destruction of the monument in Durham .

Marxism produced the worst form of slavery the world has ever seen. The mass enslavement in Communist countries was
the worst ever. In fact, the Global Slavery Index says that the country today in which there is the most slavery is North
Korea, where one in ten people there today are slaves, and that is a Communist country. And five of the top ten countries
on their Index are African ones, where the slaves are black. Everything says that you should not listen to these people
who are toppling these monuments.

Sincerely,

Timothy A. Duskin
Message
From: Lou Johanson
Sent: 9/28/2018 10:20:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: The Importance of Teach ing History

Place the statue at the front of the History Building.

From: Lou Johanson <

Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2018 11:55 PM


To: uncmonument@unc.edu
Subject: The Importance of Teaching History

After reading your Department's statement on the removal of a stature, I know that you have failed at your mission to
teach History and particularly the reason for teaching History. Only by learning History can we understand the present
or the future. As once brilliantly stated if we do not know history we are doomed to repeat it. You speak of safety in
current, popular terms. What about the safety of true knowledge, the foundations of our republic and that we have
made and acknowledged mistakes and made efforts to correct them. You must use this situation of a young soldier
created by an artist as a "teaching moment". When you remove this "symbol" you have not created a job, assured a
better life for no one nor made any student better educated. You have only erased a chance to educate and fallen for
the whim of a moment. You should be courageous. Was the Coliseum destroyed because slaves were there?
Sent from Lou's iPad mini
Message
From: Michael Simons
Sent: 9/28/2018 11:00:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Return him to his place of Honor on the UNC Campus where it was!
Message
From: Michael Gonzales
Sent: 9/28/2018 11:09:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

In my opinion, silent Sam should go right back up where it was.

Michael Gonzales
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Charles D Slater Jr I
Sent: 9/28/2018 11:39:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Letter of interest

chancellor Folt

My Name is Charles Darwin slater Jr. My Family settled the Delta of the
Mississippi River during the late 1800's and into this day
where we own a plantation.My Grandfather was a MD trained and interned
at Tulane Medical school.
When the need arose he purchased a plot of land somewhat over 200 acres
that also included the deeds to over 200 slaves.
My Grandmother being the Director of charity Hospital and my Grandfather
both Good God following Baptist of course had no
choice except to take the free slaves in and care for them the best they
could.My Grandfather was the only medical doctor for almost 200 miles
and when the people on the other side of the River needed attention they
would raise a flag and he and one of the strongest men would row the
tiny row boat across the great Mississippi to the encampment where they
lived.Needless to say it was quite a treacherous journey,but one that
had to be done.
We grew Citrus-and various vegetables and our parents tended livestock
where my Father raised breed and trained Arabians.By now your telling
your self -why am i reading this as it has nothing to do with the issue
at hand,I beg you to continue.You see my father being a strong
intelligent keeper of the plantation was pulling a orange tree out of
the ground and the tractor flipped over and fell on top of him and
crushed his skull .one of the Farm workers heard the engine revving and
knowing something was in trouble went running looking for my father
where upon he found him pinned under the tractor.This gentleman was
possibly 6'7' over 60 years of age and he literally lifted the tractor
up pulled my father out and dragged him to safety.This man was a 1st
decedent of a creole french slave brought over by King Louie 's wife
when she bought the land then called the louisiana boundry.our property
was well over 2000 sq miles.
His name was Sidney and he was quite a gentle strong smart and kind
person.Sidney picked up my father and ran 45 miles up hwy 23 almost to
English turn when my grandmother found him.Together they took him to
charity hospital where he laid for 2 years in a semi comatose state with
an open skull being treated with sulfur drugs (1950) and when the
swelling and the infection went down my grandfather sewed him up.He was
18 at the time.My father as time progressed went on into life
Business Built several Hotels Became the largest private offshore
Marine oil field boat operator -after which he sold the company to
various entities for over 200 million dollars and retired.

Now chancellor in Lou1s1ana Particularly we lost our monuments for no


reason other then bigotry and for the combined effort of a stacked city
consul and a very bigoted Mayor . . No good has come of it and in fact
only because of it we have lost thousands of tourist a year with a crime
and murder rate per capita of over 98% and we have lost a large portion
of our culture.The people behind such movement have nothing to loose nor
nothing to gain nor anything to fear.When people came to New Orleans It
was because it was the south -it was the confederacy-the civil war -the
antebelem homes the cotton plantations the OLD HISTORY OF THE SLAVE
TRADE -It was because of the civil war it became a long lived treasure
that never haunted blacks or anyone for that matter -but one that if you
ask made blacks proud and and made them worthy and part of NEW
ORLEANS.-The combined effort of Al Sharpton BLM and Mitch Landrieu and
whom ever have some lost forgotten desire that they are still being
victimized because of the southern Heritage and a Pseudo White Supremacy
movement will never move on as long as there is something left to gain
posture around.This type of Black behaviorism you know will never
existentially go away.The speech given at the ceremony of silent Sams
dedication was -may have and could be construed into many different
reasoning's as the reader sees fit.Yes it provokes and its sharp tonged
hatred in many ways was reminiscence of the times that were happening
then --NOT NOW .You cant satisfy everyone with every statement-but yet
chancellor does this statement hundred years ago not reflect into the
minds of the decedents today of the lO's of thousands of the men women
and children who dropped their books their home duties ,their offspring
and made it their duty to defend that with was considered to them the
same life that Sidney felt for my father in 1932.
It is and has become a very sad shame of affairs that today outsiders
-paid (SOROS) left-wing Protesters hired buy the University organized by
Dixon and fueled by BLM -leverage a point of inflection to as the Honest
and the humane and the cultural aspect and concept of silent Sam -NOT
JUST THE FACT THAT HE WAS A CONFEDERATE THUS HE IS GUILTY OF EITHER
OWNING OR KILLING THOSE THAT WOULD FREE SLAVES but that There is no
compromise and no effort to educate the ones who would tumble Historical
monuments without even the slightest bit of TRUE "CHANCELLOR" "TRUE"
history and cultural meaning.Those same feelings when Sam was
memorialized,are the same feelings that are being felt today-Yes we are
in a different time a different space -but the feelings and the effects
and the results that are being promulgated are the same -they are
dangerous and they will ultimately bring about a civil disobedience.if
left unchecked.
My conclusion and I apologize and as I very much appreciate the time you
have taken reading this.our student body must take direction.Has it
taken direction from you-from the Board of Alumni The board of Governors
whom have they taken direction from in the last several years when it
comes down to silent Sam and the ones opposing simply because he was a
boy who left school and went to fight in a war with which he was
rightfully and dutifully called upon to do so.can anyone say they have
brought Conclusive matter to the understanding of the students -if you
have and it has not prevented this and you feel you have done your best
then certainly a newer approach-possibly a museum of confederacy
heritage -if you have not chancellor then you have failed as a leader
and a director of the minds and souls of the very students -even the
students that laid down their books took up the rifles and reported to
duty as they were dutifully required over lOOyears ago.How did the
chancellor -The alumni and how did the board of governors act in
186O--HOW WOULD THEY ACT TODAY?

Again my most sincere appreciation for your time .I pray a solution can
come to honor those whose lives were lost and also to somehow satisfy
the PAID -ORGANIZED-LEVERAGED -protesters who have not a single interest
in any part of this except to disrupt and falsely promulgate a division
among not only the races but also the cultures and the beliefs of the
Citizens of the USA.

Charles D slater Jr.


Message
From: liz barnes
Sent: 9/28/2018 11:46:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

please put silent sam back on the pedestal he was removed from. what occurred on your campus was
reprehensible and should not have been allowed to happen.

Get Outlook for Android


Message
From: James Danie l
Sent: 9/28/2018 11:55:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to put Silent Sam?

There is a pedestal in Mccorkle Place ready and waiting.


James Daniel
UNC '78
Message
From: Allen Smith
Sent: 9/29/2018 12:09:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: removal of Sam

To whom it may concern,

I do favor relocating "Silent Sam" to a different location on the campus. I probably would suggest near the history
department.

I do suggest that before you relocate it, you very publicly announce the arrests and penalties to be applied to the mob
members who participated in the destruction. I would especially make note of the professor who was involved and the
actions you have taken against him. Peaceful protests are good lessons for students, but to allow a teacher to participate
and direct mob action, destruction and violence is totally unacceptable.

Allen Smith
Tryon NC
Message
From: rizatt2
Sent: 9/29/2018 1:14:11 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: rizatt2@cox. netrcfa n0349
Subject: Idea for placement of Silent Sam.

To whom it may concern.

If you don't want to break the law, put the monument back where it sat for 100 years, because that's where state
law says it should have been undisturbed.

Thank You.
Izatt Family and possible future alumni.

Sent via the Samsung an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


Message
From: Dale Wilson
Sent: 9/29/2018 1:42:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Dale Wilson [dalewilsonl@cox.net]
Subject: Silent Sam - Restore To Origna l Location

Please restore Silent Sam to the original location from where it was removed without fail.

Respectfu Ily,
Dale Wilson

Manhattan, KS (Boone, NC native and ASU graduate)


Message
From: Kamila Ku?niak
Sent: 9/29/2018 5:26:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

When is the silent Sam statue going to get fixed?


Message
From: Ken Ramsey
Sent: 9/29/2018 5:38:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a lifelong North Carolinian, I am highly disappointed in the school.


"The Boy Soldier" aka Silent Sam should be returned to the original location where he has sat for over a
century. That is the only legal, moral, and historical option.
Further, anyone who desecrates the memorial in any way should be criminally prosecuted and banned from
any UNC property. If a student, they should be immediately expelled.

Kenneth E. Ramsey, USN-Ret


Burgaw, NC

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Peggy D
Sent: 9/29/2018 6:41:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam should be returned to its original location and protected. This is not a racist thing. That statue is in
remembrance if UNC students who fought, some whom never returned. My husband's family is from NC and while his
own great-great-grandfather survived, many other relatives did not.

Put Silent Sam back!!! Never should have been removed in the first place.

Peggy Dunning
Message
From: Paul
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:06:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he was and arrest the criminals that took him down.
Message
From: Darrel Wilson
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:19:12 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please place silent Sam back on his pedestal in his original location. History isn't one sided and
neither should this country's History be either. We are one because we are many.
Have a Dixie Day.
Darrel Wilson
Calhoun GA
Message
From: William Calary
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:28:44 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Back on his pedestal!!!!!!!!

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Walter [wbridgeman@remedics.com]
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:30:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Committee,

In my opinion, I would like to see the base remain, the original SS placed in a museum, and a hologram of SS as
a replacement.

To place Silent Sam back on the podium will be too divisive and will become a perpetual battleground. The
hologram will be 21st century. It could always be turned off when necessary and the original Silent Sam can
become a teaching symbol.

Sincerely,

walter bridgeman' 83

\Valter V. .Bridgeman
CEO
REDACTED
REDACTED

Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7 edge.


Message
From: Natalie Rowntree
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:16:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Can we please return Silent Sam to his platform? Educate those who tried to destroy it as to the meaning
of the monument--teach them tolerance--teach them that the world is full of monuments and events and people
whom they won't agree with-- that does not give anyone the right to destroy a billboard, topple a statue, or
assault people
who disagree- teach them to be mindful--because we all have a right to our opinions-History is history--
whether
it is Silent Sam, Martin Luther King, or Abraham Lincoln--if you do not like it, that is your right--it is not your
right to
rewrite history--and the governing bodies need to tell these spoiled children to behave or go back home to
Mommy
and Daddy--What gives anyone the right to act like these people did?
Please send a message to the people that tore Silent Sam down--and to the next group who whines--THIS IS
NOT
TOLERATED--had the first group been adequately punished, it would have stopped there .....

Natalie Rowntree
Stem, NC
Message
From: Mark Patton
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:49:25 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Our past makes us learn

our history in our country and the world educates us to who we are and were as humans. It should be
preserved in a respectfu l way .
Message
From: revisl
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:49:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Thoughts

I just don't understand why anyone would want to prominently place (or keep in place) a monument at
our university that reminds students of an ugly chapter in our history that involved enslaving humans.
If the monument must remain for other historical references, let it be in a remote location so only
those who value its sentiments can see it. Thank you for the opportunity to share our thoughts. Amy
Tanner Revis ('84), Rutherfordton.
Message
From: Charles Priestley
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:57:10 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a British historian of the American Civil War, who has friends and relations in North Carolina and a great
love of the state, and who visited the UNC campus as recently as May of this year, I am appalled at the mindless
destruction of the statue of Silent Sam. This should never have been permitted.

Surely it should not take an Englishman to remind Americans of the wise words of President Theodore
Roosevelt during his visit to Georgia in 1905:
"All Americans who are worthy of the name feel an equal pride in the valor of those who fought on one side or
the other, provided only that each did with all his might and soul and strength and mind his duty as it was given
him to see his duty."

The statue should be restored and put back in position in order to remind Carolinians of the sacrifices made by
their ancestors, and those who pulled it down should be severely punished.

Charles Priestley
Henley-on-Thames
England
Message
From: Herbert Thomas Morgan _
Sent: 9/29/2018 9:31:32 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he was and demand that the lowlifes that destroyed it pay !
Message
From: Charles Roseberry
Sent: 9/29/2018 9:39:21 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please, restore Silent Sam to where he belongs.

Please place him right back where he was before the illegal activists removed him and destroyed property. The
abridgment of rule of law should not force conformation to the mere wants and desires of those who destroyed
the property.

Thank You, Respectfully,

Charles Roseberry
Message
From: Doolittle
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:01:27 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument

Dear chancellor,
Please restore the "silent Sam" monument to its original location, and
protect it from further vandalism.
I am a SO year old public school educator from Pennsylvania with
multiple Master's Degrees and a track record of supporting minority
students in my school district. I fear that the media would try to
portray those who want to protect Confederate monuments as uneducated,
narrow-minded, southern bigots. I fit none of those "labels." However,
I have a deep respect for the history of this nation.
Many men and boys from my hometown went to war to preserve the unity of
the United States, just as many men and boys from the chapel Hill area
went to war to -- in their minds -- protect their homes and families.
Both sides exhibited great courage. In my opinion, it is impossible to
honor the sacrifice of the soldiers from the North without equally
recognizing the valor of the soldiers from the south. Both sides must
be recognized, as well as recognizing the oppression of the
African-American population throughout our nation's early history -- not
just from 1861-1865.
Please work hard to preserve this chapter in America's history. Please
restore and protect the monument.
Thank you!
Ray Doolittle
Message
From: Diane Keasler
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:02:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam solution

As a solution to the dilemma regarding the location of Silent Sam and the significance and meaning
regarded to all statues, I would like to suggest Silent Sam be returned to its historical site and another
statue installed in close proximity honoring the contributions of another person such as Howard Lee,
Martin Luther King, Jr. or Barak Obama.

Thank you for the opportunity to make my suggestion and your thoughtful consideration .

Diane Keasler
Message
From: Edwina Zagami
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:05:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

I understand that students from UNC fought on the rebel side during the Civil War. I understand there is a value for recording this
historically. I do not understand why it needs to be a monument that is at the entrance to UNC so that it is given a place of pride on
campus. IF this statue is insulting to current students it needs to be moved somewhere else. No UNC student should have to face this
statue on a daily basis. All students need to be treated with respect. Those with deep southern roots who love Silent Sam may need a
place to visit the statue. While those who experience pain remembering the poor treatment of their relatives at the hands of slave
owners and disrespect by those who were not slave owners. My historical experience is remembering racist conversations in my own
family that shocked me at the time. I did not understand how deep the hate is and was. We no longer need to encourage this.

Thanks for asking. Please put the statue away or display it somewhere else. Please put a plaque on it explaining its history.

Edwina Zagami, Chapel Hill resident since 1985


Message
From: Adam Jones [adam@millhouseproperties.com]
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:26:50 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back and add other statues to McCorkle Place like...

Charlie Scott, the first African-American to receive an athletic scholarship for any ACC school.

The first African-American to enroll at UNC- Chapel Hill.

Dean Smith, who helped integrate Carolina.

Revamp the "slave" statue to give it more weight. It's too small in relation to Sam.

Show how far we have come rather than tear down our past.

Thanks,

Adam W. Jones, REDACTED


REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
Message
From: Miki Wayland
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:33:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The statue is a symbol and message of the power of whiteness and should not be placed anywhere where its
meaning will not be understood. That's why I don't think putting it in a cemetery or some hallway or
basement is a good idea. In those places, its meaning may not be apparent. The only appropriate place is
in a history museum where the true story of how and why it was erected is told, including the speech that
was used when it was installed at UNC.
Message
From: Weiss, Steven M [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=85d886ec185b49cba31260c6100dd 19f-Steven M We]
Sent: 9/29/2018 12:41:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Confederate Memorial

Dear Chancellor Folt,


For nearly 20 years I have walked past "Silent Sam" on my way to work. I have observed the importance of the monument to a constit11ency who
have the very human need to memorialize UNC's confederate dead. In the days since the monument was removed, wreathes and flowers have been
placed at its empty pedestal.

I know what it is to loose loved ones and the deep human need to have a public yet personal place to mourn. I would recommend the University place
the "Silent Sam" monument, or replace the monument with a modern memorial monument, in a cemetery with the confederate war dead where it can
be publicly viewed outdoors accompanied by exhibit panels that provide historical context.

We can not erase history, we can't erase the deep lasting hurt of slavery and the personal losses of the Civil War, but it is clearly no longer feasible
for the the statue to sit at UNC's front door. In its current placement, the environment the statue creates is not safe and to a large constituency it is
intellectually backwards, psychologically threatening, and personally offensive. The monument represents only the past, not UNC's present, or
dreams for the future. It does not belong in a library, archive, or museum. It is a monument, created as a large memorial for outdoor use and public
viewing. It was created and remains a public statement, not a discovered artifact or a rescued diary from the attic that informs scholarship.

We need to contextualize that statement, and provide an outdoor space for it to be seen by those who feel the need to mourn f ar away from those who
are offended by its presence. I greatly appreciate the opportunity to contribute and voice my concerns. Many thanks for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Steve Weiss

Steven Weiss I Curnto.r


Southern Folklifo Collection
CB#3926, Wibnn Special CnUectiom, LJirary
Un.ivcrsity ofN01th Ca.roLina at Chapel ITiU
Chapel Hill, NC 27515
REDACTED
UNC Libraries I SFC : Facebook
Message
From:
Sent: 9/29/2018 12:44:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I'm an alum of UNC. I got my masters and PhD at UNC.


silent Sam represents a l egacy of hate. The story of silent Sam is part of history - I am not saying it
should be destroyed but it belongs in a museum.
silent Sam should NOT be displayed on campus. Keeping the statue up sends a message to students of color
that you do not care about their experiences of hatred and discrimination. Please, please remove the
pedestal and do not put silent Sam back up.
- Jessica
Sent from my phone
Message
From: Katherine Kopp
Sent: 9/29/2018 1:17:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear UNC Administration. UNC Board of Trustees and UNC Board of Governors,

My family members have been proud residents of North Carolina for more than 12 generations.

Three generations have attended UNC-Chapel Hill (as well as other UNC system schools), with multiple
undergraduate degrees and graduate degrees from the Schools of Medicine, Law and Public Health earned by
our family.

Many of my ancestors fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War, including one who, according to family
lore, was with General Robert E. Lee at the surrender at Appomattox, before walking back to his home in
Chatham County, North Carolina.

I understand that many North Carolinians (including many who have absolutely no ties to this university or the
Town of Chapel Hill) believe that the monument known as "Silent Sam" should be restored to a place on the
campus. I vehemently disagree with this opinion.

Silent Sam is indisputably a monument to racism and white supremacism, dating to the Jim Crow era. It was not
erected as a monument to honor fallen soldiers after the Civil War ended; it was not erected until almost 50
years later. The words that were spoken on the occasion of its dedication make very clear its intent: to
intimidate black people.

Even if it were a monument to honor fallen Confederate soldiers, as others have pointed out, there is another
monument to ALL UNC students who have fought and been killed in US wars next to Memorial Hall on the
center of campus. There is no need to reinstall Silent Sam; UNC students who fought for the Confederacy are
already honored on the campus.

As a long-time resident of downtown Chapel Hill, my husband and I have seen firsthand the disruption caused
by protests and counter protests against Silent Sam, particularly during the past one to two years. As taxpayers
in Chapel Hill, we are among those who bear some of the costs to "guard" this monument - the more than
$600,000 that has reportedly been spent by the Town of Chapel Hill and the University to maintain a police
presence near the site.

Enough is enough. DO NOT reinstall Silent Sam anywhere on the campus. There is no justification for doing
so. I hope you will listen to the voices of reason and allow us all to move on and not keep fighting a war that the
South lost more than 153 years ago.

Sincerely,

Katherine C. Kopp
BA, English 1978
Message
From: Donna Kaye I
Sent: 9/29/2018 1:36:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Location for Silent Sam Statue

Chancellor Folt,

I agree with your initial statement that "Silent Sam has a place in our history and on our campus where its
history can be taught, but not at the front door of a safe, welcoming, proudly public research university."

As a tax paying citizen of North Carolina, I believe the Silent Sam statue should be moved either to the
Ackland Museum if it stays on campus, or the NC Museum of History where it would be accessible to many
North Carolina Citizens. A museum setting allows for its history to be taught within its full context.

Thank you for providing this opportunity for input.

Donna Kaye

Sent from Mai l for Windows 10


Message
From: Jerry Wood lief
Sent: 9/29/2018 1:53:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To Whom It May Concern:

I think the statue should be replace where it was and the ones that took it down should be prosecuted. It is a part of
history that they probably do not even know or care about. They just wanted to do harm and get some notoriety. The
liberals are getting so brazenly ugly and do not care what is right or wrong, they just want to make a scene and are
probably getting paid to do it. Good law abiding citizens do not even get a say anymore because they try to be nice but
they liberals have found that the more racket they raise, the more they get their way. It is time to stand up to these
people. Our whole government is now going thru a chaotic time because of this same practice and we have seen how
corrupt the government is and will get even more so is we do not stand up to these people (or more correct insane
lunatics). They are trying to change history and we do not deserve that for our kids and grandkids. Lots of things have
gone on that were not right but tearing down and destroying property that someone else paid for is definitely not
right. These people should have to reimburse for damages they do and they might think about it a little more.

Frances Woodlief, retired from UNC-CH


Message
From: Paula Waldrop
Sent: 9/29/2018 2:25:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My suggestion is to put Silent Sam right back where he was as there's nothing racist about that monument. Then
you might begin by expelling every student involved in the rioting that occurred and fire the professor involved.
Then start teaching factual history so these kiddies aren't confused. There is no excuse in this age of information
for people to remain so willfully ignorant. Remember an entire nation is watching you and 63 million of us
know the truth. Does your college not receive federal funding as well as state????
Message
From: Shields, Sarah D [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=1CAFA492F3B74ED0B664A9C522083541-SARAH D SHI]
Sent: 9/29/2018 3:06:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]; folt@u nc. ed u
CC: King, Michelle T [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Reci pi ents/ cn=a 71 f 4e649b654a26b 7 d5048c0e 76d82c-M ichel Ie T]
Subject: Confederate monument

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I write to convey my complete opposition to restoring the Confederate monument to its previous location, and I believe
it should have no place on the UNC Chapel Hill campus.

I am a Jew. If I had to attend classes each day on a campus with a monument to a World War II German soldier, I would
be certain that I had no place at the institution. Even though one could say that the soldier was simply a young conscript
without any ideology, whose own behavior he had been powerless to control, whose monument was intended to
represent nothing but sacrifice, for me, his presence would signify hatred of me and people like me.

As a result, it is not difficult for me to imagine the rage that our African-American students, colleagues, and staff
experienced each time they were forced to walk past a monument to a cause that had insisted on their own
enslavement. If UNC Chapel Hill insists on presenting itself as an inclusive institution, a monument to slavery has no
place.

Moreover, the resources (both financial and in terms of good will) that this administration has expended to protect this
symbol of racial hatred has been staggering. Many have written about the economic costs. I have been struck by the
effect your protection has had on my students and my colleagues. African-American faculty friends have talked about
their growing anger, frustration, and alienation. It is not simply the existence of the statue, but the lengths to which
your administration is willing to go to insist that a symbol of segregation must remain on our campus. Our graduate
students, who have done extensive research on the history of the monument and the circumstances of its erection on
campus, have been in the forefront of opposition. Your administration's use of brutal force to silence them has resulted
in physical injury, and the loss of any respect for campus police. As Director of Graduate Studies in my department, I am
increasingly hesitant to recommend that our outstanding African American applicants attend this university. How can
they belong at a place where your administration spends so much to keep in place a symbol of the worst degradation
and inhumanity that their forbears had to experience?

I have long been committed to public education, and to UNC in particular. I value my colleagues and my students. I hate
to watch as your administration's policies create bitterness and anger, discourage students of color from feeling they
have a place on this campus, and light a fire under the kind of racial animosity that has been growing in this community
as a result of your actions.

Sincerely,
Sarah Shields, Professor
Director of Graduate Studies
Department of History

Sarah Shields, Professor


Director of Graduate Studies
Department of History
CB 3195
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/sarah-d-shields/
Message
From: Uncheel
Sent: 9/29/2018 3:28:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

While I was born, raised, and educated in North Carolina, my heritage is not of slaves, slave owners, or even
southern. Yet, I am saddened and embarrassed about the dilemma we face with Silent Sam. I do not want him
destroyed or remanded to an obscure location, but I recognize the offense his origins may cause to many. I'd like to
reshape the message, not discard the memorial.

To me, Sam represents something beyond the Confederacy or a fight for slavery. I attended UNC during the Viet Nam
era. I had friends and family who were drafted or volunteered to serve in an unpopular conflict. Not all of them came
home and many who returned were irrevocably damaged. Sam was never portrayed as a military hero or political
leader; instead, he is a symbol of the youth that is taken into the cause of war. I always saw Sam as a young, sad figure,
and that message is not one we should discard.

My suggestion is that the statue be returned to Mccorkle Place with the "CSA" insignia removed and rechristened with a
new plaque to remember all the UNC family who fought and sacrificed before and after him. Make his message
inclusionary and a reminder of what we've lost.

I realize that my recommendation will not meet with the satisfaction of all sides. In fact, I hope it disappoints all those at
the extreme. But, I think it also provides a common message that most can embrace.

E.W. Armstrong
'76
Message
From: Susan Susan i
Sent: 9/29/2018 3:42:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a native and alum, I do not want Sam returned to his original spot. We who admired and we who
merely tolerated him share equal responsibility for what was simply wrong. If the statute applies and
cannot be amended, spin gold from straw. Award him to a University team/teams, allowing them to
incorporate and re-create him in ways that demonstrate positives emerging from struggle or tell a
fuller story.

We are formed and informed by history but are meant to face our own time. The University and Board
of Governors must do so head-on. Do not waffle.

Susan Council
Providence, RI
Message
From: Mary Mahoney
Sent: 9/29/2018 4:47:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: College info plaque

Washington & Lee's information plaque and brochure that are available to the public at the plaque. Also-all freshmen
are required to read this history and more detailed history on the school's past segregation. At first year orientation, the
students discuss this and are presented with the efforts the school has in place to correct this past history.
Message
From: Jackie Nichols [
Sent: 9/29/2018 5:50:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put him back on his pedesta l where he was

From Louisiana where we know loss when our history is taken away.

Add an interpretation sign if you have to.


Message
From: wolfmanwatt I
Sent: 9/29/2018 6:22:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep Silent Sam on UNC Campus

Hi UNC-

Silent Sam is a monument for UNC alumni and should remain on campus.

Harry Watt
Message
From: Jim Angell I
Sent: 9/29/2018 6:49:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a UNC-CH alumnus.
silent Sam should not be restored to its former location. It should be placed in an out of the way
location together with a plate that states its history - including the reason for the statue, the fact
that Julian Carr espoused white supremacy at its dedication, the controversy it sparked and its recent
removal. It should be located within the campus and not at an entryway to the campus. It should presented
a an historical artifact.
The university should erect beside it a monument to the first African Americans students who attended
UNC-CH, with a plaque explains their significance.
Beside it, the university should erect a third pedestal with nothing on it be reserved for history as the
university breaks through other barriers of discrimination and intolerance.
Jim Angell
class of '79
Law school class of '85
The University
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Teresa Ayling
Sent: 9/29/2018 6:56:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Falt:

The statue called Silent Sam appears to be a danger to the students of UNC in that it seems to be a magnet for white
supremacists and neo-Nazi groups of the sort responsible for violence in Charlottesville. For that reason, and because of
its history as a monument to white supremacy and Jim Crow ideology, I suggest it not be returned to campus.

Instead, Silent Sam and the plaques on the pedestal should be melted down and formed into blocks suitable for reuse by
artists. The blocks could be donated to the art department of a Historically Black College or University as one small form
of reparation for the forced labor performed by persons labeled slaves without compensation at UNC. As an alternative,
the blocks could be used by student artists at UNC. I suggest, for the safety of the artists and the art produced, that the
origin of the material not be revealed.

The pedestal could be crushed and reused for paving material or perhaps your art professors could think of a better way
to reuse that material.

Thank you for your consideration.

Teresa Ayling
Message
From: Lynn Miller
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:15:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thanks for the approach you are taking to decide the fate of the civil War monument known as silent Sam.
I am a 1971 graduate of UNC-CH and am a Yankee born and raised in New York State but now a Florida
resident.
I am opposed to the re-writng of history that the complete removal of statues and monuments like this
represents. However I am also sensitive to the views of those who find it offensive and a reminder of
slavery and oppression.
Perhaps a new home for the statue is in order. I would think that a home either in a museum or the
entrance to a cemetery might be a good compromise.

Best
Lynn Fishbach Miller '71
Message
From: Jeff Mason
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:35:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

Sorry, I should have signed my name to the submission below, because I want to go on record for calling
out what a sham it is for the UNC administration and trustees to pretend the decision has not already
been made to replace this eyesore exactly where it was. The fact that Folt referred to a civitas poll,
which is renowned for its shoddy process to make false claims, told me the Pope family and their
followers will decide where the statue goes, and no one else.
Good luck to you if that happens. I will support all efforts of civil disobedience to bring it down
again, and again, and again.
sadly,
Jeffrey Nelson Mason
> on Sep 29, 2018, at 6:49 PM, Jeff Mason <jmason1440@aol.com> wrote:
>
> Since the Pope family surely loves this monument supporting slavery and repression, why not put it in
the Pope box at Kenan Stadium? If it goes back up where it was, my donations to UNC will stop immediately
and not resume until it comes down forever after the Democrats come back into power.
Message
From: Stan Richard
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:39:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

He needs to go back up where he was and has always been. You need to follow state law. unless you want to
teach kids that breaking the law is ok.
Thank you
Stan Richard
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Jeffrey Kessler
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:47:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument

Put it In the Exact same spot it's always been!


Message
From: David Long
Sent: 9/29/2018 7:47:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

Dear board,
My name is David long I'm 25 year old Army infantry Vet and citizen of this great state. I'm contacting to
urge the university to restore Silent Sam to its original place. I am a decendent of multiple family members that
faught for this great state and nation since its inception and yes I also have family that fault on the side of the
Confederacy under the honorable Gen. Pettigrew which graduated from UNC and was killed on the battlefield.
Many of North Carolinas greatest have attended your university and many of those same young boys and men
defended our great state against a federal invasion. As you know Silent Sam was put in place in remembrance of
the many young men that fell in combat. These same men had their lives cut short before they could ever reach
their lifes potential. I hold my family's history very close to my heart and history in general. I have seen family's
grave stones destroyed and vandalized just for having 3 letters CSA on there head stones or having a iron cross
placed by their grave. Seeing the hate and disrespect of my family and the family of others really hurts my heart
and they hearts of millions of others that have Confederate ancestors. Please I do want to encourage you to
reconsider moving or discarding the historic Silent Sam monument because it doesn't even have any connection
with any political views instead it does honor those who took up arms for the protection of they're state. Thank
you for your time.

-David long
Message
From:
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:24:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Don't disrespect your alumni. These were men who gave their lives to a cause they believed in. They were
YOUR university's students. Don't throw them in the trash! Put Silent Sam back where he belongs, where he
has been since 1913. Consider this quote from George Orwell's 1984. This is what is happening right now:
liverv record has been destroyed or falsified, everv book revvTitten,. every
®' 'II<' ,,,., - """

picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renmned,
everv date has been altered. i\nd the process is continuing dav by day and
~ . 4..,.... ,l,I ell<' ell<'

1ninute by rninute. I:Iistory has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless


present in vvhich the Party is alvvays right''
(;eorge ()rwell, ., .,· .·,. . . . . ,. ,. ,. . . . . .
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From:
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:25:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The monument needs to be replaced exactly where it was and in the same or better condition.That is a no brainier.

Charles Garvin.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:33:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: an opin ion from an alum, Class of 1986

To Whom It May Concern: You all face challenges in the decision for the future of Silent Sam. I don't know that I could
recommend a place for the statue's future.
I will say I walked by it almost every day for years and it was part of my experience at Chapel Hill. I took photos of my
two daughters with Silent Sam, 12 and 2, while taking in a Homecoming football game.
I would add that since my time at Carolina, I have researched my family history and found many a North and South
Carolina Confederate soldier, heroes and deserters in the bunch. Most went back home and lived out their lives on small
farms and produced families that worked those farms and punched in at cotton mills.
I was the first person in my family to go to college. Being from Cumberland County, from a modest background, going to
Carolina was a goal that seem unreachable. I was very proud to make it there after 2 years at Methodist College after
being turned down out of high school.
Carolina shaped me. I am forever grateful to the school and treasure everything that makes it Carolina.
Silent Sam was part of that for me.
Now, I have continued my education in life and know more about the history of the statue and the pain of everything
Confederate inflicts on my African American friends .
I was not sad to see Silent Sam come down.
I was sad that no respect was paid those ancestors who were not necessarily slave owners, but were Confederate Tar
Heels.
In the end, I hope that your decision about Silent Sam honors history and the people that made North Carolina and is
respectful.
Take care,
Mark

Sent from Mai l for Windows 10


Message
From: Bobby Cole
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:45:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Delivery Status Notification (Failure)

---------- Forwarded message---------


From: Mail Delivery Subsystem <mailer-daemon@googlemail.com>
Date: Sat, Sep 29, 2018 at 3:57 AM
~nhiPrt· nPlivPnr ~tl'ltm: Nntifir.Minn (Failure)

JV1essage not delivered

was a technical details

LEARN MORE

The response was:

The recipient server did not accept our requests to connect. Learn more at
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---------- Forwarded message ----------


From: Bobby Cole
To: uncmonument(a),unc.com
Cc:
Bee:
Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2018 23:27:57 -0400
Subject: Relocating Silent Sam Statue
What about the Smithsonian?

Bobby L. Cole

Bobby L. Cole
Message
From: Brenda Redden
Sent: 9/29/2018 8:47:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: sam

PUT SAM BACK


Message
From: Jerry Austin
Sent: 9/29/2018 10:28:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Y'all have no choice. By state law you can only put Sam back to his place of honor. Thugs and evil, vile
terrorists removed him i ll egally so the legal and honorable course of action is to reinstall him. I
rescinded my diploma from UNC because of anger and disgust with the "progressive" atmosphere in chapel
Hill. I am part of the vast majority of North Carolinians who are ready to do away with the ultra liberal
tribe that exists in the formally "southern part of heaven". chancellor Folt, you, your cabinet and your
professors/deans disgust me.
Jerry c. Austin
Formally UNC
1971

Sent fr om my iPhone
Message
From: Gary McMillian
Sent: 9/30/2018 12:40:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave the silent Sam monument exactly where it was originally dedicated. It serves to remind us of the
bravery of ou r southern ancesto rs.
Gary McMillian
Message
From: Matt Howell
Sent: 9/30/2018 6:49:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Location Comment

Carol Folt,

As an alumni and GAA life member, I beg you: please keep Silent Sam in storage, or donate it to a private
party. Historical maintenance costs alone offer no rational reason why UNC should pay to erect this statue. I
believe that Silent Sam will not bring any peace, but more violence to our campus, and to reinstall it is to
solidify that this statue is a monument to racial oppression.

To avoid asserting that erecting Silent Sam will symbolize racial oppression without a thoughtful explanation, I
would like to quote my pastor, Matt LeRoy of Love Chapel Hill, an active member of our university's
community, on this topic. I understand that some of the commentary does not appeal to the secular nature of our
campus, but please reflect earnestly on these words and the emotion in them (particularly towards the end). This
quote is from the August 26th sermon, following the initial topping of Silent Sam; the recording can be found
on Love Chapel Hill's website.

"There is much division over the monument known as Silent Sam. There is controversy over its place, how it
came down, and whether or not it should go back up.

But some things are clear.

The monument was placed there to honor those students who fought and died for the cause of the Confederacy
during the Civil War. The Civil War was a travesty and one of the most tragic seasons of American history.
Because the Civil War was about slavery. Come at me if you want about states' rights, and I'll ask you which
rights you mean. The right for one human being to own another. The Civil War was about slavery. The
Confederacy fought to keep it in place. And the monument was raised nearly 50 years later, during the infamous
and oppressive Jim Crow era, as a reminder of that cause.

Sometimes Southerners joke and call it the 'War of Northern Aggression.' That's not funny and we should not
call it that. Instead we should call it the 'War of American Transgression.' In other words, the War of American
Sin. Because that's what it was. Slavery was the original sin of our nation.

We can honor our country and love our country, and at the same time, honestly confront the broken history of
our country. In fact, it is one of the most honoring and loving things we can do.

At our birth as we bravely declared our independence, we blindly denied the independence of our own brothers
and sisters.

As we threw off the tyranny of the English monarchy from across the sea, we maintained the tyranny of slave
holders here on our own shores. Kings of their own little colonies called plantations.

In one hand we held these truths to be self evident, that all humans are created equal. In the other hand we hid
the lies that saw our own brothers and sisters as less than equal and even, tragically, less than human.

As we created a constitution by which to freely govern ourselves, we enshrined in that founding document the
institution of slavery. Right there among those noble and revolutionary ideas about representation and rights, we
stated in plain language that some did not count as a full and complete person.
Our founders were visionary leaders and geniuses in so many respects. But on the issue of slavery they failed
us. They were courageous in the face of death and yet they compromised the very freedom for which they
fought. And in less than a century's time, their grand experiment, this great nation designed to be a beacon of
light in this world, was at war with itself

Where state took up arms against state. Where family took up arms against family. Where words like duty and
glory and honor were used to justify a blatantly sinful cause.

Should we forget history? No.


Should we erase history? No.
But we should, at times, confront it.
And we should, always, be honest about it.

17-ie statue should stay down. Keeping it dmvn is not forgetting history. To put it back elevated, celebrated,
and literally placed on a pedestal that would be forgetting and ignoring the reality of our history.

Remember it. Learn from it. Confront it. And then, and only then, can we begin the long journey to heal it."

Amen." [emphasis added]

I believe Silent Sam should stay down. If the UNC community wants to erect a statue that commemorates the
broken history of our nation, I fully support installing a new statue. Silent Sam represents, or, at the very least,
has come to represent, a celebration of the Confederacy, which organized to assert a man's right to own another
man.

It has been explained that Silent Sam stood to honor the lives ofUNC students and alumni lost to the Civil War
as confederate soldiers; I can number hundreds of other ways that UNC students and alumni have died that our
campus could and should commemorate over those that died in defense of human slavery as a right. That fight
for freedom and equality is far from over (NC continues to benefit from human trafficking); to honor those that
believe human ownership is a fundamental right - or in dying for that cause - is heinous.

I implore you: do not reinstall Silent Sam. Find a new owner for Sam; fund a new statue for our campus.
Commission a project that celebrates the triumph of America over the formal right to own slaves. For the
record, I am confident UNC will find a new home for Silent Sam, whether that be a museum, a private party, or
the bottom of the Atlantic.

Kind regards,
Ryan Matthew Howell
Class of 2015

Matt Howell
~~wx:
Message
From: Martin Schweitzer
Sent: 9/30/2018 8:28:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition of Si lent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for the opportunity to provide input regarding the disposition of the confederate monument on the UNC-CH
campus. Quite simply, I believe that a monument honoring those who fought in a rebellion against the government of
the United States for the purpose of preserving slavery and white supremacy has no legitimate place on the campus of a
modern -day university. Since the current legislature has declared that all confederate monuments must be preserved, I
suggest that the Silent Sam statue be relocated to a museum or cemetery where it can be displayed as a historical
artifact with accompanying language explaining the context in which it was initially commissioned and erected. Now
that Silent Sam has been toppled, reinstalling it in its original location or any other public space on campus as a
memorial to confederate veterans would rightfully be seen as a present-day affirmation of the values embodied by the
confederacy. Such an action would be an affront and provocation to people of all races who see human slavery as
abhorrent and the history of the brutal suppression of African Americans during the Jim Crow era as shameful. Because
there is no action that will satisfy everyone on this issue, it is incumbent on you to make the right decision which, in my
opinion, is to relegate the glorification of white supremacy to North Carolina's past and banish it forever from a place of
honor on the campus of our state's flagship university.

Yours in the desire to move forward with compassion and dignity,

Martin Schweitzer
Chapel Hill resident
Message
From: Scott Dailey
Sent: 9/30/2018 9:08:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Here's a great idea: PUT IT BACK.

Stop coddling the left and restore the statue. NC law requires it.
Message
From: Jay Raleigh
Sent: 9/30/2018 9:10:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam: It belongs in a museum! (not in a public place)

Long overdue for it to be removed from the front of campus. If people want to see it, they can see it somewhere
where it can be properly contextualized.
Message
From: David Umphlett
Sent: 9/30/2018 9:55:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: David Umphlett [davidumphlett@gmail.com]; Lorinda Umphlett [lorindaumphlett@yahoo.com]
Subject: Confederate Memorial Statue (Silent Sam)

Dear chancellor Folt,


I am an alumnus of our great university, the son of a multi-degree alumna, brother of an alumnus, husband
of an alumna (who has her own university legacies), and a lifetime member of the GAA. silent Sam is no
innocent memorial to war dead. The speeches at its dedication and the time period in which it was
erected (that of the revival of "The Lost cause") make it clear that its position on campus was intended,
at least in part, as a reminder of white supremacy. To think otherwise is to ignore fact and reality and
create a warped since of history. As a human being, as a white southern male, silent Sam was an
embarrassment and blight on the university I love so dearly. It does not represent me or the values in
which I am striving to raise my own three sons. I am glad to see it gone and wish only that the memorial
to the slaves who built the university had more prominence on Mccorkle Place. Until we are prepared to
make difficult decisions to begin addressing the inequalities that have plagued our nation since the 16th
century and to let go of the privilege that white folks have enjoyed, then no united way forward can ever
begin to materialize.
I do not envy your pos1t1on. I am sure you are facing pressure from donors and political factions who
would like to see the statue restored, but I trust that you will make the right decision - the decision
that will signal justice for those who have been historically marginalized and left behind. Let the
campus itself speak as boldly as do our advertisements that UNC is a university for all.
Sincerely,
David Umphlett ('00)

The Rev'd David Umphlett


Rector, St. Mary's Episcopal church
High Point, North Carolina
Message
From: Darrell Boyd
Sent: 9/30/2018 11:28:48 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dedicated in 1913, 48 years after the Civil War ended. The speech was delivered by UNC Trustee Julian Carr,
an avowed white supremacist, who, during the dedication, espoused his racist beliefs. The same man who spoke
favorably of the murder of African Americans that occurred during the \Vilrnington .Vfassacre of 1898, which he
called a "grand and glorious event", and celebrated lynchings.

It would take 45 years after the statue was dedicated to end segregation at UNC. When it was erected, my
university cared little about the opinions and feelings of the descendants of slaves. To continue that blatant
disregard for human dignity by bringing SS back would make me ashamed to call myself a Tar Heel. Do with it
what you will, but do not bring back a symbol of hatred and suppression, unless that's the image of UNC you
want to convey. It's not the UNC with which I want to be associated.

Respectfully,

Darrell K. Boyd
Class of 19785

Best regards, Darrell REDACTED Sent from Gmail Mobile


Message
From: Stan Latta
Sent: 9/30/2018 12:22:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Boy So ldier/Silent Sam memorial

I am writing as third-generation graduate school alumnus of Carolina [UNC] and as a concerned seventh-
generation citizen of North Carolina.

The only course of action available to the UNC under the law is to restore and then protect the Boy
Soldier/Silent Sam memorial on McCorkle Place.*

UNC has no authority to move it so that they can re-contextualize or curate it with modern-day lies about white
supremacy.

The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of paid activists.

Hark the sound of Tar heel voices....

Stan Latta

(The Honorable Commissioner Rev. Dr.) Stanley M. Latta, Col (retired)


UNC Distinguished Graduate, 1991
UNC Police - Community Police Academy graduate, 2016

* One of the members of my Masonic lodge is fellow UNC alumnus, Mack McCorkle ... a descendant of the
Reverend Samuel E. McCorkle, after whom McCorkle Place is named.
Message
From: Chet Wayland
Sent: 9/30/2018 2:57:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam location

While the best place for this monument would be at a civil War historical battleground site I understand
the legislature is requiring it remain in UNC property somewhere. Given that limitation and given that
the original intent by the daughters of the confederacy (can't say that was the intent of everyone back
then) of the monument was to honor those that died during the war perhaps the monument should simply be
placed in the cemetery on campus.
It serves two purposes there. One, it honors those that died in a war that regardless of what side you
were in saw a lot of young Americans die. Two, it places the statue in a place not frequented by the
public but accessible for those that want to see it.
My personal opinion is that these statues should all come down and I am from the south. We need to move
forward as a country and not look back. For those that worry about history, look no further in history
than modern Germany who recognizes the horror of the holocaust but forbids nazi flags from being
displayed. surely we can be better or as good as our neighbors across the ocean.
That said, if we are forced to find homes for reminders of our past then let's put them where they
belong. In historical places and not in the grounds of our public universities.
Thank you for offering this chance to express my opinion.
Sincerely
Richard Wayland
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Wohl, David A [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=4B4B8F2F994545928BD194627A6DE439-DAVID A WOH]
Sent: 9/30/2018 4:21:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDL T)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Support Dr. Kleinman Proposal

I support the proposal put forth by Professor Emerita Sherryl Kleinman in the DTH on September 28, calling for
the permanent removal of the statute in conjunction with an exhibit detailing the statute's history and legacy
as well as the recent debate over its fate elsewhere on campus.

Davie! Alain Wohi, fv1D X


f'rofos:,m-Divi,:ion of lnfoctir.H.,s 1.)1.,,ei:ises, The Ur11ver''diy of North C,H·olinil at Chapel Hiil/S1te l .. eilder--UNC AIDS Ciirnci:il Tri<'lls Unit i:il. Chapel Hill/Co­
Directo;· .. IJfK Vim! Hemorrhagic Feve;· Reseilrch Group/Co-Directo;·-NC AIDS Ti-airing ilnd Education Center (NCATEC)
DO Mi1•;on F,1rm Road/Camp.I'; Sox 721S/Chapei Hill/ NC/ 27599/ Office: REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 9/30/2018 4:31:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt and the UNC Board of Trustees ,


I want to add my voice to the group of people who want to see the Confederate memorial statue "Silent Sam" kept
off of the UNC campus. It doesn't belong on the campus of an institution of higher learning, especially the oldest
public university in the country. That word "public" is important. The university is there to serve everyone, regardless
of color, gender, orientation, and more. We are diverse. We are aware. This statue no longer serves our collective
identity.
The statue doesn't have to be destroyed. It can be placed in a museum somewhere as a relic of a bygone era.

Sincerely,
JeanMarie Olivieri
Message
From: obxamt
Sent: 9/30/2018 4:54:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ffl9c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam

Don't be silent against mobs restore silent sam


Sent from my Ta!Af A
Message
From: Kat Mordecai
Sent: 9/30/2018 4:56:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and other confederate monument

They should either be moved to the confederate cemetery which is the most appropriate place for them. If that
can not be done they should be ready recycled.

Thank you,
Kat Mordecai
Triangle resident
Message
From: Rua Mordecai I
Sent: 9/30/2018 5:04:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Ideas for confederate monuments

They should either be removed with an empty pedestal telling the story of why they were removed or moved to
a museum.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/30/2018 5:05:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am 77 years old, so of an age that all four of my sets of great-grandparents lived during the war, two
in NC. These families were all catastrophically impacted by the war, and in both NC cases, their
soldiers did not come home and were buried without memorials elsewhere. These soldiers did not
attend UNC, but my parents did.

I speak against keeping Silent Sam in his former place, because he is too upsetting to many people.
The turmoil will never stop. Please consider moving him to a museum with proper contextual
material explaining him to visitors.

Thank you for hearing me.


Elizabeth B. Wilson
Message
From: Susan Nard
Sent: 9/30/2018 7:23:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam

If someone walked into your house, vandalized it, destroyed furnishings, you would call the Law and
prosecute
I feel the same way about everyone of these statues damaged Nationwide this past year that belong to ALL
THE PEOPLE, not just some radicalized politically indoctrinated group of troublemakers
The history of Sam belongs to UNC and therefor he needs to stay at UNC
If you won't put him back in his original setting then move him into a library or entrance hall, but DONT
cave in to radicals and PC pressure
Arrest and prosecute the thugs and troublemakers
Sincerely
Susan Hesnard
Fayetteville NC

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From:
Sent: 9/30/2018 7:45:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt and the UNC Board of Trustees,


My name is Henry Northcutt and I am responding to the invitation for public comments on the UNC
Monument known as silent Sam.
I am a UNC Alumnus ( class of 1981, Kenan-Flagler Business school ) and a North Carolina native. I
believe silent Sam should
be returned to his historical location on the UNC campus. My reasons are as follows:
1) Sam was unlawfully toppled and by NC Law must be returned to his former location. The University is
obligated to follow NC Law.
2) The toppling of Sam was largely carried out by Extremists, some of whom cowardly wore masks, and said
Extremists should never be
allowed to succeed, in disregard of the law. There was a lawful procedure in place, which was being
followed, for discussing what,
if anything, the University should "do" about Sam, and the Extremists short circuited this whole process.
The University should
return Sam to his former place and then continue the process on discussing the future of Sam. To give in
to extremism will only
serve to encourage future unlawful actions in any matter where extremists decide the University is
"incorrect" in their intolerant
view. This result would not bode well for UNC in the future.
3) The University is supposed to respect virtually all viewpoints, and is supposed to be tolerant of
races, cultures, histories, and heritages, among
all. silent Sam represents a time in the history of the State of NC which may be deemed "evil" today, but
was the norm at that time. Many of our ancestors
took actions or tolerated situations which would not be permitted today, but they were a people of their
time and cannot be fairly judged by today's standards.
Getting "rid" of Sam does nothing about this history, except to ignore it, and in the words of George
Santayana "those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it". Sam is a continuing history
lesson, and is ( or was) exactly where such a lesson should be present. Therefore I strongly believe My
University should do the right ( and lawful ) thing in regards to Sam, to return him to his former
location, and continue the lawful process to determine his future on the UNC campus.
Thank you for taking time to consider my thoughts on this issue.
Regards,
Henry Northcutt
Raleigh, NC
09-30-2018
Message
From: Bill Sorrels
Sent: 9/30/2018 7:57:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Disposition

Consider having it housed in Wilson Library, or an alternative, comparable location, that is dedicated and designed to
host items associated with the North Carolina Collection of historical documents and artifacts. This may help the public
to view and experience it in better context with other items from that era in North Carolina history.

Cordially,

Bill Sorrels
UNC Class of 1986
Message
From: Josephine R Bisbee
Sent: 9/30/2018 8:05:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition of Si lent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt,


I am truly glad that silent Sam no longer greets me each time I walk on the UnNC campus. I have had to
pass it weekly for the last three years. I regret that my state legislature made it so difficult to
remove monuments that honor values that no humane person should accept in this day and age.
I am a resident of chapel Hill and parent of a UNC graduate. That statue has always felt like a hateful
embarrassment to me. The idea of returning that monument, which was erected in Jim Crow times to
intimidate people, to its previous prominent location strikes me as both hateful and foolish. I hope it
will be relocated to a less prominent place and equipped with signage that accurately depicts the reasons
it was erected in the first place and a disclaimer that our beloved UNC does not adhere to those values.
It will always generate controversy which will cause protest and potential danger to people. The costs
incurred to guard it should not be a burden to students or t o NC taxpayers.
Thank you for your attention to this,
Josephine Bisbee

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Susan Heavner
Sent: 9/30/2018 8:16:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Greetings,
I would consider moving the monument into the main library on campus in the area of NC history. Silent Sam
is an historical piece and many of us see it as such. This will allow Silent Sam to remain a gift to the university
but not at high risk for vandalism .
I am against slavery but I am for states rights. When surveying this piece of history, I realize not that it
embodies slavery, but represents a time when states fought for their beliefs. This indeed has repeated itself
because Silent Sam toppled for what some, but not all, believe. This is much like the North and the South in the
time of the Civil War.
One might argue that Silent Sam deserves a high profile position on campus. As we aspire to stand for our
beliefs, it becomes a tangible reminder that we can stand for what we believe while not belittling the
beliefs of others.
Lastly, this statue was gifted with the best intentions. There will never be a time when all parties agree but
certainly one must consider that when Silent Sam was gifted to the university, the gift was accepted. In life we
must agree to disagree. While controversial, removing it will not change history. Since slavery has been
abolished, this reminds me that times are better for which I am grateful. Slavery includes the bullying
of one people group by another. Regarding Silent Sam, allowing one people group to bully another
returns us to the time of slavery.
Sincerely, Susan Heavner
Message
From: Effie Hefner
Sent: 9/30/2018 8:21:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave Sam where he is. Are we going to destroy all of our War Between
the States monuments? Are we then going to start on monuments from
other times in our past. .. Lincoln, Washington, etc. Each period of our
history needs to be kept alive.

Effie Hefner
Message
From: User &
Sent: 9/30/2018 9:01:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:


I am an alumnus of the class of '67, and among other things was a
plaintiff in the Speaker Ban suit. over the years I've given the university
between $35,000 and $40,000, mostly to the Di-Phi Societies Foundation, Inc.
an organization I and a few others founded in the '70's and on whose board I
still sit. That foundation collected, restored and still maintains 90 odd
portraits of the university's alumni who made significant contributions to
the history of the state, the country and UNC. In recent years we have been
asked, and have honored, undergraduate requests to take down the portraits of
our two Confederate generals and a large slave-owner, Paul Carrington
Cameron. I'm afraid this trend will continue until all slave-owners will be
purged from public view, perhaps including President Polk and William R.
Davie, and it will make no difference if their portraits were painted,
respectively, by Thomas sully and Charles Willson Peale. There are scores of
such people portrayed in our collection.
To say that I was furious about the vandalism of silent Sam is an
understatement. The students have a perfect right to speak and petition for
the removal of these works of art; they do not have the right to commit
vandalism. I think silent Sam should be returned to its base to show the
vandals that they cannot win when they do what they did. The fact that they
have been encouraged by faculty members is sickening. Why is Sam important?
Because the civil War almost destroyed the university and cost the lives of
319 young men who went to war and never came back. They deserve to be
remembered. They were not morally bankrupt, but were innocent victims of the
times. If you want to replace those memorial plaques that appear to laud the
cause for which they fought, you can do that, but removal of the statue would
be inappropriate. Why not remind onlookers of A.E. Housman's observation that
although life is not much to lose, "young men think it is, and we we re
young." It would also be terrible to shuttle it off to some dark corner of
the campus, where it surely will be destroyed by the Marxist element.
I have suspended my donations to the university and the foundation until
this trend abates, if it ever does.
J.E. Greenbacker, Jr.
Message
From: G. Mark LeGrand [legrandgm@att.net]
Sent: 9/30/2018 9:07:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please restore the Silent Sam statue to its original place. We need to remember our history. Thank you.


G. 1\-fark LeGrand, P.E., FSFPE
LeGrand Engineering, Inc.
215 Park Avenue SE
Aiken, SC 29801
Office REDACTED
Fax REDACTED
Cell REDACTED
www.legrandengineering.com
Message
From:
Sent: 9/30/2018 10:10:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: SILENT SAM

Put Sam back where he belongs, and prosecute to the fullest extent all those who took him down.

You can't ignore laws and change history just because a few people pretend they are "offended" .

If you want to teach your students, teach them to follow the laws and accept true reality instead of some politically correct
altered version.
Message
From: kjl I
Sent: 9/30/2018 10:34:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

Dear Sirs:

Please review appropriate rules, regulations, and laws pertaining to this monument. It has been mentioned that
it must be repaired and placed back where it has stood for all these years.

If this is true, please do so.

If this is not true, please advise why this is not true.

Thank You,
Kurt Jahnke

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Amanda Herbert i
Sent: 9/30/2018 10:47:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Future of the statue

Thank you for asking for ideas regarding the future of the confederate statute. I feel very strongly that the statue
should NOT be placed back on display in its original place at UNC. I feel that this statue has racist connotations
and belongs to a sad time in America's history. The speech that was said at its unveiling makes me feel
physically ill and to know that this statue has clear connections and ties to that speech is truly horrifying and for
this reason, along with others, it should not be on display. Although we need to learn from the past and from
history, its presence is a slap in the face to anyone of color and to anyone who advocates for equality and
justice. I feel that it would be a good thing for it to belong to a museum where its past can be put into context
and it could still serve as a reminder and an example from history.
Thank you very much,
Amanda Herbert
Message
From: Visser, Robin L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=192b8bd960cf4447ada8c57115911506-Robin L Vis]
Sent: 10/1/2018 12:35:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Move it off campus

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I am gratified that the monument known as 'Silent Sam' is no longer standing on our campus. I respect
veterans, and we already have a moving Book of Names memorial on campus that honors UNC alumni that
have died in war, including in the civil war. It is essential that the 'Silent Sam' monument now be historically
contextualized based on evidence-based scholarship rather than popular perceptions. It has been demoralizing
to work at a research university where students and faculty had asked administrators for its removal for half a
century, to no avail. Such a statue belongs off campus, in a space such as the NC Museum of History in
Raleigh.

Sincerely,

Robin Visser

Robin Visser
Associate Professor and Associate Chair
Department of Asian Studies CB 3267
New West 210
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3267
Tel: REDACTED
Message
From: Visser, Robin L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =192b8bd960cf444 7ada8c5 7115911506-Robin L Vis]
Sent: 10/1/2018 12:52:48 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Remove monument from campus

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I am gratified that the monument known as 'Silent Sam' is no longer standing on our campus. I respect
veterans, and we already have a moving Book of Names memorial on campus that honors UNC alumni that
have died in war, including in the civil war.

Yet historians of the South have made it clear that "Silent Sam" was put on campus by the United Daughters of
the Confederacy to reinforce white supremacy, and that the dedication speech by Julian Carr was racist and
violent. It is essential that the monument now be historically contextualized based on evidence-based
scholarship rather than popular perceptions.

It has been demoralizing to work at a research university where students and faculty had asked administrators
for its removal for half a century, to no avail. Such a statue belongs off campus, in a space such as the NC
Museum of History in Raleigh. Or there could be an exhibit in Wilson library without the statue, as proposed by
Sherry Kleinman in a Sept 28, 2018 DTH editorial.

Sincerely,

Robin Visser

Robin Visser
Associate Professor and Associate Chair
Department of Asian Studies CB 3267
New West 210
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3267
Tel: REDACTED
Message
From: Ivan Browning
Sent: 10/1/2018 4:23:52 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Find an Alternative Location for Silent Sam

One possibility would be to move it to the Civil War battlefield in Bentonville. For maximum educational
purposes I suggest an alternative spot on campus along with proper signage to place it in historical context.

I definitely oppose returning it to its former location. Replacement would say to the world that UNC stands with
the Confederacy--not a good position for our state's premier university.

Thank you for your consideration.

Ivan Browning
Message
From:
Sent: 10/1/2018 7:56:52 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument Disposition and Preservation

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I received an email from you seeking opinions on the "disposition and preservation of the Confederate
Monument" commonly known as Silent Sam. I am writing to give my opinion on this disposition and
preservation.

The stone pedestal should remain in its existing location with a plaque added, explaining the historical context
of the monument, the issue surrounding it, the reocurring vandalism and its subsequent removal, and directional
information on the permanent location of the statue/sculpture for further study.

The Silent Sam statue/sculpture should be placed on permanent display at the UNC Ackland Art Museum, as it
is a sculptural art form and belongs to UNC. Many works of art are controversial in their content and give rise
to debate and further education. With this in mind, the statue will be available at the museum for educational
purposes and study within its historical context and future progress. Furthermore, the Ackland Art museum will
also be able to provided protection for the statue, as all other art in the museum is protected. The statue will
continue to be vandalized, if placed in an unprotected environment.

Please do not allow your decision to be swayed by the opinion of some, who see the statue as representative of
pro-descrimiantion, and pro-slavery. Many, including myself, look at the statue as representing the UNC
students who fought to defend their homes, neighborhoods and families from their personal and general
understanding that forces were invading. Hence these students bore arms to protect what they had. The fact
that some wealthy families in North Carolina owned slaves, does not mean that these students promoted or
agreed with slavery.

As the determination is made on the disposition and preservation of the Confederate Monument, I must
emphasize that certainly, no one is wanting a return to or condone, in any way, the horrors and immorality of
discrimination, segregation or slavery. Rather, UNC has been left with a tool to help all understand that these
shameful actions are an undeniable chapter in the history of our whole country, our North Carolina state, and
UNC. The Confederate Monument offers the opportunity to further study this history and promote efforts
toward a continuing progress of equality for all.

Thank you for your consideration of my opinion on this highly volatile situation. The whole country is
watching your decision. This is an opportunity to learn from our history, using the Confederate Monument as
an educational tool for students and the whole community at large. Please do not attempt to erase history with
your final decision.

Best Regards,

Parent of current UNC student &


North Carolina resident
Message
From: Emily MacMillan
Sent: 10/1/2018 8:57:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

My husband and I attended UNC 1983-1987. Silent Sam was no threat on campus
during our years there. I recognize the need to act responsibly now that public outcry,
attitudes of racism and division, and actions of vandalism have taken place. A
monument that held no representation of racism for me now does so for countess
people, so responsible action is necessary. I applaud you for taking that action . I hear
from students that an indoor home for Silent Sam in a place that represents history,
especially an objective view of Civil War history, is an appropriate spot for the
monument. The monument to me represents and honors the young men
who were students at UNC and had to leave their studies, the university
and their homes to fight in a war.
Thank you for your consistent communication with us about this
process, and for your focus on our university students' safety in the
meantime.
Sincerely,
Emily MacMillan
Message
From: Ted Andrews
Sent: 10/1/2018 9:15:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Katherine Andrews Home Email [kandrewsnc@gmail.com]; Kim Settlemyre [kimsettlemyre@yahoo.com]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a retired North Carolina public school teacher I am extremely disappointed in the lawless mob that pulled down the
Silent Sam monument on the UNC campus. The inaction of UNC officials and the order for law enforcement to stand
down was equally sickening.

The overwhelming majority of North Carolina residents are against tearing down monuments in our state just to satify the
far left and their antifa loyalists. As a teacher I always taught my students to listen and consider both side in a discussion
of topics. It is time our officials do the same.

Please take time to consider that you or the far left can't rewrite our state's history by taking these careless and unlawful
actions against our monuments.

Thank you for your time.

Ted Andrews
Hillsborough, North Carolina
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 10/1/2018 10:24:50 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam: think re-dedication

UNC,
I was born in Iowa in 1970. I grew up outside of Chicago, moved to Charlotte, NC for High school, went to
NC State for undergrad - where i met my wife (her uncle was a UNC grad, we had our rehearsal dinner at
the Carolina Inn, wedding down the road, and reception at the old Carolina country club). I've lived in
NC for the majority of my 48 years and am proud to call NC home (except during the "bathroom bill"
fiasco) and go to the ACC Basketball tourney most years. ;-)
My wife's family can trace their roots back to the Revolution & confederacy and has veterans in both of
those conflicts. our oldest [REDACTED] is a [REDACTED] at chapel Hill.
I'm a amateur history buff and have followed the Silent Sam situation with interest. My recommendation
would be 2 ideas:
1. same statue, same location and re-dedicate it to the fallen students and have speeches from our
current former governors (ex UNC students) and the great things students from the university have/ can
accomplish. wipe out the old dedication history.
2. re-dedicate a more modern version of the statue. don't stylize it in confederate clothes. call it
Silent Sam, have it hold a rifle, and dedicate it to students who have fallen in all conflicts, including
the war between the States.
Keep it simple. Honoring the fallen is a goodness. The dedication history behind the old statue is its
only negative.
Maybe even move the location by 20-30 feet as to re-establish the new identity/ new dedication.
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 10/1/2018 10:36:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I honestly don't see how you can do anything but put it back up, where it was, and protect until it can be
removed/ moved legally and lawfully. To do anything less means that UNC is now subject to mob rule and that
any person or group has fair game to illegally, unlawfully, ( same thing) and violently attack monuments,
signage, buildings, artwork ... anything that they personally disagree with. If you do not replace him ( to go
through due process to remove/move) .. you are setting a VERY dangerous precedent.
Mother of 3 students, wife of grad, and UNC law grad myself.
Message
From: Dick Jordan
Sent: 10/1/2018 11:27:36 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a graduate of UNC and love my University! Silent Sam is as much a part of the University as is
the Bell Tower or the Old Well. It MUST be put back to its original state .... NOT moved! This historic
statue represents US History and is a reminder of a rather dark period of our past One cannot erase
history, no matter how good or how bad it may be! If anything, this statue should be studied and
students should understand why it was erected in the first place, what it stands for and the entire
controversy surrounding it and why that part of history no longer represents this great country! There
is no better way to teach this disastrous part of history than for students to stand there and see it! The
University should be proud to have this part of history right on our campus! Students can and should
be taught what we have learned from this and how we should respect our past, how we have
changed and why that part of history happened in the first place. What better way to teach respect
and equality for ALL people .... and what happens when we don't!!

Furthermore, this statue was removed by an illegal act and by a non-student ... another teachable
moment! Even if it had been removed by a student or an insider, it must be replaced! You CANNOT
allow people, students, outsiders, insiders or ANYONE else to run roughshod over the law, over
history, over respect, over education or over our great University! Wake-up .... take charge and run
our University in a manner that EDUCATES our young people!! You cannot change or hide history!!

Thank you, and with all due respect,


Raymond (Dick) Jordan
Class of 1970
Message
From: Office of Faculty Governance [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =5198a8a 70bb9409c93e 7 68525ced b97 c-South _facgo]
Sent: 10/1/2018 12:17:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Si lent Sam suggestion

From: gloria Ribet


Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 6:43 AM
To: Office of Faculty Governance <facgov@unc.edu>
Subject: Silent Sam suggestion

I am a NC native and appreciate all of our colorful history. There is a part of me that resents feeling that
outsiders are determining how and where we honor our history. I truly sympathize with your problem .. My
suggestion is that you look into moving the statue to the Bennett Place; it is a civil war site and it is a place
where the statue would be close enough to Chapel Hill to maintain the original intent. Of course the biggest
issue is getting it put there, without those people who are just seeking notoriety targeting it and the park to
continue their own agenda. I would suggest where ever you decide to finally place the statue you get it in place
before you make the announcement.

Good
Luck,

Gloria Ribet
Message
From: Judy Coley
Sent: 10/1/2018 12:42:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The group that toppled silent Sam cannot be honored for their actions nor do they possess respect for
anyone or any cause. silent Sam was erected in honor of Ca r olina students that enlisted. And, if the
students that participated had done their homework/groundwork would have been aware of Sam's existence on
the historical area before they applied, were accepted and paid tuition. They may have even become aware
that 40% of the enlisted
History cannot be eradicated nor changed.
"silen t Sam" therefore should remain in his original location, his appropriate home, where those that
were honored were students.

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Selz-Ca mpbell, Laurie J [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Ad ministrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipient s/cn=69f2619e63ca46658delc91241a08285-Laurie J Se]
Sent: 10/1/2018 1:34:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exc hange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Dear Chancellor Folt and members of the Board of Trustees,

I am writing to express my strongest opposition to the re-installment of the statue known as Silent Sam on any part of
UN C's campus. The continued presence of this monument to the subjugation of African and African American persons is a
stain on our legacy as a public university that purports to be "for all kind." It sends a clear and resounding message that
UNC is not only unwilling to reckon with its history, but, perhaps more importantly, not committed to beginning the
process of making reparations for generations of harm.

As a white woman, I cannot fully know what it feels like to a person of color walking by this statue on a daily basis. I can
only imagine and try to learn from a place of care and connection. At the same time, I can wonder, as a Jewish woman --
what if I had to walk, daily, past a statue of Adolf Hitler? Or Josef Mengele, who conducted brutal medical
experimentation on Jewish children? What would it feel like to live with that perpetual sense of terror, of threat, of
knowing that there are those in my community who would want me erased?

I am struck by the way in which we, as a society, have made the decision that, of course, monuments to the horrors of the
Holocaust do not belong in communal, public spaces. Rather, they belong in museums, where they can serve as
flashpoints for discussion, reflection, and commitment to transformative societal change. We need to ask ourselves how
it is that we unable to give that same level of respect and honor to our communities of color on this campus. How can
we claim to be an institution with integrity, if we, by our inaction, allow such a failure of conscience to go unchecked?

There is no question that the continued presence of this statue in our midst poses an ongoing threat to the physical and
emotional health of students of color on our campus, and to the community as a whole, as it serves as a rallying point for
white nationalist groups. While the extent of that harm cannot be measured in dollars, it is, no netheless, significant to
consider t he $390,000 spent on security between July 2017 and 2018, an amount that has surely been far exceeded this
semeste r alone.

The issue of monuments to white supremacy and to our nation's racist history is not unique to our campus. The Chronicle
of Higher Education, just last week, published an editorial addressing this very issue
(see https ://www.chronicle.com/article/How-Colleges-Confront -Their/2 44586 ). While we are not alone in our challenge,
we do have the opportunity to exercise leadership in beginning to heal the atrocities of the past. I implore you to take
hold of t his oppo rtunity, and t o appropri ate ly locat e t he statue in a museum or similar location where it can be properly
contextualized and studied. Any other outcome would signal a tragic willingness to be com plicit in continued harm.

Sincerely,
Laurie Selz Campbell

*****************************************************

Laurie Selz Campbell, MSW


Clinical Associate Professor
UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work
CB# 3550, 325 Pittsboro Street
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550
REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 10/1/2018 2:03:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for the monument

Dear Chancellor Falt,


I am submitting an idea for the UNC soldier monument as well as a vote to NOT re-erect it on UNCs Campus.

First I want to share I am a Northerner who initially believed the statue should be left alone and permitted to stand as it
always had . However I've come to learn more about this statue and other statues like it (I suppose that's one good thing
that has come from all of this outcry).

As a granddaughter of Holocaust survivors I now see and understand much clearly what it is this statue represents to
many. Unfortunately it isn't representing the passionate confederate soldiers who fought for their beliefs but rather the
oppression that brought on the war and also continued to follow after the Civil War. Forms of this oppression clearly
still exist, especially in the South. If they didn't this wouldn't still be such a hot button.

Although the origin of the Swastika was in no way what it came to represent after Hitler & Nazi Germany, it no longer is
a symbol that means "good fortune" or "well-being" as the Sanskrit word suggests. Very unfortunate, but an
unfortunate truth, if we see it hanging our minds immediate go to the more current use, a representation of hatred and
genocide. That being said, it is just as important to not forget the Nazi Swastka, even though we certainly don't want it
displayed on outdoor flag poles. The most appropriate place for these artifacts is a Museum. One that can be visited by
the public and shared with future generations, to preserve history for all to be reminded and learn from it.

Sincerelv.

Resident of Durham, NC
Mother of a UNC Undergrad Student
Message
From: Herman, Bernie [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =3a96f32cefa844f58131427b0f5d7 de4-Bern i e Herm]
Sent: 10/1/2018 2:09:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Thoughts on "Silent Sam"

Dear Colleagues:

I stand with my colleagues who advocated for the removal of the monument known as Silent Sam - and I am
irrevocably opposed to its reinstatement on its former site. I do believe, however, that the monument be
relocated to a site where it can become a focal point for discussions around Jim Crow, the Civil Rights
Movement, civil disobedience, abuses of power, and every other facet of citizenship in a deeply conflicted state,
region, and nation. Although the monument retains its materiality as an object, its attendant meanings have
undergone seismic shifts in emphasis and importance. Rightly so. As inflammatory as the present moment may
seem, it is exactly the right time for conversations about civic responsibility and civil discourse. Relocating the
monument to a secluded location conducive to reflection, debate, contemplation, reconciliation, and the free and
frank sharing of points of view would align the presence of the monument with abiding campus values. To
restore it to its former site is an abdication of Carolina's core mission in favor of political expedience,
ideological convenience, and the perpetuation of values that embrace bigotry, marginalization, and inequality.

Bernard L. Herman
George B. Tindall Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies and Folklore
Department of American Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Message
From: REDACTED I
Sent: 10/1/2018 2:35:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I respectfully request and recommend that Silent Sam be returned to the UNC campus. Perhaps, not to the
original location but to a location easily accessible by the general public. Historically accurate signage should
be placed at the location to put the statue into proper historical context. Protective barriers, if needed, should be
built to preserve and protect the memorial. The statute is a memorial to the memory of deceased North Carolina
citizens. This statue was put in place to honor UNC alumni. This makes the statue directly relevant to the UNC­
Chapel Hill campus. I do not agree with the comments made when the statue was erected, nor the sentiments
expressed by Julian Carr at the time Silent Sam was erected. But that perspective is the luxury history has
granted us all.

As a North Carolina citizen I was outraged that this lawless behavior was allowed. The mob broke the rule of
law when it tore down Silent Sam. The mob's actions however popular on campus, and in the Chapel Hill area
should not be allowed to violently vandalize North Carolina property. The taxpayers of North Carolina
subsidize millions to UNC-Chapel Hill. I am confident the majority of North Carolina citizens have negative
sentiments about the toppling of Silent Sam. Expressing apathy to this situation and allowing mob rule to win
the day would be to condone the violent law less behavior.

I recommend that we erect more statues and memorials not tear them down. Perhaps the BOG should consider
statues to honor and memorialize the memory of North Carolina citizens with diverse backgrounds. Perhaps a
monument to African American contributions to UNC-Chapel Hill? Thank you for your time and consideration

Very respectfully,
Message
From: Ca leb Colley
Sent: 10/1/2018 2:37:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

In the case of Silent Sam there is no alternative site on the UNC campus of "similar prominence, honor,
visibility, availability and access," as NCGS Section 100-2.l(b) requires for moving such a
monument. Consequently law requires that Silent Sam must be returned to his original pedestal.
Message
From: Tommy Long
Sent: 10/1/2018 2:54:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whomever will assimilate all these opinions,

While I do NOT have a concrete recommendation or solution to the final location of the monument,
I would opine that due to the extreme negative connotation that this and all similar monuments
placed during a similar time-frame in history elicit, the place that Silent Sam does NOT need to be
is back on his pedestal in Mccorkle Square on the UNC campus, nor in a building that presently
exists on campus .... unless the University wants to separate it from further potential damage from
those who do not respect history or private property.

Perhaps a museum(TBD?) to be built on campus or in the community that allows for all mindsets
to embrace the past, the present, and the future, with 'teachable' information and perspective .

Thank you!

Tommy Long
UNC Class '76 BS and '79 DDS
and a proud TarHeel!
Message
From: Matt Fussa (mfussa)
Sent: 10/1/2018 3:13:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam -- make him part of a broader monument

Please seize the opportunity to do something that is unifying---build a memorial to all students/alumni killed in the
service of their nation. You can make Sam part of that and by re-dedicating the statue as a part of that broader purpose,
you have an opportunity to change its purpose. The statue alone is not offensive to most reasonable people, but the vile
speeches made at its dedication are detestable and should be firmly repudiated. Put Sam in context and frame it within
the bigger picture of student service in time of war that the terrible sacrifices made.

Matt
Message
From: jdub02468
Sent: 10/1/2018 4:42:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monuments:

Chancellor Holt,
I do not approve the damage or destruction of public property, no matter what cause it may address.
Those who participate in such activity, should not be handled with "kid gloves", but be prose-
cited to the fullest extent of the law and pay restitution.
If the decision is made to rebuke
the monuments, the contributions
made to the universities and state
by Mr. Carr should also be rebuked
and paid to the heirs of Mr. Carr.
I am sure there is a way to app-
proximate today's worth of the properties and donations.
If you need help figuring that out
call NCSU. I am sure they can help.

Thank for taking all comments.


John W Tew

Sent from my U.S. CeUulJr,ii) Smartphone


Message
From: Janet Jones
Sent: 10/1/2018 5:11:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: my choice

as a preface, i am a n.c. native (born in alamance county), was employed by unc-ch in the academic affairs
division for 32+ years (retired in 2011) and was a permanent resident of chapel hill for 36 years. i do not
want the monument returned to the space it previously occupied.

in closing, thank you for the opportunity to voice my choice in this divisive matter.

sincerely,
janetjones
Message
From:
Sent: 10/1/2018 6:16:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My vote Is to place it back where it w as. put a camera on it and fence no one should be able to touch it

Good luck with your decision

Thank you
REDACTED
Message
From: Adam R Cooke
Sent: 10/1/2018 6:22:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: A Modest Proposal

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

Silent Sam was erected in 1913. That same year William Monroe Trotter, Ida B. Wells, and other civil rights
leaders met with Woodrow Wilson (whom they had supported for president) to discuss his push to segregate
federal offices, and to express dismay over Jim Crow policies. The next year, after those leaders saw
continuation of those harmful and degrading practices they sought, and were eventually granted, another
audience with Wilson. The meeting ended with those leaders being effectively thrown out of the Oval Office.

At the same time, socially homologous statues were being erected all across the south. These statues were
supposed to commemorate Confederate soldiers and losses, but what has been readily documented was that they
were monuments to Jim Crow laws that dehumanized a significant portion of our population. This is the true
history, heritage, and context in which Silent Sam must be placed.

To that end, I humbly recommend the following. Silent Sam should returned, but the site should be
amended. A large plaque, readily visible and read, should be placed at the base of the statue explaining the
appropriate contextual history of the statue's installation. I'm sure UNC has individuals better suited to the
drafting of that plaque than myself The fact that Southern boys came to the defense of their homelands (as I'm
sure they saw it) can and should be commended. The fact that their homelands were in rebellion for
reprehensible ideas should be condemned.

But the two actions and ideas are not mutually exclusive.

Additionally, as Silent Sam is also a monument to Jim Crow, a monument to a victim of Jim Crow should be
erected in an artistically appropriate, co-located site. That monument to the victim should have physical and
psychic preeminence to the monument to the zeitgeist that created that victim - Silent Sam. Again, I can
modestly recommend a subject for the monument to a victim: Booker T. Spicely.

Thirty-one years after Silent Sam was erected and the same year that the UNC Press published "What the Negro
Wants," which uniformly called for an end to segregation, Private Booker T. Spicely was stationed at Camp
Butner as a volunteer in the US Army. On July 8, 1944, he was on pass in Durham and boarded a public bus at
the corner of Fayetteville and Petigrew Streets - less than ten miles where Silent Sam stood. When a group of
white soldiers boarded, Private Spicely was directed by the driver, Herman Lee Council, to move to the absolute
rear. Private Spicely saw himself as an equal to these other soldiers and argued against moving, but did so
finally.

However, something that he said must have upset Council because when Private Spicely exited the bus, Council
followed him and shot him twice - once through the liver and once through his heart. Council then re-
boarded the bus and continued his route. After lying in the street for 10 minutes, Private Spicely was
transported to a hospital where he died. His death was ruled a homicide and Council was charged with second-
degree murder. Two months, and one week after Council shot Spicely, an all-white jury, after 28 minutes of
deliberation, acquitted Council. Council lived out his days and died in a nursing home in 1982.
Pvt Spicley's story is haunting in its sad, emblematic familiarity. His story resonates from the fight for the end
of Jim Crow through to today's social justice movements, and stands in sharp contrast to the despicable history
that Silent Sam represents to so many.

Silent Sam is a part of a history that Americans must face. To stash that emblem of history in a non-public
location is to ignore that history - and you can't learn from ignored history. I think Silent Sam should be put
back right where it came from, but it should be put back in the proper historical context. We would do well to
memorialize, too, the likeness of Private Spicely, who would stand shoulder to shoulder with Silent Sam, and,
thus, never again be relegated to its shadow.

Thank you for your time and attention in reading this,


Adam R. Cooke
Message
From: Jeanette Bench
Sent: 10/1/2018 6:31:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I urge you to keep Silent Sam in storage. With a complete knowledge of the history of the speech, I do not see
how you can in good conscious force the students and residents of this town to continue to walk past this
statue. Perhaps there will be a time when a museum is erected that tells the entire history of the civil war, the
KKK, slavery, the soldiers that were not given a choice but to fight in a war, and those that were fighting to
keep the system of slavery in place. This country needs to heal from the civil war, NC could be a leader by
telling the history from all sides. Continuing to display a statue that only tells one side of this war is not good
for anyone.

Jeanette Bench
Message
From: Seymour Phillips i
Sent: 10/1/2018 6:33:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

The vast majority of North Carolina want,s Slient Sam back in his rightful place where he was! According to
NC State law. Does a unlawful mob rule or do the people of this great state?
Message
From: Lindsay, Lisa [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =a42143 lb44fa48658097 cc 141a89a0b 1-Li sa Li ndsa]
Sent: 10/1/2018 8:48:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and safety

Dear Chancellor Folt and Members of the Board of Trustees,

Of the many reasons to oppose the restoration of Silent Sam to McCorkle Place, the most important is this: that
statue will continue to beacon to extremists and protestors, creating the real potential for deadly violence. If
even one student or community member is seriously hurt, or heaven forbid killed, responsibility will fall not
only to the immediate perpetrator(s), but to those who had the opportunity to remove a lightning rod for
violence and did not do it.

Can you live with that on your conscience?

This year all university classrooms are being equipped with indoor locks, to keep out potential perpetrators of
violence. Let's keep our students safe on McCorkle Place as well.

Sincerely,

Lisa A. Lindsay, Ph.D.


Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor
Chair, Department of History
University of North Carolina
CB #3195
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
Message
From: Danns Simonds
Sent: 10/1/2018 8:53:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Massachusetts Mom

Put it in a new UNC museum


Donna Simonds
Message
From: Tom Sawyer
Sent: 10/1/2018 9:03:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam belongs in Mccorkle Place!

Typical Silent Sam protester.

Chancellor Falt,

Silent Sam belongs in its original location, on the pedestal in Mccorkle Place. It was placed there
with dignity and purpose and deserves to remain there.

Sam's violent detractors are, by and large, radical professional protesters, some of whom are paid
using my taxpayer AND tuition dollars (see UNC professors participating and arrested). These rioting
hooligans move from location to location, violating local laws and placing innocent law-abiding
citizens, like my UNG-sophomore daughter, in harm's way.

A quick internet search details the likes of the aggressive mob of rioters and law-breakers arrested
during the Silent Sam fiasco, many of whom have little or no affiliation with the university. Below is a
sampling of who you will cater to if you do not return the statue to its rightful location. Note their ages.

Raul Mauro Arce Jimenez - arrested for misdemeanor riot and defacing a public monument.

Jimenez is a 27 year old professional protester, a communist, and a left-wing Antifa radical. Prior to
his lawbreaking in Chapel Hill, he was arrested in Durham when a monument was unlawfully
toppled . Jimenez was charged with two felonies and three misdemeanors in the Durham riot. The
felony charges were both related to willfully rioting and are listed below:

<!--[if !supportlists]-->1 . <!--[endif]-->Participation in a riot with property damage in excess of


$1,500

<!--[if !supportlists]-->2. <!--[endif]-->lnciting others to riot where there is property damage in


excess of $1 ,500

Dannielle Jelayne Shochet - arrested for simple assault.

Shochet is a 47 year old professional protester. In April of 2018, Shochet was also arrested in
Newnan, GA following a riotous demonstration and was charged with obstruction of officers.

Dwayne Dixon - arrested for simple assault.

Dixon is a 46 year old UNC teaching assistant. I am paying his salary both through my North
Carolina taxes and the thousands of tuition dollars I pay for my daughter to attend UNC. Previous to
this unlawful behavior, Dixon was arrested for simple assault in Durham while rioting over another
monument. Additionally, Dixon was arrested in August 2017, charged with having a weapon at a
public assembly or rally and going armed to the terror of people. Incidentally, the weapon was a
semi-automatic rifle loaded with a 30-round magazine. He was also carrying two other magazines.

Alexander Henry Joustra - arrested for causing injury and damage to property.

Joustra is a 30 year old Carrboro resident. Joustra was previously arrested in 2011 for trafficking
MOMA (commonly known as "ecstasy").

Do not coddle your students - educate them. Do not placate the unlawful rioters - ignore
them.

Put Silent Sam back in its rightful place, atop the pedestal in Mccorkle Place.

Tom Sawyer
Clemmons, NC
Message
From: TWA Arey
Sent: 10/1/2018 9:37:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

To whom it may concern:

It has sicken me in my spirit that UNC would allow college students to tear down a
statue that honored students that left everything they owned to protect their state in
a time, when Northern Aggression was threatening our states sovereignty! UNC is
a state run school and my taxes pay for it to run, so the college needs to put Sam
back up, and if be put a fence around him so these left wing nuts want mess with
him anymore! !

Thank you, Tim Arey

~
~ Virus-free. wwv,,1.avastcom
Message
From: Matthew Franke
Sent: 10/1/2018 9:53:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,

Silent Sam should not re-erected in an outdoor location on our campus. Instead, the monument should be placed
indoors in a museum-like exhibit on UNC during the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Jim Crow era. This
way the monument will provide physical evidence of the myth of the Lost Cause and will be pedagogically
useful. The accompanying exhibits should be curated by faculty from the University, especially those affiliated
with the Center for the Study of the American South, the Department of History, and the Stone Center for Black
Culture and History. Control of the exhibit should remain firmly in the hands of the faculty--not in any outside
organization. The exhibit should also include interviews with people who supported and opposed the statue's
removal from campus, so that the debate itself will be documented as part of the statue's history and as an
example of the fault-lines surrounding this issue to this day.

To re-erect Silent Sam in an outdoor location on campus, without the type of detailed context that this statue
needs, would effectively represent an endorsement of the values that the statue represents--namely the
Confederacy, the Lost Cause, and the Jim Crow South.

To those who would argue that the statue simply commemorates fallen UNC students, I ask: how many UNC
students died in World War I and World War II and Korea and Vietnam and Iraq? Where is their memorial? If
honoring dead UNC students is truly Silent Sam's purpose, then he does a poor job. It's difficult to celebrate
Confederates without celebrating the Confederacy and its values, which run counter to the mission of our
university as a public institution which ought not to exclude people on the basis of race.

I heartily endorse the building of a new monument to all UNC students who died in any American war, to be re-
erected in the location on which Silent Sam used to stand. The new monument should list how many UNC
students died in each of our country's major wars. In this way, University can honor its war dead without
necessarily endorsing particular causes that they might have fought for.

Sincerely,
Dr. Matthew Franke
UNC class of 2014
Message
From: Christina Young
Sent: 10/1/2018 10:13:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Dear Sir.

There have been a lot of controversy over the silent Sam confederate statue in UNC Chapel Hill and as a north Carolinian
myself I believe it should be keep on campus, the students that think there thuggish and aggressive behavior to be a
noble cause for equality and to end racism, but they have no respect for history, keep it there as a reminder to the sad
past the south has or as a marker to honor those who fought for the very ground it stands on, but those people are not
true Carolinians so they could never understand what it means to be a Carolinian or a southerner. My family's ancestors
fought for the north and the south, but I do not wish to disrespect or destroy union statues, Theses students, that have
no respect for the men who didn't fight for slavery, but for their home and fellow countrymen. have been radicalized
and feel the desire to bring their bigotry and hate to our home and desecrate our culture and heritage, regardless of
what Sam stands for, it is not up to their judgement to decide the fate of something that has been there for over a
hundred years. The collage should stand tall against this prejudice and never tolerate these acts again.

Sincerely, Camden Young. Age 18.


Message
From: Jerry Austin
Sent: 10/1/2018 10:28:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Why does there need to be an "idea" about Sam? Return him to where he should legally be, where he was
illegal l y removed. Follow the law, do your job!

Jerry c Austin

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Jennifer Fusco
Sent: 10/1/2018 10:38:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for the Memorial to Civi l War Soldiers of the University

Thanks for requesting feedback from the community about the future of the Memorial to Civil War
Soldiers of the University, which is often referred to as Silent Sam. I think the monument should be
relocated to a museum, or a less prominent outdoor location, and should be part of an artistic exhibit
that explores the history and impact of the civil war for the citizens of North Carolina and the UNC-
Chapel Hill campus and surrounding community.

Because the monument was created to honor University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students
who fought for the confederacy, I think it would be helpful to have some information that explains why
North Carolina's legislators voted to secede from the United States of America and become a part of
the Confederate States of America, and how this resulted in the citizens of North Carolina being
called upon to fight in a civil war on the side of the Confederate States of America, which ultimately
lost, was dissolved and whose states and territories were reclaimed as part of the United States of
America after the war.

It would be wonderful to add a monument nearby to honor and recognize citizens of North Carolina
who resisted secession and supported remaining or returning to a union with the United States of
America. I don't know if there were any UNG-Chapel Hill students who took a stand against secession
or who helped to restore North Carolina's statehood within the United States of America. If there
were, this would be a wonderful place to honor and recognize them individually or as a group.

There should also be information about the hundreds of thousands (millions?) of African-born and
American-born people of African descent who were enslaved in North Carolina - during both the time
this territory was a colony and during the period when it was a state. I think it is important to include
recognition of slavery prior to the American Revolution, since the wealth of slaveholders helped fund
the revolution, which resulted in the establishment of North Carolina as state within the United States
of America.

Because UNG-Chapel Hill is the oldest public university in the United States of America, the campus
holds a special place in the history of this country. I think recognition through other artworks near
the Memorial to Civil War Soldiers of the University should be given to the many people whose work
as slaves helped create, maintain and broaden the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The
artwork might explore how slaves helped build the campus and how the work of slaves contributed to
the wealth and success of the University's benefactors through the years. Many landowners donated
the land for UNG-Chapel Hill. How many of them were slaveholders?

A monument should be erected adjacent to the Memorial to Civil War Soldiers of the University that
honors the contributions of the men and women whose enslaved labor helped establish a lasting
legacy of outstanding higher education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This would
also be a good location to recognize the first African-American students who attended the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and acknowledge that it was 162 years after the university's charter
before this occurred.

Thank you, again, for requesting community feedback on this issue.

Jennifer Fusco
Carrboro, NC
Message
From: Noku Dzu
Sent: 10/2/2018 12:11:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

The offensive and disruptive statue does NOT belong on the UNC
campus. Find an innocuous off-campus place for it (since it can't be
destroyed legally).

Perhaps there is a Confederate cemetery that could take it.

Thanks,

A Chapel Hill resident


Message
From: Dave Isenhour
Sent: 10/2/2018 12:14:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
CC: REDACTED
Subject: Return Silent Sam Memorial

UNC Chancellor Carol Falt

I find it very disturbing that the Silent Sam Memorial was allowed to be torn down by a bunch of thugs
and I am also very disgusted that it was done apparently by the facts that continue to come out and
be verified with the knowledge of some at multiple levels at the university as well as at the law
enforcement level who stood by and allowed the illegal acts of those so called people to take place.

It is no hidden fact that those evil people that took part in that event are lawless and have absolutely
no respect for our laws or the constitution of our nation.

As I am sure you actually and surly know or at least should know within your position, The Silent Sam
Memorial was placed for the purpose of honoring and remembering the students of UNC that
responded to the call of their State. These students left and joined the Confederate fight not because
they owned slaves or knew anyone that owned slaves but they joined to fight and repel the North who
did in fact invade the South over a lot of issues with slavery only being a very small if any issue at the
time. Many of these students did not make it through the war and died and like in so many other
cases throughout the South leaving their families with no body of their loved ones to bring home and
properly lay them to rest. The memorial of Silent Sam and other such memorials in place were
erected as many war veterans aged as a way to show honor and respect to them and the ones that
never came home following the war. In addition these memorials help document the history of the
State of North Carolina. Those students as well as all other veterans stood up and fought for their
State and whether some like it or not they are a part of our history and the truth should be
taught instead of allowing a bunch of lawless communist agitators to decide what of our history
should remain and what should be removed.

All of those involved in the actual hands on tearing down of the memorial on campus as well as
anyone else that worked behind the scene to instigate, plan or play any other part in it what so ever
should be held accountable for their actions. This includes the UNC students that it has been
documented by photos and video where part of this destruction. It also means that any university
administration, staff, professors or anyone else associated with the University and participated in the
actions of allowing the events to take place should resign and or be terminated at once from their
positions with charges being filed to the fullest extent of the law and yes some of those related
individuals were also documented by photo and or video participating in this event as well.

As far as the current status of the Silent Sam Memorial the memorial statute was and is still protected
by Law. By Law it must be returned to the status, position and location as it was prior to it being
illegally damaged and defaced. This should be done without debate or any attempt to change its
location. That is the Law and any deviation from this or attempt to do otherwise is not acceptable and
will not be tolerated in any way. As I mentioned above the groups that took part in this destruction are
pure evil and care nothing about our state or our history. They are for whatever reason acting on their
delusional thought processes that they can take the law in their own hands to do what they wish
without repercussions. That is one reason we have laws in place. The majority of the people of North
Carolina are good and outstanding law abiding individuals. They have shown time and time again that
they want these memorials to stay and stay for the purpose they were erected for years ago that
includes for their family members that were a part of the war.

It is outrageous to me that there would even be any thoughts at all about even suggesting that
another location be found to move Silent Sam or any other Memorial to Confederate Veterans.
I would greatly hope that you do the right thing and see that the memorial be returned to its location of
prominence and unlike before in the future see that the appropriate actions be taken to preserve and
keep the memorial from future damages of any kind.

In case there still remains any question to this point I will close with this.

The Memorial must be returned to its original location by Law and once that is complete it must be
appropriately protected from such damage such has occurred in the future.
Any other actions are unacceptable by any standard.

David Isenhour
Richfield North Carolina
Message
From: James Holaday
Sent: 10/2/2018 7:23:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam idea

Dear Chancellor Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,

\Vhen I was in school I never really paid any attention to Silent Sam, he was just an old statue that
added to the ambiance amongst the big trees. I also never knew there was any ulterior motive to his
being erected, only that he was a monument to students who died during the war. That's probably all
most people knew. I certainly never saw him as a monument to a cause.
Regardless, there is a difference between a monument to a cause (Robert E. Lee on his horse) or a
monument to the dead. Silent Sam (like the statue that was destroyed in Durham) represents a
common soldier. In my mind the solution is simple: just put him in the school cemetery with other
monuments to the dead. Maybe add a plaque that tells his complete story, but he and that story are
important to the university. I think that is solution most can be happy with.

James Holaday
UNC'14
current NC Central graduate student in History
Message
From: Brian Robbins
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:11:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Save our history

Please do what you can to save our history. Our great grandfather's where not monsters as the modem narrative
goes. They where simply defending their home & country from invasion.

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


Message
From: Heather Tsihlis I
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:55:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Remove Silent Same

Please, please, please, do not keep Silent Sam on campus. If you insist on keeping him on campus, at least put
him in an indoor museum-type environment with historical context. Thank you.

Heather Tsihlis
Carrboro resident and spouse ofUNC faculty member
Message
From: Brian Garay
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:56:49 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow Up

Dear Chancellor Folt-

Please add my name to the list of alumni who wish that Silent Sam not be returned to its pedestal, and that it
should be housed in a discreet place with a marker describing its history and controversy. Please consider:

• The statue commemorates an armed force that waged war against the United States.
• The "heritage" claimed by its backers included, and largely depended upon, slavery.
• The statue was erected at a time when the Ku Klux Klan was ascendent, and the dedication speech of
Julian Carr reflected a racism that cannot be tolerated at UNC.

UNC students in the Civil War era joined the Confederate forces for many reasons, and I'm sure many of them
thought their cause noble. Tragically, it was not. If there is a proper tribute to the antebellum South, it would
focus upon the small farmers and businessmen who struggled to forge worthy lives in the face of the industrial
revolution and an increasingly global economy. If there is a heritage to be celebrated, it is the dedication to
family and neighbor wrought out of that trying era. Selflessness, generosity, courage in the face of adversity -
these are the positive traits that distinguished Southern culture in the early/mid-l 800s. A statue of a Confederate
soldier bears no relationship to what I love about the South.

I urge you to take bold leadership. Do not equivocate about what we stand for as a university community, Lux
Libertas. And keep in mind that the light we seek, the liberty we cherish for all mankind, includes a respect for
people with whom we disagree. Defenders of Silent Sam hold their own set of sincere beliefs, and to shut them
down would only serve to divide us further. Instead, consider respectful ways to address their views in a way
that helps educate us all. Find common ground. For example, find a place for Silent Sam where other, more
positive, aspects of Southern culture can be celebrated: Perhaps a sculpture garden with memorials to notable
UNC graduates where history can be put in context and discussed. Let's accept and learn from both the noble
and ignoble deeds of those who came before us. Let's use those lessons to seek a better way for our own lives.

I wish you continued success in leading this great institution, and I thank you for your service to the University
of North Carolina.

Sincerely,

Brian Goray (AB, 1981)


Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 11:23:46 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam Suggestion

Flag: Follow up

Good morning, below is a copy of the email I sent to the special email address furnished for people to voice their opinions
concerning Silent Sam . I realized later I should have .cc'ed the Office of the Chancellor.

Respectfully,

James McNeely

-----Original Message-----
From: rtpemt
To: uncmonument
Sent: Mon, Oct 1, 2018 1:40 pm
Subject: Silent Sam Suggestion

Good afternoon,

My name is James McNeely, a life-long resident of Durham, NC, and lifetime supporter of UNC. Until August 20, 2018. I
watched with sadness, anger, and outrage as a mob of people , many UNC students and many outside agitators, tore
down not only a statue, but a MONUMENT, a MEMORIAL, to honor the sacrifice of the UNC alumni, the "boy soldiers"
who made the ultimate sacrifice in defense of their homes, their lands, their country. Despite what the protestors may
claim, the Silent Sam Monument is not to honor the institution of slavery, nor is it a symbol of hate. To say this is to
demonstrate a complete ignorance of history. But, I've observed that you cannot have a civilized conversation with a "rage
mob." Yes, "rage mob" is a strong term, and I don't use it lightly. But I have 20/20 vision when I wear my glasses and I
have seen much video footage of the protests before and after the toppling of Silent Sam . But when I see protestors, both
UNC students and others, physically fighting law enforcement officers, throwing objects including "smoke bombs," well, I
think "rage mob" is an apt description .

My suggestion for Silent Sam is repair whatever damage was done when it was illegally torn down. Then, it should be put
right back where it was, and has stood for more than a century, before these protestors were born, indeed, before even
their parents were born. Anything less would be to dishonor the memory of the very alumni of UNG-Chapel Hill who made
the ultimate sacrifice. Further, I propose that a substantial fence be erected to protect the monument in it's proper location.

I'd like to close this letter with another suggestion since it is relevant. The "problem" with Silent Sam is not the monument
itself. The problem is with the students, certainly not a majority of the student body, and with the outside agitators. As for
the students, I feel UNC is much too lenient with students who disrupt the normal routines at the University. Specifically,
Maya Little. I, and many others, have a hard time understanding why this person has not been expelled for her previous
act of vandalism. I have a photo of her smearing red ink on the base of the Silent Sam Monument, allegedly mixed with
her own blood, while a UNC-CH police officer stood by and did nothing. Why is this person still a student at the
University? Further, the University would be entirely within it's legal right to take out a "no trespass order" on Miss Little.
Also, you have a professor in your employ, a Dwayne Dixon, who is a known leader in the local ANTIFA movement, is
known to carry a loaded semi-automatic rifle with extra loaded magazines, and has been arrested here in Durham last
year when he was present at a rumored KKK rally, which, incidentally, never materialized. I have worked for two
prestigious companies in Research Triangle Park, IBM for 32 years, and Research Triangle Institute for 9 years. I can
assure you, if I had been arrested for something I would have had my employment terminated at both of these companies.
Again, I, and many others, fail to understand why this sort of person is employed by UNC-CH.

One last thing I'd like to bring up. "Problems," like the toppling of Silent Sam, are best cured by prevention . It seems quite
suspicious that the UNC-CH police officers and the Chapel Hill Police Department stood by and did absolutely nothing
while the protestors surrounded Silent Sam with huge screens to block their activity of cutting the statue free from the
base. If the law enforcement officers had DONE THEIR JOB AND DONE THEIR DUTY, the statue would not have been
toppled and you would not have this headache of a problem confronting you now. As many of my friends and
acquaintances have commented, it's almost as if law enforcement knew in advance this was going to happen. Certainly,
Chapel Hill Chief of Police Chris Blue was known to have ordered his officers not to interfere with the protestors. That is
well known as his cell phone text messages have been published by the news media. If the UNC-CH Board of Governors
bow to the "rage mob," they will only protest something else. And mob rule will continue. I submit to you that the leniency
shown to the protestors who toppled the Confederate Monument in Durham on August 14, 2017, led up to the toppling of
Silent Sam. I sincerely hope that UNC-CH will make a statement, a statement that the law applies to all, and the
consequences of breaking the law is an important lesson that we all should take to heart. Otherwise, our society will break
down into anarchy.

Respectfully,

James A. McNeelv
Message
From: John Watson
Sent: 10/2/2018 11:39:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt:

I am a Chapel Hill resident and a graduate of, and continuing donor to, UNC-CH. I am writing to express my strong
opposition to re-installation of the statute known as Silent Sam at its former location or any other similarly prominent
location on our campus. No one can read Julian Carr's gleeful description of his horse-whipping an African American
woman- given as part of his dedication speech for the statute in 1913-and mistake the statute for anything other than
what it is. It is a monument to the defense of slavery, an institution that has stained the history of our nation and that
works its hateful impact even to this day. As such, the statue has no place of honor on our campus. If it has any place at
all, it is an appropriately curated place for reflection and, particularly for white Southerners like me, contrition and
shame.

I leave to others more familiar with our physical plant than I am to recommend whether there is a campus location
where the statute can be displayed in a setting that explains its historical context and that invites the viewer to a deeper
understanding of the evils of slavery and their continuing legacy. I am convinced, however that restoring the statute to
a prominent location would create a constant threat to public safety. Equally problematic, it would serve as a tribute to
an odious institution that our university should emphatically reject, not honor.

Very truly yours,

John D. Watson, Jr
UNC-CH '77
Message
From: Bennett, Trude Ann [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=6117BF9769DB485C8AEBE9E4115EA7E7-TRUDE A BEN]
Sent: 10/2/2018 12:15:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Remove statue from campus!

As a double graduate and retired faculty from UNC-CH, I want to register my strong support for REMOVING
SILENT SAM FROM CAMPUS. I do not believe there is any other principled or appropriate solution. Trude
Bennett
Message
From: McGrath, Eileen [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=A4FEOECD9259437FAA7D24E9695A864E-EILEEN MCGR]
Sent: 10/2/2018 12:33:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: New location and use for the Confederate Monument

For many of the years that I worked at UNC I walked by the Confederate Monument each morning going from
a bus stop on Franklin Street to my job in Wilson Library. Given that this statute is part of UNC's heritage, how
can we use it better? Here's what I propose:

Move it to Hamilton Room 100 or a similar small auditorium. I think Hamilton 100 would be a good choice
since Hamilton Hall is home to the History Department and this lecture hall is a dump, in serious need of a
makeover. Put the statute in one comer of a renovated Hamilton 100. Provide a modest amount of interpretive
material, materials created by on campus experts such as Fitz Brundage, Jim Leloudis, and Cecelia Moore. But
make this interpretive matter just the beginning of an ongoing dialog by:

1. Equipping the area around the statue with boards for members of the community and visitors to record
their thoughts about the statue--what they think it meant in the past, what it means to them now. These
could be oral comments, or written. There are now electronic white boards that record what is written on
them. The Health Sciences Library is about to get one. (Contact Barrie Hayes, bhayes@email.unc.edu
for information about this.) These comments will document Sam's meanings in our time; they will be
raw materials for future histories of UNC. The UNC Library, especially University Archives, has
experience storing electronic records, which is what these white board comments will be. Contact Nick
Graham, the University Archivist at ngraham@email.unc.edu.
2. Making Silent Sam the subject of an undergraduate seminar course each year. I think that the History
Department might be asked to start this off, but it should not be assigned to them as an ongoing
burden. The College of Arts and Sciences should be responsible for the course, and the instructor, and
the approach, should change each year. I'd like to see how students and faculty in different disciplines
approach this controversial part of our history. Let's see how different students process this statue and it
meanings by having the Silent Sam course taught one year by someone from Africa, African American,
and Diaspora Studies, the next year by someone in Creative Writing, then Communication, then
Anthropology, etc. Imagine how interesting it will be to see how studio art students interpret
Sam. With the students' permission, all these projects should be added to a University Archives
collection on Silent Sam.

I think this suggestion can satisfy a number of constituents. It will be successful if:

1. Hamilton 100 is truly renovated and technologically upgraded. If people feel that the statue is just
dumped in an unattractive, out-of-the-way place, the move will be a PR disaster and the existing
departments in Hamilton Hall will, rightly, be disgruntled. Spend the money to turn Hamilton 100 and
its new resident into an asset. Someone will want to fund this.
2. UNC advertises what is being done.
3. When the statue is moved into its new location, make sure that there is clear signage to it so that it does
not seem as though the statue is being hidden away. We want campus visitors to be able to find it easily.
Their reactions may be different from those of the campus community, and it will be important for the
historical record to have them aspart of the historical record too.
4. Faculty from diverse departments see the value in using Silent Sam as teaching artifact.

The Confederate Memorial has been part ofUNC's history for over a century, and it is, sadly, not going
anywhere soon. I hope that my suggestion present a way to incorporate it into the ongoing story of Carolina by
allowing both casual and focused reactions to the statue. Those reactions will bring the statute forward in
time. Community opinion about the Confederate Monument evolved over the course of the early twentieth
century. We can't predict how it might change again, but all these changes are part of the story ofUNC.

Eileen McGrath
Message
From: Chris Hakkenberg [
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:07:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam not welcome at UNC

To whom it may concern,


As a recent PhD graduate of UNC, I am strongly against any reinstatement of silent Sam and frankly
embarrassed that in 2018 this is even a question. This is not a monument to fallen soldiers, as much as
to the racist origin of the Daughters of the Confederacy.
It is time for UNC to try to be less racist!
Thank you,
Chris Hakkenberg (2017)
Message
From: Herbert, Teri Lynn
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:07:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: statues

All of the statues were the creation of artists and craftsmen. I hate for any of them to be
destroyed, just for that reason. It was their life's work. You don't destroy paintings because
they are unpleasant to behold.
I would do more educational info for the statues, explaining the context better. Moving to a less
conspicuous place would be ok in my opinion.

Thanks for the opportunity to speak.

Teri Lynn

This message was secured via TLS by MUSC .


Message
From: Taylor Pardue
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:09:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep it down, put it in a museum

Honoring Silent Sam by displaying the statue in the north quad is an embarrassment to the University.

Taylor Pardue
Class of '13
Native North Carolinian

Taylor L. Pardue
Insikt - Risk Management
Message
From: Jill Simmerman
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:14:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: I oppose Silent Sam being reinstated on campus.

Hello,

I am a two-time alumnus of Carolina and someone who actively donates to the University. I STRONGLY
oppose reestablishing the Silent Sam monument on UNC's campus. It does not belong on our campus. It does
not belong on the entrance to our sacred place. Your decision will impact my donations.

Thank you,
Jill Simmerman
BS Environmental Science, Class of 2009
ivIPH, Class of 2012

Jill Simmerman
Message
From: Ke lly McHugh Chtcheprov
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:15:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please don't put Silent Sam back up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I beg you, please do not put Silent Sam back on campus. Carolina is an open-minded, progressive school that
welcomes all. Re-erecting the statue will send a different message not only to our campus community, but also
to prospective students and their parents. Put it in a museum, auction it off to raise scholarships for minority
students, or bury it under Gimghoul Castle. But don't put Silent Sam back in any place of prominence on our
campus.

Best,
Kelly McHugh Chtcheprov
Adjunct Lecturer, UNC School of Media and Journalism
UNC Class of 2012
Message
From: Potter, S Steven (Steve)
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:16:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

Monuments celebrating the Confederacy must go.


Message
From: Susan Edelman
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:24:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Dear Chancellor Folt and the UNC Board of Trustees:

I would respectfully request that Silent Sam not be returned to Mccorkle Place or anywhere else on campus unless or
until a full and declarative account of its history, including the reprehensible remarks of Julian Carr, is abundantly clear.
Shame on us if we don't learn from this hideous past! I do not besmirch the memories of those whose ancestors fought
and died in the Civil War; their anguish is real and should be acknowledged with sympathy. But this statue, erected so
long after the war, and with such a burdened introduction, has no place at a University which rightfully prides itself on
having moved North Carolina forward.

I'm ashamed that in my years at UNC Chapel Hill, and the hundreds of times I passed Silent Sam, I had no idea of its true
roots. Please help me assuage that shame by creating a plan for the statue that doesn't stain the University's quest to be
a beacon for freedom and opportunity for all.
Best regards,

Susan Datz Edelman, AB Journ 1977


Message
From: Chris McMillan
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:25:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a graduate of UNC Chapel HIii (B.S. Mathematical Sciences '86) and my family has lived in North Carolina
for over 250 years. In fact, we have been here longer than North Carolina has been a state and longer than
the University has been in existence. My great grandfather and two of my great uncles served in the Army of
the Confederacy. I can say with surety that my family did not own slaves nor did my ancestors serve the
Confederacy as a way to preserve slavery. My family fought to preserve their homes and their means of
feeding, housing, and clothing themselves. The Silent Sam statue recognizes men just like my ancestors. To
reduce the cause of the War Between the States to a single issue and to reduce the meaning of the Silent Sam
monument to a single issue (which actually is a falsity) is just plain wrong. An institution of higher learning
should know better and should try harder to educate its students and all residents of the state rather than
giving in to the viewpoint of a minute group of radicals who would rewrite history to further their activist
agenda.

State law is clear on the disposition of the statue and precedent has already been set by the decision to allow
existing Confederate monuments to remain on the grounds of the State Capitol. There is no need for the
trustees to develop a recommendation to deliver to the UNC BOG. Simply follow settled law and return the
statue to the place it has occupied peacefully for over 100 years. Those who are "offended" by the statue can
easily avoid ever passing by it. The current location of the base (and future location of the statue itself) is in
an area that is one of the most open areas on campus. It is no inconvenience to bypass Silent Sam if you
choose to do so. Those who would like to educate themselves would also be free to examine up close the
statue and the plaques attached to the base.

Those who were involved in toppling the statue are guilty of destruction of public property. I suspect the
whole crowd that assembled that night was in violation of protesting without the proper permits from the
town of Chapel Hill and/or the University, but strangely, no one has been prosecuted for these violations. If
the University removes Silent Sam from its proper place on the campus, it is sending a loud and clear signal to
the world that mob violence and mob rule is effective and can achieve its ends. My University - our university
- is better than that. Return Sam to his base and show the world that the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill will not be bullied into action by an unlawfully assembled mob. Show the world that the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill values and tolerates differences of opinion and is willing to advance the
knowledge of all who would engage in civil discourse and rational thought.

Chris McMillan
Message
From: Emily Hassel
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:31:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam comment

Silent Sam should be moved to a location where Black students, faculty and staff do not have to pass by and view it as a
matter of daily life at Carolina, where it is entirely their choice to view and read about it. Life is hard enough - Carolina
should not make it harder.

Also, general opinions really do not matter. If you want to consider what to do with a statue glorifying war to keep Black
people as slaves, you should ask only Black students, faculty, staff and alumni what they think.

Moving this statue is frankly one of the easiest ways to address the continued human damage from slavery - far easier
than halting multi-generational stress, poverty and educational shortfalls. Do the right thing --you won't regret it!

Emily Ayscue Hassel


Message
From: Lori Gibson
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:32:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Place him in the North Carolina collection with a copy of the dedication speech that put him up in the
first place. It is historical and please show it all for what it is.
Lori Gibson
class of 1985
Sent from my iPhone - GO Heels!
Message
From: Scott, Tj [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=4C592CA1E 1144284B0CF4C235C010629-TJ SCOTT (T]
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:32:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exc hange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Grand Master Davie

T.J. Scott

Office of Public Affairs


200 East Cameron Avenue, 03A South Building
Chapel Hi ll, NC 27599
,.,, 919-962-6961 E ti scott@unc.edu

From: Ed McMahan <EMcMahan@littleonline.com>


Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 2:16 PM
To: Scott, Tj <tj_scott@unc.edu>
Subject: Fwd: Grand Master Davie

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From:
Date: September 29, 2018 at 10:57:48 AM EDT
To: emcmahan@littleonline.com
Subject: Grand }\,faster Davie

October 1, 2018
ToMr. W.EdwinMcMahan
Board of Trustees, UNC-CH
As author, publisher, and alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I
encourage the Board of Trustees to be decisive and resolute in handling monuments
and commemorative names of buildings. Your 16-year moratorium on name changes
was not the sort of decision that I mean. I would recommend revisiting previous
controversial commemorations according to a slate of priority, beginning with the
Josephus Daniels Student Stores, Hamilton Hall, Carr Building, Aycock Hall, Spencer
Hall, Mitchell Hall, and Swain Hall. You will thus facilitate the teaching function of the
University, in which we study carefully the lives of worthy persons and present them
to the present generation as models to emulate.
I think it would now be acceptable for my alma mater to render overdue honor and
visibility to William Richardson Davie (1756-1820), although he was,just like
Washington, Jefferson, and Madison, a slave owner. The Board ought not to shy away
from imperfections in otherwise exemplary persons, but give bold approval to persons
whose lives and character were in keeping with today's values, not overlooking
notable African Americans.
Davie was one of our country's Founding Fathers, a heroic leader of cavalry in the
Revolutionary War, governor,founder of our University, and as Grand Master of
North Carolina's Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, he laid UNC's first cornerstone
with his own hands. Five good likenesses of Davie exi.st, two in Philadelphia's
Independence Hall and three at the University of North Carolina, which can provide
the basis for a splendid sculpture on the spot where the University was first
conceived. If the University will ennoble this historic and conspicuous site
with a tribute to the founder's memory, North Carolinians of
future generations, each time they see it, will admire the vision of our
Trustees and Board of Governors! Will you kindly keep my suggestion in
mind, and possibly lend your personal support to the idea? Thank you!
Sincerely,
Hubert "Chuck" Hawkins
Dan River Lodge #129
Madison,NC
i'-~5i;:.=ri

~l~I
Portrait by Charles Fraser
Message
From:
on behalf of Sandra Thomas I

Sent: 10/2/2018 1:33:4U 1-'IVI


To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I was a student at Carolina during the late 6os. A period when free speech was as important as free
love. Students wanted to hear both sides of the issue. Remember the Speaker Ban ruling?

Now, we seem to be in a period where the only valid side of an issue, is the side "I" choose.

It is said that if we don't learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it. Where is the discussion
about the young men and women who fought for the Confederacy, but returned to embrace a new
day? Young men and women who gave much to the University, the State, the Nation.

Are they forever damned because they chose loyalty to their State, their region?

Put Sam back in McCorkle Place. Hold seminars and open discussions about the period. Yes, slavery
was wrong. But it is also wrong to paint every Southerner with one brush.
My great-grandfather lost a brother at Gettysburg. He did not fight for slavery.. there was never a
slave in the family. So I am not supposed to honor him?

Sandra Christenbury Thomas


Class of 1970
Message
From: Lisa Dulli
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:33:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

I wholeheartedly agree that the statue should be removed from public display on UNC's campus. I strongly support the
right to freedom of expression, but by displaying a statue that was designed to represent soldiers who fought for the
right to enslave other human beings sends a message that this history is something that the university deems worth
commemorating.

If the statue is to be displayed, it should be in a museum. Given the importance of the civil war to this country, a
museum dedicated to documenting the war, not sensationalizing it or romanticizing it, but to documenting the war from
various points of view. Such a museum could record the causes and consequences of war, from a variety of perspectives,
in a effort to permit future generations to learn from history. Statues, such as Silent Sam, that were erected during a
time of growth of the white supremist movement in the early 1900's should be displayed as what they were -
monuments that were erected to with a revisionist strategy to romanticize the idea of the confederacy and to send a
message to black people that their place had not changed. As recent article in Forbes noted ""A number of historians
have shown that powerful white Southerners were creating a revisionist narrative of the Confederacy as a protector of
states' rights, Southern homes, and white Southern women in this period .. "
(tl.H.P..?..J/www. forbes,com/ sites/kri sti naki Ilgrove/2018/08/22/ scholars· exp la in--the · racist--h isto rv--of. u ncs--si lent-sa m ··
statue/#2843f605l14f). This is what observers need to learn from viewing statues such as Silent Sam. However, it is
insufficient to simply post a placard with this information at its current site. The statue needs to be balanced among
other statues that commemorate other, different aspects of the war.
Message
From: Kim Porter
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:36:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Alum supporting the permanent removal of Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt and others who it may concern:

I am a proud alumna of UNC-Chapel Hill and I support the permanent removal of the Silent Sam
statue. I would like to see Silent Sam relocated to a museum or off-campus location where it can
be viewed, fully contextualized, by those who choose to see it. I will not support UNC as an alumni
if Silent Sam is returned to campus. The dedication speech when the statue was erected proves
that this statue represents racist views, and causes harm and ill-will for many students and
alumni, and is not representative of the views of the majority of our UNC family. I also request
that the remaining pedestal on the central quad be removed from that location. Silent Sam was
a blight on our beautiful campus. The entire country is watching how we handle this. With white supremacy
and naziism on the rise, these conversations and actions have never just been about Silent Sam and UNC, but
about symbols and acts of hate in all forms across the country. Please send a message to our nation that white
supremacy and racism will not be tolerated. Especially not on a campus where I learned exactly why Silent
Sam and the people who put him there were and always will be on the wrong side of history. I also ask that
the University not punish any students involved with the toppling of Silent Sam.

Thank you for your time and attention,

Sincerely,
Kim Porter, Class of 1991
Message
From: Pamela Strickland [pamelas@electronicservicesinc.com]
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:38:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Display Sam in a secure campus building

Wilson library? Morehead Rotunda?

Sl

Pam Str1ddand
Vice President
Electronic Services; inc
REDACTED
268 Highway 121/264 AIL farmvrne,
NC 27828
Phone:REDACTED
p2melas@electron1cservicqsinc,co
rn www,e!ectronicservicesinccom

Please considei: the environment before printing this email,


Message
From: Joseph J. Moyer
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:41:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

In a recent article to the News & Observer opinion page the writer makes the point that at the time of the Silent
Sam design stage the designer attempted to ameliorate the Confederacy effect by having Silent Sam be depicted
in Civilian clothes not in uniform. Since the UNC alumni fought in one of the two combatant sides of the Civil
War, albeit on the losing side, one could use that opinion writers thought to suggest that Silent Sam could be
used as a Civil War Monument, to remember all those who fought and died in the Civil War.

Yes Silent Sam was erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy but NC was a Confederate state, hence it is
history, albeit not very good for NC and UNC, but should not be forgotten by making Silent Sam vanish to
some sight where it will not have the impact it does being on the UNC Campus as a Civil War monument,

My wife and I say this in our belief that Southerners by now have changed and certainly reject all the views
held by the Confederacy at that time. Therefore it should not offend Southerners and as far as Black Americans
go they can be angry about being slaves but they should also recognize that Slavery was not invented in the
USA and that most Blacks were sold into slavery by their own Chieftains, hence; it is more important that they
recognize that Slavery was abolished as a result of 600,000 mostly white soldiers losing their lives in the Civil
War.

And my wife and I hold no rancor about this situation, my family did not come to America until the early
1900's but my wife's side has been here a long time, she is a Member of the Daughters of the American
Revolution and the National Society, Dames of the Court of Honor. Her great grandfather Captain Andrew
Lewis died of wounds received in the battle of Gaines Mill

I recently wrote an article that was published in the Sept. 16 edition of the News & Observer suggesting that if
Silent Sam were rededicated as a Civil Wat Memorial. It is as follows:

"As long as Silent Sam remains a Confederate Monument it will be lightning rod for protests. The Confederates
basically started the Civil War, and Silent Sam represents all of what was wrong with Confederate views, and it
is part of our sordid history. The Daughters of the Confederacy wanted to honor the UNC alumni who fought
and died in the Civil War.

Hence; if it is rededicated as a Memorial to all those who served and died in the Civil War we have a Memorial
that we can all agree is appropriate, and be proud of what the Civil War accomplished. A plaque that reads "On
this date xxx, this statue is being re-dedicated as a remembrance to all who served in the Civil War and the
600,000 who died to abolish slavery. A reunited America did not send the slaves back to Africa but gave them
citizenship" should be added to the pedestal on which Silent Sam stands.

This action along with a UNC Website that allows questions and discussion about the Civil War, along with
postings from Faculty and any authority on the subject should provide a means for students to better understand
all aspects of the Civil War, and would be a great means of acquiring knowledge not in the curriculum of
UNC."

We think the Website is very important in that it will allow questions and answers to pertinent issues pertaining
to the Civil War period and should be able to defuse angry issues that may still come up on the Campus.

Thank you for your consideration of our proposal,

Sincerely Yours

Madeline and Joseph J. Moyer


Message
From: Ken Neher
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:44:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Certainly to many ss is abhorrent.


However it is important to remember that both Yankees and Confederates are part of our history be it good
or bad when viewed from today. I suggest that a history of UNC
via a variety of monuments be created on campus in a one place. such history can span many years and
lessons. The focus is taken off ss therefore.
Ken Neher
UNC 70
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Joseph J. Moyer
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:49:51 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam
Attachments: 10-2-18 to UNC committee on disposition of Silent Sam .docx

Flag: Follow up

Dear Dr. Folt:

Last summer I wrote several E-Mail's to you about Silent Sam (SS). At that time I suggested that you rededicate
SS to become a Civil War monument to remember all who served and died in the Civil War. I also suggested
that you should be careful about allowing too much Militant Black folks from acquiring too much student
power because through that power UNC might become another University of Missouri, we all know how that
has resulted in reduced admission requests and reduced Alumni contributions and a just plain degradation of the
University's reputation. You did not take away Melissa Little's scholarship when she defaced SS, you allowed
her to become the folk hero on the Campus.

Now you have a real problem on your hands, and it looks like the Board of Governors is not going to take
putting SS at some Battlefield site very easily and you are faced with the decision of what to do.

I have sent a note to the site you set up for public comments, suggesting that SS be rededicated to become a
memorial to remember all those that served and died to abolish slavery in the Civil War. I attach that to this
memo. I hope you think seriously about my suggestions.

P.S. I do not know what all you might say at the rededication of SS, but it is more than appropriate to address
the Daughters and Sons of the Confederacy in the following thought process. I am sure the Daughters and Sons
of the Confederacy have meant to do a lot of good for the South, but is high time that we remove all elements
and views of the Confederacy and it's thought from Southern life, hence both of these groups should rename
themselves to be Sons and Daughters of the Civil War, and devote all of their efforts to doing good for the
communities they are in, and cease desist from any Confederate activities. The same can be said for the
Confederate Flag, it is time to never display it again except in museums and in re-enactments.

Sincerely Yours

Joseph J. Moyer
In a recent article to the News & Observer opinion page the writer makes the point that at the
time of the Silent Sam design stage the designer attempted to ameliorate the Confederacy effect
by having Silent Sam be depicted in Civilian clothes not in uniform. Since the UNC alumni
fought in one of the two combatant sides of the Civil War, albeit on the losing side, one could
use that opinion writers thought to suggest that Silent Sam could be used as a Civil War
Monument, to remember all those who fought and died in the Civil War.

Yes Silent Sam was erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy but NC was a Confederate
state, hence it is history, albeit not very good for NC and UNC, but should not be forgotten by
making Silent Sam vanish to some sight where it will not have the impact it does being on the
UNC Campus as a Civil War monument,

My wife and I say this in our belief that Southerners by now have changed and certainly reject all
the views held by the Confederacy at that time. Therefore it should not offend Southerners and as
far as Black Americans go they can be angry about being slaves but they should also recognize
that Slavery was not invented in the USA and that most Blacks were sold into slavery by their
own Chieftains, hence; it is more important that they recognize that Slavery was abolished as a
result of 600,000 mostly white soldiers losing their lives in the Civil War.

And my wife and I hold no rancor about this situation, my family did not come to America until
the early 1900's but my wife's side has been here a long time, she is a Member of the Daughters
of the American Revolution and the National Society, Dames of the Court of Honor. Her great
grandfather Captain Andrew Lewis died of wounds received in the battle of Gaines Mill

I recently wrote an article that was published in the Sept. 16 edition of the News & Observer
suggesting that if Silent Sam were rededicated as a Civil Wat Memorial. It is as follows:

"As long as Silent Sam remains a Confederate Monument it will be lightning rod for protests.
The Confederates basically started the Civil War, and Silent Sam represents all of what was
wrong with Confederate views, and it is part of our sordid history. The Daughters of the
Confederacy wanted to honor the UNC alumni who fought and died in the Civil War.

Hence; if it is rededicated as a Memorial to all those who served and died in the Civil War we
have a Memorial that we can all agree is appropriate, and be proud of what the Civil War
accomplished. A plaque that reads "On this date xxx, this statue is being re-dedicated as a
remembrance to all who served in the Civil War and the 600,000 who died to abolish slavery. A
reunited America did not send the slaves back to Africa but gave them citizenship" should be
added to the pedestal on which Silent Sam stands.

This action along with a UNC Website that allows questions and discussion about the Civil War,
along with postings from Faculty and any authority on the subject should provide a means for
students to better understand all aspects of the Civil War, and would be a great means of
acquiring knowledge not in the curriculum of UNC."

We think the Website is very important in that it will allow questions and answers to pertinent
issues pertaining to the Civil War period and should be able to defuse angry issues that may still
come up on the Campus.

Thank you for your consideration of our proposal,

Sincerely Yours

Madeline and Joseph J. Moyer


Message
From: Jon Schwenzer
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:50:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam: An embarrassment to UNC for over 100 years

The so-called "history" proponents who wish to preserve silent Sam are simply endorsing racist beliefs.
Confederate soldiers were not noble. They were traitors to the United States of America & victims of the
political powers of the day. The monument romanticized a dark era in North Carolina. The sooner the
statue & its base on campus are forgotten, the sooner the image of our university can be rehabilitated.
Perhaps an exhibit in a museum could house the remnants of this disgraceful pile of stone & metal. An
explanation & apology in the display would be the most appropriate disposition.
Sincerely,
JON CHRISTIAN SCHWENZER
class of 1971
Composed &sent via
Jon's iPadPro
Message
From: Wysor, John [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =a94ef7a24f9d44d5a2dd1f96d1664a5d-John Wyso r]
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:51:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Proposal

This is not intended to be sarcastic or flippant, Since the monument was erected and funded, at least in part, by the
Daughters of the Confederacy, I propose giving it back to them to find a more suitable location, and let them know
clearly that location cannot be on University or state property.

Thanks for your consideration.

John Wysor
Public Computing Specialist
Health Sciences Library
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
335 S Columbia Street CB# 7585
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7585
REDACTED
Message
From: Laura Emerson
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:53:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: My suggestion for Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for providing us with this opportunity to comment on the fate of Silent Sam. The most recent
controversy over that statue reminded me of the university's action when it was determined that Cornelius
Phillips Spencer was an out and out racist. All accolades for her accomplishments were quickly removed and
her praiseworthy status downgraded.

In preparing for what I was going to say here, I googled her name and found a wonderful article, "A lecture
prepared for "Remembering Reconstruction at Carolina: A Community Conversation," a
conference sponsored by the Chancellor"s Steering Committee for Remembering Reconstruction at
Carolina and the UNC Center for the Study of the American South, October 2,
2004. https://south.unc.edu/files/2012/09/Seeking Historical Truth by Dr. Chapman .pdf If you're not
familiar with that conference, it will provide good background for the University's place and North Carolina's
racial history.

As you "carefully review and consider all ideas," let me propose this one. When I divorced my
husband, the way I celebrated my liberation from our dysfunctional marriage was to have my
wedding set made into a piece of jewelry that represented my new, productive life. Let me suggest
that the statue of Silent Sam be melted down and made into a work of art that is more
representative uf Carolina as The University of all the people.

Thank you,
Laura Emerson
Class of 1998
Message
From: Mason, Rebecca *HS (Employee Assistance Program) [RMM6E@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu]
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:53:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Feedback on future of Silent Sam

Thank you for asking for feedback regarding Silent Sam's future. I am an Alum and a southerner and walked by Sam
daily during my years at Carolina (1974-1978). I have lived in Charlottesville Virginia for the past 36 years and witnessed
the violence on August 12, 2017. As part of my learning since then, I have had to painfully reflect on my own bias and
racism. I do not believe the statue should be replaced on Mccorkle Place. I now see it as a divisive, reconstructionist
symbol that is painful for many, much like the Confederate flag. Put Sam in a museum (the Ackland?) and leave the
pedestal with added inscriptions to contextualize the memorial.

Rebecca Mason, MSN, CS, CEAP


Faculty and Employee Assistance Program
Hospital West Complex room 1982
University of Virginia
RE DACTE D, Charlottesville, 22908
REDACTED
REDACTED
http://uvafeap,com
Message
From: Wendy Stephens
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:55:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Jay Halli
Sent: 10/2/2018 1:58:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Good afternoon Chancellor Falt

As an alumnus 1978 I am writing to express my view on the disposition of the Confederate monument
vandalized several weeks back. It would be easy to leave it out of place in hopes that the conversation will
pass, tempers will ease and the whole thing can be forgotten. However I suggest that the message such an
action would deliver is shortsighted.

Here are two:

1) My ancestors fought in the civil war. Indeed my great great grandfather's class of 1861 Wofford college S.C.
volunteered for duty and promptly left school. The school remained closed for 10 years. He was wounded in
the battle of Manassus. By all accounts he was a fair and honest man. Hard working and dedicated to his
family. He believed in a cause that at the time was felt to be right and just. The times have changed but those
values have not. The statue is a reminder to our family about those values and does not represent the myopic
view of racism or slavery.

2) College life is a wonderful thought provoking experience. A time to learn, express new ideas and have
meaningful debate about the issues of the day. This wonderful time is an expression of freedom. A freedom
that we enjoy in this country and have made great sacrifices to preserve with our blood and treasure. Those
sacrifices are uneven and sometimes not well spent. But those reflections often have to be made looking back.
Silent Sam reminds us of both and therefore promotes balanced debate. This is a skill

If we can't manage our public affairs in a manner keeping with our laws and due process we stand to lose
other freedoms. We all agree to try and abide by the laws of the land including the ones with which we don't
always agree. Return Silent Sam to his right position and encourage our students to approach their problems
and concerns in a lawful manner. Civil protest is a freedom. Destructive behavior is not.

Thank you.

Jay Hall
Charlotte, NC
Message
From: Nancy French
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:05:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello-
In my opinion, silent Sam statue needs to be removed permanently from Mccorkle place and put into a
museum.
The statue was erected in the early 1900s during the resurgence of the KKK. It symbolizes the racist,
hateful and violent apartheid that stains the history of our great state and of our country. I say this
especially because I am a legacy of this history.
I grew up in the Jim Crow south in eastern North Carolina. I am a 1976 graduate from UNC chapel Hill. I
also received a Masters degree in city planning at UNC in 1981 as well as a law degree a 1981. My husband
received his PhD from UNC. All of my siblings attended UNC as did one of my children. My father, mother
and uncle attended UNC as well as some of my more distant relatives.
My family has been in North Carolina since the 1750s at least. Many branches of my family were
slaveowners. Two of my great grandfathers fought in the civil War. My review of ancestry.com indicates
that I have numerous distant black relatives who must have been progeny of those slaveholders. Many of
our family papers from the period surrounding the civil War are housed in the southern Historical
collection at Wilson library. I acknowledge with shame the part that my family played and slavery and in
post- civil War racism.
Although I am proud of my ancestors, I am not proud of what they did, so I say
"TAKE DOWN THE STATUE! "
Put it in a museum with the description of where it used to be located, why it was erected and why it was
taken down.
North Carolina as well as other southern states and the rest of the country need to come to grips with
and look directly into the face of the racism and class system which has been present in this country
since it's inception. The removal of the statue is the first step in that direction. This is especially
critical in the face of the racism and nationalism that has currently infected our country.
only when we acknowledge and accept our past can this country begin to heal. I would like to see North
Carolina take the lead in this effort.
Thank you for the opportunity to speak on this issue.
Nancy Noneman French, BA 1976, JD 1981, MRP 1981
Message
From: Tammy Rhodenhiser
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:07:54 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Re: statues
Attachments: image00l.png

Flag: Follow up

I see that there is a dedicated email to voice our concerns about the statue. I cannot link to it. Please let me
know the email address. There is no plan that needs to be done. It is to be placed in its former location no more
than 90 days after the toppling. That is the law. It does not need to be addressed further. We do not need to let
these outspoken, liberal people whether they are from UNC or otherwise tell us what to do. If our students do
not like our University and they accepted an invitation to attend, then they need to abide by our history.
Otherwise there are other universities that will let them in. I understand free speech and am all for it but not to
the destruction and bullying of our leaders. Also, please address the police and text messages and our UNC
campus police. This event should never have gotten out of hand. Thank you.

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 3 :37 PM Chancellor <chancellor@.unc.edu> wrote:

Dear Ms. Rhodenhiser,

Thank you for your email and we apologize for the delayed response. We understand that people feel strongly
and deeply about the Confederate Monument, the way that it was toppled and its future. We regret the
impersonal nature of this response, however due to the large volume of emails we have received and the
complexity of this issue, we are unable to personalize each response. Please know that each email is being
read.

On August 28, the UNC System Board of Governors passed a resolution directing the UNC-Chapel Hill Board
of Trustees and university administration to develop and present a plan for the Confederate Monument's
"disposition and preservation." In the near future, Chancellor Folt and the Board of Trustees will announce a
process to create a "lawful and lasting path that protects public safety, preserves the monument and its history,
and allows the University to focus on its core mission of education, research, economic stimulation and
creating the next generation of leaders."

You can find the most recent statements about the Confederate Monument here. We encourage you to read
these statements and to check back for the most up-to-date information.

Respectfully,

The Office of the Chancellor

From: Tammy Rhodenhiser


Sent: Monday, August 20, 2018 lU:)6 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: statues
Ok. I have just witnessed this ridiculous display on MY campus. Where were the police? The fact that
professors are a part of this is reprehensible. New students should be expelled. Raise the statue back up and
protect it. Do not give into these few. If they hate the University and what the history stands for, why are they
there. Alumni love the university and do not want it to change but History must move Forward.

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 29, 2017, at 1:37 PM, Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu> wrote:

Dear Ms. Rhodenhiser,

Thank you for writing about the Confederate Monument, better known as Silent Sam. How we
address our past is deeply personal to many in our community and encompasses a wide range of
perspectives. I encourage you to read my recent messages to campus linked here and here,
which more fully explain the situation. Last week, the Board of Trustees amnned the
University's obligations under the law, which require us to receive permission from the State
Historical Commission to move it.

Let me assure you that even if the law changed, any decision about the future of the statue
would be made with great thought and deliberation and in compliance with our campus policies.
In 2015, the Board of Trustees passed two resolutions, one that placed a 16-year freeze on
renaming buildings and one that called for a broad effort to carefully and thoroughly curate
Carolina's history.

Thank you again for writing.

Sincerely, Carol Folt

From: Tammy Rhodenhiser


Sent: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 7: 16 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: statues

Dear Chancellor Folt,

As a graduate ofUNC as well as my husband and son, I implore you and the trustees not to give
in to the frenzy and take down honored statues. The frenzy is not about the statues at all-it is
about power. Of course there is no room for violence, bigotry and supremacy ideals but we
cannot erase history because we don't like something. A lot of the young people today need
"safe spaces" because their feelings get hurt. Well welcome to the real world. You have to learn
to live together and appreciate different opinions. We have to learn from our history, not throw
it away. We are from the South, had relatives that fought for their way of life and did not have
slaves. So didn't their life mean anything? Please take a stand on the side of history and our
great university.

Best Regards,
Tamara Rhodenhiser
Message
From: Bert Williams [bwilliams@sterlingwealthllc.com]
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:11:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I liked it right where it was.


But if that is not possible, it needs to be reinstalled either somewhere else on UNC campus or
another public space or museum.

R Bertram Williams Ill CFP®


Principal I Financial Advisor
Sterling Wealth Management LLC
REDACTED
Wilmington NC 28403
REDACTED REDACTED c REDACTED f
bwilliams@sterlingwealthllc.com
Visit us at www.sterlingwealthllc.com

Securities and Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, M ember FINRA/SIPC, A registered
Investment Adviser. Fixed insurance products and services offered by Sterling Wealth Management LLC are separate
and unrelated to Commonwealth. Fixed insurance products and services offered through CES Insurance Agency
Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:14:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam"

Chancellor Folt

Thank you for the opportunity for me to say that the "Silent Sam" statue
should be returned to its pedestal on Mccorkle Place where it belongs .

Why in the world would you think otherwise.

Go Heels

Thomas A Glascock, Ill '62


Message
From: Phillip Parkerson
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:20:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

Dear UNC,

Please do NOT restore the Silent Sam statue to its former pedestal in Mccorkle Place. It is a monument to the defense of
slavery and is extremely offensive to current generations of students, faculty and Chapel Hill townspeople and visitors.

Removing the Silent Sam status it not "erasing history" . It is simply acknowledging that we will not "honor" that history--
the defense of slavery--with a statue/monument.

When Saddam Hussein was overthrown in Iraq in the early 2000s, his statues were torn down across the country almost
immediately by the citizenry. No one tried to say that they should leave the statues of the horrible dictator up as part of
recognizing history. The statues honored a dictator, and when he was overthrown, no one wanted to "honor" him by
leaving the statues in place. It's the same situation with the Silent Sam statue. Removing it does not mean we are trying
to erase history. It simply means that we will not honor a Civil War soldier who fought on the southern side to defend
slavery. That is not something worthy of honoring and is indefensible.

Personally I would like to see the Silent Sam statue melted down and destroyed. But at the very least do NOT restore it to
its previous status in Mccorkle Place. Put it in a dark, dusty corner of the campus if you have to, but do not put it back in
Mccorkle Place.

Sincerely yours,

Phillip K. Parkerson
UNC Class of 1987
Message
From: David Sisk
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:20:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Monument feedback

I strongly advise against returning Silent Sam to the pedestal on McCorkle Place under any circumstances.

The best way to make good use of the memorial would be to display it indoors, surrounded by historical
context. By itself, the statue tells a narrow story of willful ignorance and racial hatred. Within the historical
context of African slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction and the Lost Cause, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights
movement, the statue offers a useful lesson about a moment in time when people tried to rewrite the past rather
than grapple with it. As William Faulkner wrote, "the past is never dead. It isn't even past." This, in my view,
would be the best possible way to use Silent Sam to help build a better future.

David Sisk
M.A. 1987, Ph.D. 1994
David W. Sisk
Associate Director for Administration
Information Technology Services
REDACTED I REDACTED

1· · -·--·-----�---· --
•REDACTED
�'3aint ft�N 66106 t.Jt1/\
Message
From: Kathryn McCormick
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:22:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Thoughts

Hi there,

Silent Sam should be put in a museum, where it belongs. It should not stand at the entryway to our university. I
think that there is a difference between acknowledging a racist past and protecting it. Know the difference.

I love UNC but truly can't defend keeping Silent Sam on our campus to people outside of the UNC community.

Thank you
Message
From: John Horne
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:23:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It should remain on campus in its current location. It is a historical marker with significance from
different perspectives. You may have already received this thought but, if not, here it is. After WWII
the allies required the Germans to maintain certain "monuments" as a reminder of what Hilter did to the
Jews and this was to ensure it would never be forgotten and would no t happen again. could not our
monument be portrayed as t hat type reminder. We will never satisfy both sides completely but maybe this
would be a good comprise. Thanks for the chance to offer an opinion.
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Howard, Rosemary [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =b3 712c97 lb5a452ba6565b29e4598514-Rosema ry Ho]
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:28:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My family has been in North Carolina since the mid eitheenth century. My mother and grandmother we're both
members of the Daughters of the Confederancy. I am a UNC alum and a retired staff member.

I strongly oppose returning the statue to it's original place. It should be in a location devoted history where
visitors choose to see and study it.

It should also be described, not as a Confederate monument, but a Jim Crow monument to enforce white
supremacy. Of course it is offensive if you believe in equality for all.
Sincerely
Rosemary Howard

Get Outlook for Android


Message
From: Robert Nichol
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:30:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I highly recommend it be put back in place and that all students who participated be expelled, those not
students be charged to recover expenses and blocked from taking any UNC classes or attending events. Any
student identified as having been present during the destruction should be required to submit a statement
on what they observed, what they did, and the identity of al l those they recognized. Failure to submit a
complete statement would result in a one semester expulsion. Please, do not let these folks think there
are no consequences to their actions.
vr,
rjn class of '86
Message
From: Linda Smith
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:30:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a 1978 MBA graduate of UNC (Kenan-Flagler) Business School. I think it's time that a statue that glorifies slavery
days should be removed and placed in a museum, such as a Civil War museum. I find the statue a hurtful reminder of a
dark time in our history. It's 2018 ... time to move on from this type of nostalgia that glorifies the Confederacy and
continues a false narrative about why the Civil War was fought. It has no place in today's diverse society. A statue on a
major university's campus should not be polarizing. For me, Silent Sam is as offensive as racially charged symbols such as
confederate flags, swastikas, or statues of Hitler and/or his minions. No one's trying to erase history... there's simply a
time and place for these relics to make sense. Thank you for encouraging comments.

Linda Jackson Smith


MBA 1978
UNC-Chapel Hill

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


Message
From: Jane Smith
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:31:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:

If UNC does not have one, it is time for a school museum which displays the history and resolution of civil
rights issues of ALL types at the university, including women's rights, gay rights, black rights, freedom of
speech (speaker ban law), war protests and the resolution of Silent Sam to name ones in my lifetime.

If possible, the displays should include the total number and participation of students and faculty and the
number of outsiders to UNC who were arrested for each occurance.

Regarding Silent Sam, I am curious as to any oath NC soldiers took and whether they swore their allegiance to
defend and obey the laws just of NC or if their allegiance was sworn to the confederacy. Were they sworn to
defend NC?

Jane Shermer Smith '73

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Annice Wms
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:35:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please place Silent Sam in a location appropriate for other relics of the past

Chancellor Folt,
As a proud three-time graduate ofUNC-CH, I earnestly ask that you find a location for Silent Sam that is not
one of prominence. The racist history of our beloved University is not something to forget, but it is also not
something to celebrate and give prominence. I am a Black woman, and therefore not among the citizens who
could have enrolled at the University in 1913 when this monument was erected and dedicated with words of
division.
Times have changed. The University has changed. Just as we tear down and rebuild other structures to move
forward with modernity, so can we do with this and other racist relics.
Thank you for your consideration.

Annice (Hood) Williams, Ed.D. '93, '98, '05


Message
From: Jay Levinsohn
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:37:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Placement of Silent Sam

I reccomend putting Sam in coach Larry Fedora's office. He has the room and if he loses a few more games he
will be out recruiting or interviewing so he won't miss the space. On the other hand this may not be so great a
solution since so many of his players are African-Americans, and are still being taken advantage ofby the
athletic program, they may find it offensive.

Jay R. Levinsohn
Message
From: Sue Myers
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:38:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam's Future

It is my hope that the University will return silent Sam to his rightful place on campus. History is
just that , History. While we may not always agree with it, history cannot be changed by simply deciding
to hide it away. If silent Sam is permitted to be hidden away, it is to give radical rabble rousers
the power to tear down not only this statue but to tear down anything else that they do not agree with.
That has become the mantra of this radicals, disrupt and destroy the property of others because if you
don't believe their rhetoric, nothing you believe in is valid. I was appalled as I watched the tv
coverage and actually saw a chapel Hill law enforcement officer stand there and laugh while this
happened. Please do not give the radicals that kind of power. I understand that a lot of students say
they don't like it as do many of the faculty. But that doesn't mean it's the right thing to do.
Respectfully,
sue Myers
Message
From: Lynne Gmail I
Sent: 10/2/2018 2:42:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Perspective on Silent Sam's relocation

silent Sam stood in my path when I went between journalism classes in Howell Hall, classes in other
buildings, and the Daily Tar Heel in Graham Memorial, where I worked as a reporter. I was on a first name
basis with silent Sam, and I nodded to him and said, "Thank you, Sam" for his imagined gunshot
recognizing my maidenhood, as the long-standing Carolina legend went. Never once did I think of him as a
symbol of the economic and political war between the states over slavery. To me, he was an affectionate
part of the campus traditions, much like The old Well and Playmakers Theater and south building.
The years I attended UNC, 1964-1968, were transition years for much of the state and the south, and the
nation. Students were demonstrating and championing equal rights. We fought hard to gain ground toward
equality and do away with "separate but equal." No more signs over restrooms and water fountains, no
separate eating places, no separate accommodations. Many of those protests and discussions were held on
the lawn in silent Sam's shadow. I never once heard anyone point out that it was a statue that
represented repression.
I was raised in a family that didn't recognize racial boundaries because we were taught that every man,
woman, and child deserves respect and recognition as a human being. Yes, there were many places that
remained separate but equal, but my friends at Carolina included both races, men and women, northerners
and southerners, and any number of other diversities. I remember vividly, as an eleven year old girl,
deliberately walking up to the colored water fountain in Belk's Department Store and drinking the water,
and nothing happened to me. I couldn't understand, even as a child, what could possibly be different
about two side-by-side water fountains. I carried that questioning with me when I came to UNC. But I
never questioned silent Sam or The old Well or Playmakers Theater as anything other than symbols of
Carolina being there through the years, representing the meaning of the university to young men and women
who came there to learn.
I loved and still love the UNC campus. so many things have changed since I was there. Now students
protest to have separate but equal facilities, tear down symbols that were not really the symbols they
choose to recognize, and respect---for other human beings or for property---does not appear to be the
guiding principle in behavior that it once was. I do, however, hope that the Carolina traditions and its
deep history in the state and in education are being preserved. Please keep silent Sam safe. I don't
advocate a separate Carolina museum with statues, plaques, a relocated Playmakers Theater and old Well
where alumni go to be nostalgic. The silent Sam statue is a piece of the Carolina history that deserves a
place that shows its relationship to students as a landmark between classes, not as a symbol of
divisiveness among races of people. unfortunately, I don't have a brilliant suggestion for its permanent
location, but I did want to add my perspective to how it should be treated after it is relocated.
Best regards,
Lynne Jennrich
Message
From: Deleot, Tom [tdeleot@financialguide.com]
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:07:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Under no circumstances should we allow an outside mob and local vandals to dictate a course of action to the
people of NC. Silent Sam depicted a period in our history that was fraught with bitterness and racial hatred but
also a mournful and sad remembrance of those killed during the Civil War. NC lost more men than any other
state in that conflict. Less than 13% of those killed had ever owned a slave. They fought for their state. If the
people of NC decide in a lawful manner to take down all Civil War related statues, then so be it. I am not in
favor of that. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, a country that destroys its past has no future.

Thomas l. Deleot CLU ChFC


Benefit Service Company
REDACTED
Winston Salem
North Carolina 27101
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
tdeleot@benefitserviceco.com
www.benefitserviceco.com

This e-mail transmission may contain information that is proprietary, privileged and/or confidential and is
intended exclusively for the person(s) to whom it is addressed. Any use, copying, retention or disclosure by any
person other than the intended recipient or the intended recipient's designees is strictly prohibited. If you are not
the intended recipient or their designee, please notify the sender immediately by return e-mail and delete all
copies
Message
From: Greg Stanley
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:11:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FUTURE DISPOSITION OF "SILENT SAM" MONUMENT

I spent 1968-72 at UNC-Chapel Hill, graduating in 1972 with a BA in Chemistry. "Silent Sam" was a familiar, distinctive,
and historic presence during my college years. Growing up as a native son of North Carolina, for me "Silent Sam"
recognized our Southern heritage and culture, completely devoid of racial or slavery connotations. I realize, as a white
student, I cannot completely identify with the feelings of my African-American fellow students and citizens. I do not at
all deny or denigrate those emotions.

The years of slavery were and are indeed a blot on the bright history of our beloved nation. It was then and is now a
moral evil and needed to be completely eliminated, which unfortunately cost this nation the tragedies of a Civil
War. However, it is very much a part of our history. We cannot deny or ignore it. In fact, we can learn from it. Perhaps
"Silent Sam" can be a silent reminder of past ills, the continuing need for healing and restoration, and a lasting warning
lest we go down that painful path again.

At the same time, the monument can help us remember and memorialize the brave men and women who loved their
home and gave their lives and fortunes for its defense, regardless of their convictions regarding slavery. Many, like my
family, were never slave owners. Many, like us, were poor rural farmers and laborers whose personal experiences never
included the blight of slave ownership. They simply loved their native state and courageously gave of themselves for its
defense. Unfortunately it took the painful experience of a Civil War to effect the eradication of this evil (slavery) and
help to forge the United States into more of what we should become. That process continues.

I loved UNC and my time there. I am still an avid supporter. I do hope we can find a way to preserve the "Silent Sam"
monument even if it means relocating it or casting it in a somewhat different light, devoid of any racial or political
implications. That would be my desire. In my 40+ years of ministry in the Christian church, I have learned over and over
the glories of taking a potential negative or tragedy and redeeming and transforming it into a great positive
blessing. May we never lose that vision and hope. May this moment in our current history become a source of unity
and healing rather than a cause of more dissension, hatred, and polarization.

God bless you today!


Greg Stanley
Pastor, Coronado Baptist Church
Hot Springs Village, AR
Message
From: Charles Gurkin I
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:14:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Two issues to be addressed

Good afternoon,
Thank you for creating the means for alumni and others to comment on the issue of Silent Sam and a path
forward. In my mind, there are two issues. First, what to do with the statue itself and second, what (if anything)
should go in the physical spot where the statue once stood. My feeling is that Silent Sam should be removed
completely from campus or at the very least put somewhere out of the way with signage addressing its history,
including its shameful dedication. A replacement in spirit should be a monument/plaque to UNC students who
have died in all wars, including the civil war.
As for the site itself, there is no reason that the first thing to greet people entering campus from Franklin Street
should be a war memorial. A new statue should be commissioned celebrating some positive aspect of the
university or the state. Maybe it celebrates us as the first state university. Maybe it celebrates accomplished
alumni. Maybe its an artistic interpretation of the state itself or of the state motto, To Be Rather Than To Seem.
As this conversation expands to other buildings and their namesakes, my feeling is that the names of those who
perpetrated racism and hate after the Civil War should be expunged. Those, like Julian Carr, who defied the
outcome of the war through terror should not be honored by the university.

Thank you very much,


Chip Gurkin '99 (white male, in case you're taking demographic info)
Message
From: Deleot, Tom [tdeleot@financialguide.com]
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:14:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Continuation:

I would like to see the statues put back where it was till there is a decision. If it needs to be guarded 24/7 then
so be it. Not a small price to pay to keep the mob from getting its way. They will never be satisfied. Next thing
you know the mob will go after any building that has a name whose ancestors were slave owner s. This total
lack of respect for the law cannot be toler ated. No more standing down the police. There are less than lethal
methods to disperse a mob.

Thomas L. Deleot CLU ChFC


Benefit Service Company
REDACTED
Winston Salem
North Carolina 27101
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
tdeleot@benefitserviceco.com
www.benefitserviceco.com

This e-mail transmission may contain infonnation that is proprietary, privileged and/or confidential and is
intended exclusively for the person(s) to whom it is addressed. Any use, copying, retention or disclosure by any
person other than the intended recipient or the intended recipient's designees is strictly prohibited. If you are not
the intended recipient or their designee, please notify the sender immediately by return e-mail and delete all
copies
Message
From: Eleanor Kinnaird
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:23:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt, I have a 50 year history with Silent Sam as do my children. We lived in the neighborhood next to
the campus so we frequently passed by the statue. We loved Silent Sam. But we didn't think about the history that
accompanied Silent Sam. We didn't think about the African-Americans who did know the history and were pained at the
history it represented for their ancestors. We do know well the history now and it is time to say a good bye to Silent
Sam. The Bentonville battlefield would be an appropriate place to put him. A plaque on the remaining pedestal would
give the history of the monument and why it was removed.
I close by quoting an ancestor of mine, a Union Soldier in a letter dated 31 May 1862, Gustine writes,"Rebels
fought [Indian] style hyding behind treese, they did not come out of the wood once during the Fight. Our Fire
worked most terribly upon them [their] dead laid in masses ... in the Fight the Rebels cried out Bull Run ... we
killed 2 or 3 hundred+ took 3000 Prisoners, they were North Carolinians. I saw they were poor fellows, they
had been pressed into the service+ wanted to take the oath+ go home."
That is the real story of Silent Sam.
Thank you for your attention and consideration,
Ellie Kinnaird
Chapel Hill
Message
From: wanda wi lliams
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:49:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The only logical place ON CAMPUS to put the monument is the cemetery, in the area where civil War
veterans are buried. Isn't that whom it honors?

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:54:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please put back exactly like it was.

I am afraid the mob will next start burning Civil War books from the library.

Respectfully ... D. Michael May


Class of '65

Sent ti-om my Verizon, Samsung


Message
From: Frederick Allen
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:55:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

This business of Confederate memorials has vexed many in the south. At the Atlanta History Center,
Sheffield Hale, the President, has advocated a sensible approach that basically calls for the
preservation of memorials - but with broadly expanded sources of information explaining the history of
each monument. Some 90 percent of Confederate monuments were erected after 1890, and reflect the campaign
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and others to honor the "Lost cause."
It is of some irony that silent Sam dates to 1913, the first year of Woodrow Wilson's presidency, when
many gains by African Americans were rolled back. Indeed, 1913 was a fraught time for lynching and the
continued imposition of Jim Crow law.
I'd favor restoring silent Sam with a full explanation of his history.
Rick Allen BA '70
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Cynthia Thacker
Sent: 10/2/2018 3:59:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an alumna of the university and a frequent v1s1tor to the campus, I would like to see the statue
moved. I understand the history behind the Daughters of the Confederacy, my great-grandfather fought for
the Confederacy. Now we must get beyond some sad nostalgia for the "lost cause" and move into the reality
of the fact that that war was about slavery and the perpetuation of a culture based on slavery and we
cannot continue to revere the philosophy that created the appalling inequity we see today. I don't
believe in whitewashing history; I believe that there should be some way to say through our public
monuments "Yes, we did that once. It was bad and we should be sorry and sad that it was done, we do not
celebrate it, but we do not forget."
Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:17:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Thoughts

As an al umni it saddened me to see the statue torn down in that manner. I do hope the perpetrators do
not get away with it. That being said, unfortunately it appears it cannot be returned to its place
without continued fear of violence and danger to students and others. I have t wo suggestions:
1) the cemetary on campus
2) Wilson Library
Hopefully these two places warrant enough reverance that no one would damage it but that remains to be
seen
Good luck
Jamie Ayscue
class of 1986
Message
From: Russ Cowell
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:18:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave the base in place as is (unless treatment on its top is required to prevent water/ice damage).
Keep silent Sam in safe storage until tempers cool. The bronze statute can be removed to Memorial Hall
at some point in the future for public viewing.

Russ Cowell
class of 1954
Message
From: Roy
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:29:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Roy Schonberg [roys@nc.rr.com]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

Thank you for providing the opportunity for community input which I think is appropriate given that UNC is a public
institution.

I have lived in Orange County for 40+ years, have a child that graduated from UNC-CH and spouse that worked at UNC
for 25 years so I feel a strong connection.

Memorial Hall honors NC veterans that fought in most, if not all, wars and conflicts. It honors the soldiers for their
patriotism, sacrifice and service. This is appropriate regardless of what one thinks of any given conflict.

To the best of my knowledge, other than Silent Sam, there are no other memorials specific to a single conflict honoring
NC veterans on campus, certainly none in such a prominent location as on the main quad when you enter the university
from Franklin Street. You have to wonder why if Silent Sam is truly just to honor those tar heels that fought for the
confederacy they are the only ones worthy of a highly visible, conflict specific memorial.

Silent Sam was erected in the era of Jim Crow (just read some of the speeches given at its dedication) and is an offensive
reminder of racism and oppression which has no place at a public institution. It should not be reinstalled and the
pedestal should be removed.

Roy Schonberg

Roy Schonberg
Message
From: Kenny Foscue
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:3~:lL 1-'IVI
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a UNC graduate (class of 1977) and a member of the Alumni Association, my


suggestion is to place Silent Sam in a physical space that presents the larger context of
the Civil War and the fight against slavery and for civil rights. As it has stood until
recently, to many people, including myself, it symbolizes support for the rebellion and
therefore for slavery. Please use this opportunity to develop a center of civil rights and
reconciliation that recognizes the horrible impact of the Civil War, the University's earlier
support for slavery and subsequent support for civil rights.

Thanks for this opportunity to comment -

Kenneth Foscue
Message
From: Madison, Jane Leserman [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN = 10081C2121894D949A02583EB0B6A122-JAN E LESERM]
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:40:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep silent Sam Silent

It's time to keep Silent Sam in a museum and not as a monument on Campus. We do not need any more glorifications of
the civil war and the values behind the erection of this statue.

Jane Madison
Professor Emeritus
UNC
Message
From: Fred Stephens I
Sent: 10/2/2018 4:49:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I comment as a graduate ofUNC and as one born and raised in North Carolina. My paternal grandfather (born
in 1851 in Southern Wake County) was a teenager during the civil war. I assume I had distant relatives who
fought for the confederacy. That said I have never heard any family in my life supportive of slavery or wish to
praise slavery in our history.

I believe Silent Sam was installed during a period of racism and southern poverty that persisted until WW II.
Harsh economic treatment of the South was likely partly in play.

I would like to see a sign or memorial at the site to recognize and educate the political complexities of the north
and south conflict. Putting Silent Sam in a museum or back where he was is less important to me than
educating more people on the complexities of the war. We should recognize that our soldiers sometimes
are expressing loyalty to their families and homeland rather than agreement with a cause.

The last thing we need is more oversimplifying. This is a call to educate.

Sent from Fred L Stephens


Message
From: Marsh Hardy ARA/RISK
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:07:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam isn't silent.

For years I thought the elegant statue honored Minute Men. only the recent controversy taught me its real
purpose. It's stirring art, but only after removing "CSA" from his canteen and any language dignifying
the southern "cause". Many Confederate statues are notable art and worth saving and re-purposing for that
reason alone, but enough of this "heritage" baloney.
I have enough of that "heritage" for anyone: My family moved to NC from England in early 1600s, included
many slave owners like William Randolph and John Marshall, and great-grandfather Wm. J. Hardy (cousin of
Douglas MacArthur) a young artillery officer who served under "ole Marse Roberts" E. Lee. on my wall is a
CSA war bond, an investment of $1000 to pay $1800 over 30 years, first coupon of which is clipped, but
the next one had a maturation date after Appomattox. We were bankrupted by "the Woah" and joined the
southern diaspora westward. I'm the first generation, since, to live back in NC.
We must not minimize that this "heritage" involved treason (armed insurrection rather than legislative
process)[l] unpunished through the magnanimity of Abraham Lincoln (against the wishes of his more radical
colleagues) and gross human rights violations and misconceptions about human nature. [2]
There are various choices now, either put up lots more statues, next to existing ones, honoring all those
others sacrificed in "the Woah", Reconstruction, Jim Crow and civil Rights eras, tear them all down,
maybe saving a few for museums, or repurpose them. Reuse can ignore or explain, but never dignify, the
old south or the racism at the core of its rotten heart. An extended revision might point out historical
connections of Nazi Germany to the old south. The Nazi party cited "scientific" work of southern
eugenicists (many professors of eugenics in southern medical schools) for their official race-based
policies.
1. https://www.quora.com/Was-is-it-legal-for-any-state-to-quit-the-United-states-If-yes-did-Abraham-
Lincoln-break-the-law
2. "(Jefferson's) ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the
equality of races. This was an error .... our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea;
its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the
white man; that slavery -- subordination to the superior race -- is his natural and normal condition." -
Confederate VP Alexander Stephens, savannah, March 21, 1861.

M. B. Hardy, statistician
Message
From: El len Alexander [
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:07:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please put him on a battle field in North Carolina. Thanks


I walked by him every day on my way to school. chapel Hill elementary , chapel Hill High school and UNC
graduate
Sent from my iPad
Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:27:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam - Freedom of Speech

Good afternoon, thank you for the opportunity to address the topic of Silent Sam. I am an Air Force veteran of more
than 23 years in two branches of the service, a graduate of the Persian Gulf War, alumna of 2009 and most importantly
mom to two sons, one of whom is engaged in studying medicine right there with you. Silent Sam represents history. He
represents from whence we came. It is absolutely imperative we LEARN from history. It is at this juncture that I am not
certain the agitators who came on campus recognize this message. WE LEARN FROM HISTORY. Most importantly, we
learn how NOT to repeat history or mistakes. Slavery was a mistake. A huge mistake. Take note of the agendas which
this mistake served. Pulling down this statue did not reverse a single ounce of the mistake made. It simply destroyed a
TESTIMONY, a war in which we learned slavery was and is WRONG. Students of the Civil War will quickly tell you this
war was about secession, the economy between two regions of the country dependent upon manufacturing and
agrarian resources. My great great great grandfather served and literally walked home from Fort Monroe upon release
in 1865.

Everyone suffered. To this day, everyone suffers in war. Nothing has changed.

This is what MUST change: adversarial actions. UNC is a place where minds meet and discuss issues. We don't tear up
property, we don 't destroy other people's belongings and we don't pull down anything in 2018. The evil perpetrated in
August was an act of violence, deliberately planned and executed to intimidate, frighten and scare other people. Tell me
why those people were wearing bandanas around their faces. Are they afraid to show who they are? When did we
become afraid to speak our minds in respectful, reasoned dialogue and conversation?

Reasoning does not require violence. Reasoning starts right there at UNC: the first public state university in the nation, a
cornerstone in civility and intellectual conversation.

I am all about freedom of speech to include mine, this time. The difference: I do not destroy other people's property. So
here goes: as a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, I am informed by another native North
Carolinian, the United Daughters of the Confederacy were a driving force in building that monument as a testimony of
the lives lost at Gettysburg, Bull Run, Manassas and a host of other locations. People died defending their homes, their
families, their neighbors, their communities. Now there are questions that beg to be asked, starting with "why". Why
would you leave your family, walk or ride your horse to raise your hand, join and defend your home? What did they
believe in? And let's get rid of stereotypes. Were they all white, black or some other ethnicity or race? No, they were
not. They were Americans who believed they owed it to their "home", however that home was defined, and believed
they had to defend that home. So they went.

I dare say if we suffered another attack today, we would find more "Silent Sam's" signing up to defend the "Home
Land". Silent Sam is every one of us who stands up for the Flag, states the Pledge of Allegiance, salutes and teaches
their children to honor the same. I know a bunch of "Silent Sam's" who are standby right now ready to go on a
moment's notice should this nation come under attack. Been there, done that. Thousands of us serve in all kinds of
capacities. So it is our responsibility to proceed beyond superficial emotion, rhetoric and false stereotypes into the
arena of knowledge substantiated by facts.
I am sick and tired of being labeled as some kind of two dimensional paper doll, democrat vs republican, white vs black
or whatever, male vs female, collusions or non-collusion, dossier or not. How about a member of the human
situation? How about a graduate of UNC Chapel where I actually tried to learn? Is that not TOO much to ask? How
about showing RESPECT for other people who gladly pay taxes for this education process? How about some respect for
people who earned their degrees and lives without destroying public property?
We teach and deal with facts. We fight a daily war against lack of knowledge and/or ignorance. What was wrong was
wrong. There are lots of things I do not like or appreciate every single day. However, I do not attack people who try to
teach or work with facts/truth, tear them down or destroy them.

It is absolutely imperative we ALL understand: FAILURE to learn from history is to be doomed to REPEAT
history. What did pulling down that statue accomplish? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. It was an act of oppositional
defiance with limited critical thinking processes in terms of consequences versus the desired outcome. The outcome
was not as dramatic as these protesters hoped. It was simply an act of willful destruction.

Two
options:

1. Position Silent Sam back, knowing this backlash of ignorance is likely to happen again.
2. Position Silent Sam in a secure location where students of history can see the message, learn, apply the lessons and
guide future generations NOT to repeat those mistakes. Sam goes back up. The lessons from facts remain our
responsibility.

We make the choice to learn. Thank you for the opportunity to speak.

/jbr/

JANICE BUTLER RYCKELEY, Lt Col, USAF, NC Retired


Class of 2009

Matthew 5:14-16. (14) You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden. (15) Neither do
people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand and gives light to everyone in
the house. (16) In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and
praise your Father in heaven.

Philippians 4:8 (8) Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right,
whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable--if anything is excellent or praiseworthy--
think about such things.
Message
From: Dan Bowling
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:32:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put it back ...

Silent Sam should be placed back on its pedestal immediately. The mob mentality this nation is experiencing of late
where the lawlessness of a few should not be tolerate nor rewarded.

Silent Sam is a historical monument that stood in Mccorkle Place for over 100 years. It's history- plain and simple. I was
always taught that we should embrace and learn from history, both the good and the bad. The Civil War was a horrible
experience for both the North and the South, but it happened and violently tearing down a statue is not going to change
that history.

Place Silent Sam back on its pedestal in Mccorkle Place immediately.

Respectfully,

W. Dan Bowling Ill


UNC - Class of 1997
Message
From: KRBi
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:39:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

As a North Carolina resident and tax payer, I am enraged at this lawless act. And, as a UNC graduate, I
am ashamed.
At a minimum, UNC administration and UNC and chapel Hill law enforcement should:

Repair/restore the monument and return it to its original site.


Expel and charge, as appropriate, all students involved in the protest, riot and destruction of property.
Arrest and try all non-students who were involved.
Investigate involved campus and city law enforcement personnel for failure to discharge their duty in
protecting the statue.
sue all who are found guilty to recover all costs incurred by UNC and North Carolina taxpayers.
Watching the video of the tearing down of the statue at UNC looked exactly like previous news videos of
ISIL tearing down ancient monuments and statues in Syria. In both cases, the perpetrators simply
destroyed things that did not match their personal world view.
Thanks for asking for input.
Karl R Benson JR

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Paul Henson
Sent: 10/2/2018 5:59:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam. There is no room for suggestion. He needs to be put back up where he previously stood. No question. If he is
moved to an "alternate location" he will be pushed into teaching a history that he does NOT represent. Silent Sam is to
remember the sons of UNC that fought honorably. The lives lost and the sacrifices made. He is UNC history , He is North
Carolina history, He is Southern history, He is our history. Remember , to get respect, you have to earn it. Be respectful
but let them understand moving Silent Sam is unlawful and does not represent the speech of one man , but the lives of
over 1000 . . Every poll ever done in our state has proven that 2/3 of the state does not approve of removal of any
monument. The socialist views in Chapel Hill do not reflect the views of our state as a whole. Silent Sam is our monument
and history, not a 4 year student from another state.

A proud retired UNC Chapel Hill employee.

Paul Henson
Message
From: Patrick Deerin
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:01:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:

I write to encourage you to not place the Silent Sam statue in a prominent place on the University of North
Carolina campus in Chapel Hill. The confederacy, which the statue represents, was antithetical to the many core
values of the University, including inclusitivity, striving for knowledge, and fairness. I urge you to not place
Silent Sam back on campus. If do you re-erect the statue, placing it in a corner of campus with a plaque
contextualizing the injustice of the worst chapter in our history (the Confederacy) might be appropriate.

Sincerely,

John P. Deerin
Class of 2007
Message
From: Joseph Sauve
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:07:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: James Mcguinn Libmcguinn@gma il.com]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

Concerning the damage done to the Silent Sam monument by an illegal mob last month, the only course of
action available to UNC-CH under North Carolina law is to restore and protect the memorial. You have no
authority to move the monument, change it, or relocate or it! Remember, the University belongs to the people
of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority or paid activists!!

You must restore Silent Sam as soon as possible, return it to it's original location, and protect it properly in the
future!

Thank you.

Joseph Floyd Sauve

Tryon, North Carolina

Class of 1976 UNC-CH


Message
From: Kathy Sumner
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:09:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam"

Yes, the stature should be replaced. what is this country coming to when we need to try to remove a part
of history ..... sounds like Hitler burning books he did not like!! should we try to get rid of history
or try to learn from it??? ! ! ?? Anyone in his right mind knows the answer to this question! ! This
monument is not celebrating the Confederacy, it's just trying to honor the men that lost their lives in
the fight. Was slavery evil??? Yes of course! But we can't get rid of what happened because we tear
down a monument!! I have not researched it, but I feel quite sure that monuments to the Union men have
been erected also. Don't we need to tear them down too?? They are also a reminder if that terrible
war!!
As a solution , maybe a similar stature of a Union soldier should be placed beside 'silent"sam" and a
plaque reminding us all of the lives lost both in the North and the south during this terrible war.
Removing this stature will only ignite a war in everyone 's soul that loves history , and also has
ancestral ties to a loved one that fought and died in this terrible war.
The actions that happened at UNC are an embarrassment!! It should have been stopped but police just
stood around and watched! ! A77 involved should have been expe 17 ed from school ! !
K. Sumner

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Ke ll y Morrison
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:11:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep "Silent Sam"

I am writ1ng in favor of keeping the historic "silent Sam" statue. It is such an icon of history for our
beloved unive r sity. The fact that the university was formed PRIOR to the CIVIL WAR is unbelievab l e. The
fact that students had to postpone their education to pursue war efforts is unimaginable, including the
fact the university shut down after the war.
That war, like it or not, is a part of America's history. And therefore is a part of UNC's history. You
can't erase everything people deem offensive. It's THEIR perspective it's offensive, simply a subjective
view. The only thing objective is the war happened, st ude nts left their studies to join t he war, the
statue is dedicated to them. It honors former students. How are we to know their political views? Does it
matter when you're honoring someone's legacy?
This statue is a valuable piece of history, and though some may not like its pl ace in said history, it
serves a purpose as a reminder of what has transpired to bring us to this point.
As a former student it would upset me greatly to see this statue removed from its place. Another entity
falling to the sensitivities of our current society. Don't let our be l oved university be another victim
to those who cannot tolerate being un comfortable in a world that wasn't designed to fit their every need.
Thank you-
Kelly Morrison, class of 2002
Message
From: Ted Burns
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:13:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: dwburns11@gmail .com; tigrpaw01@gmail.com
Subject: Silent Sam

Please put the monument back exactly where it was so that we may continue to honor our ancestors who died
in the War Between the States. colonel Henry Burgwyn went to UNC and died at Gettysburg. I have always
thought of him when I walked to and from downtown from the campus as a student. Just because some
students feel offended in light of their interpretations doesn't mean we have to honor every request from
every group. Lawlessness on the campus concerns me a great deal more than anything. In the past,
something like this would be met with a quick dismissal from the University. If the offended students
didn't like UNC as it was when they applied, they should have considered going to that school in Durham.
Thank you for your consideration in this matter.
Ted Burns UNC class of '69
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Donna Bravo
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:17:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate statues

We would like to see statues and other memorials regarding the Confederate States of America to be moved to
museum settings where context can be added to explain their existence.
Message
From: Dr. Dag Zapatero
Sent: 10/2/2018 6:22:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

Dear Chancellor,

I am writing a quick note to express my desires for rules of law and respect of property and freedom of speech and
persecution for ALL. We have too many victims in our society. No one can speak without someone else being felt
victimized even if their point of view is incorrect. How did we get here?

For the chief of police to ask his offices to stand down was disturbing . Who elected him as the decision maker for the
university, it's alumni and the citizens of the State of North Carolina?

What started the American Civil War? Was it that Lincoln imposed the first federal tariffs or taxation in 1861, which
favored the North businessmen and required every Southern to pay? Slavery was abhorrent, but it was the tariffs which
largely contributed to the South seceding. Slavery however became the cause which rallied the North. All disagreements
have two sides, and I for one and glad to be able to share a common table with all men and women in this great country.

What does history say? Students may see Lincoln as a savior but he was also a racist when it came to American Indians
and personally signed off on many death sentences. This next section from the website Abraham Lincoln: Enigmatic
President, and Full of Contradictions :

"The largest mass execution in American history occurred under Abraham Lincoln's vvatch.

On December 26, 1862, 38 Dakota warriors were publicly hanged after being convicted of war crimes.
'The charges, originally brought against :393 Dakotas, stemmed from their attack of farmers and
villagers in Minnesota earlier that year .., ... ., ..,. ..,

,,,..,,, .. ,,.,,. Fully avvare that the Civil \Var ,vas under way and military troops \Vere elsevvhere, the
Dakota attacked settlers, killing "not less than 800 persons," Lincoln told Congress in December
1862. 1'he U.S. immediately moved troops to l'vfinnesota and, after several battles, crushed the
upnsmg.

Under Gov. Alexander Ramsey, l'vlinnesota held military trials) corrvicting 32:3 Dakotas of war crimes
and sentencing 303 to death. But the trials were corrupt and "completely absurd," Finkelman said.
"The Dakota didn't speak English and they didn't have lawyers," he said. "The trials were totally
unfair,"

Under U5 law, however, death sentences could not be carried out unless the President signed the
orders. In an unprecedented move, Lincoln ordered a complete review of every charge, and ultimately
confirmed onlv 39 of the sentences (one prisoner 1.vas granted a reprieve).

".Anxious to not act with so much clemency as to encourage another outbreak on the one hand, nor
with so much severity as to be real cruelty on the other, I caused a careful examination of the records
of trials to be made," Lincoln 1.vrote in a message to the Senate in December 1862. The Army executed
:38 prisoners by public hanging on the day after Christmas.

"This case was the largest mass execution in U.S. history," Finkelman said.
Although an of the trials were shams and many of the convictions vvere unfair\ it is significant to note
that Lincoln revievved the cases at all, Finkelman said. M.innesota leaders expected him to "rubber-
stamp" the death sentences; instead, Lincoln pardoned 87 percent of those \vho vvere convicted.

The 16th president of the l.Jnited States, Lincoln often is credited for his sympathy toward minorities
and fonvard-thinking attitudes about equality. 'fhe author of the Emancipation Prodamation, which
freed slaves and set in motion massive social and political changes, Lincoln also represents a shift in
federal Indian policy.

"Indian policy was clearly secondary to the Civil vVar/ Finkelman said.
These historical facts which seem lost on student today.

Christopher Columbus is credited by many scholars for starting the modern slave trade. Do your students and faculty
appreciate that? Why no righteous protesting to end the inclusion of Columbus Day on our calendars? Do students today
appreciate the slave and indentured servants were initially white Europeans? Indigenous people of the Caribbean, then
filled the need to have more slaves in Europe.

I am a descendent of Taino Indians and this history is not lost on me. Columbus and the explorers that followed raped,
enslaved and annihilated the indigenous people of the Caribbean. When they were wiped out the European monarchs
turned to Africa. I am sadden that our educational system has failed to educate our students that slavery goes back to
Egyptian time of the Pharos. Jewish people were slaves too. They were raped, beaten and murdered during a time that
record keeping didn't allow for meaningful discussion. These slaves were white, brown and black. Students seem to think
that slavery started in America.

Silent Sam needs to be restored to his place of prominence. There are ways this could have been accomplished but
tearing down the statue in a unilateral manner was not one of them. Silent Sam needs to stand again and the university
needs to encourage debate and for students and outsiders to respect private property. I'm a supporter and open to
meaningful mutual respect of ALL points of view. It's your responsibility to ensure public safety for ALL.

The failure I see here is not the actions of our students, but rather the leaders in education and law enforcement for not
responsibly educating and protecting the rules of law.

With highest esteem,


Dr. Dag Zapatero, DDS

Grammar and syntax en-ors comtesy of Dag Zapatero, and is solely indented for the amusement and angst of the reader(s ).
Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 7:20:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

As a new parent to the UNC community, I would like to send my heartfelt request to please remove the statue
from campus. We are from Charlottesville, and we've seen the horrors of the controversy over this issue. The
violence in Charlottesville will never be forgotten. These statues are not appropriate in our times, and they are
offensive to many people. Please help our youth, and new young adults, to understand that we need to look at
our history with perspective and thoughtfulness. It's time to move forward with kindness and an open heart to
all people.

With respect,
Message
From: Walter Mason
Sent: 10/2/2018 7:31:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him in a museum


Message
From:
Sent: 10/2/2018 7:32:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

under NC law silent Sam must be returned to its site within 90 days of the event removing the statue.
Once returned there should then be a discussion about its future. I vote for silent Sam remaining at its
historical location. At the same time there should be a discussion on the provision of a memorial for the
civil Rights movement or other similar historical event or events or recognizing the contribution of a
significant minority individual associate with NC history or t he University. I certainly do not believe
the issue of silent Sam should be decided by those who unlawfully removed the statue. I also find it
difficult to believe those who claim that they are fearful of being on the UNC campus or are
uncomfortable with UNC because of the statue. I find such statements to be unreasonable, highly
reactionary and not wo rt hy of belief. Ce rt ainly such statements by s t udents or others should no t form the
basis of decision making on this matter.
The history of NC is not the history of New England. NC with other southern states did leave the Union
and have their "double histories" and the consequences of it. NC should remember its past. But more
importantly it should also look to its future. I regret the old North State is failing in the later.
can't you just at least leave the past alone.
Michael Parrish '68
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Jody McCoy
Sent: 10/2/2018 7:38:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam should be returned to his historical pedestal

When I reflect on people that tear down monuments, the Taliban in Afghanistan and ISIS in Palmyra come to mind.
Totalitarian zealots.

And, now, the lawless mob that tore Silent Sam from his pedestal on the UNC campus is added to that list. They should
not be rewarded for bad behavior by locating the statue elsewhere.

The vandals may think they are "just social warriors" but I strongly disagree, and so does existing law.

Silent Sam stands for those sons of the University who fought and died for the South when their homeland was invaded
by Union troops to preserve Empire.
I recall the historian Shelby Foote in Ken Burn's Civil War documentaries addressing just this issue. Mr. Foote related
that a Union soldier inquired of a Confederate soldier
of why he was fighting when his family were not slave owners, he replied "because ya'II are down here!". Those are the
brave young men that Silent Sam represents to many of us.

Slavery is a sin. 700,000 plus people died to eliminate the institution in this country, and to force the Southern states
back into the Union.
To me, Silent Sam is not a monument in support of slavery, but to the young men who defended their native land and
those of their neighbors from invasion.

We can and should learn from history, not destroy it. I recommend permitting adding additional worthy monuments
that might reflect the "justice warriors" world view elsewhere on campus.

To be, rather than to seem, is an appropriate motto for North Carolina.

I hope the Board of Governors will demonstrate the courage to return Silent Sam to his rightful historic site.

Sincerely,

Joseph Bennett McCoy, Ill


M.A. 1979

,JODY J\,frCOY, DifffCTOR


Stratec;1c 'lbvrer· office: RED ACTED • mobile: REDACTED
ADVISOR& cina.ll.: REDACTED • www.sta.online
Message
From: Joe Saunders [joesaunders@alumni.unc.edu]
Sent: 10/2/2018 8:02:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Remove Silent Sam Permanently

Hello,

I am a 2005 graduate of UNC Chapel Hill and I am writing to say that I strongly support permanently removing
the Silent Sam statue from its old pedestal on campus. The statue is a symbol of a racist, pro-slavery, pro-
confederate past, and its prominent display is incredibly offensive and hurtful to so much of the UNC
community.

And while the statue may reflect part of the state and the university's Civil War history, that history is not
something that should be celebrated. Instead, the Silent Sam statue should be relocated to a different, indoor,
museum-style location on campus where it can be viewed with its proper historical context.

There are so many important and inspiring individuals connected with UNC's history that could better be
honored with a new monument at that location. Why waste that space on something that's considered so hateful
by so many?

Thank you,

Joseph Saunders
Message
From: L. Howden I
Sent: 10/2/2018 8:43:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am not sure how tall the ceilings are in the Ackland, but somewhere in there with an appropriate history and
attribution to the sculptor seems like a possibility. It would be sheltered and protected in that space. It is a work
of art, regardless of the politics.

Best of luck in your search.

LindaHowden, '66
Message
From: Cheryle Pope
Sent: 10/2/2018 8:46:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam off UNC campus

I sincerely believe that Silent Sam should be moved off UNC campus, to a civil war historical site. This will
allow those interested in the history of North Carolina to see and celebrate their confederate heritage as they
wish. At the same time it removes this statue from public property, where diverse people pass daily. In 2018, it
is time to remove symbols of institutionalized discrimination and racism. Those who believe in equity and
equality clearly see the pain and suffering caused by such symbols. As a graduate of UNC, and a resident of
Chapel Hill for 59 years, I do not want to see Silent Sam returned to campus. Find a historically relevant space
instead.
Thank you,
Cheryle Pope
Message
From: CHRISTINE D. ELLESTAD
Sent: 10/2/2018 9:00:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I would like for the silent Sam monument to be put back where it was before it was violently pulled down.
A plaque should be erected to explain the history of the statue. Removing the statue removes the need for
conversation about our shared history. It is not acceptable for mobs to destroy state owned monuments -
especially ones that mark important events. History is important to remember and understand as it
inevitably impacts the present and the future. Put the statue back and use it to teach future generations
what is stands for and how our world has changed since then. silent Sam is an important vehicle to prompt
critical thinking about race, culture, and history. We need it to remind us how terrible those days of
slavery and war were and to appreciate our progress as a nation.
Christine Ellestad
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Buttonsdog
Sent: 10/2/2018 9:02:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It was a sad, sad day for this great University, the rule of law and the right for respectful
disagreement. The administration should be ashamed for not protecting public property and for lack of
condemnation for those who destroyed this historical monument.
We should put silent Sam back in place and not reward these extremists. We should put up signage that
describes the context leading up to the war and the intent of the monument to honor students who fought
in that war. silent Sam is a student. Did he choose to go to war? Probably not. Was he able to "buy"
his way out a war like the planters sons? Probably not. Did he know why he was fighting? Was it to
perpetuate an agrarian way of life and an immoral enslavement of humans? or was it because his brothers
and cousins were going, or his daddy, or he thought it would be a great adventure or his girlfriend
shamed him? Why does any 18 year old boy do anything? or anything that makes sense? Why do we vent
our hate toward an inanimate object which is not glorifying a war or warmongers but a common soldier, a
young man, probably conflicted and with various motivations.
Put silent Sam back up where he has stood for over 100 years and let's teach history to those who
obvious l y choose to ignore it.
Message
From: Larry Peterson
Sent: 10/2/2018 9:33:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Future of Silent Sam

As an alumna from the class of '77 (1977 ... not 1877) I suggest we provide Silent Sam a place of honor and memory in the
th
Auckland Museum of Art as a sample of early 20 century sculpture with its complete history and background.

Larry Peterson '77


Executive Director
Habitat for Humanity of Springfield, MO
REDACTED
Springfield, MO 65804

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


Message
From: Jim Parker
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:03:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am certainly open to discussion of what to do about historical monuments. In the meantime, I believe I will let
lawbreakers donate to the University and I will donate to other charities.
Message
From: Kenneth Toppe ll
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:11:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

When I was an undergraduate at UNC, I laughed at the foolishness associated with the statue. I saw the silly
legend being passed from class to class as young women passed by. I never knew the history of that wretched
speech given in dedication of the statue. That speech and the debasing humor of its "local wisecrack" should
serve to ban this legendary insult to all that UNC has come to stand for.
I am exceedingly proud of being a graduate ofUNC, as members of my family have grown to love it as well.
Please put "Sam" in a museum with a plaque to explain its ugly background and malign history. Do not let it
grace the grounds of the "Southern Part of Heaven."

Kenneth L. Toppell, MD
Class of 1963

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away." - Maya Angelou
Message
From: Meredith Dasher
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:12:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I don't favor the silent Sam statue returning to campus.


If it must be displayed on campus, I would favor it being indoors, perhaps in a history building. There
should be accompanying information about the historical and cultural significance of the statue.
Respectfully ,
Meredith Dasher
class of 1995
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Melanie Shores
Sent: 10/2/2018 10:36:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: the future of Sam

It is unfortunate that a decision was not made about the statue before violence erupted. However it is kept, we must tell
the full history of these monuments, which were erected many years after the civil war by the Daughters of the
Confederacy who promoted an false/idealized version of the pre-civil war south, and sought to romanticize those who
fought in the dreadful conflict. Importantly, the history of our state University needs to be told, not only from the point
of view of the white majority, and we need to honor those who have made often unpopular but morally just decisions in
matters of race and justice within the university system. I would suggest a permanent display about these issues be
housed in Wilson Library. Having lived within an hour of Chapel Hill all my life and having attended for 4 years, I only this
year learned about John Ehl e's fascinating book The Free Men about a civil rights movement in the town of Chapel Hill
in the 1960s. I am sure there are many more valuable untold stories. Perhaps the statue can be part of an exhibit of
history that touches on the ongoing struggles of the university reflect the demographics of the state, and the push and
pull of movements ..

I think this idea of an email survey is an important start. We must make be certain any group/committee/department
deciding where and how to display the statue is a diverse group (black, white, asian, male, female, native American,
various ages) in order have best outcomes. I would also suggest you rely on the scholarship of the historians and
archivists in your midst - In fact Wilson Library would be an ideal permanent home for Sam.

Sincerely,
Melanie Shores
Class of 1986
Message
From: Betsy Benton
Sent: 10/2/2018 11:36:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The statue is a big part of hi story & UNC' s hi story, as well!! [H11 [j. I hope that those in charge will
allow the statue to remain in its place_ where it has been for many years• □
Sent from my iPhone
1 Cup (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like crazy!
worldhealthlabs.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5bb4395d3b33395b1a39st01duc
Message
From: Mark W. Young
Sent: 10/2/2018 11:52:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: SILENT SAM MONUMENT

DEAR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,

I AM WRITING TO SAY I FEEL THE SILENT SAM MONUMENT SHOULD BE RETURNED TO IT'S
ORIGINAL LOCATION ON CAMPUS. THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED NOT TO GLORIFY
SLAVERY, JIM CROW SEGREGATION OR ANYTHING ELSE. IT WAS ERECTED AS I UNDERSTAND
IT TO HONOR THE ALUMNI FROM UNC THAT DIED FIGHTING IN THE CIVIL WAR.

SEVERAL MONTHS BACK, I SENT THE FOLLOWING COMMENTS TO THE NORTH CAROLINA
HISTORICAL COMMISSION IN REFERENCE TO THE MONUMENTS ON THE STATE CAPITAL
GROUNDS AND I FEEL THAT THEY APPLY TO SILENT SAM ALSO:

FROM 1861 TO 1865, APPROXIMATELY 125,000 NORTH CAROLINIANS SERVED THIS STATE, MORE THAN IN ANY WAR IN
OUR NATION'S HISTORY. OF THIS NUMBER, SOME 40,000 DIED INCLUDING 3 OF MY ANCESTORS. THE VERY FIRST
CONFEDERATE SOLDIER KILLED IN THE WAR WAS HENRY LAWSON WYATT OF EDGECOME COUNTY AT THE BATTLE OF
BETHEL. MANY OF THESE MEN WHO SURVIVED THE WAR, CAME HOME PERMANENTLY CRIPPLED FROM WOUNDS OR
WEAKENED BY DISEASE. THEY SERVED THIS STATE HONORABLY ON MANY BATTLEFIELDS AND LIVED THROUGH
CONDITIONS THAT WE CAN'T BEGIN TO IMAGINE TODAY.

MANY TODAY SAY THAT BECAUSE THE CONFEDERACY HAD THE INSTITUTION OF SLAVERY, THESE MEN DON'T DESERVE
TO BE REMEMBERED OR HONORED. THE UNITED STATES HAD THE INSTITUTION OF SLAVERY DURING THE
REVOLUTIONARY WAR, THE WAR OF 1812, THE MEXICAN WAR AND IN THE BORDER STATES OF THE UNITED STATES
DURING THE CIVIL WAR UNTIL IT WAS FINALLY ABOLISHED BY THE 13TH AMENDMENT IN 1865. SHOULD WE REMOVE
THE MONUMENTS TO THESE VETERANS? JIM CROW SEGREGATION WAS THE LAW IN THIS COUNTRY DURING THE
SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, WORLD WAR I, WORLD WAR II AND THE KOREAN WAR. SHOULD WE TEAR DOWN THE
MONUMENTS TO THESE MEN? SHOULD WE SEND THE U.S.S. NORTH CAROLINA TO THE SCRAP YARD? SOME SAY THERE
SHOULD BE NO MONUMENTS TO THE LOSERS. WE LOST THE VIETNAM WAR. SHOULD WE REMOVE THE VIETNAM
MEMORIAL WALL?

ALL OF OUR STATE'S VETERANS DESERVE TO REMEMBERED AND HONORED. THEY EARNED THIS RIGHT WITH THEIR
SACRIFICE ON MANY A BLOODY BATTLEFIELD THROUGHOUT THE 241 YEARS OF OUR NATION'S HISTORY. THEY SERVED
WHEN ASKED TO DO SO AND THEY DID SO WITH HONOR AND DIGNITY. WE DON'T HAVE TO SUPPORT THE THE CAUSES
FOR WHICH THEY FOUGHT BUT WE MUST SUPPORT THEM. ANYTHING LESS WOULD BE A SHAME AND DISGRACE AND A
BLIGHT ON OUR STATE'S PROUD NAME.

THANK YOU.
THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN THIS MATTER.

RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED,

MARK W. YOUNG

"THE PAST IS THE TORCH THAT LIGHTS OUR WAY."

-AMSTERDAM VALLON
(GANGS OF NEW YORK)
Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 12:26:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam 'disposition and preservation'

Mount it on roof peak of Kappa Alpha fraternity house, v\/l1ere it will serve as a lightning rod. vVhen it gets
enough strikes to render it a non-recognizable molten mess, give it a display place of prominence as a nature-
sculpted vvork of art appropriate for the tirnes.

Alternately, set a predetermined price per "shot" and give everyone who has ever been offended by Silent
Sam's presence on campus an opportunity to pay for a "blast" from a welder's torch. When appropriately
unrecognizable and the transformation no longer a source of income, allovv the public to re-name the am:vork.
Charge a submission foe for each suggestion. Have a committee of alumni, students, fo.culty, administration
select top 5 or 6 narnes. Charge the general public $1 per vote to decide the final narne.

ff enough money is raised, use Sam's "remains" as part of a base/support for a new, positive-image artwork to
display at the original site in tvkCorkle Place.
Message
From: jay no lte
Sent: 10/3/2018 12:43:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam"

Chancellor Carol Folt,

Under current North Carolina Lm,v, fortunately, you nor the University has the power to remove or
move the "Silent Sam" JVIernorial to the students who attended UNCCH and served in the North
Carolina Troops during the \,Var Between the States. The only legal action that is permitted by North
Carolina Lmv is to immediately repair and return "Silent Sam" to his ORIGINAL location on the
UN CCI-I Cam pus. This is a public University that belongs to .ALL North Carolinians, even those of us
·who are descendants of North Carolina Confederate Veterans.

Please follow the Lavv and return "Silent Sam" to his original location on UNCCH's Campus .

.J."W. Nolte, ,fr


lVIaysville, NC
Message
From: Cedric Brown [cedric@alumni .unc.edu]
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:03:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: On Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt:

Truthfully, the only reason that I'm submitting comments is to balance/cancel out at least one supporter of the
Confederacy. You and I both know that Silent Sam is an anachronism, a symbol unfit for 21st century
recognition. We both know that the removal of one statue isn't going to erase white male hegemony from the
campus, as I'm guessing "his" supporters feel and fear. We both know that putting him back up on the
McCorkle Place pedestal would reassert the same values that landed him there in the first place - a staunch
belief in white supremacy as a guiding value. We both know that, at its core, this issue is about whiteness - not
regional pride (since Africans and Natives have been here all along, too), not honor (since secession was indeed
about the preservation of slavery, the peculiar and most dishonorable institution), and not preserving history
(since it has too often been told from one perspective). We both know that Silent Sam does not represent the
best of our Carolina, priceless gem.

While I'm disappointed that the protestors didn't grind Silent Sam into dust, iflegalities indeed dictate his
resurrection, please use your power to control the context: display him in a manner where the full story of his
presence can be told from multiple vantage points, not whitewashed and divorced from the brutal and bigoted
history that he represents.

Thanks for your leadership.

Cedric Brown '89

P.S. Please pardon any typos; I've written this on my phone.


Message
From: DR CHERYL BILLINGSLEY [
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:53:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam should remain where it is.

Silent Sam has been part of the landscape ofUNC for many decades. This monument was created to give
respect to all of the primarily poor soldiers who gave their life for their state's rights in the Civil War. My great,
great grandfather, a poor southern farmer, fought for the South and was a great friend of the blacks. It saddened
me to see the UNC response to the demolishment of Silent Sam.

I have considered removing UNC from my will, as many of my friends and relatives are considering this also
based on the decision of the handling of this case for Silent Sam's location.

I trust that you will make the correct legal decision and leave this monument where it rightfully deserves to
stand!

Sincerely,
Dr. Cheryl Bradford Billingsley

Sent from ProtonMail mobile


Message
From: Guy Bryan
Sent: 10/3/2018 3:31:44 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

You have broken the law as it has been written about all the monuments! It is an illegal act that you have
allowed to take place. Each an ever one of the staff members on the UNC Chapel Hill board of directors along
with each and every member of the city's commissioners,police force, DA's office,and any other town or city
officials that had a part in taking down and approval of the Silent Sam statue under the law should be
prosecuted for vandalism of a protected state property! And serve or pay restitution for the damages and to be
restored in it's original place for which it was inttended and dedicated to over 110 ago!
If I as a tax payer intentionally go out and willingly,deface,destroy and knowingly brake the law, I will be
arrested and charged with the crime against what ever I committed, as such should any one that does so, no
matter who you are !
AS A TAX PAYER OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA,! DEMAND THE ACTION THAT YOU PAY
FOR REPAIRS AND THAT THE PROTECTION OF OUR MONUMENTS BE UPHELD BY THE LAW
WRITTEN AND THAT SILENT SAM BE REINSTATED IN HIS ORIGINAL POSTED PLACE!! IF NOT I
DEMAND THAT YOU BE BROUGHT UP ON THE CHARGES FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF THE
STATE PROPERTIES AND BE PROSECUTED TO THE FULLEST EXTENT OF THE STATE LAW!
Message
From: Jeff
Sent: 10/3/2018 5:23:41 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

silent Sam is part if our history. He represents what is both good and bad about our past. Rather than
remove him, I would like to see him placed back on his pedestal and also commission a display to
commemorate those in the south who opposed slavery and a display on what slavery did to the slaves. If we
are going to remove all memory of our past does that mean we are renaming all our buildings? Do we remove
the name of our founders so as not to offend anyone? I think silent Sam serves as a reminder that no
person is all good or all bad and this should be preserved. Isn't the University supposed to remove us
from our comfort zone, to make us rethink our positions, maybe even change our minds? How can this happen
if we hide unpleasant truths?
JSPeele, class of '82
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Neil Davis
Sent: 10/3/2018 6:37:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Why not a Sam Ervin, a venerable NC politician at the center of the Watergate investigation. Place his statue in
place of the Confederate soldier.

Neil Davis
Class of '75
Message
From: Med ley, Anna Rose [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=2CD45A75D25E4DFB810EOF8837EOFEF0-ANNA ROSE M]
Sent: 10/3/2018 6:57:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees
Attachments: image00l.png; ATT0000l.htm; image00l.png; ATT00002.htm; image00l.png; ATT00003 .htm; image002.jpg;
ATT00004 .htm; Flyer28Sep.pdf; ATT0000S.htm

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Williams, Elizabeth A" <elizabeth.williams@unc.edu>


Date: October 2, 2018 at 9: 54: 14 PM EDT
To: "Canady, Joseph R" <icanady@unc.edu>, "Medley, Anna Rose" <anna.medley@unc.edu>
Subject: FW: [F0~1AL NOTICE] :Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

Please add this to the ideas for SS. Thanks

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586
·-' ·
, · ·.·•·, ....,
....

Ailll'.W . .
..
·.··
. . ........ ·•

:t. K .A: R S _: :
T'Hl'. CNiVE U:SITY
i%(J '.R_.I ~Jl Ci.t\lt-(Il.-,1 t:f/Si

.., .
• ,
From : Kirkman, Roger,
Sent: Tuesday, October 2, 2018 9:06 PM
To: Williams, Elizabeth A <el!z~aetr,,'Niil!an1s@uncedu>
Cc: Canady, Joseph R <1cinady@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

Overrun by a need to address time-critical tasks, my absence for the last week reflects only this distraction. My friend has
constructed a position paper, which contains both text and illustration. However, it 's prudent to keep this limited in distribution, so we
agreed that despite co-authorship, for now only my name is attached.

I hope this will give an adequate idea of the proposal, but wish it to remain undistributed outside South Building for the time-being. My
apologies for the cloak of mystery here; most of the time I'm accused of being far too candid. The concern is that division on this is
so sharp that if one faction decides to approve, another will likely oppose the proposal.

Roger

From: Williams, Elizabeth A <e!,zabeth.wi1!,an1s@unc.edu>


Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 2:01:09 PM
To: Kirkman, Roger
Cc: Canady, Joseph R
Subject: RE: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees

Roger,

We app!'eciate any feedback that you may have. I can assure you that ail submissions to the email box wil! be reviewed. You a!'e welcome to cc me
on what you send so that I can ensure that your thoughts are hea,·d.

Best,

Elizabeth A Williams

Assistant to the Chancellor

9.19--962 -15FJ6
·-' ·
, · ·.·•·, ....,
....

Ailll'.W . .
..
·.··
. . ........ ·•

:t. K .A: R S _: :
T'Hl'. CNiVE U:SITY
i%(J '.R_.I ~Jl Ci.t\lt-(Il.-,1 t:f/Si

.., .
• ,
From: Kirkman, Roger <kirkman,,J;wssu.edu>
Sent: Monday, September 24, 201811:58AM
To: Williams, Elizabeth A <eliz�br;tr,,'Niilian1s@uncedu>
Cc: Canady, Joseph R <1cinady@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

Dear Ms. Williams

My very best thanks to you for your quick response. Unfortunately, going through the standard channels will just put this into the
current sea of animosity and refusal to contemplate compromise. Chances of a hearing are miniscule.

By November 15, my friend, the actual requestor may be able to extricate himself from this trial he's involved with. You may hear from
him, then. He's quite ardent about this.

Discussing this with the chancellor per se is not required. However, it needs to be put in the purview of someone within a circle who
can actually do something about it.

The windows in my schedule is filling up rapidly; many of the tasks would otherwise go undone. I appreciate your time in listening to
me.

Roger

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Roger N. Kirkman

Winston-Salem State University

Videoconference Center

REDACTED

Winston-Salem, NC 27110

REDACTED

From: Williams, Elizabeth A <eiirnbeth_.wi_lii_a_n-is(ITJunc.edu>


Sent: Monday, September 24, 201811:34:56 AM
To: Kirkman, Roger
Cc: Canady, Joseph R
Subject: RE: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and t he UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees

Dear Mr. Kirkman,

Thank you for calling the Chance!lor's Office to let u;; know of your ideas about Silent Sam. I am not abie to make an appointment for you to meet
with the Chancellor directly, but we wouid iike your feedback. Plea.se see the email below with information on how to submit your ideas about
the statue's future ( you can include the visuals that you mentioned in that ernaii).
Thank vou again for- ,·eaching out,

Elizabeth A. Williams

Assistant to the Chancellor

919-962--1586
·-' ·
, · ·.·•·, ....,
....

Ailll'.W . .
..
·.··
. . ........ ·•

:t. K .A: R S _: :
T'Hl'. CNiVE U:SITY
i%(J '.R_.I ~Jl Ci.t\lt-(Il.-,1 t:f/Si

.., .
• ,
From : no ___ replvf&Je:-r1ai!,ur:c,edu <nn tr:~::iivr.-:i)emaji,un{,edu>
Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 10:57 AM
To: Williams, Elizabeth A <elinileth.wiiliamsrJ;u~c.edu>
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees
Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board ofGovemors gave the UNC-Chapel
Hill Board of Trnstees and me a clear path to develop a for the Confederate Monument's
"disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC System President
Margaret Spellings and the Board ofGovemors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a next
step, we have created a dedicated email address, 11ncmonurn<:nt:il1mc.<:du, for anyone to submit
ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual responses, we will
carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to the Board of Governors
in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject to disclosure under North
Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor

<
Fitting Agreement into McCorkie Place

Like any institution that has endured and grown, UNC has amassed a wealth of artifacts
that recal I its life and aspirations down through the years. Some of those aspirations
meet the test of ti me and speak to generation after generation; others eventually fal I
silent, unable to communicate intelligibly to the world around them.

Sam, the soldier of the lost cause of the old South, has now passed into the incommu-
nicable past, unable to speak to us any longer of duty, sacrifice and heroism as he once
did speak to generation after generation of students. We think of him and realize that
history really happens; it makes a difference; and it has happened to him.

What is fitting to be done with a body, once admired and respected 1 now become to
many an object of contempt - whether thoughtless or otherwise? What might take his
place and speak a better, more enduring word that everyone can hear?

Another of the University's artifacts is a


bronze casting of Anna Hyatt Hunting-
ton's Youth Taming the Wild. A stone
version is depicted at right.

,\1any alumni from the 1950s to the


1990s will recall this work. It stood for
decades in the middle of the north face
of Person Hal 11 the University's original
art museum. Hyatt Huntingdon pre-
sented her statue to the University in the
1940s to help build the museum's col-
lection. It is currentlv held bv Ackland
I ,

Art Museum but not on display.

The statue presents a vigorous youth


straining to hold onto and bring to
ground a majestic rearing stallion deter-
mined to break away and fly off in the
wildness of its heart. The sculptor has
captured the two fierce wills in the mo-
ment when their contest could go either
way and moves us with love for each of them in their opposing furious intent. It was
a wonderful gift to give a University where fiercely opposing ideas are meant to strive
against each other and amaze us with their beauty, strength and audacity. Could this
work of art be the right word from the University's past to recall to duty in the present
crisis of ideas?

One can easily imagine it on the same stone plinth where Sam has stood so long. The
only problem is its size. Ackland's record indicates the overal I height at 6'1 " 1 the base
29" square. An inexact reckoning of Silent Sam's plinth suggests the existing bronze
would appear small on that base. It should be more in the range of 80-90", its base
48-57" square. This would require the casting a larger version and permission from
Brookgreen Cardens near Myrtle Beach S.C. 1 where Hyatt Huntingdon placed a massive
stone version of the statue 1 160" in height, with her collection of then-modem Ameri-
can sculpture. Inquiries to Brookgreen Cardens have determined that no mold for the
bronze copies survives.

This proposal has many things to recommend it to those who believe a University is sup-
posed to preserve the past while also building a better present and future. First, it brings
back a traditional work of art to a position of honor at U NC. Second, it's the work of a
female sculptor - in her day one of the few considered a peer in her art Third 1 it re-
quires minimal alteration of the location. Fourth, its theme has universal appeal.

Roger N. Kirkman AB 1973


28 September 2018
Message
From: Vincent Kopp
Sent: 10/3/2018 7:51:14 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "The Monumnet" aka "Silent Sam": leave it down, take it away, take the mora l high-ground

10.3.18

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I have been surprised by how much better I feel with "The Monument" aka "Silent Sam" down.

No longer do I have to explain to out of town guests, unfamiliar with Chapel Hill's rebellious and racist past,
how the monument's dark history belies UNC's shining present and brighter future. Nor do I have to make
excuses any longer for the statue's embarrassingly anachronistic persistence and shamelessly sexist nickname.

It pleases me to think folks can now walk--folks obviously unlike you and me--past the vacated plinth on
McCorkle Place and not have to look away or feel queasy when passing a symbol built for mixed messages.

It is also deeply personal for me as a North Carolina citizen, Chapel Hill resident, retired faculty member, and
UNC alumnus who has witnessed the strife surrounding "The Monument" for decades.

I have lived in Chapel Hill since 1969, mostly downtown, as I do now on Rosemary Street. That places me in
the vicinity of all the protests, within earshot of the hovering news helicopters and the police sirens when they
are used, and the disruption from roaming trucks and crowd movements when events spill off campus into my
neighborhood.

I pay NC and Chapel Hill taxes so my money goes to both the legal defense of "The Monument" and others like
in the state--a position with which I disagree--and to "serve and protect" Chapel Hill from NC's intransigence
toward repairing its racist past.

As a UNC donor I'm small potatoes compared to many and yet I want my money to have impact and my voice
to be heard. I will always be an ambassador for the school but I need more to work with on the issue of racial
reconciliation and the University's willingness to take a rational stance toward legislative overreach in
University property management affairs.

My sincere hope is, as you deliberate on how to proceed (which I hope involves resisting and litigating against
the clown-car NC legislature, for which I will give money), my "vote" can reflect the various connections I bear
with this issue, unlike someone who is not touched so directly by this issue by residence in Chapel Hill or being
connected to the University.

Thank you for your service. I wish you every blessing.

Sincerely,

The Rev. Dr. Vincent J. Kopp


Emeritus Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics
Message
From: Karl Bauman
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:19:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

October 3, 2018

There are many reasons Silent Sam should be removed from The University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill. The reason that supersedes all for me is that it is a blatant symbol of racism. I hope UNC is better than
that.

Karl E. Bauman
Professor Emeritus
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Message
From: Charlie Webb I
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:49:36 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Good morning;

I have thought about this issue for a long time now and finally decided to submit my opinion
here. Thank you for providing this forum.

As is well known at this point the University has two choices. First, put the monument back in it's
original location. Second move it to another, less prominent location.

There is a state law in place that covers the removal or movement of monuments. Exercising the first
option complies with that law. Moving the monument would violate the law but would placate the
vocal minority that pulled it down, at least until another group becomes offended and does it again
which will bring the issue back to where it is today.

Here is my opinion. The University is an institution of learning. Replacing the monument on it's
original pedestal teaches the students that this is a country that values the rule of law and that the
university does not submit to mob rule. Moving the monument teaches that any time someones
feelings get hurt all they have to do is throw a tantrum, break a bunch of stuff, and they will get their
way. I sincerely hope that the first option is the one implemented.

Sincerely,

Charles M. Webb Jr.


Message
From: Dale Heberlig [news@roanokebeacon.com]
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:50:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
CC: John Hood [jhood@johnlocke.org]
Subject: Silent Sam and the silent admin at UNC

First of all, the criminals who toppled the statue should be arrested and
vigorously prosecuted.
Second, the administrators responsible for ordering law enforcement to stand
down should be terminated from employment and prosecuted, if at all possible,
for contributing to violence.
Thirdly, th e claims that the statue poses a safety risk are absurd and thoroughly
cowardly. If there is a safety risk to the existence of the statue, LEO should,
again, arrest and prosecute those responsible for creating the risk. You do not
assail the target of violence, you attack the perpetrators.
It is so simple and so discouraging that our "leaders" can't acknowledge simple
truths.

Dale Heberlig
Staff Writer
REDACTED
Plymouth, NC 27962
REDACTED
REDACTED

Email: REDACTED
Message
From: Ragland, Scott A [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=EF7C5E01FC8C43299BF8B186F3E6D072-SCOTT A RAG]
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:07:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Why not move Sam plaque to Memorial Hall?

Memorial Hall already honors the University's Confederate dead, both with tablets inside and in the Book of
Names outside. And, of course, the first Memorial Hall was built for the purpose of memorializing them and
other prominent University figures, and the current building continues to do so. Rather than relocate Sam in his
entirety, why not move the "To the sons of the ... " plaque to Memorial Hall and display it in proximity to the
tablets? If anything, this would be a much more fitting tribute than Sam, because it would link the plaque to the
actual names of those who died, something Sam doesn't do. ALSO, NO OTHER WAR HAS A SEPARATE
MEl\fORIAL ELSEWHERE ON CAlVIPUS. It seems this gives us a perfectly reasonable rationale to do what
I describe. In fact, I think it demands it.

Scott Ragland
UNC Development
Class of 1987
Message
From: John Hine [jhine@goldsborolawyers.com]
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:19:14 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

If Silent Sam stays down, so will my gift giving.

John C. Hine
Baddour, Parker, Hine & Hale
Attorneys at Law
REDACTED
Goldsboro, NC 27533-0916
REDACTED
REDACTED
jhine@goldsborolawyers.com
Message
From: Michael Page
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:38:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thank you for setting this email up.


A few ideas for you:
If the statue is to be displayed somewhere, and not in a graveyard where it belongs, or in a warehouse
out of view or wherever you stored the Saunders Hall plaque, the statue should be moved far from campus.
Someplace where it doesn't infringe on the education and safety of your students, which should be
paramount.
Also, you could build a NC history building at the Bill Friday center. Put the statue and the base in it.
charge $100 entry. All the proceeds go to fund minority scholarships.
Thank you,
Michael c. Page
class of 2003

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Davis, Ben [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=a287fd52c46c4e3d99fb311f66bad16c-Ben Davis(]
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:39:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam opinion

To Whom it may concern,


My name is Ben Davis a nd I have worked at the School of Public Health here a t UNC CH for twenty yea rs. I am writing to
voice my strong opinion that the Silent Sam statue needs to be moved to a loca tion off the ma in quad of ca mpus. It is a
symbol that conveys racist attitudes and imposes a negative atmosphere for not only people of color, but sends a
message to all that it represents our community's views which it does not. It is embarrassing as well as ha rmful to our
community. If a majority of people would like it to remain intact in a museum as a reflection of the history of North
Ca rolina , I would be ok with tha t. Let it be known that Chancellor Falt quoting partisan Civitas polls saying that 70 % of
polled want the statue back on campus was seen by us, and it exposes the Chancellor's conservative bias that does not
represent the majority of the UNCCH community.
Please keep the statue in a museum where the racist views it represents belong.

Thank you,
Ben Davis

Ben Davis - Gillings School of Global Public Health


IT Support Analyst - Classroom Capture System Administrator
REDACTED
Message
From: House, Sharon P. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=59EC1BF39B6849238A2BD9222D85AB8D-SHARON P. H]
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:09:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Do not put Silent Sam back where he stood

Good Morning

Please do not put Silent Sam back where he stood.


Please do relocate the statue somewhere else on campus.

Thank you
Sharon P. House
Message
From: Stan Farthing
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:26:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam's fate

Greetings!
Thanks for the opportunity to give input on the fate of Silent Sam.

I agree with those who say that Silent Sam is an important part of the University's history and should be
preserved, but for different reasons. We must acknowledge the dark times and the bad choices in order to learn
from them. Therefore, I propose that Silent Sam be given a prominent place on campus, maybe even on his
original base, but with a monument next to him that would accomplish two purposes: one, honor people whose
lives were not nearly what they should have been because they were enslaved; and two, memorialize those who
lost their lives because of the color of their skin. The additional monument could also express the regret and
contrition of the dominant culture for allowing and participating in such atrocities.
Thanks!
Stan F
Stan Farthing
UNCMBA '85
Message
From: Hilton, Alison R [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=f5d200ab483143f0bde6ae25 7a9cebc0-Alison R Hi]
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:48:06 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

I graduated from the UNC School of Public Health in 1996 and have since been both an employee and
volunteer for the university. I have served as HB Alumni Section President and have worked at the UNC Injury
Prevention Research Center and the Lineberger Cancer Center. I currently work for the UNC Institute for
Global Health and Infectious Diseases. I have always been a strong supporter of our university.

The wonderful training that I received at the UNC SPH, one of the finest schools of public health in the
country, gave me a firm grounding in a broad definition of public health and understanding of the social
inequities that lead to the many disparities that we see in our society. For this reason, I am deeply
disappointed in the approach that the UNC administration has taken on the issue of Silent Sam.

As you know, Silent Sam was a gift from a blatantly racist organization in an openly racist time that was
intended to remind African Americans of their position in a segregated society. Its presence on our campus
creates a hostile environment for students and faculty of color. In public health, we understand that living in a
racist society causes stress that can lead directly to morbidity. Silent Sam literally creates an unsafe
environment for many members of the UNC community.

I do believe that we should not erase history. Silent Sam can go in a museum along with needed context
describing who donated it to the university, the racist speech made by Julian Carr at the statue's dedication
and other facts about how the university has evolved from a segregated institution to the place it is today.

While I understand that the NCGA has made the matter difficult for UNC leadership, and that many large
donors to the university have expressed pro-Silent Sam opinions, sometimes a leader must do what is right
and not what is perceived to be popular. Silent Sam does not deserve a highly visible place of honor on our
campus.

I am watching this issue closely and my future support (financial and other) of the university will be
determined by the decision that is made by UNC leadership on the fate of Silent Sam.

Thank you,
Alison Hilton
MPH '96
Message
From: Marni Goldshlag
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:00:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an alumna of UNC (NIEd in Special Ed, 1976), I very strongly suggest that Silent Sam be either disposed of
or put on some Civil War battlefield. It is outrageous that students, professors and the public at large have had
to be reminded of the terrible timein US history when slavery was the law of the land (or at least part of the
land). I feel especially sorry for those students of color who have had to deal with this reminder for so long. NO
MORE!

Marni Goldshlag
Message
From: audre davis I
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:09:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Public Comments - silent sam monument

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I am a proud 1989 graduate from UNC-CH, who is deeply ashamed of my university's failure to act regarding the removal
of the offensive monument. As an African American graduate, I believe that the moral ground that the university stands
upon, should guide the decision. Can you understand the offense and pain that African Americans feel when faced with
the vestiges of slavery that are still held in high esteem? For me, this monument is the equivalent of the confederate
flag being flown by the university. This is the time and UNC-CH is the place to take the step forward, to acknowledge our
collective past and move in unity towards our future, remove the monument and replace it with something worthy of
reverence for ALL.

Sincerely,

Audre Davis
Message
From: Luchara R Wallace [luchara.wallace@wmich.edu]
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:10:27 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Good morning Chancellor Falt,


I am 1998 alumna of the Department of African and Afro-American Studies at UNC Chapel Hill and I
also happen to be an African American women in support of retaining Silent Sam. We can not erase our
history, positive or negative, by simply removing a statue or even changing the name of a building. The greater
issue is the relationship between African Americans and the University for the past two centuries. If you were
to place Silent Sam back on the pedestal, it might be worth having some written context around why it is there
and why it considered a worthy part of our University history. Further, I would recommend developing a
monument tour (guided or independently) that would take participants through the history of our University
and all of its symbols and lore. It should be ok to reference the monument in honor of the slaves who built
our campus when presenting the history of Silent Sam as well. Please consider what other aspects of UNC
history need to be highlighted and represented as well. I would like for us to consider linking and
acknowledging the contributions and involvement of Native Americans on our campus and state as well. I
know many other immigrant groups have arrived since our University opened its doors, but it might be
worthwhile to put things in a historical perspective so that the fullness of our history can be recognized.

Respectfully submitted,
Luchara (Sayles) Wallace '98
GAA Life Member

Luchara Wallace, PhD


\'(TMU-College of Education and Human Development
Associate Professor, Special Education Program
School Connection Program Principal Investigator and Director
Turnaround School Leaders Project Grant Co-Principal Investigator
REDACT ED (office)

"BE the change you want to see in the world."


Message
From: Poe, Paula [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=F10E3D199F914754A95E2EC08458129D-PAULA D POE]
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:12:20 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam should live someplace in a historical museum, not in Chapel Hill, but maybe in Raleigh, or
a Museum of Southern History someplace in the South. There will be more monuments and
historical representations from the Civil War and the Civil Rights movement that will in all likelihood
qualify for such a home in the not too distant future one should expect.

Thank you for letting me share.

Paula Poe
Message
From: Eubanks, Joseph M [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=3F6BDD704A444AA49C3B8F0432011B80-JOSEPH M EU]
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:14:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]

It should remain. Whatever your beliefs, you cannot change or rewrite history. Hitler burned the books.

Joseph M. Eubanks
Purchasing Agent
Tel:REDACTED
Email:REDACTED
Email: REDACTED

·r : : i .f : ;: : :�: : v�:· �::. �:: :�: �: ·r·f


:::.f ::::::,::i��: -�:· :::-�· (: :�:. :�:;:::::) �,: :� �t�
,;::.:: t:::�-� /�. �:.:.�:: �:.. :�} �}.;, t

The University of North Carolina Chapel


Hill REDACTED
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1100
Message
From: Sherry Holloman
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:15:52 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please place silent Sam back in his original spot. As a 1986 graduate of this institution, I'm
embarrassed and ashamed of what has happened and is happening with UNC. I will no longer send funds to
support this school as long as it sides with the liberals. I no longer share the same morals and values
that this schoo l represents. Many changes, including a new chancellor and athletic director, need to
happen before I donate further.
sherry Holloman
class of 1986
UNC school of Pharmacy

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Edward Wood
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:29:07 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monuments

State law requires this monument to returned to its original location. Please do so.

E.W. Wood
Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:42:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am writing to note my support for moving Silent Sam to a location that can be secured and NOT returning him to his
original location. I am a parent of a UNC student and my focus is on the safety of the students. The photographs of the
police in swat gear escorting protestors on the campus was truly disturbing for me. I appreciate the police providing
protection but this is not the type of college experience I want for my children, and I am worried it is only a matter of
time before someone is seriously injured.

No response is needed, I just wanted to let you know my position.

Thank you for all your efforts to find a workable solution. I know this is a difficult issue.
Message
From: Road Runner
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:57:25 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Recommendation for Silent Sam

Greetings,
Now that the deed is done, my recommendation would be to remove the pedestal (ideally funded through
fines levied against those responsible for toppling the statue), fill in the hole with some dirt, and
spread a little grass seed. Pass stewardship of the statue to the N.C. Historic Commission and let them
decide a suitable, safe resting spot for the monument. It should not be moved or otherwise reinstalled on
any campus in the UNC system, as critical thinking and open civil discourse have been replaced by emotion
and sanctioned mayhem.
If we weren't living in an environment of perpetual offense, I would suggest a memorial for all UNC
students who are veterans of all conflicts be erected in the place of silent Sam, but that would l ikely
draw protest as well. Plus, taxpayers shouldn't foot the bill for any sort of "replacement" memorial,
including an apologist pl aque or any other acknowledgement of silent Sam's existence.
It's done. Let it be done and move on.
Glenda Kiddoo
ABJOUR '83
Glenda G. Kiddoo, PMP
Message
From: Reggie Shuford
Sent: 10/3/2018 12:52:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Folt:

As a proud double alumnus ofUNC ('88 undergrad, '91 law), I am heartened by the recent student activism
aimed at making the campus a safe and welcoming environment for all. That activism included the toppling of
Silent Sam and subsequent efforts to ensure the statue is not returned to its previous location. Coincidentally, I
happened to be briefly visiting Chapel Hill the afternoon of August 25 and was able to participate in a protest
myself It felt really good.

I realize that the powers that be, including a former law school classmate on the Board of Governors, are
pressuring the school into returning Silent Sam to its prior location. I am writing to encourage you to resist that
pressure. Silent Sam, as you yourself have noted, is a divisive symbol reflecting a hateful period in our nation's
painful and tortured history, and has no place on the campus of an esteemed university like UNC, particularly
given its history and mission. If it must be saved, locating it in a museum or similar place that provides accurate
context for the real reasons underlying such confederate iconography might be acceptable.

I loved my years at UNC and remain proud of my association with the university. That association would be
irreparably harmed should Silent Sam be restored to its former home.

Thanks,
Reggie Shuford '88, '91

Twitter: @reggieshuford
Message
From: Bryson66 [
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:01:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an alum (1989) I feel silent Sam has no place on the UNC campus other than in a museum. It represents
a history and principles in opposition to the spirit of education embodied by the University. It also
legitimizes the racist foundation upon which the statue's placement on campus represents in the first
place.
We have faced a similar situation with a Confederate statue that was removed from the center of town here
in Gainesville. The statue was given to the Daughters of the Confederacy for their own use.
It's not an attempt to rewrite or cleanse history. It's the removal of an offensive symbol that is
inflammatory and has no need to exist in such a public place and can no longer be overlooked.
Sincerely,
Bill Bryson
Bill Bryson
Message
From: Claire Allen I
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:22:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam statue

Dear chancellor Folt & committee,


I am a graduate of UNC and very fond of my undergraduate alma mater. Having grown up in the south, I
believe it is important to continue to honor our history in civilized, non threatening ways - this statue
does just that.
It seem unreasonable to tear down a static representation of our history just like someone should not
destroy a painting or other artifact. We cannot ignore the fact that confederate and union soldiers alike
were in the trenches of the civil War battles and proudly fought for their country.
Let's make a concerted effort to reposition the statue in it's original position on campus. It is a
tribute to our history and our southern roots.
Sincerely,
Claire Mitchell Allen
BS PT 1987
Message
From: James Davis I
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:37:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt,


I am a 1989 alumnus of UNC-Chapel Hill and am wr1t1ng to express that I strongly oppose the return of
silent Sam to the UNC campus. The statue is a monument that glorifies a racist past that in no way
reflects the diversity and ideals of my alma mater.
Sincerely,
Dr. James Davis
Message
From: Phil Marsosudiro
Sent: 10/3/2018 1:56:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: please don't replace Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Folt --

I'm a '94 MBA graduate and ~SO-year citizen of North Carolina.

I'm also a person of color, a Quaker, a business owner, and an advocate for goodwill and
progress for all North Carolinians.

I respectfully ask that you don't replace Silent Sam in its old location, but find some
other place that reflects its history without eulogizing its cause.

Sincerely,

Phil Marsosudiro, Durham

Marsosudiro & Company LLC

Management consultant and coach


for spiritually focused professionals
and adults with ADHD

Do Good. Have Fun. Make Money.

REDACTED
REDACTED
Message
From: Douglas, Anne M [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=328de91elc6c42d0a716efl l7325676b-Anne M Doug]
Sent: 10/3/2018 2:36:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam suggestions

Hello,

I would like to make 2 suggestions:

1) Turn the former location of the Confederate monument into a "Speaker's Corner," like they
have in Hyde Park in London, where anyone can have a turn to speak. We can thereby
demonstrate that UNC supports the free exchange of ideas and opinions.
2) Create a Museum of University History, and install Silent Sam in there. This would of
necessity require new construction, perhaps in Carolina North.

Thank you for soliciting ideas from the community.

Anne M. Douglas
The Unlverslty of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Historic Collection Curator
Facilities Planning and Design
REDACTED
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
REDACTED
REDACTED
Message
From: Bill Hester I
Sent: 10/3/2018 3:15:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

It's the law, PUT IT BACK.

Bill Hester
Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 3:32:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

Where is an appropriate location for exhibiting a statue that honors a racist legacy? I think the answer to that is
no where. Unless you want to melt it down and recast in it the form of the black woman who Julian Carr was so
proud of horse whipping, Silent Sam has no place on the campus of a public university whose mission is to
"teach a diverse community of undergraduate, graduate, and professional students to become the next
generation of leaders." To respect the diversity of your faculty and student body and to make amends for a racist
history, Silent Sam needs to go.

Respectful 1y.

Parent of UNC student


Message
From: Nancy Vannoy
Sent: 10/3/2018 3:42:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,
I was disappointed in the violent removal of silent Sam. I understand that it was not sanctioned. We
simply can't forget our history even if it isn't pretty. I feel that it must be put back up or you
will encourage others to simply do what they want.
Perhaps we raise funds for an additional statue that represents the anti slave movement.

Respectfully,
Nancy Vannoy
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Kevin Harden
Sent: 10/3/2018 4:25:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestions for the Confederate Statue Disposition

Dr. Folt:

I was wondering if the university might create a designated space (small building) to
house the statue on another part of campus away from Franklin Street. This would
require visitors to have to enter a building to see it. Assuming also that the location would
NOT be so prominent (further into campus West), that may create more comfort for
students when they are traversing the campus grounds.

If the Generally Assembly will adjust their thinking to a more "reasonable" position, may
yet move towards resolution of this issue, and recognize how ingrained racism is in our
southern society.

Thank you,

Kevin Harden
reference Librarian
Averett University
Message
From: Kathy Eaton
Sent: 10/3/2018 4:44:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As alumni, my husband and I have discussed the controversy over Silent Sam. We both feel that it would be
best to see it submitted to some museum. I never really thought of it being controversial until I read the speech
that was given at the dedication. There is no room for that at our university. All students and faculty should be
proud of the statues on their campus.

Sincerely,
Kathy Davis Eaton Class of 1978
Charles Warren Eaton Class of 1977
Message
From: Samuelson, Al len Douglas [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ cn=Reci pients/ en =cf96c080e30d4196a022128807a6c0f4-AIIen Dougl]
Sent: 10/3/2018 5:12:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ cn=Reci pients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 7 Sb-South_com (
Subject: Conf monument

Dear Dr. Parise,


I am Allen Samuelson DDS, Associate Professor at
the UNC School of Dentistry and write to give my
opinion on this matter. Any decision made should
ultimately be grounded in what was at one time
known as "Natural Law"; which was the grounding
of our own Declaration of Independence and indeed
our Constitution. The basis of moral decision
making is not so straightforward, but human beings
indeed, deep in their very soul, know "right" from
"wrong" which in and of itself implies a "third" or
"higher" standard outside of which we evaluate our
own "standards". Indeed, the attorneys at the trials
in Nuremburg used this type of reasoning to bring
judgement upon the Nazi Regime. They argued
generally (I am NOT a lawyer so please forgive if in
error!) that no reasonable person would seek to
somehow justify the enslavement, murder, forced
servitude of any human being or group. This
opinion is grounded in Nature's Law - and Nature's
God (See The Declaration oflndependence).

If you return to the Constitution of the Confederate


States of America and many of the "Confederalist
Papers" (I made this word up - what I mean merely
is those confederate government officials or jurists
who wrote explanations as well as their opinions on
the subject of their form of government) you will
find arguments for and indeed wholesale
justification for the enslavement of other human
beings (see Alexander Stevens speech among others
from 1861 ff. It must be wrong- it has to be
wrong. If not shown to be wrong then it can
"happen in the future all over again" - see Aldous
Huxley "Brave New World" and Sinclair Lewis' "It
Can't Happen Here". Therefore, any statue or
recognition, however "benign" it may seem to
some, honoring anyone holding those views and
under whose government they fought, need not be
displayed. To me it was as US Grant so humbly
stated (with regards to Robert E Lee at Appomattox
proceedings) "I felt like anything rather than
rejoicing at the downfall of a foe who had fought so
long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a
cause though it was, I believe, one of the worst for
which a people ever fought, and one for which there
was the least excuse."

Here are several thoughts:


I.The United States of America was founded on the
proposition that all men are endowed by their
Creator with unalienable rights etc. In addition it
argues that all men are created equal. These are
arguments from natural Law - and must, therefore,
be inviolable.
2.The United Stated was founded on IDEAS not
necessarily "people". The minute we engage in
"people" recognition, the case for hero worship
arises. RE Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Grant, etc
would be appalled, I imagine, that there are statues
of them and worse, people are actually fighting and
dying over them. RE Lee, remember, was most
proud of his service at West Point (the only cadet
EVER to graduate with NO demerits, serving as
superintendent later) and as President of
Washington College.
3.The VAST majority on BOTH SIDES of the
argument I can guarantee you, are very uninformed
with regards to American History (10,000BC
though the present). That being said, I side with the
African Americans who oppose the statue as their
argument is deeply rooted on 400 years of the
"slavemaster's whip" and Jim Crow and Civil
Rights etc and is very legitimate. Anyone on the
opposite side, again, I will wager are incredibly
uninformed and are merely responding from "gut
reaction" or the "state of their digestive system" or
the "vagaries of the weather" and therefore minimal
validity.
4.Now, with regards to unlawfully removing
property of the state of NC -well, what the
founding fathers did in Philadelphia, was certainly
unlawful with regards to Royal Law-just as one
example, I could list many including the Tennis
Court Oath-you see what that started-wow! They
had had enough - they are sick and tired of being
sick and tired. At any rate, remember, the very first
line of the Declaration of independence "When in
the Course of human Events it becomes
necessary ...... etc etc and so forth and so
on". Perhaps those African Americans were finally
weary of the symbol of the confederacy being in
full view and perhaps "legitimizing" the fight the
soldiers there honored fought for and the constructs
they overtly or unknowingly fought and died for. ...
5.All this being said, I understand the other side as
well. I think those who don't want it removed are
as Faulkner states:

"For every Southern boy fourteen years old, not


once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant
when it's still not yet two o'clock on that July
afternoon in 1863, the brigades are in position
behind the rail fence, the guns are laid and ready in
the woods and the furled flags are already loosened
to break out and Pickett himself with his long oiled
ringlets and his hat in one hand probably and his
sword in the other looking up the hill waiting for
Longstreet to give the word and it's all in the
balance, it hasn't happened yet, it hasn't even begun
yet, it not only hasn't begun yet but there is still
time for it not to begin against that position and
those circumstances which made more men than
Garnett and Kemper and Armistead and Wilcox
look grave yet it's going to begin, we all know that,
we have come too far with too much at stake and
that moment doesn't need even a fourteen-year-old
boy to think This time. Maybe this time with all this
much to lose than all this much to gain:
Pennsylvania, Maryland, the world, the golden
dome of Washington itself to crown with desperate
and unbelievable victory the desperate gamble, the
cast made two years ago."

- William Faulkner, novelist

.... they are sentimentalizing the war and forgetting


really what the confederate states were
legitimizing. I do not even think "slavery" crosses
their mind. They are merely memorializing a
feeling, a past, a family history and not so much all
the negative qualities of the confederacy. Most, I
imagine, if cornered in a room and asked "Is slavery
permissible" - would answer no -
categorically. Others claim "we do not want to
rewrite history or revise history." This has been
done many times as philosophical ideas change,
evidentiary weight comes to bear, or a nation
coalesces ala the United States of America. So, to
my mind, being an earnest Christian, the statue is a
lump of brass, tin, iron molded temporarily into an
image of a by gone past (erected in the early
1900's! well past the actual events) by those
wishing for a past that really wasn't what they think
it was - the good old days ..... I really do not think
SO.

Lastly, and perhaps not leastly, the speech by Julius


Carr does not help the argument at all. It is
nauseating to read the words he states on the day of
dedication. They are offensive to any ears at any
time. Yes, we must guard against "Whig" history
and not judge individuals except through the lens of
their times, but like stated in all of the above, some
ideas are merely WRONG whatever the times. His
were wrong. I say: The statue can be removed and
if individuals, uninformed or otherwise, desire to
never again give any money to the university then
so be it. They are sentimentalizing their "time" here
at UNC. It would be interesting to know how many
of these individuals actually went to the statue,
considered the weight of its message OR even read
the plaque upon it. I can tell you many of them
know nothing of the American Civil War, the
institution of Slavery nor American History etc.

Kindly submitted and with much respect and high


regards for the leadership of the "people's
university" -
Allen Samuelson DDS
PS: It could easily go into a museum explaining its
significance in history - a history we do not want to
relive ..... .
PPS: As a means of appeasement and due process- the statue could literally be placed back upon the pedestal
and removed in a proper and orderly fashion and placed on display with a narrative. One could stare "we have
heard you. However, through the power vested in the state of NC, we hereby remove the statue LAWFULLY.
Thank you.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 7:29:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I would have to start this email by saying that I am saddened and disappointed by the tum our society has taken. 1984?

I was driving back north after having dropped off my son as a freshman at UNC the day that Silent Sam was toppled. I
was shocked and disgusted. I have taken a long step back and understand that what that statue means to some folks is
entirely different from what it means to others. I know the history. My grandfather was chairman of the department of
history at UNC for many years. I only wish he was alive to offer insight today. I asked my 18 year old freshman son. This
was his response.

I mean it's a historic


landmark for the Civil War

And you can't hide history


from the world, yet I don 1 t
think a politically
aggravated campus is the
best spot, so l1d say a Civil
War Museum

Like Gettysburg

It was as if he had read my mind. I think that the statue has become a source of contention and a safety issue for the
people of Chapel Hill.

Gettysburg. I have been several times. It is a beautiful memorial honoring all of those who lost their lives that day fighting
for what they believed in. Many were from N.C. Perhaps that would be an appropriate final resting place for Silent Sam?

.
Sincerelv'
Message
From: Kate Rouleau
Sent: 10/3/2018 7:29:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

I am recent MA grad ofUNC, and wanted to share my thoughts about it the statue. Frankly, it's a shame that
the university still honours those associated with a group of people who believed in perpetuating slavery under
the pretence of state's rights, manifested by both the statue and some of the names on buildings throughout
campus. It is time to honour UNC grads who have accomplished fantastic things unrelated to slavery - what
about the 19th, 20th and this century?

Add the statue to a museum or building on campus with a description of why the university placed it on campus
in the first place, and how it became untenable for the university to have it in such a place of prominence on
campus because of the insentivity it represents towards students of colour and their allies.

Best,
K
Message
From: Jean Templeton
Sent: 10/3/2018 7:36:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I received my Ph.D. From UNC, Chapel Hill, in 1979. I see Silent Sam as a monument to veterans. I see it as a
monument, particularly, to UNC students who were veterans. Are veterans only to be honored if they were on
the winning side?

11
I do not see it as a monument toward the cause of slavery. Our Civil War historians could enlighten us about
the real reason II the Civil War was fought.

I believe Silent Sam should be preserved. This monument was destroyed illegally. I don't believe such methods
need be rewarded.

Thank you for considering my thoughts,


Jean Templeton, Ph.D.

Sent from myMail app for Android


Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 7:43:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Silent Sam Monument

I want to encourage UNC-Chapel Hill to put the Silent Sam Monument back on its pedestal in its original
location as it represents hundreds of UNC students who went off to war to defend their homeland against an
invading army.

I do not understand why the University would allow outsiders to come onto your campus and tear down such a
memorial to many fallen dead students who attended UNC back in the 1860s.

Robert E. Lee once said "A nation which does not remember what it was yesterday does not know where it is
today.

Byron Brady
Raleigh
Message
From: Aqueelah
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:10:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Removal

Good Evening,
I feel that the Silent Sam monument should be removed and replaced with a monument of the three African
American men who desegregated UNC in 1955, Ralph Frasier, Leroy Frasier and John Brandon. It's time for
these three gentlemen that be honored for those heroism. The funds allotted for the relocation of Silent Sam
should be used for a more meaningful purpose. The Frasier brothers and Mr. Brandon deserve to be honored
with a monument or having a building named in their honor.

Respectfully submitted,

Aqueelah L. Poole

Aqueelah L. Poole
Message
From: Chet Roslanowick
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:10:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Move ss to one of the civil War Battle Fields or a Museum. Do not put him in public spaces that attract
divisive behavior. Let those who want to commemorate the civil War do it at those locations.
Chet and Marsha Roslanowick

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Laura - Personal
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:18:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a proud UNC alumnus (1993) and child of two UNC alumni, I can't remember a time when I didn't know
about silent Sam. However, the time has come to let that tradition lay to rest. Please do not waste the
money putting him back up; instead, look to UNC's future rather than its past.
Lay Sam to rest.
Laura Laxton
class of '93
Delivered by tiny, tiny fairies
Message
From: Barbara Wil liamson
Sent: 10/3/2018 8:44:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam would be far better in a museum - so that our parks can feel welcoming to all. We need a few statues that
embody the values of all. Barbara W.
Message
From: Julian Brantley
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:05:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think that the United States government should accept every Confederate Monument and separate the metal
from the granite. There should be a national Monument and Memorial for the Civil War/ slavery event. The
monument should be constructed out of all the collective granite and metal from the Myriad of State local and
individual monuments. The New National Monument should memorialize what happened in a constructive and
positive way.

Dr. Julian C. Brantley


Message
From: Karen L Boulas [klboulas@northcarolina.edu]
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:18:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Statue

I would support the statue being put back where it was.


I don't ever thing negative behavior should be rewarded.
Thank you.
Karen
Message
From: Matthew A McGuigan
Sent: 10/3/2018 9:47:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam and Uphold the Law

Chancellor Folt,

The majority of people in North Carolina wish for all to stop playing politics with our memorials, our veterans,
and our dead!

UNC-CH belongs to all of the people of North Carolina, not just to a small minority of historically ignorant and
perpetually offended people. North Carolinians overwhelmingly want Silent Sam put back at McCorkle Place
and the law demands you do just that.

Y'all do not have a 90 day window to ponder an illegal move of Silent Sam. Silent Sam wasn't removed legally
and he's undamaged. Put Silent Sam back and uphold the laws of North Carolina.

Demand strong punishment for the crimes committed, in the toppling of Silent Sam.

Deo Vin dice,

Matthew A McGuigan
Message
From: Raymond Falk
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:01:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Mccorkle Place

---------- Forwarded message---------


From: Raymond Falk·
Date: Mon, Oct l, 2018, 14:53
Subject: McCorkle Place
To: <UNCMonuments(a),unc.edu>

It is my opinion that the 4 faces of the remaining pedestal be elegantly adorned with plaques displaying 4
historical claims of the revisionist Jim Crow history and evidentiary rebuttal, point-for-point

Also, my own Verizon IP address 24.171.181.82 was today denied access to UNC information on Rev.
McCorkle.

Thank you for your attention.

Ray Falk

UNC-CH:
BS 1976
MS 1980
PhD 1985
Message
From: Lois Bal len
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:01:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Falt,

Silent Sam does indeed have a place in our history and on the UNC campus, but not at the front door of what
should be a safe, welcoming, proudly public research university. "

As a tax paying citizen of North Carolina, I believe the Silent Sam statue should be moved either to the Ackland
Museum ?fit stays on campus, or the NC Museum of History where it would be accessible to all North Carolina
Citizens. A museum setting allows for its history to be taught iv ithin its full context.

lhank you for providing this opportunity for input.

Lois Ballen
Durham
Message
From: Monica Lavery
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:26:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: relocation of Silent Sam monument

I am the parent of a UNC Senior who has been active in the campus civil rights movement. I have
followed coverage of the protests closely, as well as visiting the site before the statue came down. I
am aware of the larger Chapel Hill community and UNC departments and libraries refusing to have
the statue anywhere on campus. I think the most appropriate place for it would be in the NC History
Museum, with an appropriate explanatory display making clear that it is part of the history of the Jim
Crowe movement in NC, which is now hopefully behind us.

I think it would also be helpful for someone (perhaps local clergy) to work with the UNC Trustees and
other leadership figures who want the statue to be returned to its pedestal. As a trauma therapi st, it
seems to me that they need to work through their psychological and spiritual resistance to coming to
terms with the Confederates, Jim Crowe advocates, etc., in their own family and cultural histories.
Their stance on the statue appears to be driven out of a reaction formation against shame, and they
need healing of this shame just as much as the descendants of enslaved people need healing from
the history of suffering of their ancestors.

As an NC citizen and taxpayer, and a UNC tuition payer, I appreciate this opportunity to give input
about the Silent Sam Jim Crowe statute.

REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:34:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Deposition of toppled Sam

Monument Location Committee,


Please take into consideration the wishes of the stude nt body in making this de cision. The majority of the UNC student
body is opposed to reinstalling Sam on the former pedestal in the "front porch" of the unive rsity. Sam has been a great
source of d
isagreement
and open
hostility between people
on the UNC campus. Please find a suitable location off the UNC campus to locate Sam.
recommend Bentonville battlefield as an appropriate location for education and study of this chapter
of American history. Sam will stand in tribute on this battlefield to the fallen youth of North Carolina.
Thank you,
REDACTED
REDACTED
Chapel Hill NC 27517

UNC School of Public Health 2007


Message
From: David Moretz
Sent: 10/3/2018 10:57:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Return Silent Sam

I walked past "Silent Sam" for eight years as I earned my BS degree and DDS degree, learning to play by the rules and
honoring the history of this great institution. UNC should obey the law and return the stature to its rightful place where
it has been for over 100 years.

David Moretz, '74, '81


Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Message
From: David Spicer
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:03:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: CSA statue

Destroying or removing historic items is a disgrace especially for a University. Just because some folk can't
understand or tolerate a countries past history, It is no reason to bow to illegal activities to remove it. Restore
the statue and next time don't stop the police doing their job to protect it.
Message
From: Ken Caudell
Sent: 10/3/2018 11:37:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Relocation

Dear Chancellor Falt:

We know that the Silent Sam statue has nothing to do with the Civil War. What it illustrates is the
power of Jim Crow in the first half of the 20th century. It should be moved to a place where this can
be addressed. A history museum is the most appropriate place, as far as I am concerned. It should
be remembered that most Civil War veterans made peace with each other after the war, as
comrades-in-arms. The statue flies in the face of that fact, and should be treated as an artifact of the
Civil Rights battles of the 20th century. Incidentally, some of my ancestors fought for the
Confederacy in Georgia regiments . I can be proud of their courage and tenacity, without bowing to a
despicable relic of white racial supremacy.

Thank you for taking the time to read this.

Kenneth N Caudell, Durham, NC


Message
From: Russell Scott Day [russellscottday@hotmail.com]
Sent: 10/4/2018 12:53:18 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: SilentSamlnlitVaultwithGlassTop/RSD

Dear Faculty,
I suggest "Silent Sam" be put in an underground vault with a glass top next to "Unsung Founders". Creates
tension between different goals of labor and of those who hire labor. Provides and provokes conversation
maintaining the desired historical context. Buried underground with a glass top "Silent Sam" is about as safe
from vandals as it is ever going to be on that campus.

Thanks,
Russell

REDACTED Transcendian Playlists on youtube


to book Scott Day call Nancy Alex at REDACTED
amazon. com/author/transcendian
http://www.transcendia.org
@ Transcendian
https://www.createspace.com/800620647
Message
From: JC Taylor
Sent: 10/4/2018 5:45:41 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Replace the statue.


Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Tim Grier
Sent: 10/4/2018 5:48:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

It is North Carolina law that this Memorial should be repaired and replaced back in its original place of honor
unless approved by the state to move it to a place of equal prominence

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Dana E. Page
Sent: 10/4/2018 7:08:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put silent Sam back up!!!

Put silent Sam back up where it belongs!!!


Fire Folk ... If she cannot protect a monument how will she protect your child.
David Klinge UNC MBA 1980
Message
From: Karen Curtin
Sent: 10/4/2018 7:08:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: SILENT SAME

Dear Chancellor Falt:

Silent Sam needs to find a new home in a museum that provides some historical perspective. It does not belong
at the front door of our university! We need to send a clear and welcoming message to everyone at UNC.
Message
From: Susan Mitchell
Sent: 10/4/2018 7:34:20 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor,
I believe this statue has no place in the town of chapel Hill. No only is it a symbol of oppression, but
it would again create an unsafe environment for the citizens of chapel Hill. And the cost of security is
another negative.
I know that Governor Cooper wanted to have it removed for safety reasons, but he was thwarted by the
legislature. Fortunately no one was hurt when silent Sam was taken down and the situation did not
escalate.
silent Sam should be installed in a museum setting as part of our history, but not as a monument to the
civil War and the oppression it represents.
With thanks,
Susan Mitchell
Parent 2013
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Dave Cable [dcable@springsidepartners.com]
Sent: 10/4/2018 8:01:15 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chanc]
CC: Dave Cable [dcable@springsidepartners.com]
Subject: Suggestion for Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

D r. Falt,
I am writing with a suggestion for dealing with Silent Sam. I suggest the statue be buried immediately adjacent to the
pedestal. At that location, I suggest placing a substantial plaque recognizing the historical significance of the statue,
telling the story of our changing societal norms, and include a bronze relief image of the statue. This keeps the statue on
state land, as required by statute, symbolically buries a symbol of the ugly underbelly of our history, while also
recognizing the historical context and significance of both the statue and the current times.

I hope this helps inspire a solution to this difficult and emotionally charged issue, and I wish the very best as you move
forward with this and so many other challenges.

Thank you for your excellent leadership of NC's flagship institution of higher ed.
Dave

Davis J. Cable, MAI, AI-GRS, CRE


Springside Partners, LLC
REDACTED
D avidson, NC 28036
REDACTED
dcable@springsidepartners.com

"Of all the questions which can come before this nation, there is none which compares in importance with the central
task of leaving this land better land for our descendants than it is for us. Conservation is a great moral issue. JI Teddy
Roosevelt, fall, 1910.

"A true conservationist is a man who knows the world is not given by his fathers but borrowed from his children. JI John
Audubon
Message
From: DuJuan Brown
Sent: 10/4/2018 8:37:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: No Silent Sam

As a UNC alumnus, for many reasons, I have always opposed Silent Sam. I want to be proud ofUNC and the so
many esteemed pinciples it stands for!

DuJuan Brown
'86
Message
From: Birdsong, Laurie B. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=86b77 43944b64a349e6f31dc6a65c86d-Laurie B. B]
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:16:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam input

Two points for the decision-making cmte to consider regarding the future "where" & "what" of Silent Sam:

• It should be emphasized, possibly on the plaque accompanying the statue -- Silent Sam represents those UNC
th
male students who put their post-secondary/University education on hold mid-19 century & joined thousands
of other Southern soldiers who did not have the resources to enroll in/obtain a higher education. Yes, these
UNC soldiers fought for the Confederacy, but in historical context, they fought for the sovereignty of a region
(loosely stated, "the South") that had given them the only roots/identity they knew.

• Consider relocating this statue to Bennett Place in Durham, NC. - Well known around the Triangle & beyond,
General Joseph E. Johnston's Confederate Army surrendered to General William T. Sherman at Bennett Place on
nd
April 26, 1865. This surrender -- much overshadowed by Lee's surrender at Appomattox, VA- became the 2
(after Appomattox) and last major stage in ending the War Between the States. Relocation of Silent Sam to
Bennett Place might offer a balance of association/thought -yes, the UNC soldiers represented by Silent Sam
fought for, in part, the slave-owning sovereignty that the Confederacy stood for; however, as the site where the
war ended and Emancipation had been a part of the surrender earlier accords at Appomattox, Bennett Place
symbolizes a prevention of further bloodshed & a historical crossroads for the beginning of reconciling the North
& South.

Thank you,

Laurie Birdsong, MPH


PR/Communications Specialist
UNC Department of Radiology
UNC Department of Anesthesiology
Message
From: King Prather
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:25:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The North Carolina Museum of History would be a great location. The monument doesn't need to be on
campus.

King Sent from Gmail Mobile


Message
From: Gregory Starling
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:28:08 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Placement

To whom it may concern,

I am writing about the placement of the Silent Sam monument. If it is deemed to be placed anywhere on the
university I think it or a monument of similar meaning should be placed in the UNC cemetery. Since the
purpose of the monument is to memorialize the dead the appropriate setting would most likely be in the above
suggested place. If Silent Sam is deemed too big to be placed in that setting, then there should be a smaller
plaque or something similar that serves the same purpose to memorialize the dead UNC students, faculty etc .. of
the Civil War.

Regards,

Greg Starling
Message
From: Kate Blackwel l
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:54:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Goodbye, Silent Sam

Hello Chancellor Folt,

Firstly, I'd like to thank you for setting up this public forum. Letting different voices be heard is going to be what makes this
work, I hope.

I'm a UNC grad (2012), and like many students from alumni families, I remember running around Silent Sam and thinking of it
as part of the Chapel Hill campus way before even associating it with the Confederacy. When I learned what it stood for,
though, I was mortified and saddened. There are so many ways I am proud to be a Tar Heel and associated with the university,
but this was like hearing a beloved relative drop a racial slur over dessert. The message this sends to the world about UNC is
just painful, and it sends a looming suggestion of bigotry and intolerance to students and community members who pass it.

The statue just cannot go back to the place it stood before. Leaving it there was like letting a cancer grow unchecked, but
returning it would be to tacitly reaffirm those awful words said at its first dedication. If the University sees fit, for the sake of
not forgetting and burying the past, I think you could follow a Holocaust memorial style display of it in some venue. But please
let the world know that this part of our history, while not to be forgotten, is not something of which we are proud.

Thank you,

Katlin Blackwell (class of2012)


Message
From: McNeilly, Mark [Mark_McNeilly@kenan-flagler.unc.edu]
Sent: 10/4/2018 10:10:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d6156 4ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South_ com on]
Subject: Monument Proposal
Attachments: Monument Proposal - Final.pptx

Attached is a presentation containing a proposal primarily on what to do with the remaining monument. The goals of
the proposal are:

• Diminish the probability of violence


• Come to a compromise solution that accommodates all sides
• Meet state law as best we can
• Promote
• Reconciliation
• Proper remembrance
• Humility of Beliefs
• Freedom of Speech
• Unity

Please let me know if you have any questions.


Thanks,
Mark

Mark McNeilly
Professor of the Practice
Marketing & Organizational Behavior
Kenan-F lagler Business School
4510 McColl Building
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
REDACTED
Monument Proposal
"An Object of Remembrance"
Mark McNeilly
Professor of the Practice
Kenan-Flagler Business School
mark mrneiHy(a) ker.an-flagler.Lmc.r::du
REDACTED
Agenda

• Situation
• Goals
• Options
• Proposal
• Benefits
• Next Steps
Situation
• If no action is taken to replace or modify the statue
• It signals the rule of law is irrelevant
• It ignores state law
• It diminishes the UNC brand
• The situation may lead to further violence on campus

• If the prior statue is put back up and restored to its prior state
• The problems prior to its destruction will continue
• It diminishes the UNC brand
• The situation may lead to further violence on campus
Proposal Goals
• Diminish the probability of future violence

• Come to a comprom ise solution that accommodates all sides as best as possible

• Meet state law as best we can

• Promote
• Reconciliation
• Proper remembrance
• Humility of Be liefs
• Freedom of Speech
• Unity
Proposal - Modify the Monument and seek
BOG & Historical Commission Approval
• Add a pyramid in place of the prior statue to signify that leaving it in the
"destroyed" state is not acceptable and to communicate other meanings, e.g. a
combination of the Old South (the base) and the New South (the pyramid).

• Add new inscription on the stone base to offer remembrance in a proper


context and promote reconciliation, humility of belief, freedom of speech and
unity.

• Add a display providing the history of the monument next to it, including the
destruction of the prior statue and the concept behind the altered monument.
The act of destroying the prior statue will be positioned as, although the
motive behind it was understandable, the action itself was a negative and an
unlawful one. Those who performed it will in no way be celebrated.
Proposal - Inscription
The following inscription would be added to the monument.

This monument remembers those students of the university who bravely but mistakenly
served the Confederate cause in the Civil War. Let their actions and sacrifice remind us of
the need to be humble in the certainty of our beliefs , civil in our discourse, strong in our
support of free speech and resolved to solve our disagreements in a peaceful manner.

"With Malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God &ives us
to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation s
wounds." Aoraham Lincoln

E Pluribus Unum
Out of Many, One.
Motto of the United States of America
Proposal -Altering of the Monument

• Rather than put the prior statue back on the pedestal a pyramid
would take its place on top of the current stone base.

• Why a pyramid?
• Symbolically, pyramids represent aspirations, human development,
harmony, and unity.
• Practically, a pyramid would be hard to pull down
Proposal - Historical Display
• The display would be placed next to the monument and provide the
history of it, from dedication to the many controversies over it to its
destruction and finally to the monument they now see before them.
• The dedication description would include Julian Carr's horrific speech.
• That would be followed by other notable events, such as the list
offered here.
• The destruction of the prior statue will included. The positioning will
be that, "although the motive behind it was understandable, the
action itself was a negative and an unlawful one." Those who
performed it will in no way be celebrated.
• Ending the display will be a description of the altered monument's
symbolism and explanation of the inscription.
Handling of the Prior Statue
Create a special commission to offer proposals, however, the
options should meet these criteria:

1. Must be handled with respect.

2. Must be protected.

3. Must not be put in a place that would create a dangerous situation.


Benefits of the Compromise to Stakeholders
Those who supported the prior statue
• The monument recognizes the soldiers (but not the cause)
• The monument is reconstituted (albeit in an altered state)
• Those who destroyed the prior statue do not have the last say and
their acts are positioned as negative and unlawful

Those who were against the prior statue


• The prior statue is not returned
• The cause of slavery is recognized as wrong
Benefits to U NC

• Explosive situation defused


• Recover from negative brand impact
• New monument in synch with our beliefs
• Provide an example of how to handle tough situations other
institutions may face
Next Steps

• Engage the Board of Governors for approval.

• With their support engage the North Carolina Historical Commission


for their approval.
Back-up
State Law
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a monnment. memorial, nr work of ;at nwnd by thc Stat nmy not he rcmovd, rdn,,;1ted, or
dkrcd in mry way wifonl!t the ;ipprmnl. of tbc Nfrrlh CnmEin Hfaklrkd Cnmmi~sirn:i,
{hi Limihthm on Remuvd, ~ /t.n objc.:t nf rcm"'mhrnncc bcnk<l on ;mh!k pmp,;:cty
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this ,ubsectkm, .An objcd of remcmhrmicc that is kmporndiy rdn.:ab:I sfod! be rdurnd tu its
original. k,c11tinn witbn 90 day, of comp.htkm of tbe pn.tjcct that m:pim:l ifa kmpornry
n,~movat /i,n nb_/ctt d' remcmbmmx ti:mt i, pcrn1;im.~1tdy rcbr1tted sbd! he rdo,,;1t,~d 1tJ a siic of
shnibr pwmiuei1ec, h<mfrr,. visibility ,1vai!ilhbty, ilmJ iw:es, thM. ,rrc within the b<mHd.ttdl~ nf
the jwi,didinn fmm which fa was rdorntc&. An object nf RmtmbrmKe may not lx., n:bcated to
a m11s,wm, ct1nete1,y, w inarn;:o!eum tmk,,; it vms wigind!y pb:cd ;it ~nd, a location, A,; ,met\
ir, Hrh frK ItTm d' re1n<'nihrm1e,," meant fa rnnrm.rmmr, ,n,wM>ri,Jc( plaque, d,J:tw.,
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( J) Whea approprime n1ea:mn::s are required by the State or a pofoi>::aI
su:hdivisinn o.fthc State tu prc;,crve the nbjwt
\Vh~:a n~:.c:es~•lffY for cons:trttction~ rt~110\11tic1n~ {Ji:· rtX'.'.{)nfigtr.tt~tis.Jn of
building,, open spa,x:s, parking, or transpmtation projects,
(c) Exceprinns,. - This section does not apply in the fol1o-wi_ng:
( J) Highway markern set up by the Board of Transport.atiun in coo,perntimi 'Nifa
the Dcpmlmen:t of Environmental Qm;lity and the fJepmiment of Natnrn! and
Cultural Res,:,1mces as provided by Chapter ! 97 ofthe Public Laws of l9J5
An object of remcm!:mmcc owacd by u private party that is hx:ated un p«bfo::
prnpcrty and that is the :mhjwt of a legal. ,tgr1Xment between the private
patty and the State nr a pu!itirnl ,mhdivision of the State governirig the
rcm,wa1 or relocation of !he object
{3) Ao ohjed of rcmemhrnm::e for whk,-h a b.1i1dh1g inspcc!rn:- or simi!.a:r official
has dct1c11:nincd poses a threat to pt!bhc bccimse of an tlnsafo or
cla.ngemm condition, (2015-170, s. }(e}; 2tJ15-24l,, s,
Message
From: Will Flanagan I
Sent: 10/4/2018 11:47:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: location of Silent Sam monument - one suggestion is to place it in the old town or university cemetery. It is in
memory of those students who died. James Smalley, BA 1961
Message
From: James Blackwell
Sent: 10/4/2018 12:03:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I am a North Carolina native and proud graduate ofUNC-CH. People that know me all know that I cherish
Carolina and the time I spent there. As such, I feel immense (occasionally obnoxious) pride most of the
time. The other side of the pride that goes with my attachment to UNC, is a personal kind of pain when the
institution does not fully live up to ideals that I would agree are sometimes unfairly high. I appreciate the
difficulty of my expectations and hopes, but there they are in any case.

The fact is that UNC is beloved as "my university" to many people who have strong feelings in sometimes
different directions. That reality must make decisions about Carolina a lot of "fun," both sarcastically and
literally, for you and the board.

I do what I can to help with what I perceive as the right thing for the University. After recent athletic program
issues were revealed (painful to have them, good to deal with them), I shifted my donations from the GAA to
the College of Arts and Sciences to suggest the relative weighting of those values from my perspective.

With regard to the monument in question, I would say that the days when a student might walk past this
monument literally whistling Dixie are long gone. The statue is clearly not a monument to the highest ideals
that we aspire to. Today the University and those that love it are finally free of a monument to brave but
horribly misguided men that fought a war that in its very best light, set brother against brother to take our
country apart. In the war's dark heart was slavery. I would say it is past time that we stopped figuratively
whistling Dixie around this truth.

I have heard concern that we should not validate the way the monument was removed. While the way this
"band-aid" was yanked off was painful, it would have been painful to some no matter how it was done. It is not
unfitting that it was an act of rebellion that removed this monument to rebellion. I understand there are
counterarguments that have some validity but I would conclude that whether you agree with that or not, the
wound will heal better without a monument to those who fought for the wrong side.

I would also suggest that replacing the statue will only lead to further difficulty in protecting it and (for those
who value it) desecration of whatever value they hold it in. That is a lose/lose. Whenever any shooting or other
event happens around the country, UNC will have a rallying point where the University will be on the defensive
over a regrettable monument in the center of the campus and possibly it's vandalism. Not very attractive talking
points for recruiting the best and brightest students.

To me it is clear that this statue should not hold a featured place on our campus. Where to put it is a far tougher
question and one to which I do not have a clear answer. I believe that a monument should represent our highest
ideals. On the other hand, a memorial remembers people, flaws and all. None of us are perfect.

At its best, this is a memorial to those that died in the Civil War but only on one side. It more fittingly belongs
in a cemetery overlooking confederate dead. I am not sure where that leaves me. It is possible that there is an
appropriate place on campus. I have visited Hillsborough and seen a large number of confederate historical
markers at their old cemetery. Possibly that would be an appropriate site. I wish I had the ideal answer that is
gentle to everyone but does not misrepresent our ideals.
My degree was in History. I do not want to erase history or rewrite it. I also do not want a false glorification
what that terrible war was in our history or, far worse, misrepresent our highest ideals today.

In my life working in public policy, when it got difficult I would encourage those around me by suggesting we
were lucky to get to work on problems that people cared about. Our work made a difference. Have courage
and have "fun".

Best Regards,
Jeb Blackwell
Class of 1979

PS
Sorry for the long letter. Liberal Arts Major.
JB
Message
From: All ison Davis Chrisco
Sent: 10/4/2018 12:14:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for representing our University well.


I am an alumnus (BSBA '89) and resident of North Carolina. I am aware of at least one ancestor who fought on
behalf of the Confederacy in the Civil War.

I am embarrassed to admit that I did not give much thought to Silent Sam and what it represented during my
time in Chapel Hill. In 2018, I gained awareness of the donor's intent for the statue and have given thought to its
meaning today. Please hear my request to take it down and leave it down. It belongs in a museum where it
can be acknowledged in historical context. Today, the University promotes a community of inclusivity. Silent
Sam does the opposite by communicating a message of intimidation and white superiority.

Please help the University be a part of the solution (not part of the problem) in addressing racial tensions and
injustice today.

Best regards,
Allison Davis Chrisco

Go Heels!
Message
From: Robert G Clawson
Sent: 10/4/2018 1:02:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

This was no big deal during my years at UNC.

There were no Confederate overtones.

As I recall, the story related by UNC guides was that if a virgin walked by that Sam would fire his
rifle.

Since the meaning attributed to Silent Sam has changed due to the MeToo movement, and other things,
perhaps he should be relocated to a less prominent location, such as near the campus Police Station.

I do feel strongly that those who pulled silent Sam down should be expelled, if they were students, and
prosecuted for vandalism.

Yours truly,

Robert G Clawson Jr '63

REDACTED
Charleston, sc 29401

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Penelope I
Sent: 10/4/2018 2:18:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Alum view on Silent Sam

Thank you for the opportunity to weigh in on this issue. As a proud alum of UNC - chapel Hill (Class of
1989), my preference would be that the silent Sam statue remain down/removed. silent Sam is a divisive
monument, that caused me and classmates anxiety and pain while also serving as a constant reminder that
the university was not truly intended for us. The University is well served not having this reminder of
racism on the campus! Thank you for your consideration.
Be JOYful !
ptt
Penelope Thornton Talley, Esq.

Sent from my iPhone -- which usually adds a typo or two, so please forgive any grammatical errors.
Message
From: Bert Clere
Sent: 10/4/2018 2:36:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt,


I write as someone with family ties to both the Confederacy and the UNC system. My Great Great
Grandfather, Isaac Daniel, was a Sergeant in the 7th NC who fought at Gettysburg. My mother, Sarah V.
Clere, received her B.A. and PhD from UNC. My father, Thomas Clere, taught in the English Graduate
Program at UNC. My sister, Sarah Clere, received her PhD from UNC. I received my B.A. from UNC Asheville
and am currently pursuing an M.A. at North Carolina Central.
I lend my voice in agreement with the city government of chapel Hill that the silent Sam monument should
be moved, "to a more contextually appropriate place that is safe for public viewing." I believe there are
many potential locations in the chapel Hill area that could serve this goal. I believe the slient Sam
monument is an important part of UNC's history. But it is deeply tied to the University's participation
in the institutions of slavery and racial segregation. For that reason, it is a deeply painful symbol for
many and should not be prominently or reverentially displayed on campus. A less prominent location along
with a further plaque contextualizing the statue's creation, and the University's regret for
participation in unjust social structures, would be a fitting way to remember without excusing the
inexcusable.
Given my own family history I am deeply mindful that many see this statue as a way of honoring the dead
rather than honoring racism. But we cannot erase the cause the Confederates explicitly said they were
fighting for, nor can we erase the dehumanizing words about African American women which were spoken when
the statue was put up. our history must be faced for what it is. To return silent Sam to a place of
reverence and honor on campus would be to insult the memory of all of those who suffered under the
oppression of slavery and segregation. I believe that UNC can and must do better. Thank you for asking
for input from the community, and I wish you the best in making the decision that is best for the
community.

Bert Clere
Durham, NC
Message
From: Eisenstein, Sascha [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =9df099265c4e43 78a 30194 fldebcf9d8-AI exa nder M]
Sent: 10/4/2018 2:47:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Comment on Confederate monuments

To whom it concerns,

I am writing this message to implore the UNC Chancellor and Board of Trustees to remove all monuments to the
Confederacy and to individuals who participated in this state's history of immoral behavior toward people of color. The
monument known as Silent Sam is the most well-known example, but there are many more . The way this university has
handled the protests about Silent Sam has been a complete failure for several reasons. First, it is abundantly clear that a
vast majority of people agree that the monument should at the very least be moved to a less prominent location, but that a
more just solution would be to move it to a museum so that its representation of historical bigotry and hatred is explicitly
cited. By failing to do this, the University has incited implicit supporters of this state's history of white supremacy to openly
assemble, which is their constitutional right. Because this institution rightly encourages students and faculty to exercise
tolerance and compassion towards all people, especially those who have been marginalized, it was inevitable that these
Confederacy apologists would be met by fervent counter-protests that are in the spirit of the University's purported values
of inclusion. In this way, the University has implicitly facilitated and encouraged conflict on repeated occasions. As a
response to these conflicts, which were entirely foreseeable, the University decided to react to the occasions with
unnecessary police force, rather than having proactively taken measures to prevent them altogether, resulting in the
physical abuse of students by police officers and multiple unnecessary arrests. Both the pro-Confederacy demonstrators
and the anti-racism counter-protesters will most likely continue this cycle until the University performs its responsibility to
remove the source of the conflict. Regardless of whether you believe the monument represents Southern history or is a
symbol of white supremacy, it is clear that the best solution is to remove the monument's now disembodied pedestal. I
and many of my fellow students are disappointed in your mishandling of the situation, but it is not too late to rectify your
mistakes. My guess is, you have received more messages in favor of this stance than opposed to it, and that should
indicate the correct path.

Best regards,

Sascha Eisenstein, M.S., CRC

He/Him/His

Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Department of Allied Health Sciences


The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Message
From: Ken Lawing
Sent: 10/4/2018 4:15:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please don't allow "hate" determine the outcome of silent Sam. It was "hate" that tore
it from it's base, kicked and spit on it. It was kindness, respect and love that built this
statue to honor the very young students of UNC that died in the war. silent Sam should be put back on its
pedestal.
Ken Lawing
UNC '59
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: jhw
Sent: 10/4/2018 4:40:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]; Chancel Ior
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Put the Silent Sam statue back on campus where he belongs

The violent protesters do not speak for the majority of the student body and alumni. The chancellor turns her
back on the majority.

The Silent Sam statue needs to be returned to his original position on campus.

Please do not try to please a political interest at the expense of your alumni and students.

Thank you.
Message
From: Paul Harrison
Sent: 10/4/2018 4:45:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam statue

It should be in a museum in a prominent location with historical information to explain its significance
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Weissman, Deborah M [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =f3902f9930ec480ba483166fdd3d2a0e-Debora h M W]
Sent: 10/4/2018 4:59:56 PM
To: UNC M onument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Please remove

We must re-evaluate our campus geography/racialized geography and how it


interferes with our values of humanity and dignity and our core mission.
Put the monument -- Sam and pedestal-- in a museum off campus with
other confederate monuments and explain their Jim Crow history and
stated purpose to intimidate free Black persons.
Contextualize and historicize the civil war and confederate soldiers...
traitors? poor men? As well as the effect of the excessive brutality of
union soldiers.
consider the pain that these symbols cause many students, staff, and
faculty of color along with those who are horrified by the history of
and ongoing racism of this country.
Seek to reconcile with all.
Thank you.

Deborah M. Weissman
Reef c. Ivey II Distinguished Professor of Law
school of Law
University of North Carolina at chapel Hill
Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, CB#3380
chapel Hill, NC 27599-3390
(direct mail: 160 Ridge Road, chapel Hill, N.C. 27514)
REDACTED
REDACTED (fax)
email: REDACTED
View my research on my SSRN Author page:
http://ssrn.com/author=79639

IMPORTANT: This email transmission, including any attachment, has been sent by or on behalf
of a lawyer or law firm and is intended only for the use of the individual or entity to which it is
addressed. It may contain information that is privileged, confidential and exempt from disclosure
under applicable law. If the reader of this communication is not the intended recipient, or the
employee or agency responsible for delivering the communication to the intended recipient, you
are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify me
immediately by email or telephone and delete this communication and all copies. Thank you.
Message
From: Mark Moore [
Sent: 10/4/2018 5:22:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Removal

Dean Chancellor Falt and UNC Board of Governors:

I'm writing to express my support for removing the Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

In a perfect world, Silent Sam would have no place on the UNC campus in this day and age. The fact that certain
elements of society still cling to Confederate memorials-and the hate and oppression they represent-is a damning
indictment of North Carolina in 2018.

But given the fact that you're under political pressure to keep the statue in some way, I offer my opinions on what
should be done with Silent Sam:

1. Returning the statue to Mccorkle Place should be a non-starter. I agree with your recent "not at the
university's front door" assertion.

2. The statue's pedestal, currently still standing in Mccorkle Place, should be dismantled and removed
permanently. Think about it. Leaving the pedestal (which has textual panels) in place while relocating the statue
itself would in effect create two Confederate memorials-and thus twice the controversy.

3. The statue, minus the pedestal, should be placed in an interior exhibit somewhere on campus. Perhaps in a
new dedicated museum space that can include other relics from the university's past. Most importantly, a Silent
Sam exhibit must include textual signage clearly explaining that the statue was erected during the Jim Crow
era-in celebration of the Confederacy. This was the era when Confederate veterans made a concerted effort to
revise their history with a false States' Rights narrative and "Lost Cause" mythology.

Make no mistake. Silent Sam and similar statues from that era were erected to intimidate African Americans and to
reaffirm white supremacy. It is time for UNC to join the twenty-first century in moving past these symbols of division and
hatred.

In closing, I urge the UNC Board of Governors to take this a step further and dictate the removal of any other
Confederate memorials that might exist on any campus within the UNC system.

Sincerely,

Mark A. Moore
Author of The Old North State at War: The North Carolina Civil War Atlas (NCDNCR, 2015)
Distributed by UNC Press
Message
From: Jerry Austin
Sent: 10/4/2018 7:38:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Crisp

chancellor Folt,
If Crisp said "one can hope" about the destruction of silent Sam, he should be moving on to more
lucrative endeavors.
Jerry c Austin
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Richard Boner
Sent: 10/4/2018 7:48:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an alumnus of UNC-CH, I request that the silent Sam statue be returned to its original location and
that measures be taken to protect it, including video cameras and fencing. Furthermore, anyone who is
identified defacing the monument be prosecuted.
Richard Boner
AB Journalism 1971
JD 1975
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Arlene Medder
Sent: 10/4/2018 8:30:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

In my opinion, one of the best places for the statue known as Silent Sam, since it's a memorial to the war dead,
would be the cemetery. It would probably be more tactful to put it on the eastern side, away from the African-
American graves.

Arlene M
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
Message
From: Ho, Jennifer A [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=29279B68111F48C4B3159C56FC98DCC5-JEN NI FER A]
Sent: 10/4/2018 8:33:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

First, I want to commend Chancellor Folt for making the decision that the statue
cannot be returned to its pedestal. I know that was not an easy decision to make and
that she is receiving a lot of criticis1n, both fr01n constituents (com1nunity members in
NC, alum, and donors) who want the statue returned to McCorkle place and activists
who wanted Chancellor Folt to take more decisive action earlier.

Ideally (and I know there is nothing ideal about this) what I think should happen is
that the statue should not return to UNC Chapel Hill at all. If there are people who
want the statue-who feel strongly about it as a symbol commemorating Confederate
dead, then it should be placed in a graveyard that has Confederate dead. I'm sure there
are many, but Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh seems a good place, particularly since it's
near the capital of North Carolina: htt.p_;.J/historicoakv~!oodcerneterv.org/historic-
confoderate-cen1ete:rv.asp
Chancellor Folt and the Board of Trustees will need to petition the historical society,
but I think that this could be a win-win solution: NC residents who feel strongly about
the statue can have a space where it will be appropriately housed and can appropriately
honor Civil War soldiers and the c01nmunity at UNC Chapel Hill do not have to be
subject to the statue and all that it represents.

We also save our community from outside forces, like the pro-Confederate and alt-
Right groups who have been protesting on campus and creating counter-protests and
wreaking havoc and causing fear among students. I spoke to one of my former
undergraduate students a few weeks ago and he mentioned that he feels a constant
sense of anxiety over the issue of the protests-he fears that there will be violence that
will break out and that students will be harmed, even die. I believe this is also a fear
that many in South Building have.

For this reason, I think it's crucial that the statue not be returned to cainpus. It is a
disruptive force, and its presence will continue to divide our community and continue
to be a source of tension and conflict.

If, for some reason, it has to be returned to campus, then I think the only fitting place
that it can be placed is the cemetery on campus. It still may be a source of controversy
and conflict but at least it will be someplace that is more appropriate to part of what
people think was its original intent. And I think there's the added benefit that perhaps
we can say that the statue and its representation of white supremacy is also more
appropriate for a final resting place.
Sincerely,
Jennifer Ho

Jennifer Ho
Professor, Department of English & Comparative Literature
Associate Director, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
Greenlaw Hall, CB#3520
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3520
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED
Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Message
From: Brian Brewer
Sent: 10/4/2018 8:59:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a UNC graduate and descendant of a non-slave holding Confederate veteran. I believe that Silent Sam
should be returned to it's original place on the Carolina campus and anyone participating in the future
destruction of the statue should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. This monument is not a racist
symbol it's a dedication to the service of UNC students and faculty who fought in a war for their state. I have
read so much about the Julian Carr speech at the monument's dedication. Yes that was pure hatred coming
from a white supremacist. I also understand that the statue may offend some because of the history of
slavery in the South. Slavery was a terrible institution and a true dark side in American history. However, you
can't remove a monument because of one man's comments or because of something that some may disagree
with or find offensive. There was a lot of dissension about the Vietnam War. Does this mean that the
Vietnam War memorial should be toppled for this same reason? It is our state's history. It is our University's
history. You can't change that. It would be a true disgrace to the young men who left the University and their
homes to go fight in a war to protect their state.

I hope that you will consider returning Silent Sam to it's proper location. Thank you!

Brian Brewer
UNC Class of 1995
Message
From: Ben Howell
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:22:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

It's already past time for putting the civil war monument back up!!! It represents the many students who
sacrificed for a cause they believed in, states rights. Destruction of public property is illegal, conspiring to
allow violence on the campus is illegal. Do the right thing and immediately put Sam back.

And, diversity on campus is a joke. Race based admissions is discrimimatory. Have you considered the rights of
those denied admission who are more qualified based on sat, act and grades. If you really want to discriminate
in the name of diversity then do so fairly for all races - Chinese, Canadian, Hispanic, Russian, Japanese. See the
point?
Ben Howell
Class of '84

Sent from rny Verizon, Samsung srnartphone


Message
From: Samulski, Richard J [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=EF 13072C64094E748F19758BF25A7A67-RICHARD J S]
Sent: 10/4/2018 9:29:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It is time for UNC leadership to stand up & do what is right & remove this embarrassment & disgrace from
our history going forward. Waiting on people like me to weight in when you know wholeheartedly we can not
go forward as a society with such reminders of our a painful past.
Imagine if it were individuals that were celebrated for Nazi concentration camps instead of the civil
war.
We have failed to provide our youth with a clear vision of what UNC stands for. How do we call ourselves
educators when we are hesitant to teach the truth. silent Sam is not so silent since it represents a
voice of discrimination that has yet to be muzzled.
Where are our leaders?!!!
Do not load the gun again by erecting silent Sam & hope no one will be a victim of collateral damage
whether emotional or physical.
Again where are our leaders?
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Mark I
Sent: 10/5/2018 1:14:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please do not put that statue back up. The careers of black students and staff should mean something.
overcoming our racist history shou ld be a desired goal. Replacing it would be contrary to my values.
Thank you for reading.
Mark Burniston, '90
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Jean McDonald
Sent: 10/5/2018 6:14:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an ardent alumnus and a long time Chapel Hill resident I implore you to find a different place for Silent Sam to reside off
campus where the rise and fall of his existence can be contextualized. I personally will be happy to never see the statue again
having learned the history behind the installation and am relieved that people of color will never have to walk by a statue that
surely has come to symbolize long standing racial division in our country. My grandfather, father and now son have all served
in the military and their service to our country can and should be honored by other less divisive means.
I appreciate this thoughtful approach to polling the community for thoughts and opinions but also think this is the time for
bold leadership in preserving the values of the university and thus do not see where a statue to the confederacy has any place
on our campus.
Sincerely,
Jean Hix McDonald, Class of 1983, 2014
Message
From: Bill Nelson
Sent: 10/5/2018 7:3 1:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ient s/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam should be returned to the same place this is Not the way to remove it .. Ether way its hate .. Try Doing it
lega l that's we do in t his country what 's next to be destroyed knocking something ove r that's not is not legal,, just a
cheap shot an t ...
Message
From: Brown, Stephanie Willen [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=0D90DE6C6A024C44A7F814B6C2145796-STEPHANIE W]
Sent: 10/5/2018 8:41:06 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Boynton, Lois A. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=0ca381c8bdle42d9a06blcc4778ced98-Lois A Boyn]; Brown, Stephanie
Willen [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =0d90de6c6a024c44a 7f814b6c2145 796-Stepha n ie W]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam gathering/ input session for UNC staff?

Hi there,

I'm wondering if the university is going to have any input sessions for *staff* input on the Silent Sam statue.

My faculty colleagues are talking about the faculty sessions, and one told me that the Employee Forum was
going to be setting up sessions for staff. However, I have emailed them twice, starting two days ago, and
haven't heard anything (see below for the first message).

I really would like the opportunity to hear what my staff colleagues are saying- not just faculty & students.

thanks for any input you have!


stephanie brown
UNC staff member since 2009

From: "Brown, Stephanie Willen" <swbrown@unc.edu>


Date: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 at 8:58 AM
To: lntouch <intouch@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: lnTouch - October 2018

hi there,

Are you going to be having gatherings/ input sessions for staff to get their (our) feedback on Silent Sam?

When I inquired of the Faculty Governance group if they are going to solicit feedback from staff, they replied
that the Employee Forum was going to "sponsor something for staff."

I really would like the opportunity to hear what OUR colleagues are saying - not just faculty & students.

thanks for any input you have!


stephanie brown
UNC staff member since 2009

From: Employee Forum <intouch@unc.edu>


Reply-To: lntouch <intouch@unc.edu>
Date: Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 4:53 PM
To: "Brown, Stephanie Willen" <swbrown@unc.edu>
Subject: lnTouch - October 2018
October 2018

hatws new with the forum


The next full meeting of the Employee Forum will occur on October 3, 2018.
Monthly meetings are generally held on the first Wednesday of the month from
9:00 - 11 :30am in the Sonja H. Stone Center Hitchcock Multipurpose Room . They
are open to the public.

Follow us to participate in mn
social media scavenger bunt
October 19, 2018
On Employee Appreciation Day
(October 19), the Employee Forum will
once again be hosting a social media
scavenger hunt. Follow the clues left
on our social media platforms to find
prizes donated by community business
partners. To ensure you don't miss out
on your chance to participate, make
sure to follow
Twitter and ,. .................
•.•.•.•·································· •.

Employee Forum recognizes UNC ·


[fousekeeping Services
During International Housekeepers
Kudos
Week (Sept 9-15), the UNC Employee
If you know of a peer who has been
Forum presented a proclamation
recognized with an award or completed
recognizing the contributions of UNC
a significant accomplishment, .................... .
housekeepers to the University's
mission. The proclamation was read by ................................•.•· · · · · · · · · and we'll feature it here in
the monthly lnTouch Newsletter.
Forum Chair Shayna Hill and Vice
Chair Kathy Ramsey during three shifts
of celebrations in Housekeeping
Services. The Employee Forum would
like to thank our housekeepers for their
tireless work in providing us with a
clean, professional, and safe work
environment.
Campus news and announcements

Events and professional development opport1..rnities


• (10/10)

• (10/11)

• (10/16)
• (10/17 & 10/19)
• (10/19)

2-Step to be :required fo:r campus email users


Think phishing is a "campus" problem? Criminals don't care how or where they
get your financial information and don't differentiate between your personal and
professional accounts.

Enroll now in 2-Step for campus email. Here's how:

• Visit.:::.:::., . .,. ,: :., . .,.,.,,,,.,,. . ,.,,,,.,.,,,, . : : : ., , . and click on "2-Step Verification for Office 365."
• Follow the quick on-screen prompts to opt in to 2-Step Verification.
• -... ,......,. .,. . ,. . .,. . ,. . ,. ,. . . . .,. . ,. . ,. . .,. . .,. ,. to finish 2-Step enrollment.

If you wait until your account is automatically switched on for 2-Step in November,
you won't be able to check your email until you configure your preferences. Save
time and hassle ... do it now!

Uid vou know?

UNC operates a computer loan program for permanent full-time employees. If


you're seeking to purchase a new computer or tablet, make sure to check out
Student Stores before you buy elsewhere. If you purchase through UNC, you can
place a down payment on your new device and spread the remainder of your
balance over six months of interest-free payroll deduction. More information can
be found

Communi service updates

Hurricane :Florence relief efforts coordinated by Carolina Center for


]:T) u 'i,,.l" C'
ml C, ,-,el"'\,,'ICC ((',(""'T)C')
. ·' , .. ]: k-,

North Carolinians, including students, faculty and staff at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill and the surrounding community, are asking how they can
support the recovery from Hurricane Florence. In particular, they are seeking
guidance on donations for affected locations. CCPS is listing a variety of
organizations that are providing assistance -- this list is not all-inclusive, and we
encourage you to always do your own research into an organization before
deciding where to volunteer your time and/or share your financial or in-kind
resources . For in-kind resources, please pay careful attention to what is
requested. For example, most organizations are not requesting clothing and
dropping clothing off when it was not requested can slow down response and
relief efforts.

UNC's Ongoing Efforts and Information

Over the past week, more than 500 folks at Carolina and in the surrounding
community stepped up to provide supplies to affected areas in partnership with
Carolina Athletics, CCPS, and students from the Buckley Public Service Scholars
and APPLES Service-Learning programs. A group of university stakeholders
gathered to share plans and ideas for ongoing relief work, and many others in the
University community found various ways to donate, serve and learn about what
is most needed. Although these efforts will help provide some immediate
assistance, the aftermath of this storm will necessitate extensive, long term relief
and support for the many affected areas. Opportunities to help will continue to
develop. Visit the Carolina Center for Public Service web page for all the most
recent updates on University Efforts to support

To support UNC-Chapel Hill's relief efforts donations may be made to:


........................................................................... which is managed by the Carolina Center for Public Service.

Fill the Truck Round 2

In response to continued requests from affected areas, the University of North


Carolina at Chapel Hill is hosting Fill the Truck Round 2, a supply drive to collect
specific items for locations that were hardest-hit by Hurricane Florence. Fill the
Truck Round 2 will take place from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 8 at the
Williamson Parking Lot, located directly across the street from the Dean E. Smith
Center.
People may also bring donation items to collection sites from now until Oct. 8. The
collection sites include:

o Campus Y

o Gillings School of Global Public Health

o School of Social Work

o Biology Department in Coker Hall Lobby

o Carolina Center for Public Service

Requested items include:

o Mosquito repellent

o Cleaning supplies (mops, brooms, dust pans, face masks, sponges, buckets,
spray bottles, wipes)

o Canned vegetables

o Dry cereal, cereal bars

o Paper goods (napkins, plates, cups, knives, spoons)

o Feminine products

o Adult diapers

o Quart-sized and gallon-sized food storage bags

The supply drive does NOT need water, baby supplies, clothing or used/open
containers.

Supporting the State's Efforts

Anyone interested in volunteering with the state can sign up through the .•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•
................................................................. Volunteers can indicate here if they are interested in
volunteering time, supplies, donations or resources to assist communities
impacted by Hurricane Florence. Donations to support efforts may also be made
directly to local efforts or to the

Shelter Information

The shelter at the Friday Center is being operated for the State of North Carolina
by the Red Cross in partnership with the University. They are fully staffed and
currently do not need additional donations of goods. Monetary .,,,. . ,.,.,. ,.,.,., .,.,. ,., ., . ,.i .... ,,.,.,.,,.. , .. , .. ,,,·: .. i .

............................................. where individuals can also apply to be a Red Cross volunteer.

Members of the University community who wish to offer specific expertise and
knowledge to the relief efforts are encouraged to contact the Carolina Center for
Public Service at ::::.::::::..:,:::... ::: :: ::.: :.: ::.:.· .... .... .. ...

Habitat for Humanity fall women build: October 19 & 20, 2018
Habitat for Humanity's annual Women Build program recruits, educates, and
inspires women to build, fundraise, and advocate for stable and affordable homes
in our communities. Due to the overwhelming response from the Spring Women
Build Week and an interest to make Women Build a year-long community, Habitat
for Humanity of Orange County is excited to announce its first ever Fall Women
Build shifts! For two days only, join us on our new construction site in
Hillsborough .... ,.......•. . •...•.....•...•...•....•. .....•...•................,. . . . . . .•. ..........•...•......•....•...•...•. •....•..•. •. ....•...•......•...•...•. . •. •. •. .

Submit your story about Community Service Leave or other UNC


faculty/staff volunteer experience

Have you utilized your•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•. .....•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•. Have you or your department


otherwise served the community or volunteered in other ways? Send a picture
and a short blurb (300 words or less) about your experience and what you've
gained from using your leave, and we'll feature you here! Email submissions or
questions to Katie Musgrove at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,.,. . . . .·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Interested in serving on the Employee Forum's Community Service


~ . • .,j. ,,
( ommihee.
The Employee Forum has created a committee devoted to promoting UNC
faculty/staff Community Service efforts. This committee, in coordination with
members of Carolina Center for Public Service and other campus organizations,
will host various community service events throughout the year, similar in nature
to the annual Carolina Blood Drive that is currently hosted by the Employee
Forum each year. The committee will also advertise various other ways in which
UNC employees can participate in community service throughout Chapel Hill and
the wider North Carolina community.

If you are interested in signing up for the committee listserv or helping us out in
any way, please email Katie Musgrove at ,. . ,. . . . ,,,. . ,.,. . .,.,. . . . ,.,. . . ,. . . . ,. : :. . , .,. .,. . . .,. ,.,.,.,.,. .,. ,. . ,.,. . . .,. . ,.,. .,. . ,., . .,., . ., ., .·

Sincerely,

Employee Forum Community Service Committee

From the town of Chapel HUI




• (10/20)

News from arm.md the state

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Employee Forum
Uf\JC-CH Employee Forum
·134 East Franklin Street Room 207
Chapel Hill, Nolih Carolina 27599
Message
From: Barbara EIiertson
Sent: 10/5/2018 9:08:01 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Location of Silent Sam

Hello. Thanks for opening this process for public comment. I grew up in Louisiana, and have lived all my
adult life in North Carolina. My ancestors were in the Confederacy.
My opinion about the silent Sam monument is that it belong in a cemetary: it is a remembrance of young
people who died. Its proper location is in a place of commemoration of the departed. It does NOT belong
in the center of a campus or any civic space.
Is there any spot in chapel Hill similar to Bennett Place in Durham? If not, them move Sam either to
Bennett Place or to a chapel Hill cemetary.
Thank you for listening.

Barbara
B. Williams Ellertson
Message
From: Bob Brinton
Sent: 10/5/2018 9:10:01 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Return Silent Sam

Giving in to mob theatrics is the worst action the University could take.

Return Silent Sam.

Educate the students by teaching History so they understand the States Rights issue. Compare the
South's agrarian position against the North's sweatshops and explain it is all a learning and growing
process. We learn from mistakes, we learn from history, and to erase history leads to a repeat of
history.

Place a marker at the site explaining it's a statue commemorating the bravery of persons taking a
stand, believing in their ideals, and reminding people to discuss issues without violence and name
calling.

Most named colleges, buildings, and our everyday surroundings are named for people who in some
part of their life failed to live up to their ideal, or took positions they later changed . To move Silent
Sam is the start of a slippery slope of opening North Carolina up into changing all of history that
current groups who yell the loudest don't agree with - i.e. 'mob rule'.

Best Regards,

Bob Brinton, 75
Message
From: Chip Davis
Sent: 10/5/2018 9:18:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

The Silent Sam Monument on the campus of UNC should be returned to


the top of the monument at it's present location. I am pretty sure
that the NC General Assembly passed a law in 2015 protecting this
monument and others across the state.

You just cannot ingnore the rule of law.

Chip Davis
Raleigh
Message
From: Nathan Garrett
Sent: 10/5/2018 10:56:52 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I strongly favor removal of the statue . However, the citizens who paid to erect it and the citizens who object to its
removal feel as strongly as I do. Therefore, in order to give some satisfaction to both sides, I recommend that the statue
be put back where it was in the same condition it was in when it was pulled down and that inscriptions be placed
at the base stating when and why it was erected and when and why it was pulled down.

Nathan Garrett
(Former CPA, former attorney, former community organizer and former tenured assistant professor at the NCCU
Schedule of Business)
Message
From: Arnold Huskins I
Sent: 10/5/2018 10:57:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Preserve and protect Silent Sam Memorial in its entirety

Dear UNC Board of Governors:

As a retired US veteran, a retired VA employee and a native Tarheel, I urge you to preserve, in its entirety, the "Silent
Sam" memorial to our past North Carolina veterans and to insure it does not become vandalized again.

Without this memorial being obscured or hidden away, I would like to see it protected and preserved in a location with a
perimeter metal fence to prohibit it from being vandalized and destroyed. It does not have to remain in its present location
but in a location where the public can view this memorial and place flowers at its base.

I am appalled that the University Police and the law enforcement officials of local municipalities allowed this egregious act
of vandalism of this historic veterans memorial to occur. I urge those responsible to be penalized to the fullest extent for
allowing this criminal act.

I hope the Board of Governors will do all in its power to preserve this memorial to these past North Carolinians who did
their patriotic duty and served the state when called to do so .

Thank you for your time!

Sincerely,

Dr. Arnold M. Huskins


Major, USAF, Retired
Message
From: samuel franklin
Sent: 10/5/2018 10:58:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: my support for Silent Sam

Dear UNC Board of Governors,

I wish to write in support of maintaining the Silent Sam memorial to Confederate alumni in a prominent
location on the UNC campus. This monument recognizes the service of many decent and honorable young
alumni whose death was the ultimate sacrifice in defense of their belief in a free form of government based on
self determination. The desecration of this monument by UNC students and outside agitators is a stain on the
reputation of the University. UNC has a duty to promote civil discourse between people of different
viewpoints. We should never yield to anarchy and mob rule.

Thank You,
Dr. Samuel Clay Franklin Jr.
Class of 1986, 1991
Message
From: Carson Foard
Sent: 10/5/2018 12:00:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Holt:

Thank you for providing this forum for comments re 'Silent Sam'.

I recommend that the 'Silent Sam' statue be repaired as required, reinstalled on its original pedestal,
in its original location, and be surrounded by a fence in an appropriate style, preferably black wrought
iron, permitting a clear view while protecting against further unlawful actions on the part of anyone
with mayhem in mind.

Had 'Silent Sam' been properly protected by the University when this debacle began, we would not
be in this unfortunate position .

While I imagine this is not a situation you anticipated at the time you accepted the position of
Chancellor, I am sure that you will understand that a truly liberal arts University such as the proud
institution at Chapel Hill can and must tolerate and nurture widely varying points of view based on a
full and accurate presentation of facts. As a Native North Carolinian and an alumna from some years
past, I am proud of the growth and progress of my alma mater since the mid-20th century, but I am
dismayed at the uber-liberal direction it has taken in recent years. I know that many others share my
concern.

The current political environment is not conducive to rational discussion of the many facts concerning
slavery in America and the Confederacy that have a bearing on the fate of our Southern
memorials. As a UNC student recently said, "I don't know much about history, but I sure don't like
Silent Sam ." Our history has been weaponized by people whose goal is to stir dissension and
division amongst Americans; the "Take 'Em Down" groups around the South have openly socialist
goals and international trolls are actively participating in the effort to denigrate not just the South's
history, but that of all America, through a barrage of inflammatory soundbites and activism tinged with
violence.

'Silent Sam' can be viewed as a teaching opportunity. North Carolinians are certainly not opposed to
progress and improving our already considerable stance in life, but we are opposed to shaming and
erasing our history. The lack of factual knowledge about the United States in the 19th Century is
astonishing but can be remedied; what is far more dangerous and disturbing is that anger,
intolerance, sneering denigration, and a truly remarkable sense of self-righteousness accompany that
lack of knowledge. As Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. once said, "There is nothing so cheap and so easy as
retrospective self-righteousness", yet presentism abounds in our universities' history departments and
fosters exactly these attitudes.

At least seven of my ancestors were Confederate soldiers; three died in the War. Some were
slaveholders; others weren't. I have no apologies for any of that. History is how we arrived where we
are today; if one single thing - one event, one day, anything - had happened differently, we would not
have had the same outcome. This history includes the need of the South to commemorate its
catastrophic loss of fathers, sons, brothers, family, and friends.
Citing slavery as the primary cause of the Civil War is not accurate; that is a long and detailed
discussion, so I will simply make that statement and welcome the opportunity at any time to go over
the facts that support it. Those facts will lead to the conclusion that students who feel 'Silent Sam' is
a symbol of racism are not fully versed in the issue. Their time at UNC would be an excellent venue
for clarifying this.

I hope you will take my comments into consideration as you deal with this issue. I will appreciate your
recognition that the history of the United States is complex but the purpose of 'Silent Sam' is simple:
to commemorate the lives of 287 UNC students who died in a failed effort for independence, and who
would have once again become U.S. citizens had they survived. Clearly, there is nothing threatening
or discomforting about 'Silent Sam', and students who have been led to feel that way can be relieved
of such a sad burden .

Anne Carson Foard


BA, University of North Carolina, 1965
MBA, New York University, 1978
MFA, Fontbonne University, 2012
Message
From: cjs@cjohnsonsheffieldcpapc.com [cjs@cjohnsonsheffieldcpapc.com]
Sent: 10/5/2018 12:20:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Advocate: Put Silent Sam in his place and leave him there. (ID:4C4DA24501EDE776)

UNC Board of Governors:


UNC Board of Trustees:
UNC President Margaret Spelling:
UNC chancellor carol Folt:
I hope ya'll are doing well today.

I am writing to advocate for each point of emphasis below, both individually and collectively for all of
the fo77 owing :
1. Return silent Sam to his place on campus at UNC CH.
2. IMMEDIATELY Returning Silent Sam to his place on campus at UNC CH.
3. Prosecution to the fullest extent of the law for each and every offender and law breaker.
4. Discipline law enforcement for 'just standing around collecting a pay check and watching the law be
broken and public (ie my) property being destroyed.
5. Do not give in to mob rule, EVER.
6. Make the offenders pay the bill for the damage done.
7. IN my opinion a majority of the citizens of the USA, NC, Duplin county, and little two stop light
Warsaw, are fed up with the likes of the liberals: I see easily identifiable similarities between silent
Sam's treatment and Judge cavanaugh's treatment in his confirmation fiascoes as examples of inappropriate
behavior: For examples:
7a. ruthlessness
7b. lawlessness,
7c. selfishness,
7d. mob actions,
7e. illegal actions,
7f. waste of taxpayer dollars,
7g. "I count and you don't",
7d. etc.
8. Admitting more qualifying NC Students who are NC Residents, whose parents pay the income taxes to fund
public education system that you manage, and who are probably more likely to have NC values and are
potentially more likely remain in NC and share the benefits of our investments in their UNC-CH
educations.

C. Johnson Sheffield, CPA


BSA Eagle 1966, James Kenan High School (Name sake family for Kenan Stadium) 1968,
UNC- CH 1973
Public Servant: Town Board, chamber of Commerce, Rotarian, Scout leader, voter, taxpayer, etc.

we Like what we Do and we Like to Help You!


The firm of C. Johnson Sheffield, CPA, PC
REDACTED, Warsaw, N. c. 28398-0895
office: REDACTED and Fax REDACTED
Message
From: David Henkel
Sent: 10/5/2018 12:23:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: NC Troops

what you have allowed is tantamount to communism and intolerance. I am ashamed.

Charles D. Henkel, LTC (Ret)

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Carson Foard I
Sent: 10/5/2018 12:35:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Additional comment for Chancellor Holthe

Thanks again for making this forum available for comments.

I am adding a second brief comment on how startling it was for a North Carolina Presbyterian to be
accused by Governor Cooper of "idolizing" Confederate memorials. We are rarely accused of
"idolatry"; more often of being boring.

What a remarkable remark! Respecting and honoring our history is how I would put it, and even he's
not impressed with that, "idolizing" is really a stretch.

I admire Governor Cooper's energy and concern for our State, but I am dismayed by this slam at
those of his North Carolina constituents who respect their history and have every intention of
continuing to respect and memorialize their ancestors, whether they won or they lost the greatest
debate in our country's past.

In addition, NC AG Josh Stein recently referred to our State's history as a "dark time in American
history"; in effect, he believes it should not be memorialized in any way. If AG Stein, not a North
Carolinian, cannot accept our history and live in the present among North Carolinians who are proud
of that history and don't make 'presentist' value judgements about it, perhaps he would find another
State more to his liking.

Anne Carson Foard

BA, University of North Carolina, 1965


MBA, New York University, 1978
MFA, Fontbonne University, 2012
Message
From: Paul Barefoot [barefootstlc@embarqmail.com]
Sent: 10/5/2018 12:50:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam Thoughts

From: "Paul Barefoot"·


To: "uncmonument" <uncmonument@uncedu.com>
Sent: Monday, October 1, 2018 7:11:30 PM
Subject: Silent Sam Thoughts

Hello. I think Silent Sam is looking a peaceful place. I would like to see it mounted on whats left of the
Turner bridge on Neuse river south of Smithfield. This is the bridge that the 20,000 Confederate
forces crossed on way to Bentonville, only to retreat back across it days later. Hardly anyone knows
the history of this bridge or it's where abouts. Check my video out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oU N DOH E4YgM&t=31 s


Message
From: Paul F. Williams
Sent: 10/5/2018 1:01:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam suggestion

Since the statue is an artwork, it could be displayed as such in Ackland. No matter how much material is provided to
explain its context if it is displayed outdoors it will be visible from a distance without the necessity to consider the
contextualizing material. As a display in an art museum the statue will be viewed only at close range where the
explanation about the statue becomes part of the display.
PF Williams
MBA 1973
PhD 1977
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/5/2018 1:28:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: FW: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
9.19-962-.1586

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,::,i' ;::,:: *::: :if, :�e,:*:: :::. :r:� :r i:. �:

From: Martha Copp·


Sent: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 6:06 PM
To: public@bog.northcarolina.edu; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>; Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

Dear Chancellor Folt, UNC Board of Trustees, and UNC Board of Governors,
I am a UNC Chapel Hill alumna concerned about how UNC is handling the "Silent Sam" monument problem. I
would dearly like to see UNC Chapel Hill Trustees, the BOG, administrators, faculty, staff, and
students exhibit courage and leadership to create a bright line between the university's present and future
mission and the school's past support for, and tacit endorsement of, white supremacy.

I read a recent issue of the Daily Tar Heel (Friday, September 28, 2018) and agree with Dr. Sherryl Kleinman's
reasonable proposal. An exhibit in Wilson Library or another campus location explaining the racist origin and
toppling of "Silent Sam" on the UNC campus would be the most appropriate educational response. The actual
statue should not be exhibited anywhere on campus because it serves no educational purpose. It was erected for
the purpose of intimidation and to celebrate white power and dominance over African Americans (a reason
that the United Daughters of the Confederacy erected monuments throughout the South long after the Civil
War).

The same issue of the DTH had an excellent front page story about Kenan Mem01ial Stadium. I was surprised
and appalled to learn of William Rand Kenan Sr.'s participation in the 1898 Wilmington Massacre. This
information needs to be widely acknowledged. It's clear that the university's history is rife with those who
owned slaves, supported white supremacy, or committed violent racist acts (such as Kenan Sr.). A permanent
exhibit at Wilson Library (or another appropriate location) should document UNC's racist past. It cannot be
hidden or forgotten. Until this history is openly acknowledged and processed as an educational tool, UNC
cannot claim to be a university where all are equally welcome and respected.

Sincerely yours,
Martha Copp
MA (1987) and PhD (1993), UNC-CH

REDACTED
Johnson City, TN 37601
Message
From: Marshall Bowden Jr.
Sent: 10/5/2018 2:06:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocation of the Confederate War Memorial

known as "Silent Sam"


1. In Wilson library in the Southern History Collection as it is Southern and it is History. A history of the meaning of
the Memorial should be added.
2. South Building in the foyer. Again with a history of the meaning of the Memorial. South Building being built
partially by black slaves aids in presenting the history of the University.
3. Placed outside near the Carolina Alumni War Memorial between Phillips and Memorial Hall. The Carolina Alumni
War Memorial all ready tells the history but additional information can be included.
4. Placed in the NC State History Museum in Raleigh. The monument tells a part of NC History.
Thank you for the opportunity to give input. I was introduced to Silent Sam in August of 1976. UNC representatives did
not present the Memorial as a white supremist or jim crow era memorial. He was presented more as a joke. I
understand the symbolism that it really represents and believe that it should be removed. Silent Sam has been outside
in Mccorkle Place for over 100 years and he has not hurt anybody. Please save him!

Marshall Bowden Jr, BS Pharmacy, Class of 1981


Sent from Mai l for Windows 10
Message
From: Roy B. Brock
Sent: 10/5/2018 2:44:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent Sam

As a 1960 graduate of UNC, and a veteran of US Army [54-56] I will suggest storing silent Sam in a windowless basement
on the backside
of the Campus. He was on the wrong side protecting slavery! Replace his place with a statue of the late William Friday.
roy brock
Message
From: Aaron Honeycutt
Sent: 10/5/2018 3:01:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a NC c1t1zen I would like silent Sam put at a place of civil War History such as Bentonville
Battlefield in Four oaks. It DOES NOT belong on UNC's campus as a celebration to the many who fought to
maintain slavery in the south. The place of honor it has held at UNC is shameful and does not represent
who North Carolinians are now in 2018.

Thank you for offering me a chance to share my views.

Mary Honeycutt
Pittsboro, NC
Message
From: Linda PARKER
Sent: 10/5/2018 3:05:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whomever is receiving comments and suggestions on the future of "silent Sam":


The violent and inexcusable tear down of silent Sam has saddened me on many levels. It is a wound that
will stay with me forever. Although I feel certain you would not replace it where it has stood for these
many years, that is where he THis would be belongs.
My preferred suggestion would be to place Sam on a pedestal in the old Cemetery. There he would "rest"
along with other departed souls in a dignified and solemn environment.
My next preference would be to place Sam on a pedestal in a safe but prominent location in Wilson
Library. The advantages of this location would be that he would be safely secured each night and
generally would be out of sight and mind except for those of us like myself who choose to see him. He and
whatever people think he represents could be studied and researched, since this is the purpose of the
Library.
whatever you decide, I beg that you do not hide or lock him up out of sight or otherwise obscure him from
those of us who respect, honor and learn from our history.
Linda Parker
Message
From: James L Chavasse
Sent: 10/5/2018 4:17:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

For God's sake, leave the stature of Silent Sam where it is. Don't give in to a bunch of ignorant bastards
(including faculty) who think it is a memorial to slavery. It is not. It is a memorial to Carolina alumni who
died in a war. Nothing more. The police were there, and what I want to know is who gave the order for them to
do nothing until it was too late. The chancellor?

When I was at UNC I never heard the first word of complaint about the memorial. We got some amusement
about how he got his name but no complaints. Tell those rabble-rousers to go to hell.

Jim Chavasse
UNC '49
Message
From: Sheila Exum
Sent: 10/5/2018 4:30:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam and any other civil war heroes/honorees/tributes should be placed in a "Look how far we have come"
park. Something like the Korean Conflict/War in Washington, DC. In addition statues of the first Black student to attend,
the first black person to graduate. Statues for the first Native American, Asian, and Hispanic students to attend and to
graduate should also be erected. We are one of the oldest universities in the nation. So of course we are going to have a
Civil War History which should not be erased. However, the truth needs to be told. As an African-American graduate of
UNC and the mother of a sophomore at UNC I can honestly say that I love my UNC. Please find a way to settle this in an
honorable way.

Sheila Exum '83


Message
From: mojoowens@twc.com [mojoowens@twc.com]
Sent: 10/5/2018 6:19:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam placement
Attachments: Silent Sam placement

Oops. Forgot name & address.

Jessica Owens
REDACTED
Smithfield, NC
Message
From:
Sent: 10/5/2018 6:18:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam placement

Why not place silent Sam at Fort Macon State Park? The fort itself has both Union and Confederate
history. It has achieved the status of a museum and those who go there are in search of history or
historical perspective and are less likely to protest the placement of a statue. And Sam has become an
actual part of history now with recent developments, which could be detailed with a plaque at the site.

History cannot be denied and should not be rewritten to assuage our consciences. Sam's placement at Fort
Macon is appropriate.
Message
From:
Sent: 10/5/2018 6:50:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

This just baffles me, how the the south, can go to war in order to secede from
the U.S. gove r nment in order to maintain s l avery, lose the war and want to e r ect statutes
and monuments and want to keep a confederate flag. Where in the history of the world has
this ever happened? These people should have been tried for treason and shot.
silent Sam is an insult to Black students and no Black athlete should represent UNC
in any sport until this statue is gone forever.
Quincy Jones
wake Forest, NC
Message
From: Peggy Su llivan
Sent: 10/5/2018 7:56:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Location

My suggestion of final resting place for Silent Sam would be The Bennett Place in Durham, NC.

Is there a reward for the winning suggestion?

Get Outlook for Android


Message
From: Marietta Sh lien
Sent: 10/6/2018 7:59:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a proud graduate of UNC Graduate school. I was fascinated with the history of the south and the
university surrounding the campus. Whether you ag ree or disagree with the politics of history you respect
this history. People flock to Europe to see the history whether they agree or disagree with the monuments
or ruins they represent. They do not destroy them or remove them. Who is running the university? Who is
representing and protecting this history whether you agree or disagree with the history they represent?
Remember, these student protesters and destroyers of history are only passing through! what happens when
all statues and historic buildings
are removed? Who or what will relate the history of this university and all it represents?
Message
From: Joseph J. Moyer
Sent: 10/6/2018 12:16:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam-Resubmission

I re-read what I sent to you on Tuesday 10-3-2018, and I would like to make a few minor corrections that I will
add in Red below, that clarify my note.

I would also like to include part of what I wrote to Dr. Folt, because I got a canned response to my E-Mail to
her.

"P.S. I do not know what all you might say at the rededication of SS, but it is more than appropriate to address
the Daughters and Sons of the Confederacy in the following thought process. I am sure the Daughters and Sons
of the Confederacy have meant to do a lot of good for the South, but is high time that we remove all elements
and views of the Confederacy and it's thought from Southern life, hence both of these groups should rename
themselves to be Sons and Daughters of the Civil War, and devote all of their efforts to doing good for the
communities they are in, and cease desist from any Confederate viewpoints and activities. The same can be said
for the Confederate Flag, it is time to never display it again except in museums and in re-enactments."

We feel strongly that the South/former Confederacy must make a more determined effort to remove all views
and beliefs of the Confederacy, because it is high time that they fully rejoin the Union of States, the United
States of America, and such actions we state above are very necessary. With UNC taking such a stand and very
verbally saying so can be a very motivating force for other Southern Universities doing so as well as hoping this
view crawls deeper into the Southern viewpoint.

In a recent article to the News & Observer opinion page the writer makes the point that at the time of the Silent
Sam design stage the designer attempted to ameliorate the Confederacy effect by having Silent Sam be depicted
in Civilian clothes not in uniform. Since the UNC alumni fought in one of the two combatant sides of the Civil
War, albeit on the losing side, one could use that opinion writers thought to suggest that Silent Sam could be
used as a Civil War Monument, to remember all those who fought and died in the Civil War.

Yes Silent Sam was erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy but NC was a Confederate state, hence it is
history, albeit not very good for NC and UNC, but should not be forgotten by making Silent Sam vanish to
some sight where it will not have the impact it does being on the UNC Campus as a Civil War monument,

My wife and I (both born in Pennsylvania) say this in our belief that Southerners by now have changed and
certainly reject all the views held by the Confederacy at that time. Therefore it should not offend Southerners
and as far as Black Americans go they can be angry about being slaves but they should also recognize that
Slavery was not invented in the USA and that most Blacks were sold into slavery by their own Chieftains,
hence; it is more important that they recognize that Slavery was abolished as a result of 600,000 mostly white
soldiers losing their lives in the Civil War.

And my wife and I hold no rancor about this situation, my family did not come to America until the early
1900's but my wife's side has been here a long time, she is a Member of the Daughters of the American
Revolution and the National Society, Dames of the Court of Honor. Her great grandfather Captain Andrew
Lewis (Pennsylvania 11 Regiment) died of wounds received in the battle of Gaines Mill

I recently wrote an article that was published in the Sept. 16 edition of the News & Observer suggesting that if
Silent Sam were rededicated as a Civil Wat Memorial. It is as follows:

"As long as Silent Sam remains a Confederate Monument it will be lightning rod for protests. The Confederates
basically started the Civil War, and Silent Sam represents all of what was wrong with Confederate views, and it
is part of our sordid history. The Daughters of the Confederacy wanted to honor the UNC alumni who fought
and died in the Civil War.

Hence; if it is rededicated as a Memorial to all those who served and died in the Civil War we have a Memorial
that we can all agree is appropriate, and be proud of what the Civil War accomplished. A plaque that reads "On
this date xxx, this statue is being re-dedicated as a remembrance to all who served in the Civil War and the
600,000 who died to abolish slavery. A reunited America did not send the slaves back to Africa but gave them
citizenship" should be added to the pedestal on which Silent Sam stands.

This action along with a UNC Website that allows questions and discussion about the Civil War, along with
postings from Faculty and any authority on the subject should provide a means for students to better understand
all aspects of the Civil War, and would be a great means of acquiring knowledge not in the curriculum of
UNC."

We think the Website is very important in that it will allow questions and answers to pertinent issues pertaining
to the Civil War period and should be able to defuse any issues that may still come up on the Campus.

Thank you for your consideration of our proposal,

Sincerely Yours

Madeline and Joseph J. Moyer

I re-read what I sent to you on Tuesday 10-3-2018, and I would like to make a few minor corrections that I will
add in Red below, that clarify my note.

I would also like to include part of what I wrote to Dr. Folt, because I got a canned response to my E-Mail to
her.

"P.S. I do not know what all you might say at the rededication of SS, but it is more than appropriate to address
the Daughters and Sons of the Confederacy in the following thought process. I am sure the Daughters and Sons
of the Confederacy have meant to do a lot of good for the South, but is high time that we remove all elements
and views of the Confederacy and it's thought from Southern life, hence both of these groups should rename
themselves to be Sons and Daughters of the Civil War, and devote all of their efforts to doing good for the
communities they are in, and cease desist from any Confederate viewpoints and activities. The same can be said
for the Confederate Flag, it is time to never display it again except in museums and in re-enactments."

We feel strongly that the South/former Confederacy must make a more determined effort to remove all views
and beliefs of the Confederacy, because it is high time that they fully rejoin the Union of States, the United
States of America, and such actions we state above are very necessary. With UNC taking such a stand and very
verbally saying so can be a very motivating force for other Southern Universities doing so as well as hoping this
view crawls deeper into the Southern viewpoint.

In a recent article to the News & Observer opinion page the writer makes the point that at the time of the Silent
Sam design stage the designer attempted to ameliorate the Confederacy effect by having Silent Sam be depicted
in Civilian clothes not in uniform. Since the UNC alumni fought in one of the two combatant sides of the Civil
War, albeit on the losing side, one could use that opinion writers thought to suggest that Silent Sam could be
used as a Civil War Monument, to remember all those who fought and died in the Civil War.

Yes Silent Sam was erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy but NC was a Confederate state, hence it is
history, albeit not very good for NC and UNC, but should not be forgotten by making Silent Sam vanish to
some sight where it will not have the impact it does being on the UNC Campus as a Civil War monument,

My wife and I (both born in Pennsylvania) say this in our belief that Southerners by now have changed and
certainly reject all the views held by the Confederacy at that time. Therefore it should not offend Southerners
and as far as Black Americans go they can be angry about being slaves but they should also recognize that
Slavery was not invented in the USA and that most Blacks were sold into slavery by their own Chieftains,
hence; it is more important that they recognize that Slavery was abolished as a result of 600,000 mostly white
soldiers losing their lives in the Civil War.

And my wife and I hold no rancor about this situation, my family did not come to America until the early
1900's but my wife's side has been here a long time, she is a Member of the Daughters of the American
Revolution and the National Society, Dames of the Court of Honor. Her great grandfather Captain Andrew
Lewis (Pennsylvania 11 Regiment) died of wounds received in the battle of Gaines Mill

I recently wrote an article that was published in the Sept. 16 edition of the News & Observer suggesting that if
Silent Sam were rededicated as a Civil Wat Memorial. It is as follows:

"As long as Silent Sam remains a Confederate Monument it will be lightning rod for protests. The Confederates
basically started the Civil War, and Silent Sam represents all of what was wrong with Confederate views, and it
is part of our sordid history. The Daughters of the Confederacy wanted to honor the UNC alumni who fought
and died in the Civil War.

Hence; if it is rededicated as a Memorial to all those who served and died in the Civil War we have a Memorial
that we can all agree is appropriate, and be proud of what the Civil War accomplished. A plaque that reads "On
this date xxx, this statue is being re-dedicated as a remembrance to all who served in the Civil War and the
600,000 who died to abolish slavery. A reunited America did not send the slaves back to Africa but gave them
citizenship" should be added to the pedestal on which Silent Sam stands.
This action along with a UNC Website that allows questions and discussion about the Civil War, along with
postings from Faculty and any authority on the subject should provide a means for students to better understand
all aspects of the Civil War, and would be a great means of acquiring knowledge not in the curriculum of
UNC."

We think the Website is very important in that it will allow questions and answers to pertinent issues pertaining
to the Civil War period and should be able to defuse any issues that may still come up on the Campus.

Thank you for your consideration of our proposal,

Sincerely Yours

Madeline and Joseph J. Moyer


Message
From: Laura Hoxworth
Sent: 10/6/2018 2:46:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Move Silent Sam to a museum where it belongs

As a UNC alum, a North Carolina native, a UVA employee and Charlottesville resident and a lifelong
southerner, I have been steeped in confederate history and the many passionate opinions surrounding it for
years.

As a graduate student currently studying the history of higher education, I know that historical figures and
events are complex and nuanced. It is critically important to remember where we came from, but history
deserves to be judged with context and grace.

Here, the context is not forgiving. As our own faculty research has proven and Chancellor Folt has said: "Based
on everything we know, there is no question that the monument was erected during a period where white
supremacy, bigotry, and racism were a strong message that was conveyed publicly by those who supported the
symbolism of the artifact and spoke at its dedication."

There is a clear difference between a historical artifact -- displayed with context for the purpose of education --
and a monument, displayed on a literal pedestal in a public place to signify honor. Silent Sam stood at the
entrance of university for more than a century, signifying honor and support for white supremacy, bigotry, and
racism to everyone who stepped foot on campus.

Because UNC missed many opportunities to act proactively, we're now forced into making a decision. As a
member of university administration myself, I respect the need of university leadership to stand on the side of
law and order and condemn activists pulling down the statue. I also respect that there is no easy decision here.
Of course, doing the right thing often isn't easy.

There are many, many more ways to honor our veteran alumni than placing this single statue back on its
pedestal. I believe that UT-Austin can provide a positive example of how to remove a confederate monument
from a position of prominence and place it within the correct context: on display as the historical artifact it is, so
we can all learn from our complicated history and work toward healing together.

You have an opportunity to use this critical juncture to stand with your community -- the students, faculty, and
Chapel Hill community who have made their thoughts and desires abundantly clear -- instead of folding to
threats and pressure from wealthy donors and North Carolina residents who value the elevation of this single
artifact over the well-being of the faculty, students and alumni who make UNC what it is.

You have an opportunity to make a decision that will undoubtedly go in the UNC history books for students like
me to read about for centuries to come. I hope that you will find the courage to make the right one.

Laura Hoxworth '11


Message
From: Jim Berry
Sent: 10/6/2018 5:24:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Where does it end?

Dear UNC Leadership:

Several conclusions may be drawn from the "Silent Sam" episode. Already, you have changed
attribution for Kenan stadium and some are saying that "Tarheel" must also go.

Oh yes, and we are not yet hearing from the Native American contingent. After all, "we"
slaughtered their ancestors, left bodies to rot, stole their land and imprisoned survivors and their
future generations on "reservations" where the preponderance remain in poverty even
today. Theirs is a far more painful history than the enormous benefits now enjoyed by those
whose ancestors were forced from primitive tribal lands to work in America, descendants of
which now enjoy the comforts and opportunities of modem society. (What parent does not
envision a better life for his children?) Africa is a bit like heaven, much talked about, but no
one wants a seat on the next bus!

Sixty years beyond my college days, a first question would be, "How do today's students have
time to ponder anything other than the next class or the last exam? Have academic standards
declined or are non-students fomenting dissatisfaction?

Has the current generation been victimized by maturing in an era when "a trophy for all" to
ensure no one's feelings are hurt? Are we raising a generation that believes their lives will
always be gentle and forgiving, a group unequipped to deal with inevitable adversity-including
the demands of war, the need to defend the right of free speech (for which they now appear
unable to accept, much less defend!).

What is the responsibility of a University to its students, it's community, it's Country? I submit
it is not to bury history, to pretend that it didn't happen. Rather, a University should, in addition
to training future leaders and patriotic citizens, expose its students to the sorts of conflicts and
contrarian views that will be foremost in their lives the very moment they step foot off of
campus and into the first job.

Thoughtful1 y,

Jim Berry
Professional Engineer
Colonel, USA (Retired)
REDACTED
Raleigh
Message
From: Bill Williams
Sent: 10/6/2018 5:35:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To Chancellor Carol Folt and the UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

These are sad days in Chapel Hill. It appears that the University is determined to adopt a policy based on the
views of the loudest and sometime lawless. If the University yields to such pressure you can be assured you will
quickly have more of it.

Of the Confederate monument, it appears to me that the faculty is seeking to assume greater influence than it is
entitled. The University of North Carolina does not belong to the students, faculty, donors or staff including the
whole of Administration. The University belongs to the citizens of North Carolina period. The same people who
just a few years ago took upon themselves a debt of more than one billion dollars to support new construction
on campuses of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill was a significant beneficiary. That is a significant
sacrifice for a population of people who have a median family income of $50,343 (2017). I do not think that the
same group would approve mob rule be installed on the campus in Chapel Hill. As a fact a recent poll of
citizens of North Carolina found that 70 % of those polled were in opposition to the destruction of the
Confederate monument.

It is hard to have confidence in the Administration when there are members of that Administration who tend to
display a negative feeling regarding the monument.

The Confederate monument has not injured anyone. There are those who claim great harm. Not a one of those
or any faculty member (particularly faculty) were alive when the Confederate monument was put in place. All,
including in particular the faculty, came to this University voluntarily. Had they felt the kind of hurt that is
being displayed now they would have never have come. That is particularly true of a freshman who was
involved in an earlier demonstration the first few days of her enrollment.

University officials speak of the current location of the monument to be offensive because so many students
HAVE TO WALK by it every day. Outside of the Forest Theater it is probably impossible to find a place where
fewer students, faculty and administration trod.
As far as the argument concerning safety is concerned: Yes, it could be unsafe if the University allows mobs to
run wild and then have the police back away as was shown in a WRAL-TV report. It is evident from a reading
of a number of emails made available on the WRAL TV website that there was an attitude of retreat prevailed
during the demonstration which ended in bring down the monument.

We have to return to the day when the University does not seem to be owned by faculty, administration,
students and members of the Chapel Hill community who in most numbers have voluntarily moved to Chapel
Hill since the monument was put in place.

In conclusion it is essential that the Confederate monument be returned to its original place on the campus. Any
yielding to the loudest and/or most violent group will not be greeted with praise but with an escalation of such
demonstrations which will not be restricted to Civil War monuments.

Sincerely,

Bill Williams'62

Wilson, NC
Message
From: Moreton, Elizabeth Olive [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =5E399234B 70E44D68C3 60A2731690B4E-ELIZABETH O]
Sent: 10/6/2018 5:58:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Memphis finds legal loophole to remove Confederate statues

can we sell the land to a non-profit?


https://nypost.com/2017/12/21/memphis-finds-legal-loophole-to-remove-confederate-statues/

Elizabeth Moreton
emoreton@email.unc.edu
Message
From: Eunice Brock
Sent: 10/6/2018 6:36:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: SIient Sam

chancellor Folt:
I think "silent Sam" should be returned to its original place and plaques put up to explain (1) that it's
purpose was to honor the 372 alumni who died in the civil War, (2) that the statue represents a poor
young soldier-not a general on a horse (poor young men fight on the front lines and their officers and
generals at the rear, if at all,) and (3) that it is a beautiful piece of art by one of the best
sculptors of the time.
If we do not return the statue to its original location, we are succumbing to mob ru l e.
Eunice Brock
chapel Hill
Message
From:
Sent: 10/6/2018 7:03:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: comment on Silent Sam

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the statue's removal.

I first moved to Chapel Hill for graduate school in 1989 in the Department of City and Regional
Planning. I had to walk by Silent Sam every time I was traveling between DCRP and Franklin
Street. Apparently people tried to make light of it by repeating some misogynistic myth about how the
statue would react to virgins--that is a fairly strong argument for removal by itself.

As somebody that grew up in the north, I tried to take a respectful, albeit, uncomfortable view of the
commemoration. During the time I was in graduate school, three extremely disturbing racist events
occurred. One was the vandalism attack against an African-American woman who had been elected
(if I recall correctly) homecoming queen. I was deeply shocked. The second was the showing of "Do
the Right Thing" by Spike Lee. During the moderated discussion afterwards, an African-American
woman exclaimed that the only thing wrong with the film was that more white people didn't die in
it. The third was after graduation, when I went to dinner with a friend and her family to
celebrate. Her father saw an interracial couple at the restaurant and exclaimed about how disgusting
it was.

I held my tongue for all of those events. I lived for several more years in Chapel Hill, including my
time in law school, but I rarely walked by Silent Sam anymore. Let me tell you about another statue--
the one in Charlottesville that "inspired" the white nationalists to descend on the college town where I
had done my bachelor's degree. When I read about the disgusting weekend, saw the video of haters,
and learned of the murder of a young woman, I was absolutely horrified.

Then Trump refused to condemn the KKK or Nazis or any of the other disgusting groups there. Ever
since his campaign of deeply racist comments about Mexicans, Africans, African-Americans, and
Muslims, we have witnessed every racist in this country come out of the woodwork, emboldened to act
on their vilest prejudices and fears. THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHAT TRUMP HAS
DONE AND WHAT THE NAZIS DID IN GERMANY TO DISTRACT THE DOvVNTRODDEN FROM
THEIR ECONOMIC PAIN BY TELLING THEM EVERYTHING WOULD BE BETTER IF WE JUST
GOT RID OF THE_ _ _ _ "OTHERS".

NOBODY needs a Confederate statue on a university campus to learn about their history--the citizens
and visitors of North Carolina need to learn about the Confederacy in the context of a history museum
or under the guidance of a history professor. Monuments should be for heroes and if by some
horrendous fate UNC-Chapel Hill is forced to return that statue, it better be placed next to an
ENORMOUS plaque explaining that the majority of Confederate leaders and soldiers were fighting to
defend their EXPLOITATIVE way oflife. I also encourage you to require every UNC undergraduate
student to watch Ava Duvernay's "Thirteenth" documentary as part of their orientation.

Very few things have made me prouder to be a Tar Hell alumna than reading on Twitter about the
toppling of Silent Sam! As I heard a retired law professor remark, "they should have pretended it got
lost in the flooding".

sincerely,
Julie Locascio
http ://www, linkedin, com/in/ju!iefocascfo
http://www, tricks!nca ptivity, com
Twitter @Ju!ie_Locascio

-----Original Message-----
From : UNC General Alumni Association <alumnimail@unc.edu>
To : pomba27 <pomba27@aol.com>
Sent: Tue, Oct 2, 2018 1 :02 pm
Subject: Out of the Blue : After Florence, Friday Center Shelters Hundreds; Field Hockey Stadium Named for Coach; Late
Night With Roy on Oct. 12
Message
From: Chancellor [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=34BE32522A4549BCB309FDDAD4DE781A-SOUTH_CHANC]
Sent: 10/6/2018 8:04:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: FW: Positive Idea for Silent Sam

Elizabeth A. Williams
Assistant to the chancellor
919-962-1586

-----original Message----­
From: Jnewbanks
Sent: Saturday, October 6, 2018 6:52 AM
To: chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
subject: Positive Idea for silent Sam
Dear chancellor Folt
I am a UNC alum, class of 1984, and a former member of the marching and basketball pep bands. Typically
I supply my ideas under an alias, but as UNC is one of my alma maters (the other the University of Notre
Dame), I write under my true identity. For the record, my ideas have been adopted by others; but, I
receive no credit as I never wished any.
To the point of Silent Sam. Instead of relocating Silent Sam, what if the quad was reinvented into a
statue garden? Silent Sam has many histories on the UNC campus, including the one to which I was taught
on a new student tour - he's searching for virgins and nobody ever discussed the American Civil War,
racism, etc. The plaque on one side, if placed on any other war memorial, would never be found
objectionable. It is also fair and reasonable for the University to recognize fallen alums - even from
the American civil war.
To diminish the impact of a single statue (no matter where it is placed) add statues for other wars, but
also add statues for our alumni, such as those that fought for civil rights or were pioneers in medicine,
science or renown for other reasons. But no benefactors, per se.
Turn the quad into a garden celebrating the alumni of UNC. Not necessarily their policies. while it is
regrettable that one individual gave a hateful speech at Silent Sam's unveiling, I do think it is
reasonable to believe that some, maybe many or most, simply wanted a memorial to those that they loved
and lost. This is the way that I always saw Silent Sam, and the virgin thing. For the record, to the
best of my ancestral knowledge, my family would have been in the ohio River valley during that war and
none fought for the Confederacy, so I do not have some personal attachment to this topic.
I will admit that I do not understand those that feel anguish from something that occurred 150 years ago,
the civil war, I do get that many have been victims of recent racism. I do not feel that silent Sam
necessarily represents current racism as we can document racism in multiple directions, including against
whites - although I have never personally experienced it.
I recognize that no matter what you or a committee choose to do, some will find your decision to be
objectionable. Frankly, there are many things that UNC has recently done or does today that I find
objectionable. But I shall leave those for another day.
John Newbanks
REDACTED
Charlotte. NC 28226
BSBA '84
PS - While I have never been a benefactor of UNC of any consequence - my sons attended elsewhere and so
did my money - if such an idea above were adopted, I would be happy to pledge to support it financially.
I would imagine that it would take years, if not decades to fulfill such a vision. And in just 3 more
semesters, I won't be sending my money to u of sc. Yay!
sent from my iPad
Message
From: David Ward
Sent: 10/7/2018 8:29:41 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Return the Silent Sam monument

The University must respect free speech of all people, not just those who shout loudest and are willing to resort to
vandalism and other crimes to promote their interests. Silent Sam has a long tradition among Carolina faithful, most of
whom I suspect never considered it a memorial to slavery or other ideals of the Confederacy. The monument
remembers all of the University's sons who fought in the Civil War on either side of the conflict. It is a monument to
people who lived and died for their own versions of free speech one and a half centuries ago. It is NOT a glorification of
slavery or any other ideology.

Modern thinking is appalled by much of what humans have done to each other over our history, centuries of
institutionalized slavery being among the worst. But, we must remember that past decisions were made by generally
well-meaning people applying the mores of their time. Humanity's spirit of decency has evolved, and will continue to
evolve. That fact does not give us the right to change history, or remember only the parts that fit within our modern
belief system. Past decisions, including the bad ones, are historic facts created by people of bygone ages; people of
today are not responsible for those decisions. Recognizing that historic figures did not always do things "right" by
modern definitions helps us to anticipate and avoid such atrocities again, hopefully. We lose perspective and knowledge
when we ignore or paint over our true history.

Let us not allow a few loud protestors to control the University. Return the Silent Sam monument to its long-held place
near Franklin Street to continue one of the smaller, but important, traditions of our University's life. This action also will
uphold a broader tradition, namely the recognition that all voices and opinions are welcome at the University of the
People!

David R. Ward, CPA


Class of 1966
Message
From: Catherine Dean
Sent: 10/7/2018 10:02:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument silent sam

To whom it may concern:


I would like to see the monument returned to it's place, BUT with a monument of equal size of the woman
mentioned by Ju li an Ca rr at his dedication speech, the woman who was "horsewhipped unti l her dr ess hung
in rags" for disrespecting a black woman placed beside him. If people REALLY want the confederate
monuments to be used for educational purposes (I hear they do, to justify the monuments), the best way to
do it would be to put monuments of their victims right there so we can see the truth.

Catherine Dean
Message
From: Kimel-Scott, Karen [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =B5EE9Al 1DBC64DD697D6421FC6 7C876E-KKI MEL]
Sent: 10/7/2018 2:18:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exc hange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello!

I wanted to share my thoughts. I was signed up for a feedback session however I was unable to attend.
I was an undergraduate at UNC and now a faculty member. For my patients, my students, my faculty colleagues at this
point Silent Sam represents its racist history, from the stories from the original dedication to the current national
debate. Silent Sam if it must be put back up somewhere per NC law it should be put up within a building or museum
where the proper histo ry can be put into context.
The context should include: The history and stories of Confederate soldiers that the monument originally represented,
the statues dedication and the effects of Jim Crow laws on UNC/Chapel Hill and surrounding areas, the contribution to
UNC by slaves. There was a beautiful partial list with the names of slaves that built and wo rked on UNC buildings that
was published by the library. A display where all of this could be displayed to truly help us understand and celebrate our
collective history.

Thank you,
Karen Kimel-Scott

Karen Kimel-Scott, MD
Message
From: White Bob [bob.white@umontreal .ca]
Sent: 10/7/2018 3:01:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I heard about plans to return silent Sam to his previous location.


As a UNC graduate and as a concerned citizen with regards to very sensitive issues about racial history
and gender dynamics in our country, I think that moving this monument to its original position would be
sending a horrible message to students and residents of the university community.
Bob White (International Studies and Anthropology, 1988).
Bob White
Bob W. White, Ph.D.
Departement d'anthropologie
Universite de Montreal
https://umontreal .academia.edu/Bobwhite
Message
From: Jim Berry
Sent: 10/7/2018 7:08:57 PM
To: ettaaberry@aol.com; scottcberry@aol.com; bberryl@ec.rr.com; Jim Boswell [drjtbos@gmail.com];
equipco2000@gmail.com; davidourso@cox.net; jeanniealbarado@gmail .com; wpberry65@gmail.com;
tunegal@juno .com; UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Everyone should know about this!. .. Why is not more commonly known, taught in school?

Try this: https://www.voutube.com/watch?v=60pmScMUMc4

If it does not work, type: youtube, Everyone must know about this before it is deleted ... Why is
the US government always truing to hide it. Click on the one 33 minutes long.
Message
From: Tom Giduz
Sent: 10/7/2018 8:23:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf37 49272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Tom Giduz, M.D., P.A.


REDACTED
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27517

October 7, 2018

Dear Chancellor Folt,


I an1 a UNC alunmus, '79 and '84, and a lifetime resident of Chapel Hill. Silent Sam has
been in my life for 60 years. I was a child when civil rights protestors staged sit-ins across the
street from Silent San1 in front of the post office and were arrested and carried off the sidewalk
in handcuffs. Interestingly, Silent San1 was not a part of those protests. As an undergraduate in
the late '70s, the only attention that we gave Silent Sam was to joke about why his gun was
silent. It is a good sign that attention is now being turned to the powerful history surrounding
the erection of the statue.
History isn't always pretty, but the University has an ongoing responsibility to accurately
report it, not to editorialize it or try to change it. Whether the University chooses to place the
statue back on the pedestal in Mccorkle Place or move it somewhere else, the history of the
University and the town in the early 1900's must be accurately reported. Wherever Silent Sain
goes, he must now take with him the inscribed history of segregation in the town of Chapel Hill
and the University, and a biography of Julian Carr. Students, alunmi, and townspeople will
then be invited to stop, read, and be educated regarding the University's painful past.
I would further suggest that this education should not stop with a statue in Mccorkle
Place, but similar inscribed history should be placed outside Kenan Stadium. It is important all
students and alumni at the University be told the truth about the magna11imous generosity of
William Rand Kenan, Jr. and the fact that his father was a racist and murderer. Similar histories
can be placed outside of many of the other University classrooms and dormitories nained after
racists.
Again, the University's mission is not to re-write history or worse, cover it up by
changing the naine of a building or hiding a statue. The nlission of the University must be to
educate its students, and the citizens of the State, as to what life at the University was really like
for everyone in its first 2 centuries.
Sincerely,
Tom Giduz, MD
Message
From: Kathy VandenBerg
Sent: 10/8/2018 7:11:23 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam idea - truth and reconci liation

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Use Silent Sam as part of a truth and reconciliation monument garden, relating to the Civil War, or better yet to
the history of Civil Rights on campus. Take him down off his pedestal. Put a big tree or a fountain where he
stood, and do a sculpture garden or some other art installation on the main quad. Include a written history of
Sam on plaques explaining the plight of southern soldiers and their families; the creation of the statue (why and
when); the national protests of Confederate symbols; and finally the attempt at reconciliation with this new
installation. Put in other statues, the same size, of slaves, a Union solider, women, children, the first black
student, MLK, Dean Smith, Nelson Mandela. Acknowledge lynching. Make UNC a leader in the national
effort to heal racial pain.

I would donate to this cause.

Sincerely,
Kathryn VandenBerg
UNC B.S.N. 1986, J.D. 1991
Message
From: Michael Schell
Sent: 10/8/2018 8:33:42 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: UNC Confederate Monument

Suggestion for how to handle the Confederate Monument at UNC.

1. Silent Sam must be restored somewhere on the UNC campus.

2. Use this opportunity to construct an additional monument or monuments to all sons and daughters ofUNC
who have served in the nation's wars. Put the new monuments in a courtyard, and include in the courtyard the
Silent Sam pedestal and statue. There is no reason the Civil War should be the only one recognized on campus.
Surround the courtyard with a wrought iron fence that is maybe 3-feet high. The courtyard needs to be large
enough that people cannot touch the monuments, but as they walk around it, can read all of the inscriptions.

3. The courtyard has to be deemed a safe space with appropriate warning signs. The public should not be
allowed inside the fence. There have to be arrests and significant penalties for anyone who violates that.

4. The new monuments need to be tasteful, not some abstract design that won't stand the test of time. Obelisks,
similar to the Joseph Caldwell monument might be appropriate, but they should not all look the same. Have
separate ones for the 19th, 20th, and 21st century wars. Leave space for the future too. Make sure there are
inscriptions for every major conflict, probably beginning with the War of 1812. For the Civil War, also
recognize the Union military if any UNC grads fought for that side, and I'm guessing some did.

5. The courtyard doesn't need to be in McCorkle Place, but it needs to be on North Campus in an easily
accessible space. It shouldn't be hidden in the woods either if any still exist on North Campus.

6. Silent Sam was in McCorkle Place for over 100 years. If the monument is moved, plant grass there.
Stipulate that nothing can be placed in that area for another 100 years. Do not replace the Silent Sam
monument with anything that is the least bit controversial.
Message
From:
Sent: 10/8/2018 9:49:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument

Fol ks,

LEAVE THE MONUMENT & HISTORY ALONE. REMOVING history is a DISSERVICE to future generations an an act of
fascism and flies in the FACE of EDUCATION. Get out of bed with communist affi l iated, Soros funded,
America hating Black Lives Matters, ANTIFA and the NAACP and LEAVE OUR MONUMENTS ALONE! ! !

Thank you,
Capt. Phil Walters
Message
From: Ed Caldwell
Sent: 10/8/2018 10:18:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave it where it has proudly stood for decades! History is the past, it's over. It is to be remembered and
respected.
Those who seek to change history are fools. George Washington wore a wig on special occasions - that
doesn't make him a transvestite.
I studied under the finest of History Professors at the University. They taught us how to think - not what to
think.
Am I a bit angry - yes indeed - with reason.

The information in this email and any attachment(s) is/are confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the
addressee( s).
Access to anyone else is unauthorized. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible
to deliver
it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly
prohibited. If this message has been sent to you in error, do not review, disseminate, distribute or copy it. If you are not the intended
recipient, please delete this email.
Message
From: Marcia E Herman-Giddens [meherman.go@gmail.com]
Sent: 10/8/2018 11:06:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Please do NOT place Silent Sam on campus

Please do not place Silent Sam anywhere on campus. There are many reasons for this. A
primary and practical reason is that it will continue to be a target of vandalism no rnatter
where it is. I for, for one, do not want my taxpayer money going to police and security to
protect it.
I believe it would be best put in a civil war site such as Bentonville Battlefield. Where ever it
is put, it needs to be accompanied by a statue having to do with slavery and interpretive
text.
I have standing for my opinion. I have 2 degrees from UNC and am adjunct faculty. Two of
my children have degrees from UNC. My great-grandfather graduated from UNC in 1854
and went off to fight in the Civil War. Furthermore, a cousin of mine served as the model for
a "Silent Sam" type of memorial that is in another county in North Carolina. It needs to be
removed as well.
Thank you for considering my opinion.
Marcia E. Hennan-(:riddens, PA, M"PH, DrPH
Adjunct Professor, Gillings School of Global Public Hcalth, UNC, Cbapd Hi.11
Scientific Adviser, Tick-borne Infections Council ofN01th Carolina, Inc.
REDACTED, Pittsboro, NC 27312
Olfice REDACTED
Message
From: Bob Blair [bblair@b lairmarketing.com]
Sent: 10/8/2018 11:16:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: Ideas for the UNC Confederate Monument

Last Friday, I sent my ideas about the UNC Confederate Monument to you. I apologize for putting an earlier
draft revision in the text of the email rather than the most current version which was attached. Please let me
know if you need further clarification.

Bob Blair
blair(a)blairmarketing.com

On Fri, Oct 5, 2018 at 12:35 PM Bob Blair <bblair@,blairmarketing.com> wrote:


Below and attached are some ideas and thoughts about how to reshape the UNC Confederate Monument in a
way that reconciles and unites.

Bob Blair

434-851-5200 (m)
blair@,blairmarketing.com

Text of idea message attached and below:

Re: Ideas for the UNC Confederate Monument

Let me offer some ideas and thoughts about how to reshape the UNC Confederate Monument
in a way that reconciles and unites.

Encouraging people to thoughtfully express themselves and listen to other opinions has long
been part ofUNC's heritage. Just as Lee and Grant shook hands at Appomattox, finding
common ground can unite us. I suggest we foster conversations and "handshaking" with a
three-part approach to a new Confederate Memorial.

First, let's restore the existing monument in the same area of campus out of respect for those
who feel that it honors values such as duty and sacrifice to protect homeland and family. The
location can be adapted to include new statues.

Second, add a new statue, a Union soldier, much like "Silent Sam," an enlisted man in
uniform. Both soldiers convey the value of duty to protect home and country. Ordinary soldiers
may have been victims of "powers that be" or experienced the brokenness of humanity within
the culture of the day.

Third, point to progress made since the end of the Civil War by adding two life-size figures of
present-day soldiers sitting on a bench together, looking at each other ... shaking hands. Place
the new statues in front of the two larger statues within a circle representing "common
ground." Put multiple benches nearby to encourage people to sit down, talk and discover
common ground ... or simply agree to disagree respectfully.

Such an approach to upgrading the UNC Civil War Monument would be costly. Yet the
investment would be well worth it given the divisiveness now in our society. A message of
reconciliation is much needed now, plus an endorsement of the need for freedom of expression.

I recall standing by "Silent Sam" in 1966 during the "speaker ban" era listening to Herbert
Aptheker speak to students from the sidewalk on Franklin Street. I was not impressed by
Aptheker' s speech, but I was impressed by my university that allowed this gathering to
demonstrate the wrong of banning personal expression, including faulty notions.

Speaking of meaningful demonstrations, I also recall standing silently on Franklin Street with
other silent demonstrators to protest the Vietnam War. We were respectful, and I believe we
made a difference. Again, such was the nature of our university community.

War is not simple. Like the War in Viet Nam, the Korean War, World War I and II, and the
War Between the States, war is complex and very disturbing. But good can come from such
bad experiences. In spite of the brokenness of humanity, some people in opposition engage in
positive ways and even "shake hands." Let's memorialize and encourage such behavior with a
new and improved UNC Confederate Monument. The timing is so right, and I want to be proud
of Carolina again.

I have more thoughts about reshaping the UNC Confederate Monument. Please let me know if
I can help. I have left out something important - slavery. This very important consideration
deserves due treatment. So much so that perhaps it warrants another monument that is
somehow connected to "Silent Sam." For now, I we focus on restoration of the UNC
Confederate Monument.

Robert (Bob) Jackson Blair


Class of 1968
Message
From: Mary Beth Grealey
Sent: 10/8/2018 11:35:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Leadership Team,

This is a long statement, but context is important. I wrote most of this the day after the statue came down.
Thank you for reading the entire piece.

25 or so years ago, I lived in Selma, Alabama for 4 months, working on a movie. It was a presidential election
year, so the annual commemoration of the 1965 marches from Selma to Montgomery was a big one. Candidates
and luminaries were all there and I walked across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. That bridge is unique in that you
can't see what's on the other side until you're two-thirds of the way across. That descent affected me deeply,
quietly walking up one side and seeing the chaos on the other side when it was too late to tum back. The
difference being, the chaos I saw that day was just news cameras and crowds vs. police dogs and billy clubs.

I took my teenagers on a road trip this summer. We went to Atlanta and visited the Center for Civil and Human
Rights and the Carter Center. We went to Sunday school with President Carter in Plains and then we went to
Selma.

Haunted Selma. Block after block of 150 year old houses, unsellable. Then block after block after mile of stick-
built run down houses, some with no windows, unescapable. Downtown mostly dead, again with antebellum
hotel, mill, stores, all closed, only a few bright spots. Usually when a downtown is dead, the outskirts hold all
the big box stores. Not Selma. A Dollar General, a Wendy's and a few others. Selma has done everything it can
to recover - there are memorials and museums everywhere.

From there we went to Montgomery and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which has documented
lynchings throughout the South. Every county that is documented has a stone with names on it. Orange County
is there, Wake County is there, and there are six names on the Chatham County stone. Every American should
visit that memorial and walk through and down into this dark history.

I bring all this up, because I'm thinking about intent. The historic record behind the placement and dedication of
Silent Sam is an ugly one, one that's difficult to brush aside with platitudes. It's a mangled description of one
population's experience, based on bigotry. The Montgomery memorial (calling it the lynching memorial hurts,
but that's what it is) documents actual events, perpetrated to cause terror on a very different population.

Personally, I'm cool with Silent Sam coming down, in whatever manner it happened. The statue's purpose was a
form of terror, like lynching. It's worth noting that the last person on the Chatham County stone at the memorial
was murdered in 1921, eight years after Silent Sam was erected. The question I pose to folks I discuss this with
and to you, now, is: Is it more important to stop terrorizing POC today or to commemorate the deaths of men
long gone who fought for a cause on the wrong side of history?

Silent Sam should be melted down and renewed as a memorial to the times we, as a society, got things wrong.
There's great opportunity here, don't mess it up. And you might consider a visit to Montgomery, as research.

Sincerely,
Mary Beth Grealey
Message
From: Caryl Price
Sent: 10/8/2018 11:38:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam future

Hello, I am a long-time resident of chapel Hill and have always had a problem with silent Sam. But it has
only been recen tl y that I've become so upset that the statue stood on a public, state university campus.
I'm grateful that it is no longer there, and am sorry that it took protesters to make that happen, and
that the University itself could not find a way to make it happen sooner.

My opinion is that the statue should go inside a museum, or other similar place, and that the history and
speeches made around it should be posted with it as a powerful learning tool and example of what we
should NEVER do again.
Thank you,
Caryl Thomason Price
Message
From: Susan Dalton
Sent: 10/8/2018 1:29:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Bennett Place in Durham

can you please relocate silent Sam to Durham? Bennett Place seems like a great site. It does not belong
on the UNC campus.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: lcrayton
Sent: 10/8/2018 2:35:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam

Ladies & Gentlemen,


Restore silent Sam to his pedestal at Mccorkle Place,
Terminate the employment of chancellor carol Folt,
Expel any students involved with the illegal destruction of silent Sam
Prosecute all outside agitators involved in this outrageous vandalism.
STATE LAW REQUIRES SILENT SAM TO BE RESTORED TO HIS ORIGINAL LOCATION.
REPLACE HIM AT MCCORKLE PLACE AS REQUIRED BY STATE LAW.
Margaret Crayton
Mt Pleasant, NC
Message
From: K Larese
Sent: 10/8/2018 6:42:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Please add my name to your list ofUNC alumni who DO NOT WANT Silent Sam returned to his old spot.

Respectfully yours,
Karen Larese
UNC-CH '88
Message
From: Capowski, Joseph John [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d lb68b524c234 7348254f2d8eb 7 c076f-ca powski]
Sent: 10/8/2018 8:27:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam suggestion letter
Attachments: CapowskiSilentSam-10-05-2018.doc

Attached is a letter about Silent Sam, based on a


very similar experience in Budapest
Joe Capowski
To: Decision makers on the future of Silent Sam
uncmonument@unc.edu
October 7, 2018

From: Joe Capowski


capowski@email.unc.edu
REDACTED

As a retired faculty at UNC, former mayor pro tern of Chapel Hill, and
long-time
resident, I have followed the Silent Sam story with great interest. I
realize that your decision will be difficult and will not satisfy everyone.

I write to describe a very similar situation in Budapest, Hungary that I


believe was resolved well. I worked at the Semmelweis University
Medical School in Budapest in 1980, and have returned there ten times
sinc e. I must preface this story with the firm statement that in no way
am I promoting communism.

When World War II ended, the USSR government, headed by Jozsef


Stalin, ruled Budapest and placed many statues within the c ity. The
largest was an enormous statue of Stalin that was finished in 1951, and
torn down by Hungarian citizens during the failed 1956 revolution.
X
Also placed in the city were many statues of the communist leaders
Lenin, Marx, and Engels, as well as statues that promoted government
power, friendship between Russian soldiers and Hungarian workers,
and the benefits of a communist society.

In addition, names of streets, town squares, and metro stations were


changed to promote communism. A large majority of Hungarians -- but
not all -- detested the communist control and the icons that
represented it.

In 1991 when communism fell, the city had to decide what to do with
these statues. A group of historians with a commercial interest,
proposed a park named "Memento Park" on the outskirts of Budapest,
which would permanently display the statues and tell the story of that
era. The park does not promote communism, rather wishes to preserve
historic artifacts. The park is located about three miles from the city
center, close enough to be reached easily by public transit, but distant
enough so that the city's citizens do not see the statues in their daily
lives.

It worked. The park has become a tourist and education attraction. As


years pass, the park becomes more valuable, because today, assuming
that a person starts to
sense the concept of government at age 10, Budapest has reached the
point where less than half of its residents have ever experienced
communism, and that fraction continues to decrease.

The website of the Budapest park is mementopark.hu, though in my


opinion, the website does not present the park very well.

Applying the Budapest experience to Silent Sam, placing him in a park


of Confederate monuments some distance from Chapel Hill, might be a
satisfactory solution.

Thank you so much for all your efforts on this issue.


Message
From: Larry Hill
Sent: 10/9/2018 10:49:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam/The Original Tar Heel

As a lifelongNorth Carolinian, it's really disgusting that anyone at UNC would attempt to
cover up their complicity with taking down, Silent Sam, the Original Tar Heel, by now asking
for public input on how the monument to the Greatest UNC students, should be handled.
Chancellor Folt, and the UNC Administration did nothing asNorth Carolina law was being
broken, now UNC is attempting to further their illegal activity by appropriating an authority
that is not contained inNorth Carolina General Statutes 100-2.1.

From reading the "North Carolina General Statutes 100-2.1. Protection of monwnents,
memorials, and works of art", it's very clear thatNO ONE at UNC has the authority to decide
the faith of the Original Tar Heel/Silent Sam. It is also very clear the statue should be returned
to its original location at Mccorkle Place. This is what the majority ofNorth Carolinians want
and expect, even Chancellor Folt referencing a recent poll stated over 70% ofNorth Carolinians
want it returned to Mccorkle Place.

UNC used to be very respected by manyNorth Carolinians, unfortunately, Honor, Courage and
the rule of law have been completely discarded atNorth Carolinas flagship university. When
UNC authorities allow people like Dwayne Dixon to participate in illegal activities without any
repercussions or being terminated by the university, it really dishonors all the great men and
women ofNorth Carolina.
It's time to obey the law and restore the Original Tar Heel, Silent Sain to its original position of
honor. It's what the people ofNorth Carolina want and expect.

Larry Hill
REDACTED
New Bern, NC 28562
Message
From: Elizabeth Dunnagan
Sent: 10/9/2018 12:43:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam monument

Remove silent sam from the UNC campus. He is a symbol of racism. If you do not want to destroy the
monument, place it on a confederate battlefield and give it the correct context, including that it was
placed on the campus during Jim Crow.
Message
From: Nora
Sent: 10/9/2018 12:50:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

I attended and graduated from UNC as Political Science M.A. student, from 2016-2018.

The "Silent Sam" statue's prior presence on campus severely undermined students' ability to learn in
an unbiased and safe environment. I am glad that the statue has been removed from its former
location.

I feel extremely strongly that the statue does not belong anywhere on UNC's campus. In addition to
the high potential for physical violence, were the statue were to be reinstated on campus grounds, it
would continue to threaten UNC's stated dedication to "leading change to improve society and to help
solve the world's greatest problems." Silent Sam's history on campus is inextricably tied to white
supremacy, and its installation was a direct attempt to gloss over the racist motivations of the
American Civil War. There is abundant evidence for this statement within the speech given during the
statue's original placement on campus
(https://exhibits. lib. unc. edu/fi les/original/c1160e4341 b86794b 7e842cb042fb414. pdf - page 9C
provides a particularly explicit illustration of the racist motivations).

Leaving the "Silent Sam" statue on campus would reinforce this revisionist history. It is particularly an
affront to African American members of our campus and community, but also an attack on everyone
who recognizes the importance of acknowledging the past truthfully so that we can evolve and
improve.

In "Silent Sam's" former place, I personally endorse installing a statue that commemorates people
who endured and fought back against racial violence. However, I firmly believe that this decision
should lie in the hands of their descendants.

UNC has an opportunity to stand up to racism and revisionist history, and to work towards healing
and equity. I hope that UNC will choose the latter, and I will refrain from making any financial
contribution to the university until that time.

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Nora Weber

Nora Weber
Message
From: Rebecca i
Sent: 10/9/2018 1:23:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I wish I had a good suggestion for where to put the statue, but I do not. I agree that it should not be put back in
its original location. Perhaps there's another outdoor spot where it can go, that is not so public?

Thank all of you for the opportunity to comment, and my very best wishes solving this problem.

Rebecca Carpenter
Class of 1975
and current Chapel Hill resident
Message
From: Melissa Weider
Sent: 10/9/2018 1:46:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Return statue to previous location. Do not reward protesters that destroy property. If there is to be a
change, it should be done in a lawful way. The University and State of North Carolina can not establish
the precedent of taking the law into your own hands and rewarding mob rule.
Thanks for asking,
Melissa Weider
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Michael Ledbetter
Sent: 10/9/2018 3:04:51 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam
Attachments: scv Image (9).jpg; mclscv90517- Yahoo Mail .html; IMG_0753.MOV; Cleveland County Confederate Monument,
Shelby_ Military and Veterans Memorials_ The American Legion.html; mclccbc917.html; mclscv18e.jpg

I have attached some short letters and pictures for your consideration and review. Your support of the
protection of our Heritage is most appreciated. Sincerely, Mike Ledbetter
Michae!L. ..

"/ahoo Mail ~-S~e~a-rc~h~M~a-il~~-S~e~a-rc~h~W~e~b~··-J !Account Info Gd,Go I


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2. I)gtls(t) Toi"Kevin" <kevinm1957@aQ +
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Confederate Statues,monuments, grave markers, symbols, and protection of same*-scope of problem

I am a concerned citizen that wishes to thank the Commissione rs for this opportun ity to offer feeback for your consideration . My disclaimer is stated at the end of th is letter
which includes my personal demographic information for statiscal purposes. Selected contacts within the Federal government felt this to be important to know how to properly
analyze the information to engage the proper departments and agencies. My personal contact information will be located there. It is my hope that I am a part of the "silent
majority" that does not on many occasions use their voice in government. This is my first.

President Trump has not been too elequent in the defense of the right to free speech or the right to peaceful free assembly (with proper permits). I will not try to defend radical
groups who wish to use violence, death and destruction to achieve their aims and purposes.These groups exist on both the "Right" and "Left". It is a National Tragedy
recording the (9) people that have died in first, Charleston and then, Charlottesville. I see this issue as more a need to enforce the Rule of Law and the support of our law
enforcement officers to be sure that order within our country is maintained. Those sworn professionals want to go home at night to their families. It is not fair to them to be given
the task of enforcement of law without resonable means of protection. I personally know of a situation where a previous President called up Federal troops to assist our (out of
State) law enforcement resources which were deployed in a flood zone due to a hurricane where the majority of the people were minorities. Federal troops were there to help
prevent looting. They were with assult rifles but with NO BULLETS. We also do not need to have students in a unruly protest when less than lethal force can be used by
modern training to have excessive force be used like the case of Kent State where several students were killed.

It seems that we are loosing the Respect for authority which is a great concern to our law enforcement especially after our last Presidental election cycle recorded the situation
where extreme "Left" groups insited crowds to become mobs and caused several law enforcement personnel to loose there lives in several states. We do not want to see th is
practice escalate. None of us want this activity to come to our hometown. However, if history has taught us anything, people who use violence, death and destruction of
property to achieve their radical aims and purposes usually cannot be satisfied through APPEASEMENT. At the expense of between 40-50 Million deaths worldwide, it took the
full might of the free world for the Allied forces to defeat the Axis forces in World War Two.

Aloi of people cannot express their opinions on public record because the ability to speak for the orginaziton is given by "public information officers usually at a higher level
within the "chain of command." No-one wants to be given the impression that they live in a bad place. Locally, a few decades ago, local radical groups clashed in protest at
Greensboro, NC that eru pted in open gunfire whereby several people were killed . Such people found "sane" to stand trial should be prosecuted by the State and if found guilty,
be sentenced as the criminals that they are. So, the question remains:"where do we go from here?" and "where does it stop"? The silent majority by its outcry is beginning to
take notice. However responsible public officals should not in my opinion over react at the expense of our core values, principles, and moral codes. This includes "equal
protection under the law".

My short (3 minute) presentation in summary requires no public response or formal motion in the fact that currently the statue located on the old county court house location is
on land owned by the county and thereby under its juridiction subordinate to State law which protects such statues against defacing, sale, removal, relocation or destruction.
Separate from that law, it is my understanding from local supervisory level law enforcement that any damage to property generally estimated above $1,000 is considered to be
,.,. folr.n\l In c-r.mo c-t,.,,toc- it ic- ,-,.,.,,llor-1 "m,.,,li,-,.hor.1 ,c- mic-,-,.hof'' It ic- m\l 11nrlorc-t,.,,nrlinr1 th,.,,t tho 1,.,.,..,.,.,,1 c-t,.,,t, 10 ,,.,,.,,c- oro,-,.tor-1 h" tho 1,.,.,..,.,.,,1 ,-,.h,..,,ntor r.f tho I lnitor-1 n,.,,, 1r1htorc- r.f tho
property anymore. History in general holds that if the mistakes aren't remembered, then; they are prone to be mistakes repeated. Wise people inside and outside High School
have not forgotten that lesson. Our common task is to eliminate confusion, clarify mistakes, and find common goals so as to move foward as a "melting pot" of people with the
hope of success as a free nation.

If the radical "Left" were to get their way and have the effect of trying to rewrite history, I predict that it will only make the extreme "Right" more angry. The two people so far
charged in the mu rders to date of (9) people are described by the media as belonging to "white supremeist groups" I will not name them wh ich are a matter of public record. So
far multiple injuries have been impacted on the public and we are tired of them running a mock. Many States (as does the Federal government still allows for capital punishment
for crimes up to and including first degree Murder (case of Timothy McVey-Kansas City). The Federal government has if necessary or if on federal land or builsings can
prosecute criminals under Federal "hate Crimes law. Hopefully the states will do !hair job on property and not require Federal oversight like was required in the south when
Kennedy has to use Federal troops to restore order in (2) southern states in the Sixtes. We do not need to revisit the 1968 Presidential cycle of our history where race riots in
Chicago and Los Angeles resulted in people killed.

So, why does it matter? It is a larger subject than our monument. It involves: (names of in part) schools, libraries, parks.roads, national highways,mil itary
bases,cities,dams,other public works, bridges, counties, state flags, battlefields, musemums, license plates,cemetaries, and plaques at our military academies like West Point
and Annapolis. Also, our National Registry of National places could be affected for statues and monuments. However recent activity has shown new additions. This would still
be an avenue to protect our local monument if it meets State and/or Federal standards for recognition under the National Registry for historical monuments and statues(under
the National Park Service within the Department of the Interior). This would be a better option than that which is by a request for action at the White House for protection as a
National Monument under the "Antiquities act. The petition has not gotten enough signatures presently to have the President to respond. The main problem why I would not
sign such a petition is that a National Momenment is usually a large tract of land like a National Park or National Forrest owned by and under the control of the Federal
government requiring additional resources that might take away the attention to larger threats like the war on drugs and terrorism. I do not see such an expansion as a modified
law getting through congress.

Currently, according to the Wikipedia internet electronic encylopedia an article titled "List of monuments and memorials_of the Confederate States of America states that among
the 47 pages with small font size and over 500 footnotes that there are over (1503) symbols (excluding confederate flags of all variations and State flags) and (2600) markers
for the Confedercy among (33) states which is above the (11) states that left the Union. One reason that recognition is so prevalent in Northen states is that POW soilders that
were injured , died and were buried up North had Northern people give them memorials including Confederate Memorials.Also, after the "era" of Reconstruction and southern
people who lost their land,and thereby wanted to resettle up North became good citizens of their new towns and had their heritage and legacy recognized up North.

I consider it a National tragedy that a man like Robert E. Lee who embodies the description of a "southern gentleman", considered by scholars at West Point to be one of the
five best military minds of all times , a man which is (as recognized by congress) a US veteran and citizen, a man whose land is the home of our National cemetary) a man who
instructed his troops to: (quit fighting, go home and be good citizens) has had attempts to soil his good name. I am grateful that the Federal government is not presently
considering removing Statues from our National Parks or the Treasury department thinking of removing him from postage stamps. He simply attempted to do his sworn duty as
,.,, ,.,.,._;1,..,1,.,.,.. I+;,...,.., r-li"'..-"',...,;,..,,. +,.,. him ,..,,....,.,i in""'",.._..,.;.,,, ;,._..,+,._ +h.,.. 1\.1,.,,+i,.,. ... D,-,..,_"',.._..,,+1., fh,-,,..,.. f,..,.,.,..,_;,.,..-. .-. .... +;,...,...,... ,...+ill ,.,..,_,..,.,.._,...,,,;""'7,,. "'"''+h.,...-n ""''"'"'''""""'"'+,... ,..,lfh,.,.,,,...h +h,.,.., ..-.,,-,,. in"'''"'"'+;,,,...,.,.._..,, +h,.,.

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Message
From: Catherine Crum
Sent: 10/9/2018 3:14:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,
I join many others in hoping you will take the silent Sam statue down. Permanently.
The statue is a reminder of painful truths that persist in our nation with regard to race.
In my opinion, it is in no way fair, just, or welcoming to keep the statue up.
Thanks for inviting the public to comment on silent Sam's future.
c. Crum 1990
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 10/9/2018 3:24:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
CC: Linda Ashman (Jackson) [lindaashman@gmail.com]
Subject: Confederate Monument

Chancellor Folt,

We're writing in response to your email soliciting comments about the future placement of the "Silent
Sam" monument. Please add our names to the many others who do not want the monument returned to
its prior location on the UNC Campus.

As Chapel Hill residents, we believe that all who live here should have a say in whether this divisive symbol
should remain standing in the heart of our community. Although the monument is on UNC property, it is
inextricably associated with the Town due to its visibility and prominence at the Franklin Street entrance to
campus. A tribute to Confederate soldiers-dedicated with an offensive speech by Julian Carr, a white
supremacist-is antithetical to the values of respect, equality, and inclusiveness that the Town advocates.

In addition to the moral argument, the statue's presence is a risk to public safety and a financial burden to
both the University and the Town. Due to the increasing number of public protests, Town residents have
had to pay for the additional police presence and crowd control while dealing with the inconvenience of
periodic street closures and traffic issues. In addition, as parents of a UNC student, we're concerned about
the safety of the campus community and alarmed at the cost to the University-according to one
estimate, $390,000 for the year ending in June 2018.

Although we agree that the monument has historical significance, it does not belong at the front door of
our community or this university. It should be moved to an indoor location-perhaps a Civil War museum
or display-where it can be placed in the appropriate historical context, one that fully represents the tragic
history of slavery in our state.

Sincerely,

REDACTED
Chapel Hill
Message
From: Michael May
Sent: 10/9/2018 8:37:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Orange County court continues Silent Sam protesters' trials I News & Observer

Respectfully - Michael May

"Make a Commitment to Making a Difference"

From: Michael May ,


Date: Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Subject: Orange County court continues Silent Sam protesters' trials I News & Observer
To: .. . . ..

Next the mob will attack the UNC library and burn Civil War books and search for their authors. Just like the
"brown shirts" in Nazi Germany.

https:/hNw\v.newsobserver.com/news/loca1/counties/orange-countv/article2 l 9662990.html
Message
From:
Sent: 10/10/2018 10:34:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Loeser, Richard [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=2a69f7a672474888b417ce949d530433-Richard Loe]
Subject: Silent Sam

chancellor Folt: Thank you for seeking input regarding the controversial silent Sam Monument. As a twenty
plus NC resident and four year resident of chapel Hill, I have many thoughts and feelings about the
Confederate Memorials issue. I have ancestors who fought on both sides in the civil War. Honoring family
history and regional heritage is very important to me. The civil War was and is still a central event in
our country's history and must be recognized as such. We can't erase, and certainly shouldn't, cover it
up and we can't forget it, so it seems to me that we need to devote an area to its history. The silent
Sam statue should be placed in this area and not be displayed on the campus of the flagship of the UNC
public education system. Yes, the statue was erected in respect to those descendants who fought
"honorably" to maintain their family and regional history, but it's a system founded on slavery. There
is absolutely NO place in the United States of America where slavery should be in any way, shape or form
recognized as a positive value. Allowing these monuments to stand in public places, sends a not very
subtle message that there is a group of people who believes in the ideals and practices of the old
south. This is morally bankrupt and evil. Whenever I, a white American, see these memorials I feel
embarrassed and ashamed. can you imagine the effect on people whose ancestors were slaves? Please remove
silent Sam. Sincerely, Cathie Heck
Message
From: Parsons, Eileen R. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=15B24FD9C0574A2E8F4A8A3FA17221CE-EILEEN R PA]
Sent: 10/10/2018 11:41:29 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument Suggestion

I declared my position, both professional and personal, in a letter written by several Black faculty members at UNC
released in September 2018. The presence of the monument undermines a core set of values espoused by UNC and it
contributes to an unsafe, unwelcoming, and hostile environment and climate. The monument should be permanently
removed from the campus. I suggest NC create a site/ park in Raleigh dedicated to NC history. This park would likely
cover several acres with various monuments and museum structures to feature various aspects of NC history in different
domains and of different regions in NC. The Confederate monument, Silent Sam, could be placed in an area devoted to
education in NC which would explain the various legacies of educational institutions in NC. The park consisting of
several acres of land could be funded by an admissions fee (based on ability to pay) to the history park, hence, providing
an opportunity for citizens to exercise choice.

Eileen R. Carlton Parsons, PhD


Professor, Science Education

Expert Committee, Board on Science Education, National Academies of Science, Engineering, & Medicine
Co-editor, Science Education Policy Section, Science Education
Message
From: Public BOT [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=94FB6385CE9041A19D4DCF447A9D4009-SOUTH_PAPUB]
Sent: 10/10/2018 2:35:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_ com on]
Subject: FW: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

T.J. Scott
S{Jrner:s:, Viet Chancefi{Jr and Secrerorv the t.Jniversitv

Office of Public Affairs


200 East Cameron Avenue, 03A South Building
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
r 919-962-6961 E tj scott@unc.edu

From: Jeffrey Supplee


Sent: Monday, October 1, 2018 8:04 AM
To: public@bog.northcarolina.edu; Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

Dear Chancellor Folt, UNC Board of Trustees, and UNC Board of Governors,
I am a UNC alumnus and have been following how the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill responds to
the "Silent Sam" monument problem. I hope the university will demonstrate courage and leadership in
separating the university's present and future mission from its historical support for and tacit endorsement of
white supremacy.

I recently read the Daily Tar Heel (Friday, September 28, 2018) and agree with the reasonable suggestion
proposed by Dr. Sherryl Kleinman. An exhibit in Wilson Library or another campus location explaining the
racist origin and toppling of "Silent Sam" on the UNC campus would be the most appropriate educational
response. The actual statue should not be exhibited anywhere on campus. Its purpose was to celebrate white
power and dominance over African Americans (the aim of the United Daughters of the Confederacy).

I also read the article about Kenan Memorial Stadium and was appalled to learn of William Rand Kenan Sr.'s
participation in the 1898 Wilmington Massacre. This information needs to be widely acknowledged. A
permanent exhibit at Wilson Library should document UNC's racist past. Until this history is openly
acknowledged and processed as an educational tool, UNC cannot claim to be a university where all are equally
welcome and respected.

Sincerely,

Jeffrey Supplee
M.S. Geology, 1986
REDACTED
Johnson City, TN 37601
Message
From: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]
Sent: 10/10/2018 2:35:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_ com on]
Subject: FW: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

T.J. Scott
S{Jrner:s:, Viet Chancefi{Jr and Secrerorv the t.Jniversitv

Office of Public Affairs


200 East Cameron Avenue, 03A South Building
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
r 919-962-6961 E tj scott@unc.edu

From: Martha Copp


Sent: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 6:06 PM
To: public@bog.northcarolina.edu; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>; Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>
Subject: Re: educational proposal for "Silent Sam" statue

Dear Chancellor Folt, UNC Board of Trustees, and UNC Board of Governors,
I am a UNC Chapel Hill alumna concerned about how UNC is handling the "Silent Sam" monument problem. I
would dearly like to see UNC Chapel Hill Trustees, the BOG, administrators, faculty, staff, and
students exhibit courage and leadership to create a bright line between the university's present and future
mission and the school's past support for, and tacit endorsement of, white supremacy.

I read a recent issue of the Daily Tar Heel (Friday, September 28, 2018) and agree with Dr. Sherryl Kleinman's
reasonable proposal. An exhibit in Wilson Library or another campus location explaining the racist origin and
toppling of "Silent Sam" on the UNC campus would be the most appropriate educational response. The actual
statue should not be exhibited anywhere on campus because it serves no educational purpose. It was erected for
the purpose of intimidation and to celebrate white power and dominance over African Americans (a reason
that the United Daughters of the Confederacy erected monuments throughout the South long after the Civil
War).

The same issue of the DTH had an excellent front page story about Kenan Memorial Stadium. I was surprised
and appalled to learn of William Rand Kenan Sr.'s participation in the 1898 Wilmington Massacre. This
information needs to be widely acknowledged. It's clear that the university's history is rife with those who
owned slaves, supported white supremacy, or committed violent racist acts (such as Kenan Sr.). A permanent
exhibit at Wilson Library (or another appropriate location) should document UNC's racist past. It cannot be
hidden or forgotten. Until this history is openly acknowledged and processed as an educational tool, UNC
cannot claim to be a university where all are equally welcome and respected.

Sincerely yours,
Martha Copp
MA (1987) and PhD (1993), UNC-CH

REDACTED
Johnson City, TN
37601
Message
From: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]
Sent: 10/10/2018 2:35:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam

T.J. Scott
Executive Assistant to the UNC-CH Board of Trustees &
Clayton Somers, Vice chancellor for Public Affairs and Secretary of the University
office of Public Affairs
200 East Cameron Avenue, 03A south Building
chapel Hill, NC 27599
P 919-962-6961 E tj _scott@unc.edu

-----original Message-----
From: David Robinson
Sent: Saturday, September 1, 2018 1:13 PM
To: Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>
cc: chancello r <chancellor@unc.edu>; Taylor Batten <tbatten@charlotteobserve r .com>
subject: silent Sam
Hello,
I am a 1969 graduate of UNC chapel Hill with fond memories of my time there.
As you consider the disposition of silent Sam I encourage you to think about this particularly divisive
time in our country and the negative impact of putting this statue back in a place of prominence on the
campus.
silent Sam represents both the bravery and sacrifice of the soldiers who died fighting for the
Confederacy as well as the deplorable values of the slave owners who bought and kept blacks in slavery.
While the south lost the civil War there has been a long and painful struggle to entitle the black
descends of those slaves to full participation in the America of today. Many have not yet achieved that
status.
History is important but pub licly honoring the memory of racists does nothing to promote racial harmony
which I think should be a goal of a great University.
I was born in NC, spent many years here and am well aware of the deep anger, and prejudice that many
people hold against blacks.
I ask you not to support the darker side of history.
Regards,
David Robinson
Message
From: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]
Sent: 10/10/2018 2:36:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam

T.J. Scott

Office of Public Affairs


200 East Cameron Avenue, 03A South Building
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
,.,, 919-962-6961 E ti scott@unc.edu

From: Alison Gulley _


Sent: Saturday, September 1, 2018 6:13 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Hopkins,
Kelly Matthews <hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com;
Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>; Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>;
Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>; Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>
Subject: Silent Sam

To the Board of Trustees, I am writing to you as a proud graduate of the UNC Graduate School, employee of
the UNC system, North Carolina resident, and all around southerner, having grown up in Texas. I am asking
you to please keep Silent Sam out of the public eye. Removal to a museum and contextualization within the Jim
Crow era would be appropriate. The argument that removing statues is erasing history is silly. To trot out the
obvious hackneyed example, in Germany there are no monuments to Hitler or Nazism and yet the world
manages to remember what happened in World War II. No one, except for Neonazis and other white
supremacists, argues that the Nazis should be honored for their enthusiastic embrace of and willingness to die
for their ideals. Although many people believe that Confederate monuments are simply signs of respect to
soldiers who fought during the Civil War, in the vast majority of cases--not just in North Carolina but
throughout the south--the statues were erected decades after the end of the war with the specific intent of
resisting any sort of racial equality. During the unveiling of the statue, Julian Carr stated that it was in honor of
those who fought to save "the very life of the Anglo Saxon race in the South" and noted that "to-day, as
a consequence the purest strain of the Anglo Saxon is to be found in the 13 Southern States." He
recalled with pride that he horsewhipped a "negro wench'' for insulting a white woman. At other times,
he praised the KKK and argued that black men should be kept in line with lynchings and public
execution. He was proud to honor the new statue because it represented exactly what his life
represented--a commitment to white supremacy and the debasement of African Americans.

Imagine a student of color encountering the endorsement of white supremacy when walking across
the grounds of a university that purports to value diversity and inclusion--and yes, I truly believe that
returning the statue to its former position is in fact declaring that white supremacy, slavery, and Jim
Crow are worthy of respect. If "history" is really what we're after, pretending that this isn't a monument
to racism is bad history. And the excuse "it's just a sign of its time" rings hollow and hypocritical. If
these monuments are not associated with white supremacy, ask yourselves why the modern KKK
and Neonazis are so intent on keeping them around. In a poll concerning the removal of the Robert E.
Lee statue in Charlottesville, 73% percent of African Americans wanted it gone. Why do you think that
is? Are you willing to embrace the notion that black people just don't know what they're talking about?
The fact that many white people believe that these statue just represent honor for soldiers is no
justification for keeping it. UNC is an institution of higher education and should not make decisions
based on white people's lack of historical knowledge--in this case their ignorance over the original
purpose for erecting the statue.

Again, I ask you to remove the statue to a museum or similar venue where people can go not to
honor those who fought to preserve slavery and, later, racial injustice, but to learn about a painful part
of American history and, hopefully, strive to do a better job in the present.

Sincerely, Alison Gulley, Ph.D.


Message
From: Chris Tacker
Sent: 10/10/2018 3:51:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Melt down Si lent Sam

Dear friends and colleagues,

I ignored Silent Sam during my tenure as a UNC student (B.Sc. Geology 1983), seeing him as no
more than a joke on the chastity of Tarheel undergraduates. Likewise, I grew up in eastern North
Carolina and in Tennessee, where monuments to the Confederacy were commonplace and faded
into the background. I learned the revisionist Southern view of history that played down the
fundamental role of slavery in inciting the conflict, and ignored the racism that permeates Southern
history from the Civil War to today.

I outgrew that ignorance, although many do not. These monuments and mementos of the
Confederate era were erected far after the conflict, not out of grief, but clearly out of the desire to
preserve the White status quo and to promote Jim Crow discrimination and inequity. The UNC
community near and far cannot afford the na"fve belief that the statue is anything but a monument to
the Confederacy, and the chattel slavery and racism that it promoted. It is there to intimidate and
demean every non-White citizen that passes through its shadow.

Once one sheds the romantic nonsense that has grown up around the Confederacy, it can only be
seen as treason against the United States of America. The Confederacy was built around the ideal
that a human being could be bought and sold and deprived of every freedom the Constitution
promises. These were enemies of the United States, of which we are part. The Confederacy is
nothing less than treason against every ideal that exemplifies these United States.

A monument to treason has no place at UNC. A monument to the denial of basic Constitutional
freedoms has no place at UNC. The oldest state university needs to be open and welcoming for
everyone, without a shadow from the mistakes of the past. We learn from these mistakes. We do not
venerate them, or repeat them.

Melt Silent Sam down, and make something better out of the bronze. Don't tuck him away in a
museum or a corner of campus where it can still be venerated by the backward .

My best regards,
Chris Tacker
B.Sc. Geology, UNC Class of 1983
Message
From: Gina Young
Sent: 10/10/2018 4:28:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:


I am strongly in favor of returning silent Sam to his previous location. This is an historic statue
erected in memory of the NC civil war dead. Confederate soldiers have been declared to be legal us
veterans and we should not be disturbing these places of honor. I sincerely wish we would take our cues
from Gettysburg, which has publicly declared that they will not remove any memorials to the civil war
dead, including the ones erected in honor of southern soldiers. The civil War is a fact of history.
The University, by virtue of its age, inexplicably has ties to the civil War that should and can not be
ignored. Respectfully, only citizens of NC and UNC alum should have anything to say about this decision.
Certainly, members of Antifa from out of state should have NO opinion in this matter.
Besides being of immense historical value, silent Sam is a beautiful work of art and an iconic feature of
the campus. It should be returned immediately to its pedestal. I would suggest we encase it in plexiglass
like they have done quite successfully in Mecklenburg county in order to fulfill the "public safety"
requirement of your plan (I would like to add that there wou l d be no concerns for public safety if not
for the mob violence and protests) and I suggest we add a plaque to contextualize the statue. But it
needs to go back where it belongs as the law requires. Thank you,
Gina Young
'78 '93
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Gina Young
Sent: 10/10/2018 4:36:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Written by my friend Wes ...


In the past few weeks there have been quite a few op1n1ons shared about the civil War, Monuments, and
those fallen soldiers whom we remember. I feel compelled to offer my opinion as a Caucasian male born
unto the south who has spent a great deal of time studying this portion of American history. First, to
say the main cause of the civil War was not slavery is ignorant of the history of the lead up to the
civil War. slavery was by far the most prominent motivation for the war. southern states viewed limiting
a State's right to choose to be slave or free would directly affect their representation in Congress and
ultimately threaten their economic impact to the growing nation. Representatives of these southern states
also viewed the passage of Federal laws on slavery as an overreach of the Federal government. The main
cause of the civil War was slavery.
However, in the time before the civil War many Americans viewed themselves as c1t1zens of their home
state first and citizens of the United States second. In many ways, people referred to the United States
as a conglomeration of individual states that make up the Union and not one distinct entity. often times
we see "The United States are ... " representing the plural form. It is not until after the war that the
most common view of "The United States is ... " (Representing the singular form) becomes the accepted view of
the masses. The idea of State's rights is rooted in this argument. The main idea of "state's Rights" is
that if a State can choose to be a part of the United States by ratifying the Constitution then they also
have the right to choose not to be a part of the United States and thus leave the Union peacefully. In
April of 1861, President Lincoln order a fleet of ships to resupply Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor. In
the eyes of the Confederates, this was a direct military action indicating the southern states could not
leave the Union without military intervention and the civil War began. This is not solely a southern idea
as the State of New York has many stories of secession throughout its history. In fact, the state of
Vermont exists because it seceded from the state of New York. In more recent times, many citizens of
California have petitioned to secede from the Union.
Although slavery was the main cause of the civil War that does not mean the majority of the soldiers on
either side were fighting for or against that cause. Many Confederate soldiers (mostly non-slave owners)
were fighting because they believed the Union was forcing their home state to remain part of a Union. on
the other side, many Union soldiers were fighting, as President Lincoln said, to preserve the Union. To
view all Confederate soldiers and citizens as racist slave owning tyrants is just as ignorant as
believing the Union soldiers and citizens to be a beacon of morality in a troublesome time in our
country's history. In 1863, President Lincoln issued a draft requiring military service in order to
supply the Union army. In New York City this caused a riot of epic proportions, thousands of white
citizens took to the streets and burned the draft office as well as any businesses that hired freed
blacks. They destroyed many black homes and public buildings. A black orphanage was burned to the ground.
The mob killed and lynched a number of freed blacks and any other citizens who stood to oppose them. The
riot claimed the lives of 122 people and required President Lincoln to dispatch 4,000 troops to end the
violence. The riot erupted because white citizens in New York did not feel compelled to fight a war to
free slaves. Their racist mindset was more concerned with preventing freed blacks from flocking to
Northern cities and taking their jobs and livelihood.
Monuments to fallen civil War soldiers are honoring men who fought and died in a tragic war during a dark
period of our nation's history. All soldiers, on both sides had their own reasons to fight and die in a
war that pitted brother against brother and father against son. what we have to understand is that racist
beliefs, which were very popular at the time, existed on both sides of the battlefield and with the
citizens back home.
We cannot condemn a person because of where and when they were born for if we do we are no better than
condemning a person based on the color of their skin. Too often in today's society, expressing pride in
southern heritage is wrongly viewed as racist. I take pride in my southern heritage, one that consists of
ancestors who were hard working non-slave owning farmers. I take pride in a region of beautiful beaches
and picturesque landscapes. I take pride in a genteel and laid-back lifestyle. I take pride in manners
passed down from generation to generation. I take pride in the power to change. I take pride in
tradition. I take pride in being from North Carolina. I take pride in saying yes sir and yes ma'am. I
take pride in being a loving husband. I take pride in being a father. I take pride in southern cuisine. I
take pride in people who are able to withstand 90-degree temperatures and 80% humidity from June until
September. I take pride in being an American. I take pride in saying hello to someone you do not know. I
take pride in understanding. I take pride in being a Tar Heel. I take pride in history. I take pride in
learning.
"I think it is the duty of every c1t1zen, in the present condition of the country, to do all in his power
to aid in the restoration of peace and harmony, and in no way to oppose the policy of the State or
general government directed to that object." - General Robert E. Lee's letter accepting the presidency
of Washington college, August 24, 1865

Wes
University of North Carolina - chapel Hill
BA, History

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Robert Rivers
Sent: 10/11/2018 12:38:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition of "Silent Sam"

Dear Monuments Committee,


UNC is at crossroads regarding the "silent Sam" issue, and the action you take now will define how this
University moves forward. Forgetting for a moment the passions on both sides of this issue, what was
done by toppling "silent Sam" was illegal and disgraceful. If UNC allows that action to dictate policy,
what message are you sending to any other radical group that supports a cause counter to the law or
University policy?
It is my sincere recommendation that "silent Sam" be reinstalled where it was for some temporary period
of time to demonstrate that illegal and violent actions will not cause the Administration to give in.
After a period of careful consideration, the statue could then be appropriately relocated.
It is ironic that the vandals did not read and the Administration did not note the inscription on the
statue. That inscription dedicated the monument to those sons of the University who gave their lives for
their country. It did not specify which country. As one of the most conflicted states t hat seceded,
North Carolina had many citizens who fought and died for the Union including some students of the
University of North Carolina. That monument, to me and to many others, memorialized their sacrifice as
well.
I appreciate the opportunity to comment on this divisive issue.
Sincerely,
Robert A. Rivers
UNC-CH class of 1973
Message
From: Debra Pickrel
Sent: 10/11/2018 1:54:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Ideas - A Contribution

Dear Chancellor Falt,

The path to a decision about Silent Sam's fate is no doubt challenging and complex, and I thank you and the UNC-Chapel
Hill Board of Trustees for inviting idea submissions from the UNC community in regard to it.

My idea will be considered radical by many, and, in its own way, is difficult for me to see on screen for long-abandoned
sentimental reasons, but it comes from my heart as the right "of the people, for the people" thing to do. And it has the
potential to become as an innovative standard for similar situations at other higher ed institutions ... and therefore a
point of pride for the nation's first state university ...

• Document Silent Sam thoroughly through photography, a mold, a 3D printed replica, and in all other applicable
ways.
• Remove the plaques from Silent Sam's plinth; leave the plinth in place.
• Melt the original statue and save the metal.
• Launch a "Lux/Libertas" design competition in partnership with the College of Arts & Science's Fine Arts &
Humanities for students to submit ideas/designs for a new monument to stand on the plinth. Our motto
represents light (i.e. illumination ... truth) and liberty (i.e. freedom), tying the project directly to the university but
also to the human condition at large ... the opposite of the unenlightened repression that Silent Sam represents
to so many.
• Hold a university community vote-however this is best defined-to select the winning design. Have the winner
create it with a renowned sculptor (or a diverse group of sculptors ... perhaps UNC graduates).
• At the same time, create a Silent Sam exhibit in a rear gallery of Ackland including the replica statue and the
original plaques, rich with text labels that fully explicate the monument's history and all of its meanings-
"favorable" and "unfavorable" -for all to experience.
• Hold a Day of Commemoration for the opening of the Silent Sam exhibit and the dedication of the new
monument on Mccorkle Place .... visibly moving UNC forward in the spirit of Lux and Libertas.

All best,

Debra Pickrel
GAA Board of Directors 2011-2014
AB Media/Jour 1980
Message
From: Debra Pickrel
Sent: 10/11/2018 1:56:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam Ideas - A Contribution - AMENDED

Please see correction below.,.thank you.,,

From: Debra Pickrel [


Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2018 1:54 PM
To: 'uncmonument@unc.edu' <uncmonument@unc.edu>
Subject: Silent Sam Ideas - A Contribution

Dear Chancellor Folt,

The path to a decision about Silent Sam's fate is no doubt challenging and complex, and I thank you and the UNC-Chapel
Hill Board of Trustees for inviting idea submissions from the UNC community in regard to it.

My idea will be considered radical by many, and, in its own way, is difficult for me to see on screen for long-abandoned
sentimental reasons, but it comes from my heart as the right "of the people, for the people" thing to do. And it has the
potential to become as an innovative standard for similar situations at other higher ed institutions ... and therefore a
point of pride for the nation's first state university ...

• Document Silent Sam thoroughly through photography, a mold, a 3D printed replica, and in all other applicable
ways.
• Remove the plaques from Silent Sam's plinth; leave the plinth in place.
• Melt the original statue and save the metal.
• Launch a "Lux/Libertas" design competition in partnership with the College of Arts & Science's Fine Arts &
Humanities for students to submit ideas/designs for a new monument created from the metal of Silent Sam to
stand on the plinth. Our motto represents light (i.e. illumination ... truth) and liberty (i.e. freedom), tying the
project directly to the university but also to the human condition at large ... the opposite of the unenlightened
repression that Silent Sam represents to so many.
• Hold a university community vote-however this is best defined-to select the winning design. Have the winner
create it with a renowned sculptor (or a diverse group of sculptors ... perhaps UNC graduates).
• At the same time, create a Silent Sam exhibit in a rear gallery of Ackland including the replica statue and the
original plaques, rich with text labels that fully explicate the monument's history and all of its meanings-
"favorable" and "unfavorable" -for all to experience.
• Hold a Day of Commemoration for the opening of the Silent Sam exhibit and the dedication of the new
monument on Mccorkle Place .... visibly moving UNC forward in the spirit of Lux and Libertas.

All best,

Debra Pickrel
GAA Board of Directors 2011-2014
AB Media/Jour 1980
Message
From: Belk Daughtridge [bdaughtridge@familyassetmanagement.com]
Sent: 10/11/2018 3:42:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
CC: Sam Franklin [franklin.sam@comcast.net]; Daniel Russler [drussler@familyassetmanagement.com]
Subject: UNC

Dear UNC Monument Committee

This is a sad state of affairs when it has come to the point that we have to send an email to share our thoughts on
Silent Sam.

It has become apparent that the inmates are running the asylum.

I am embarrassed for the state of affairs at the university in athletics, education and administration.

Belk Daughtridge
UNC '75, UNC MBA '80
Lacrosse Letterman
US Navy Veteran

Belk Daughtridge
,. ==-----...---- .,._,.___ ..

REDACTED, Charleston, S.C. 29401


Phone REDACTED Fax REDACTED

Please visit our website at

http://www.familvassetmanagement.com/

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received. Thank you.
Message
From: Tom O'Keefe
Sent: 10/12/2018 10:13:07 AM
To: Tom O'Keefe
Subject: Chapel Hill Anti-Racist Activist Legal Defense Fund

Dear Friends,

Hope this finds you well.

Keeping this brief, as I'm sure you've all followed what's been unfolding around the toppling of Silent Sam
(though for thorough backstory, do check out this site compiled by Jim Leloudis and Cecilia Moore).

Friends and I, all Carolina alums, have been in conversation about ways in which we might support people
(currently 24 of them) facing charges in relation to demonstrations and actions against the now-felled statue,
and although we never reached full consensus, a few of us have decided to donate to the ls~gal defense
fund being raised by Take Action Chapel Hill (TACH), and I would encourage you to do the same.

Here's what I commented/posted yesterday:

"As a UNC alum who retains strong ties to Carolina, I'm redirecting half of what would have been my annual
donation to the University to the Anti-Racist Activist legal defense fund, and strongly encourage my fellow
alums of conscience to do the same or better."

Gina, of TACH, has been kind enough to suggest that it might be possible - should UNC do the long-overdue
right thing, and urge the relevant authorities to drop charges - to redirect some of these funds back to the
university, so if that is of interest, reach out, and I will pass requests along to her to see if we might earmark a
lump of funds in such a fashion. Either way, please do let me know if you decide to donate so we can have a
sense of our collective impact here.

Warmly,
Tom

Ps, and finally, please do pass this/info about the legal defense fund along to other friends and loved ones who
are part of the Carolina community!
Message
From: Gina Young [gyoung55@hotmail.com]
Sent: 10/12/2018 12:40:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:


I am strongly in favor of returning silent Sam to his previous location. This is an historic statue
erected in memory of the NC civil war dead. Confederate soldiers have been declared to be legal us
veterans and we should not be disturbing these places of honor. I sincerely wish we would take our cues
from Gettysburg, which has publicly declared that they will not remove any memorials to the civil war
dead, including the ones erected in honor of southern soldiers. The civil War is a fact of history.
The University, by virtue of its age, inexplicably has ties to the civil War that should and can not be
ignored. Respectfully, only citizens of NC and UNC alum should have anything to say about this decision.
Certainly, members of Antifa from out of state should have NO opinion in this matter.
Besides being of immense historical value, silent Sam is a beautiful work of art and an iconic feature of
the campus. It should be returned immediately to its pedestal. I would suggest we encase it in plexiglass
like they have done quite successfully in Mecklenburg county in order to fulfill the "public safety"
requirement of your plan (I would like to add that there wou l d be no concerns for public safety if not
for the mob violence and protests) and I suggest we add a plaque to contextualize the statue. But it
needs to go back where it belongs as the law requires. Thank you,
Gina Young
'78 '93
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: James, Sharon L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=402 lc289873c40afa9d95224cece5765-Sharon L Ja]
Sent: 10/12/2018 12:50:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Civil War statue

To whom it may concern:

I write to express, in the strongest terms, my hope that the Civil War statue will not be returned to its original
location. It is a permanent cause of divisiveness and its placement at the entrance to campus makes it extremely
dangerous for the campus community. There is no hope that violence could be prevented, if the statue were to
be returned. Our students, whom we are supposed to teach and protect, will suffer genuine bodily damage
and psychological/emotional harm.

The campus has numerous locations, markers, and ways to commemorate those who fought in the Civil War,
but that statue keeps alive-publicly and prominently-the very sentiments that started the war. In a now truly
diverse state, campus, and community-which look forward to an exciting future of inclusivity and diversity-
the statue tells everybody whose family did not live here 160 years ago that we are not really part of North
Carolina, that we are in fact more likely to be considered enemies of North Carolina. It is not remotely
necessary as a testament to the campus's history.

The joking legend about "virgins" on Franklin Street makes the statue an ongoing public insult to every single
woman on campus and in the local community-but most especially to undergraduate women students.

Finally, it celebrates the avid defense of slavery, and the brutality of enslavement, that motivated the Civil
War. It is literally a monument to the principle that persons of African descent are inferior and must be kept
subjugated. The horrifying glee with which Julian Carr recorded his savage treatment of an African-American
citizen, on the day of the monument's installation, testifies to the white supremacy that motivated both the war
and the creation of the statue. That sentiment has no place on our campus! The statue is a stomach-turning
monument that has no place in an institution of higher learning, an institution dedicated not merely to its past
but to its future-a future that will be seriously marred, both internally and in terms of our reputation outside of
North Carolina.

I urge the Chancellor and her task forces to keep that statue from being returned. It is a menace to peaceful and
constructive conduct of University life and it celebrates a past founded on abuse of human beings. It does not
belong on campus.

Sincerely,

Sharon L. James
Professor of Classics
Interim Chair, \Vomen's and Gender Studies
Affiliated Faculty in Comparative Literature, and \XIomen's and Gender Studies
Campus Box 3145, 211 Niurphey Hall
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3145
Message
From:
Se nt: 10/12/2018 1:11:4 1 PM
To : UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/o u=Exc hange Admi nistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn =Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-So ut h_ com on]
Subject : In support of Silent Sam -- let hi m speak, literall y

Dear UNC Board of Governors:

Thank you for soliciting opinions from your alumni regarding Silent Sam. I graduated
from UNC with a degree in Journal ism in 198fr In my day, of course, Silent Sam was
merely an amusement, as every freshman girl who first walked across Mccorkle Place
was told: "That soldier will fire his gun whenever a virgin walks by; so far, he hasn't fired
it yet"

This August, my son matriculated to Chapel Hill as a freshman. My husband (also UNC-
1986 and UNC Medical School-1991) and I walked him over to Silent Sam, shared our
pleasant memories of the statue, and told him that Silent Sam was being targeted by
people who were trying to recast it as a tribute to evil and oppression. On that day, I
discovered the nearby statue in honor of the enslaved men and women who had helped
to build the University. This seemed an appropriate means of addressing the wrongs of
slavery by taking a positive action. I had hoped this would be enough to tip the scales
toward harmony on our campus.

Sadly, it was not to be. It appears that a fringe movement is stirring up emotions and
twisting the truth in order to create chaos, not only at UNC-CH, but across our land. We
have already suffered incalculable harm in fighting the Civil War. No good can come
from those who would see us fight one another again. To many, Silent Sam represents
a tribute to the soldiers who fought and died protecting their homeland, the Old North
State. It is not, and never has been, a nostalgic endorsement of the cruel institution of
slavery. It is an important reminder of the grief and suffering wrought upon all of us by
violence and wat

Therefore, let me suggest the following: return the statue, along with audio recordings of
different voices sharing their feelings and thoughts about its meaning. Where I live in
Charleston, S.C., this has recently been achieved, so that people using smart phones
can "listen" to the tales that the statues tell. If Silent Sam returns, why can't he speak of
his experience? And perhaps some figures in the tribute to slavery behind him can
speak of their experiences? And perhaps a grieving widow can speak of her loss and
suffering when her Confederate husband was killed? Etc. I am sure you could find
students at UNC happy to help with such a project.
One thing that I learned in the J-school: you cannot report a one-sided story. The truth
is only, ever found in looking at it from opposing sides.

So, let the statues themselves remind people of the horrific tragedy when countrymen
turn against one another in hate. In truth, we are all brothers and sisters. We must rise
above the tossing waves of mob mentality and violence.

Thank you for considering my thoughts.

Sincerely,
Message
From: Michael Lindsay
Sent: 10/12/2018 1:26:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
CC: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/ en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Corrected: Proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill
Attachments: Silent Sam Proposed Update.pdf

Dear Chancellor Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,

My proofreader just found a typo in the previous PDF I emailed you. Attached is a corrected PDF.

Sorry for the error,


Michael Lindsay

From: Michael Lindsay


Date: Friday, October 12, 2018 at 12:55 PM
To: <uncmonument@unc.edu>
Cc: <Chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill

Dear Chancellor Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,

Attached is a proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill. I believe this is a win-win solution that will help
you meet the November 15th deadline for submitting a plan to the UNC system's Board of Governors for Silent Sam's
"disposition and preservation." This proposal accomplishes the following goals:

1. Returns Silent Sam to its pedestal. Thereby adhering to a 2015 state law that prevents moving historic monuments.
Also, this action does not reward the mob who illegally pulled down the statue in August.
2. Adds a "ring of history" that will give new context to the monument; while not altering the monument itself (in
keeping with State law).
3. Honors both UNC alumni who put down their books to fight, and African Americans who suffered the consequences
of slavery and Jim Crow.
4. Maintains our history while evolving to a more complete understanding of it.
5. Offers a win-win solution for everybody concerned; Silent Sam is returned to its historic location, while a more
complete history of the monument is created.

These points are in the attached 1-page PDF, along with visuals of the proposed "ring of history."

Thank you for your time reviewing this information. It is my hope that this proposal will satisfy most people on both sides of
this controversy; while maintaining our history, and improving our understanding of it.

Sincerely,
Michael Lindsay

REDACTED
R�)!t�!Qh :' f\iC 2.7605
1) Put the Silent Sam statue back on its pedestal.
2) InstalI a ring of semi-opaque glass around the statue (IeveI with the top of the pedestal). The glass will sit in a
metal frame supported by 4 poles; metal will be similar in color to the monument's stone base.*
3) Quotes and historical references will be etched into the glass; creating a "ring of history:'
The round ring of glass will still allow complete viewing of the statue and plaques on the pedestal, while offering new
historical updates. In addition to the re-discovered Julian Carr quote from his dedication speech, other quotes and
the history of this statue will give new context to Silent Sam.
*A more creative support structure that does away with the metal poles next to the pedestal, and allows the ring of history to ''.float"
around the statue is possible. (It will be more expensive to build, but more exciting)

The combination of restoring Silent Sam to


his pedestal and adding a ring of history will:
• Honor UNC alumni who put down their
books and volunteered to fight.
• Honor African Americans who suffered the
consequences of slavery and Jim Crow.
• Be honest about our country's history,
acknowledging the good and the bad.
• End a controversy with a win-win solution.
• Maintain our history while evolving to a
more complete understanding of it.

Concept and design by lvlichael Lindsay


Contact information:
Phone: 919-828-0619 / Mobile: 919-429-0177
Email: inform@nc.rr.com
1406 Park Drive i Raleigh, NC 27605

C•;',2018 Michael Lindsay


Message
From: Cairns, Bruce A [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8572f13eb3494b1883ff4e109bd5f288-Bruce A Cai]
Sent: 10/12/2018 1:52:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Part II RE: Possibilities

Dear UNC Monument:

I have two additional parts to my three-part plan on how to de al with the Silent Sam/ Con federate Monument,

Let's as s u me Silent Sam is moved- either to Dubose House or some other location on campus (as oppo sed to a state
owned hist orical loc ation such as Bennett Place or Bentonville Battlefield)· I would then propo se to:

1) Remove all the plaques from the base of the monument and either a) give them to the Wilson Library for
storage or historical context; b) add them to the Carolina Hall exhibit where the story of Silent Sam and his
removal could be told; 3) give them to a NC Museum, or d) give them back to the United Daughters of the
Confederacy if they want them.

2) Place Silent Sam on an entirely new rock base (but not nearly as large and high) with plaques that contextualize
the statue- honoring alumni who died for a cause that was des tr uctive and hurtful to so many but is a part of our
past.

3) I woul d move the Un sung Founders Memori al to the base of Silent Sam was on with enough of a base to
contextualize that monument as welL I personally think it needs to be elevated and this would provide
appropriate respect and of course, enormous symbolism (as a triumph over whi te su premacy).

4) Even if Sam is not moved to Dubose House, there is no reas on why the Unsung Founders cannot either have
Sam's base moved to where the Unsung Founders Memorial is or keep Sam's base in its current location, move
the Unsung Founders Memorial th ere and move Sam somewhere else (as above).

As always, t hanks for soliciting input. Again, no matter what you think of m y plan, I have confidence that the Uni ver sity
will co me up with a fantastic plan. As the greate st public University in the land, we always do!

Sincerely,
Bruce A. Cairns

Bruce A. Cairns, MD
John Stackhouse Distinguished Professor of Surgery/ Microbiology and Immunology
Medical Director North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center
3008 Burnett Womack, CB 7600; 101 Manning Drive; Chapel Hill, N C 27599-7600
Phone: REDACTED; Fax: REDACTED

From: Cairns, Bruce A


Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 12:04 PM
To: UNC Monument <uncmonument@unc.edu>
Subject: Possibilities

Thanks for setting up the email. Clearly, it is important to move the monument from its current location- it has caused so
much pain and misery to so many.

But where? Such a contentious issue.


Well, I have pondered this for a very long time and I can think of two appropriate locations that are sensitive as possible
to the extraordinarily difficult challenges we all face.

1) Dubose House Cemetery: Now, I realize some really want the monument to stay on campus (and others, like
Durham, may really not want it) so if it stays on UNC campus, I propose the Dubose House Cemetery. Now, I also
th
realize the Dubose House was built in the early 20 century and not before the Civil War, but there already are
at least two cemeteries up there and one has a wall and a locked gate- and it is both quiet & beautiful! What a
wonderful place to put a monument that means so much to so many (both good and bad). This way Silent Sam
can stay on UNC property, away from the hustle and bustle, in a quiet, locked cemetery where his purpose as a
monument to Tarheel dead rather than as a monument to ugly, white supremacy can be celebrated

2) Bennett Place in Durham { http:j/www,nchlstork:sltes,org/bennett/) Bennett Place is where the largest


contingent of Confederate soldiers surrendered during the Civil War. It is already a state historical site and
having the monument moved there would be so appropriate. Why? Because Silent Sam has no ammo, he was
pointing north, and to some the monument is a tribute to Tar Heel dead (rather than a monument to white
supremacy). Even better, since it on a state historical site, the monument can be loaned to the State and taken
back if desired. Regardless where you stand on the contentious issues, Bennett Place is a place of peace (and
surrender). And is a quiet place where the monument would be left alone if the significance of what happened
at Bennett Place was emphasized. ***By the way, shame on those who might quibble about Bennett Place
being in Durham and near Duke! Durham City wasn't founded until 1869 and Durham County wasn't founded
until 1881. So during the Civil War, Bennett Place was in Orange. And don't forget it was a UNC alum that
donated the land so Trinity College could be moved into Durham and eventually be renamed for (and I quote the
Encyclopedia Britannica) an "American tobacco magnate". Duke University (known as Trinity College during the
Civil War) wasn't moved to Durham until 1892. ***

BACKGROUND: Now, if the monument is not moved, it will continue to cause disruption, pain, distraction and possibly
danger to students and members of the community. So where on UNC should it go? In the Morehead Planetarium with
other distinguished statues? I fear the same disruptions will continue. Put it in a storage closet or an unused building?
Important members of the state will be offended and not approve and it will still be attack, I'm afraid. Clearly, it cannot
go in on any other open and unprotected space on main campus. For very obvious reasons, it cannot go in the
University's cemetery where so many members of the African American community are buried anonymously. All other
public cemeteries in Chapel Hill and Carrboro are probably be out as well. So where is the best, most quiet and dignified
place on UNC property? The Dubose House Cemetery!

Finally, the other option would be to move the monument out of the area, say to the State Capitol, but that already is
enshrined in controversy. I don't think anyone would want it moved to the UNC Board of Governor's campus facilities.
Now the Bentonville Battlefield is an option, but it has a violent history (being a battlefield and all) and it is over an hour
and a half away from Chapel Hill. Of course, that would not be far enough for some who want it destroyed, but perhaps
it would be too far away for others. Another choice would be a State Museum- but I think very few If any State
Museums would want to absorb the challenge of watching over Silent Sam. So where can you put the monument, in a
quiet, closed and guarded by a secure but respectful fence/wall where its presence really should not bother any one if
put in proper context? Bennett Place in Durham!

Finally, moving the monument to Dubose House Cemetery could be done in a couple weeks (if there was a real
motivation to do so). The move to Bennett Place could be done that quickly as well, but might require a bit more
bureaucratic finagling.

In any case, thanks very much for considering the options I have presented. No matter what happens, I have confidence
that the University will come up with a fantastic plan. As the greatest public University in the land, we always face our
challenges openly and come out on top!

Sincerely,
Bruce Cairns
Bruce A. Cairns, MD
John Stackhouse Distinguished Professor of Surgery/ Microbiology and Immunology
Medical Director North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center
3008 Burnett Womack, CB 7600; 101 Manning Drive; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7600
Phone: REDACTED; Fax: REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 10/12/2018 4:51:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Ideas about the Statue's future

what to do with silent Sam?


Edmund Burke told us "Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it". so I would suggest that
'silent Sam' be moved to the General Admin Building and placed into the lobby, because the decision to
accept this 'gift to the University' was originally made by the BOT/BOG Administration. so this Monument
should not only honor the dead, but also serve as a reminder to our University leaders to make wise
choices in the future.
-REDACTED
class of 1983
Message
From: Marr, Tim [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=b8a9073e7e164b10b66c15d00659f6c2-Tim Marr (m]
Sent: 10/12/2018 5:17:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Dispositions

The site in Mccorkle Place needs to be cleansed and the monument de-dedicated there by the removal of the pedestal.
This is key because the present site has a geographically exalted power that emanates from the fact that it is at the
"front door" of campus and is aligned with an axis of power that coordinates with the apices of South Building, Wilson
Library, and the Bell Tower.

The problem, of course, is the legal restrictions about relocation. Though the Board has given some leeway to the
Chancellor to conceive of an alternative "disposition"; however, it must be done in a way that is "safe" "lawful and
lasting." For this to happen the law will need to be altered as any relocation presently requires the approval of the NC
Historical Commission and an alternative site with equivalent "prominence, honor, visibility, availability, and access."
The law also rejects moving the monument to a cemetery or museum -- two most logical locations for relocation. These
are impossible and unadvisable criteria to meet which is a main reason why we are facing this crisis at this moment. The
University and the town must have more local control of issues that affect its operations, public safety, expenditures,
and safety and these rights should not be preempted by state officials.

The strongest arguments, both moral and legal, are that any attempt to re -erect the monument on campus would re-
impose the racially oppressive (and supplanted) order of 1913, incite huge protests on campus and, thus, fail in the goal
to effect reconciliation or resolution. This creates an ongoing threat to public safety and deeply damages the university's
reputation and standing -- key to its "core mission."

A key question is about what the proper "jurisdiction" of Silent Sam is. It was created "under the auspices" of the United
Daughters of the Confederacy. Who actually owns this object if it is repudiated by those on campus?

The plaque on one of the sides of Silent Sam features "the great commander" (Lee/Christ?) claiming that "duty is the
sublimest word in the English language." The grammar is wrong: sublimest is not a word and it should be most sublime.
The educational challenge here is to investigate the changing understandings of duty as social paradigms and norms
change over time. The image of the maternal figure pulling the student away from his books evokes this sense of duty -
one that forcefully calls the student away from his intellectual responsibility of his studies out of dedication to the state,
in this case the Confederacy as "our country." These plaques are the best teaching tools about the responsibility of
moral conscience. What kind of duty are we calling our students to with the choices we are making in 2018? The female
figure with the sword on the plaque symbolically represents the moral influence carried by Chancellor Falt at this
moment in history. The "duty" of the University today is to remove this memorial from its midst as relocating it on
campus would reenact an allegiance to the Confederate States of America that would denote an act of symbolic treason
as well as an reprehensible affront to university members, especially to our black brothers and sisters.

One possible lesson these plaques can teach is to universalize through this local example the tragic loss of life caused a
result misplaced nationalism and patriotic fervor, what Benedict Anderson has cause "for so many millions of people,
not so much to kill, as willingly to die for such limited imaginings .... "

Part of de-dedication process is to confess fully and publically that the figure is of a French Catholic youth from Boston
and that the sculptor is from Canada. It is therefore itself an imported Yankee monument figuring a Northerner that
testifies in powerful ways to the limited cultural resources in the fifty years after the Civil War of the South that erected
it. When it is not standing on a pedestal the statue is quite diminutive. One suggestion for relocation I will make here is
to consider lawfully preserving the actual materiality of the monument by melting it down and refashioning it into
alternative forms. Ideally, the result would be a new figure that would symbolize the hope and democratic promise of
st
the University in the 21 century. Alternatively, it could be refashioned into miniature forms that can be safely owned by
those who privately wish to identify with it - perhaps as small tombstones offered to family descendants of the specific
students who died in the Civil war. This process would free those who are burdened by it from its oppressive public
presence anywhere on campus.

The library staff have indicated that they see no ethical way to it to be included in their space. The solution of placing the
statue in Memorial Hall is problematic because the statue runs the constant risk of being defaced. The solution of the
"Rolls of the Confederate Dead" in that building was solved by placing them prominently out of reach so high up on the
auditorium walls that they cannot even be read.

Should Silent Sam be placed back on the pedestal massive and justified protests will ensue and I will join them. Do
leaders of the university and the state fully grasp what kind of resistance this will cause? It will deeply affect national
attitudes towards UNC as well as magnify the crisis of public safety. This will erode the acceptability of UNC as a school
to attend, especially for out-of-staters and graduate students, as well as a place for faculty to teach, provoking many to
attend or move to other institutions in a way that would embarrass and deeply damage the University and its
reputation. This indicates the stakes of leadership in this challenging moment today on University Day.

Tim Marr
Department of American Studies
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
Message
From: Mike Chanin
Sent: 10/13/2018 3:35:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: UNC History

As many have noted, UNC needs a museum to chronicle its history and it could be a home for many treasured artifacts
scattered over the campus, even a cheap replica statue like "Silent Sam". Our great libraries have a different
function. Mike Chanin 1965
Message
From: Crescenzi, Mark J [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =3e05655c4 7 d b4b66851073 f9d762edd8-M ark J Cres]
Sent: 10/13/2018 11:42:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: my own thoughts on how to proceed with the Confederate soldier monument

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Now that I have communicated the collective statements of the ABL and my own department, I would like to offer my
own thoughts on how Carolina might proceed with a plan to address the enduring problems posed by Silent Sam. These
views are simply my own as a professor who has worked here for nearly two decades, and in no way should be
construed to be associated with my roles as chair of my department or the administrative board of the library. I have
been reluctant to share my own views because of my chair responsibilities, but I trust that your team can disaggregate
the information. Suffice it to say that I support both statements in my capacities as chair.

My personal preference is that that statue be relocated off campus. This preference is based in part in my desire to
support the students, staff, and faculty of color who are most deeply and negatively affected by its continued presence.
If we prioritize their needs and our commitment to providing them with a safe environment in which to learn and work,
that makes the most sense to me. Simply put, my preference is to support their preference.

Having said that, I understand that preferences and outcomes often diverge. Should you discover that whomever will be
making this decision will require the statue to remain on campus, I recommend the commissioning of a University
Museum. Perhaps we could identify a space that is not too prominent but not too out of the way (easier said than done)
and ask the good people of North Carolina to help come up with the funds to design and build the museum. I would ask
that the statue be relocated into that museum, but that the museum be much more than a place to hold the statue. This
is an opportunity to represent the entire history of the university, both the good and the bad.

I imagine this is a bit what you had in mind when considering Wilson Library as a home for the statue. There are some
key differences that will seem small to some but are essential from my perspective. First, by building a UNC Museum
that is a stand-alone entity, you can attend to the entire history of the university. The value of that enterprise is, I think,
self-explanatory. Wilson cannot accommodate that mission.

Second, you can hire staff that will knowingly and willingly be able to confront this history on a daily basis. This is far
better than imposing the statue on a staff that have a right to choose whether they wish to confront it on a daily basis.

Third, by enclosing the statue within a building, you allow everyone else to choose whether they engage with its
presence. Admittedly this is a bit na·1ve, in that everyone will know the statue is in the museum. I think this is the
dimension along which the compromise will be so deeply felt.

Fourth, museums and libraries are two different things, and our libraries are as globally prominent as they are because
our librarians have control over their content. If we inadvertently violate their autonomy by imposing this honorific
statue into their space, we will damage one of the most important mechanisms that have made our libraries successful.
It would be analogous to instructing the history department that they will now be writing and teaching about the statue.
I fear it would damage our prominence as a world-renowned library.

Relatedly, I have noticed that the response to the ABL's statement was to simply discount this position as NIMBY. If
you'll afford me the opportunity to defend that statement a bit, I think you'll see that this is not the case. Wilson
contains the most extensive documentation of southern history in the world, drawing faculty and students from all over
the world to its primary documents. For example, the Carr speech that so clearly identifies the original intent of the
statue can be found in Wilson. Ironically, placing the statue into Wilson Library will detract from our ability and
responsibility to preserve our history. It would cost well over $80M to bring the library up to code such that this history
would be able to survive the shenanigans of protesters, and anything short of that investment would be an insult to the
invaluable history that is already contained within the walls of the library.

Let me close with my thanks for your continued efforts. I know how difficult this situation is, and I am grateful for your
relentless pursuit of a solution. If I can help in any way, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Respectfully,

Mark Crescenzi
Message
From: David F Austin
Sent: 10/13/2018 8:43:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The future of Confederate monument Si lent Sam

North Carolina General Statute 100-2.1, states that

if an object of remembrance is removed, it must be relocated to a place of equal honor, accessibility,


prominence, visibility and availability, ...

It is the place that must be of equal honor, accessibility, prominence, visibility and availability. It is
consistent with the plain language of the statute to (i) restore the statue of "Silent Sam" to its
original location, (ii) add a sizeable plaque explaining the relevant history of the statue (including its
origin in the 20thC) and (iii) erect another statue not far away that draws attention to the bravery,
resilience and political intelligence of those who fought the Southern aftermath of slavery (lynchings,
mass slaughter, various forms of discrimination and segregation). The second statue would not itself
need to be silent, literally or figuratively.

Given the attention drawn and the discussion generated by the pair of statues in the NYC Wall St
area - the Charging Bull and the Fearless Girl - which concerned less serious matters (the Fearless
Girl originated as a advertising gimmick), the pairing of Silent Sam with another figure might
engender interesting discussion.

There are many different ways in which the above possibility might be actualized. The second statue
might be of Martin Luther King, Jr., perhaps surrounded by young children, with one of King's arms
extended to point at Silent Sam and the other arm around the children. King's "I have a dream"
speech might be broadcast periodically from speakers within the statue. Other figures of similar
historical importance might be represented instead, or in addition. There is really no reason to stop at
just one statue; several could be located in a large circle around Silent Sam (so as to leave Silent
Sam as visible and accessible as when unaccompanied). Any other statues could be larger than, and
on platforms higher than, Silent Sam. A series of statues might even be installed on a regular rotation
through the area. Raising the needed funds would probably not be problematic. Diverse members of
the university and local community might be asked to participate in determining the details of the
design.

I doubt that it would be more expensive to guard a few statues than one.

It was often emphasized by concentration camp survivors that it is important not to forget the
Holocaust. No doubt many Nazi soldiers thought themselves virtuous in battles for their homeland.
Noting the latter is not to praise them, but to emphasize the horror. The plaque(s) at the base of
statues other than Silent Same could make a similar point about those who fought for the
Confederacy and who thus sought to sustain slavery.

David Austin
Durham, NC
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/14/2018 8:44:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill
Attachments: Silent Sam Proposed Update.pdf

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
9.l9-962-.lSl36

From: Michael Lindsay


Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 12:55 PM
To: UNC Monument <uncmonument@unc.edu>
Cc: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill

Dear Chancellor Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,

Attached is a proposal for updating the Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill. I believe this is a win -win solution
that will help you meet the November 15th deadline for submitting a plan to the UNC system's Board of
Governors for Silent Sam's "disposition and preservation." This proposal accomplishes the following goals:

1. Returns Silent Sam to its pedestal. Thereby adhering to a 2015 state law that prevents moving historic
monuments. Also, this action does not reward the mob who illegally pulled down the statue in August.
2. Adds a "ring of history" that will give new context to the monument; while not altering the monument
itself (in keeping with State law).
3. Honors both UNC alumni who put down their books to fight, and African Americans who suffered the
consequences of slavery and Jim Crow.
4. Maintains our history while evolving to a more complete understanding of it.
5. Offers a win-win solution for everybody concerned; Silent Sam is returned to its historic location, while
a more complete history of the monument is created.

These points are in the attached I-page PDF, along with visuals of the proposed "ring of history."

Thank you for your time reviewing this information. It is my hope that this proposal will satisfy most people on
both sides of this controversy; while maintaining our history, and improving our understanding of it.

Sincerely,
Michael Lindsay
1) Put the Silent Sam statue back on its pedestal.
2) InstalI a ring of semi-opaque glass around the statue (IeveI with the top of the pedestal). The glass will sit in a
metal frame supported by 4 polls; metal will be similar in color to the monument's stone base.•-
3) Quotes and historical references will be etched into the glass; creating a "ring of history:'
The round ring of glass will still allow complete viewing of the statue and plaques on the pedestal, while offering new
historical updates. In addition to the re-discovered Julian Carr quote from his dedication speech, other quotes and
the history of this statue will give new context to Silent Sam.
*A more creative support structure that does away with the metal polls next to the pedestal, and allows the ring of history to "float"
around the statue is possible. (It will be more expensive to build, but more exciting)

The combination of restoring Silent Sam to


his pedestal and adding a ring of history will:
• Honor UNC alumni who put down their
books and volunteered to fight.
• Honor African Americans who suffered the
consequences of slavery and Jim Crow.
• Be honest about our country's history,
acknowledging the good and the bad.
• End a controversy with a win-win solution.
• Maintain our history while evolving to a
more complete understanding of it.

Concept and design by lvlichael Lindsay


Contact information:
Phone: 919-828-0619 / Mobile: 919-429-0177
Email: inform@nc.rr.com
1406 Park Drive i Raleigh, NC 27605

C•;',2018 Michael Lindsay


Message
From: Shelby Bass
Sent: 10/14/2018 10:00:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a proud Carolina grad, class of 2015. I am so pro ud of the current Carolina students that took
matte r s in to the i r own hands and removed s il e nt Sam. silent Sam has l ong reminded students (especi ally
students of color) that racism is still alive and well. It has been a place that students have gathered
to protest racial inequali ty fo r decades. Students removing i t represent s a change, sayi ng "No more" to
white supremacy and racism. Putting silent Sam back wo uld be see n by ma ny to be an approval (by UNC and
by the state) of racist power struct ures. I don't want my Alma Mater to be in the news for replacing a
confederate monument when so many would see t hat as Carolina taking a stand on t he wrong side of history.
Since r el y,

Shelby Bass
Message
From: Warren Wills [www@wwwjrlaw.com]
Sent: 10/14/2018 5:05:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Please restore "Silent Sam" to his place on campus

Chancellor Falt:
Please put Silent Sam back in his place on campus. This is important for numerous compelling reasons, including the
inherent censorship of views its removal extends, the participation of the University in the rewriting of history and the
creeping abasement of all things "Southern," the choosing of one (loud) group's demands over the sentiments of the
Alumni at large and the appearance of rewarding destructive, criminal behavior.
Thanks for your consideration.
Warren Wills '67

Law Offices of Warren W. Wills, Jr.


Garland Law Building
REDACTED
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
REDACTED
REDACTED(direct)
www@wwwjrlaw.com

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Message
From: Gina Young
Sent: 10/14/2018 8:03:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:


I am strongly in favor of returning silent Sam to his previous location. This is an historic statue
erected in memory of the NC civil war dead. Confederate soldiers have been declared to be legal us
veterans and we should not be disturbing these places of honor. I sincerely wish we would take our cues
from Gettysburg, which has publicly declared that they will not remove any memorials to the civil war
dead, including the ones erected in honor of southern soldiers. The civil War is a fact of history.
The University, by virtue of its age, inexplicably has ties to the civil War that should and can not be
ignored. Respectfully, only citizens of NC and UNC alum should have anything to say about this decision.
Certainly, members of Antifa from out of state should have NO opinion in this matter.
Besides being of immense historical value, silent Sam is a beautiful work of art and an iconic feature of
the campus. It should be returned immediately to its pedestal. I would suggest we encase it in plexiglass
like they have done quite successfully in Mecklenburg county in order to fulfill the "public safety"
requirement of your plan (I would like to add that there wou l d be no concerns for public safety if not
for the mob violence and protests) and I suggest we add a plaque to contextualize the statue. But it
needs to go back where it belongs as the law requires. Thank you,
Gina Young
'78 '93
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 10/14/2018 9:51:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: suggestion for confederate monument

I have two children at Chapel Hill, and let's just say the recent actions surrounding the monument have not been
met with unanimous opinion among them nor among our larger family.

I have spent a lot of time thinking about what would be a proper next step for the statue. After a lot of ugliness
and violence, I believe there are several 'teaching moments' that the University can help with as we go
forward. The biggest is to show respect to all sides, and to show that we are a nation of laws, not mob rule.

Here's what i suggest:

a) Clean, fix, and restore the monument to its original location. Show that mob rule is not the way to enact
change.

b) Uphold the law - make it clear that it is illegal to deface a landmark, and announce that the University will
press charges to the fullest extent of the law for anyone defacing the statue. (I believe the applicable law is
General Statute 14-147 - removing, altering or defacing landmarks - a class 2 misdemeanor punishable up to 60
days in jail). And :MEAN it. Restore the rule of law. This is giving fair warning to troublemakers.

c) Announce that the status will be moved to another location chosen in a democratic fashion. If you have that
location picked, great. The statue is relevant to UNC. You should create a plaque for it describing the
controversy to go with it in its new home. There is evil associated with the statue relevant to attitudes at the
time it was made. It is great that we universally condemn those attitudes today. But the statue is still a
memorial to those UNC students who died at war defending their home land, and it should persevere.

d) Explain that history is history. Things that one era thought were acceptable may not be seen that way by
later generations. Our past may not all be good, we may not all be proud of it - but we cannot destroy the past,
and it is good that we have come a long way in our attitudes.

e) As a side note, I don't know what happened to Dwayne Dixon, the UNC teacher who was armed and
allegedly committed assault at one of the statue protests - but if this claim is true, he should be fired and not
allowed to work for the UNC system in any capacity, ever. Again, this would be showing that violence and
breaking the law has consequences - which is NOT a message that has been heard to date.

UNC was too soft when the protests occurred - possibly not recognizing the gravity of the moment. Allow
peaceful protests, but once that line is crossed you need to enforce the law to prevent things from spiralling out
of control. Hopefully we've learned that lesson and again will show the world that we are a nation of laws, not
of mob rule.

Thank you for your consideration.


Respectfully,

REDACTED

-------- Forwarded Message --------


Subject: ANNOUNCEMENT from UNC: Message from the Chancellor - September 24, 2018
Date:Tue, 25 Sep 2018 14:05:01 +0000 (UTC)
From:UNC Family Experience <families(al.unc.edu>
To: rick@caponi grofamil y.com

Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System


Board of Governors gave the UNC-Chapel Hill Board
of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a filsil
for
the Confederate Monument's "disposition and
preservation." We have been asked to present our
plan to UNC System President Margaret Spellings and
the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond fee!


passionately about the monument As a next step, we
have created a dedicated email address,
ur:1c1rionur-rh:HTt(r1)ur:1cJ?d_q, for anyone to submit ideas
provide individual responses, we will carefully review
and consider al! ideas as we prepare a plan to present
to the Board of Governors in November. Please note
that all email submissions will be subject to disclosure
under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important


topic that will he!p shape the future of Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L Folt and the UNC-Chape! Hill


Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the


Chancellor

c:J Virus-free. www.avg.com


Message
From: Sion H. Harrington Ill I
Sent: 10/14/2018 9:52:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam"

To Whom It May Concern:

As I sit down to write this email, I cannot help feeling it is an exercise in futility, since I suspect your
minds are already made up on the issue. I am likewise sure it will be a waste of time to argue in
support of "Silent Sam's" having been erected NOT to honor the institution of slavery, but to honor the
sacrifice made during the War Between the States by young men who had called UNC home. The
young men of North Carolina, both rich and poor responded to their State's appeal to defend her from
invasion. As inconvenient as the truth and facts often are to those who refuse to accept them, the
vast majority of North Carolinians never owned a slave and never would have either due to anti-
slavery views or the expense associated with the institution. That war was fought for myriad reasons
which were inextricably intertwined. Yes, slavery was a part of it, but by far not the only reason.

If one looks hard enough, every historical figure could be defamed and every statue, building, park,
etc. could be torn down, have its name changed, or be demonized on the basis of "racial prejudice" or
any number of other hot button issues championed today by those who worship the hardcore liberal
dogma so inappropriately styled "political correctness."

As a teacher of history on the high school and college levels, my mantra was always, and remains,
respect everyone's history and respect everyone's view of that history, but to "never judge the
people of the past by the standards of the present." "Historical cleansing" is, or should be, just as
repugnant to an educated, civilized people as "ethnic cleansing." I would think this self-evident,
especially among the highly educated individuals at our colleges and universities. But, in that, I am
apparently wrong. Objectivity in the education process, free thought, free and civilized discourse, the
ability to agree to disagree without acrimony, and common sense appear to have been sacrificed in
order to appease the gods of Leftist extremism and political correctness.

Like a great many taxpayers of this State I see the lack of objectivity in the classroom at UNC-CH and
the tolerance of extra-lawful activities on campus by liberals who use rude and in some cases
intimidation tactics to deny those with whom they do not agree the right to speak, and without
impunity, as very dangerous to the rule of law and the civil rights of all. Unimpeded mob-rule on the
grounds of the campus resulted in the destruction of a much venerated old monument while campus
police merely stood and watched.

The brand of liberalism tolerated by the University and I suspect taught by many there casts serious
doubts on the continued value of the school, and especially on the worthiness of those entrusted with
its operation to hold their positions. The institution's leadership has a responsibility not only to
educate its students in an even-handed manner, but also to set for them a good example by
protecting public property and safeguarding history "as it happened."

I appeal to you to remember that if you continue to follow a policy of disregarding the majority in order
to appease the loud, the obnoxious, and often the lawless who choose to see "racism" in anything
and everything they see is earning you and the once great University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
a very negative reputation. I find it interesting and quite ironic that those on the Left who seek to
"fundamentally change America" into a liberal utopia are using the same sorts of tactics as those
used by Adolph Hitler's Brown Shirts in the 1930s and by the secret police of Josef Stalin's reign of
terror. The far Left's using the far Right's despicable tactics! Truly ironic.

Do the right thing and restore "Silent Sam" to his previous place of honor and instead of giving in to
every loud and unruly group who in their selectively self-righteous indignation"demand" something
because "they" are "insulted." The mass of those who pay the taxes to support the school and pay
the salaries at UNC-Ch would like to see "their" history, "their" heritage, and "their" ancestors honored
and not defamed. The two positions do not have to be mutually exclusive ... unless you
choose to make it so. The basic premise of our democracy is "majority rule with minority rights." It
should not be interpreted as "carte blanche" to vilify or destroy the cultural heritage of the majority, no
matter how much you may dislike it. Regardless, it would be well to remember that people have long
memories, particularly where injustice is concerned ... even to a majority.

With respects,

LTC (Ret.) Sion H. Harrington Ill


UNC-CH , Class of 1971
Message
From: Moore, Cecelia [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=9aa6e0b69d6a4a10a47acdffb7e065d0-Cecelia Moo]
Sent: 10/15/2018 10:26:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
CC: Dibbert, Debbie [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en =50b02 lbe 7fd44aee95e43f55bdd bf0e8-Debbie Dibb]
Subject: proposal on behalf of Donald Boulton
Attachments: Boulton Proposal Oct2018.pdf

Dr. Boulton delivered this proposal to me and Debbie Dibbert and asked us to share it with the chancellor. Dr. Boulton
was Dean of Student Affairs 1972-1977; and Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 1977-1994.

Donald A. Boulton
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Emeritus
REDACTED
Chapel Hill, NC 27517
Email: dboulton@mindspring.com
PROPOSAL TO THE CHANCELLOR: ROLE AND PLACE OF STATUARY AND OTHER
WORKS OF ART ON CAMPUS

Background:

I was Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students for 26 years beginning 1972. I was hired by
Chance!ior Ferebee Taylor who had been chosen by President William Friday to draft a Master
Plan for the new University System, Many changes have been made and continue to be made
as the the Campus moved into a new era. One example: The YWCA building had been built
and paid for by a private agency on state property, The relationship was ended and the building
and program came under the supervision of the Division of Student Affairs.

Many other examples could be mentioned but not relevant to the issue before us at this time,

The statuary (Silent Sam} came to my attention in the early months of 1972. Two students
asked if I would perform their wedding ceremony before Silent Sam. l refused. !t was the first
of many times the statuary became a concern. TwentyQsix yearn of experiences that were much
more difficult than this need not be repeated. The answer: Let us affirm who we are and what
we do as an institution of higher lea.ming and give proper place to land and buildings in keeping
with our reason for being here, Let us remember the past to educate the present and improve
the future,

We now do long Qrange planning as a member of a system.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Purpose: Teaching and learning, Research, and Public Service.

Thoughts and recommendations:

1, Return the area in front of South Building to include only The We!!, Old East, Old West, The
tree to which the founder tied his horse and the lawn ending at Franklin Street

We currently have the Arboretum as a living memorial and reminder of our first Department~
Botany. One reason for this: North Carolina has more examples of flora native to lts soi! than
any other state except Hawaii,

Memorial Auditorium is a memorial to those who gave their lives for our country.

The Graveyard is a memorial to the people of this town from lts beglnning.

Given this history:

2. !t is recommended that a separate area on campus be designated to contain all the statuary
on campus with appropriate educational plaques.

All other land and buildings wm only be utilized true to the purposes of the University.
Message
From: Meinecke, Chris [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=c880105fa3214db7af86176e94169f54-Chri s Meine]
Sent: 10/15/2018 11:45:07 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Input

I don't think it should be put back in its original spot on its pedestal.

If the pedestal remains, it should be contextualized to include the full history of the statue from dedication speech to its
toppling.

Statue should not be displayed again at UNC ever.

Christopher G. Meinecke
Finance Manager
Department of Anesthesiology
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
School of Medicine
Campus Box 7010
T REDACTED F
REDACTED
REDACTED
www.med.unc.edu/anesthesiology
Message
From: Lester Levine
Sent: 10/15/2018 11:48:48 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Input
Attachments: Silent Sam Speaks 100918.docx; Race in America Concourse.docx

Attached are two pieces:

• A raison d'etre - "Silent Sam Speaks"


• A sample proposal - "Race in America Concourse"

I am a UNC alum, live in Chapel Hill and available and interested in further explaining of this material and/or
assisting in the response to the legislature.

Respectfully,

Lester Levine
Silent Sam Speaks

I have been taken down by a mob as a symbol of bigotry. That is not all of who I am. At 105
years old, I would like to speak for myself.

My dedication reflected the ongoing conflicts of the American soul. There were multiple
speeches. The last speaker, a moneyed racist individual, forever besmirched me with his now
famous hideous words; he only spoke because of his fat donation. The main speaker's words,
Governor Locke, are barely remembered, but suggest a different role for me, the University and
the state [my highlights]:

"Ours is the task to build a State worthy of all patriotism and heroic deeds," he said, "a
State that demands justice for herself and all her people, a State sounding with the
music of victorious industry, a State whose awakened conscience shall lead the State to
evolve from the forces of progress a new social order, with finer development for all
conditions and classes of our people".

Over my life, I have anchored the "front gate" to UNC-Chapel Hill, the oldest US public
university, a place of learning deliberately centered in the state to be its heart and soul, a state
that has followed the Governor's challenge, in fits and starts, helping to forever change the
South and the country for the better.

Our times now remind me of those of my birth - harsh divisiveness, fear, anger, pain. Then, our
country lay in the echoes of a bitter war that nearly ended the American experiment. "Silent"
statues of combatants rose, without "ammunition", symbolizing the need to move past conflict
and killing - sadly, yet to be completely fulfilled. This suggests that, at its core, the intent of my
creation was healing.

Now we should use the potential healing power of monument again to fulfill the University motto:
"Lux Libertas" - Light and Liberty, not just for UNC, not just for Chapel Hill, but for our
fragmented country. Shunting me away is the easy way out and rewards the ideological
lawlessness simmering in our land.

My former presence must not be obliterated. My space should become a part of needed
dialogue about the complexity of racism in fulfilling Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness for
all, which for the world, is the meaning of "America". Taking or hiding away all evidence of my
existence is admitting failure of our better angels, instead of enabling it with honest discourse.

After all, as Terry Eagleton wrote: "a critical reflection on human values and principles should be
central to everything that goes on in universities, not just to the study of Rembrandt or
Rimbaud." This is not a new role for UNC or the ground where I was placed; UNC faced racial
integration in 1950, the Speaker Ban, the death of MLK, the Vietnam War protests across the
street. ..

The gate to UNC needs to be widened into the mind, not narrowed by harsh emotions. There
need to be permanent reminders, including of me, to symbolize our strained turning toward true
respect and equality for all our citizens. Then, these pieces together can create a great space
for open dialogue to bind and seal our wounds.

"When I walk along with two others, from at least one I will be able to learn." Confucius
Race in America Concourse

Why: To fulfill the University motto: "Lux Libertas" - Light and Liberty not just for UNC, not just
for Chapel Hill, but for our country. And to follow its traditional purpose:" ... to be the guardian of
reason, inquiry and philosophical openness, preserving pure inquiry from dominant public
opinions" [Pearson College, 2018]

What: Designation of an area around "Silent Sam" and another similar-sized monument (TBD-
see below) . The immediate area close to the monuments will be secure and illegal to enter. The
area outside the secure area will be large enough for gatherings of up to ~30 people and clearly
marked as a quiet zone only for learning and discussion. As today, any attempts to damage or
alter the monuments will be illegal and digitally monitored.

Objective: Provide a safe harbor at UNC for learning and discourse about race in America. It
routinely can be used for classes, meetings, meditation, etc.

More generally, it and its monuments will become a "logo" going forward to let the world know
that UNC commits to be a place to wrestle with this issue until it is no longer an issue. As such,
it might appear on listings for:

• Annual national and/or state convocations on Race in America (NEW)


• Singular art exhibits, plays, musical performances, lectures, films, etc.

Monuments: "Silent Sam" will be restored to its original place. Additional plaques will be placed
nearby quoting the positive and negative pronouncements at its dedication: the challenge:

• Positive: Governor Locke


o "Ours is the task to build a State worthy of all patriotism and heroic deeds, a
State that demands justice for herself and all her people ... a State whose
awakened conscience shall lead the State to evolve from the forces of progress
a new social order, with finer development for all conditions and classes of our
people".
• Negative: Julian Carr (Something like this)
o They saved "the very life of the Anglo Saxon race in the South ... as a
consequence the purest strain of the Anglo Saxon is to be found in the 13
Southern States ... "
o "I trust I may be pardoned for one allusion ... rather personal. (In the summer of
1865) One hundred yards from where we stand "I performed a pleasing
duty ... horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds, because ...
she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady, and then rushed for
protection to these University buildings ... "

A new monument, of approximately the same size and scale will be built next to Silent Sam,
honoring (as Sam does) personal duty; however, in this case, of African-Americans fighting for
equal rights, for example, the NC A&T students sitting in in Greensboro.
Message
From: Ronnie Brown
Sent: 10/15/2018 12:07:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Why not relocate silent Sam to Bennett Place in Durham? It's close to orange county and has civil War
history. That way, anyone that wants to see it can visit and anyone that it offends, they don't have to
go there.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Alyce Hegedus
Sent: 10/15/2018 3:06:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Folt,

In regard to the future of Silent Sam, I am not in favor of returning the statue to its prominent place. It
feels a bit like having a statue of Hitler on display.

Silent Sam was a tradition during my years at Carolina but its absence will in no way mar my affection
for the University. And I want all alumni and students to enjoy that same affection.

Sincerely,

Alyce Binkley Hegedus


Class of 1976
Message
From: Gaines Steer
Sent: 10/15/2018 3:38:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_comon]
CC: Julian Sereno [sereno@mindspring.com]
Subject: reference ideas, as solicited

I am writing to endorse the ideas put forth by Julian Serano (p.15 of the "Chatham County Line" newspaper:
October 2018).

Please contact me if the Committee wishes.

R. Gaines Steer
Community Organizer (one who has taken the audacious oath to uphold the democratic principle)

REDACTED
Pittsboro, NC 27312
REDACTED

******************************
Message
From: Connor Winkler
Sent: 10/15/2018 6:14:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam's removal

As UNC alumni, silent Sam is a symbol of racism and hatred at our university, and will always drag down
our universities goals of equality, diversity, and the sharing of knowledge. It must be permanently
removed and amends made to the black community in and around UNC.
Thank you,
Connor Winkler
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Louise Zorowski
Sent: 10/15/2018 7:27:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Relocating Silent Sam

silent Sam does not belong on the campus of UNC. silent Sam and his pedestal should be relocated to a
place like Bennett Place.

I am a UNC graduate, BA, 1967; M Ed., 1971.

Louise Lockwood-Zorowski
REDACTED
Raleigh, NC 27615
Message
From: Nancy foglia
Sent: 10/15/2018 7:31:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Friends from around the country asked me my feelings on silent Sam being toppled.My answer was "I am
thrilled". As a freshman girl in 1971, a tour leader (male) made a point of wal king us by the s t atue and
saying that he only fires when a virgin walks by. It was a humiliating experience that I have never
forgotten. I had no idea it was a confederate monument, most students did not. He was a symbol of male
humor. I am glad he went down, and strongly believe the University should have moved him years ago.

Nancy Keathley Foglia


Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Michael Brown
Sent: 10/15/2018 7:47:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam' future

I have heard the question of Sam's future and I wonder why there would be any future for the monument at all.
Message
From: Jean Carter
Sent: 10/15/2018 8:40:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It is long past time for this symbol of, among other things, cultural repression and defense of slavery
to come down from the front gate of our beloved university.
I would like to see it placed in a protected place where it can be put into historical context.
understanding of its history can be a pa rt of our evolution into an inclusive, vibrant community.
Thank you,
Jean carter BA '72 and MD '78
Message
From: tim@newspaperconsultants.com [tim@newspaperconsultants.com]
Sent: 10/15/2018 8:57:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

To the UNC-Chapel Hill Administration:

I am writing to advise the UNC Administration of my opinion as a taxpayer, since taxpayers foot the majority of the UNC
system's bills.

I was shocked and appalled to see the statue of Silent Sam torn down with no intervention from the local authorities. It
reminded me of a similar incident in Durham regarding a monument to the Confederate Dead that was pulled down
within view of law enforcement.

Mob rule and vandalism that is not curtailed by law enforcement accomplishes nothing. It leads to anarchy.

The statue needs to be put back up until a legal method of replacing it has been done. NC General Statute 100-2.1 is
very clear regarding this issue.

The NC legal system needs to be the one to determine when, how, and if Silent Sam is to be removed. We do not need
to reward a mob for taking the law into its own hands. Please return the Silent Sam statue to its rightful place until the
legal system determines its fate.

Respectfully,

T. 0. Dellinger
tim@newspaperconsu ltants.com
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chanc]
Sent: 10/16/2018 9:27:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam:

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

· r :;:� :i::: :;.,:: ::::::: i·,::t �::. :::.::. ·:-i �: · ;:--·=�,·


::::{ ::'i:::;.:,::J:::.·.r,'H: f:C::id/.:.-i:::i:tt>:{:�.
,f.:: :;:-:: :H: :::, :��::�::: '::.-. :r:� :f �:. �:

From: 0. Max Gardner Ill <maxgardner@maxgardner.com>


Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 9:13 AM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Silent Sam:

Chancellor Folt:

I have been very concerned about the issues and incidents regarding the statute of Silent Sam. I strongly believe
that the statute should not be replaced or otherwise moved to some other location on the University grounds. I
also believe that the State Historic Commission may well have full jurisdiction over the final disposition of
Silent Sam. Dr. Kevin Cherry, the Deputy Secretary of Culture Affairs, may be the appropriate party to assist
you with this matter. Please let me know ifl can help in any way.

0. Max Gardner III


Max Gardner Law PLLC
REDACTED
Shelby, N.C. 28151-1000
REDACTED (Office)
REDACTED (Max Direct)

"A man may die, nations may rise and fall, but an idea lives on."
John F. Kennedy

"We shoulcl all have an at}iding concern for justice, with a res olve for compas sion ancl concern for others, wiU1 rnincls
unfettered by racial and other prejudices , with a dedication to service to society, with an intellectual sharpness , and
with an arJility to think straight now and thrnughout life. All of these goals are worthy of outrageous arnbitions,"

N.C, Governor Terry Sanford, September 1984

"The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance-it is the illusion of knowledge."


Daniel Jo Boorstin
"Never react to an evil in such a way as to augment it. Refuse to be an accomplice. Don't lie-don't keep your eyes
shut."
Simone Weil, 1933
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 9:28:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Si lent Sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

22~
.......... ...e.·
:J
From: Miranda Mullen Shook
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2018 9:04 PM
To: Hnath45@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight
David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>; emcmahan@littleonline.com; haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com;
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; juliagrumbles@gmail.com; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews
<hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Putnam, Savannah
Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>; Caudill, Walter Lowry <wlcaud@email.unc.edu>
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Foh and the Board of 'Trustees,

I am an alumna. I was born in Chapel Hill, I currently live in Chapel Hill, and I arn raising my children
. I met mv. future husband in Monison
here. I have wonderful memories of mv., time at the Universitv.
donn.

I fed compelled to write you because I have heard that a tally of emails and letters will determine
whether or not Silent Sam will be resunected and I find that disturbing. Leaders don't make decisions
this way. And if Silent Sain is put back up, that ,viU be a reflection on you. Do you want to be
remembered for being on the right side of history or the wrong side?

The lJniversity should be a place that welcomes all people. Silent Sam's original pmvose was to
divide, terrorize, and intimidate. 'Ihere is no place for that in our community. Resurrecting Silent Sain
vvould be a stain and an embarrassinent for the University,, town, and state.

I also believe that many people, like myseH: who didn't protest and pubhdy advocate for the removal
of the statue would find the courage to speak up if the statue is put back up.

Reinstalling Silent Sam would inflict unnecessary hann to our community. I urge you not to bring
Silent Sam back to our campus. Thank you.

Sincerely,

lVIiranda Mullen Shook


Class of 2004
Message
From: Michael May
Sent: 10/16/2018 9:29:13 AM
To: rjhimmel@gmail .com
Subject: Silent Sam I UNC student Maya Little found guilty I News & Observer

I am going to put my blood and ink on the UNC library because there are "hate" books in there that praise the
confederatacy.

https://www.heraldsun.com/news/loca1/article2 l 9844085 .html


Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:05:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: A Request to Relocate Silent Sam to . New Location from a UNC History Ph.D. Alum

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

22~
.......... ...e.·
:J
From: Hilary Green
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 9:28 AM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Cc: public@bog.northcarolina.edu
Subject: A Request to Relocate Silent Sam to. New Location from a UNC History Ph.D. Alum

Chancellor Falt and the current UNC Board of Governors,

I am writing as a concerned graduate over the handling of the Jim Crow era memorial erected by the North
Carolina chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

As a historian who received my doctorate from the History Department, I have been teaching Carr's 1913
dedication speech since its 2009 recovery by fellow UNC Ph.D. alum Adam Dom by in my undergraduate and
graduate courses at Elizabeth City State University and currently at The University of Alabama.

I am a firm believer of education. Knowing the history of the destruction of African American sites of the Civil
War for highways and urban renewal efforts, I am typically reticent of the removal of markers and advocate
recontextualization and the addition of new inclusive monuments to balance out the racial history silenced by
the UDC display. However, when a site becomes the site of the white supremacist logic originally imbued by
the Jim Crow era monument builders by a present generation and a source of violence against the diverse
campus community, the only solution is to removal to an archival space or museum.

I have watched from Alabama neo-Nazis, fascists, and even neo-"Heritage and Not Hate" outside agitators
invade and attack current students physically, rhetorically, and virtually. I watched in horror from my Alabama
home this weekend on WRAL.com and Daily Tar Heel coverage, individuals draped in CSA battle flags claim
that no African Americans have a place on the campus. I watched in horror as a real outside agitator walk up
and punch in the face a student desiring the maintainance of the UNC mission to diversity.

I have also read the heightened rhetoric of Thom Goo Isl by which both emboldened these true outsider
agitators and encouraged continued violence against a community of students, faculty, alumni, and
administrators who have been speaking as one Tar Heel voice for the removal of the memorial to an alternate
site. By promoting the views of outsider agitators and not the true UNC community, the ghost of Julian Carr's
boast of horse-whipping a Negro wench grows louder and all efforts since the desegregation of the campus
becomes moot.

At this time, the only thing that will rectify this sad chapter in UNC history is leadership.

A suitable home for the toppled Sam would be in Wilson Library, specifically the North Carolina Collection,
with interpretative panels of Carr's speech and the long history of protest of the monument included. Silent
Sam must not be replaced. If so, I fear that a Charlottesville-like incident will occur by true outside agitator. At
this point, more blood caused by white supremacist logic intended by the UDC members and Julian Carr's
1913 dedication speech will be spilled.

For the past two years, I have suspended my financial contributions to the University. If the Jim Crow
memorial is restored to its empty pedestal, I will take it as a reminder of my race, gender, and place by the
current UNC administration. I am not and will not be a silenced "a horse-whipped a negro wench" whose
"skirts hung in shreds." Rather, I will continue to employ my UNC training to good use to counter
those who wish that UNC was the campus of pre-integration.

Sincerely,

Hilary Green, Ph.D. '10


Associate Professor of History
Department of Gender and Race Studies
University of Alabama
Author of Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890 (Fordham
University Press, 2016).
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:10:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Letter Regarding Silent Sam Decision
Attachments: Allred Letter September 2018.pdf

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
9.l9-962-.lSl36

From: James Allred


Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 11:01 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; juliagrumbles@gmail.com;
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry <wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews
<hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com;
hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>;
Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Cc: Somers, Clayton <clayton@unc.edu>; Scott, Tj <tj_scott@unc.edu>
Subject: Letter Regarding Silent Sam Decision

Dear University Trustees and Chancellor Folt:

As you consider your recommendation to the Board of Governors concerning the Silent Sam statue, I ask that
you please consider my views as expressed in the attached letter. Thank you for your careful consideration and
your leadership on behalf of Carolina.

James Allred
Student Body President, 2006-2007
UNC Chemistry '07 I Emory MTS '10 I UVA Law '13
September 18, 2018

Dear University Trustees and Chancellor Folt:

As you are aware, the University of North Carolina Board of Governors has directed
you to present a plan "for [Silent Sam]'s disposition and preservation" by November
15. I am writing to urge you to present a plan that will not return the statue to
monumental display, and that will only allow the statue to be seen in a setting that
makes evident its historical purpose of promoting white supremacy. This cannot
include returning Silent Sam to its former location or any other place of honor or
prominence on campus.

Silent Sam Was Erected to Serve a Particular Historical Purpose

The circumstances under which Silent Sam was erected explain the purpose and
meaning of the statue and underscore the reasons that it cannot be returned to its
former location. Much has been written about the specific words spoken by Julian
Carr at the statue's dedication. However, even more revealing is the historical
context surrounding the installation of the statue. In short, Silent Sam was erected
to make a specific political statement in opposition to African American political
power and African American education.

Following the Civil War and the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment to the US
Constitution, African Americans gained the right to vote in North Carolina for the
first time. Through the remainder of the Nineteenth Century, African Americans
exercised their political power, at times in concert with white yeomen, to bring
about a series of economic and political democratizing reforms. 1 The zenith of
African American political power came in 1894, when white populists unified with
African American voters to form a "Fusion" ticket to advocate for a more equitable
economic system, greater local government control, and greater education funding.
By 1896, the black-white Fusion ticket controlled the governorship, both US Senate
seats, 94 of 120 state House seats and 43 of 50 state Senate seats in North Carolina.

The white supremacist opponents of the Fusion coalition responded with violence,
election fraud, race-baiting, intimidation, and, finally, a coup d'etat in which they
killed black citizens and overthrew the city government of Wilmington at gunpoint.
Once they regained control of state government, the white supremacist political
coalition proceeded to systematically disenfranchise African Americans between

1This history is more fully explored in Paul D. Escott, iVlany Excellent People: Power and Privilege in
North Carolina, 18.50-1900 (Univ. of North Carolina PnJss 1985).

1
1900 and 1904 - a change that would last until passage of the Voting Rights Act in
1965. At the same time, the white supremacist political coalition began installing
Civil War memorials across North Carolina. Although only six such memorials had
been erected before 1902, 59 were standing by 1926. 2 Silent Sam, planned in 1908
and installed in 1913, was an integral part of this campaign. At the time, the
message was unambiguous: Silent Sam was erected as a celebration of the white
supremacists' triumph and as a direct threat to African Americans to stay out of the
political and white educational systems of North Carolina.

The Statue is in Conflict with Carolina's Values

The stated purpose for erecting Silent Sam in 1913 was to celebrate and maintain
white supremacy over political and educational affairs in North Carolina. In
contrast, Carolina has established itself as a leader in promoting diversity and
inclusion in higher education. As catalogued in the annual Diversity Plan Reports, 3
Carolina has committed significant institutional resources and efforts to increase
the diversity of its student body; improve academic achievement among historically
underserved students; enhance diversity among university leadership, faculty, and
staff; improve the cultural competence of the university community around issues of
diversity; engage in research that deepens our understanding of issues critical to
improving the lives of underserved populations on campus, across the state, and
beyond; and celebrate and promote the achievements of minority students, staff,
and faculty. As you are aware, this list only scratches the surface of the efforts and
achievements of Carolina to benefit historically underserved populations. Carolina
has rightly concluded that it cannot be a successful public university unless it
achieves excellence in diversity and serving historically marginalized groups.

Simply stated, the ongoing presence of Silent Sam was anathema to the values of
the university and undermined the efforts of university faculty, staff, and students
to embrace its mission as the university of the people. Returning Silent Sam to its
original position, or to any place of prominence, would contravene the significant
expense and effort the university has undertaken to promote diversity and the
benefits that diversity bestows. What good is it to put "[e]normous effort" into
training for faculty, staff, and students to identify and reduce implicit biases and
prejudices 4 if students of color are then asked to walk to class under the shadow of a
monument erected to promote white supremacy and to challenge their presence at

2 James Leloudis, History Speahs on Intentions Behind Confederate Statues, NEWS&OBSERVER,


Aug. 23, 2017.
3 Previous Diversity Plan Annual Reports are available at:

http s: // diversity. unc. edu/resources/best/reports/.


4 See, e.g., UNC Diversity Plan Report 2014-15 at 5, 24.

2
the university? What is the benefit of identifying, recruiting, and enrolling
historically diverse incoming classes, and establishing academic support for first-
generation and historically underserved students, if these students' sense of
inclusion will be undermined by a prominent demoralizing message in their
physical environment? 5

The juxtaposition between our stated values and this physical monument is not lost
on potential faculty and students. Carolina's listed top priorities include recruiting
and retaining world-class faculty and attracting and enrolling outstanding students
from North Carolina and beyond. 6 Returning a symbol of white supremacy to a
place of prominence on campus will undercut faculty recruitment and retention
efforts and will dissuade meritorious students from enrolling at Carolina. Carolina
can no longer say that Silent Sam is merely a legacy of white supremacy if its
leaders make an affirmative choice to put it back. As leaders, you must not ignore
the risk that returning the statue would communicate to faculty and students of
color that they are unwelcome here or that Carolina is uninterested in their
concerns and unsupportive of their success. Restoring the monument could also
hamper recruitment of faculty and students who are not themselves people of color,
but who are nevertheless repelled by the return of a monument to white supremacy.

The Statue Should Neither Return, Nor Be Placed on Similar Display

Your recommendation will communicate the values of the university. If Carolina is


to be true to its stated vision and values, its leaders cannot recommend returning
Silent Sam to its former location on McCorkle Place. But its presence would be no
less destructive to Carolina's priorities in similar display in some other place on
campus, where the inference of its history and purpose would be no less acute.
There is no better rebuke to the white supremacy that created the statue, the
history of which has been well documented, than to remove the statue, fully and
permanently, from the university's grounds.

Preventing the return of Silent Sam should be your goal and your recommendation.
If this course proves impossible, then any future reinstallation must make explicit

5 Silent Sam has contributed to perceived differences of experience and a lower sense of belonging
among African-American students at Carolina. Research has ckJmonstratrnl that a lower sensfl of
belonging is correlated with greater perception of stm·eotype vulnerability and the potential for
decreased academic achievement. See Loren W. Thompson, Perceptions of Stereotype Vulnerability,
Belonging and Campus Climate by African Americans Attending a Predominately White Institution
(2017) (unpublishfld Ph.D. dissm·tation, University of North Carolina at Cha pd Hill), available at
https://cdr.lib. unc.edu/indexablecontent/uuid:c8c4e8f5-dea 7 -4f2 l-9a06-8 739e36abd64.
Co See, e.g., Campaign for Carolina: Our Priorities,

https://campaign.unc.edu/#campaign_stories_grid_2_column_3.

3
(1) the full history, the circumstances, and the intentions of those that erected the
statue to exclude people of color from political and educational life in North
Carolina, including- the shameful words that accompanied its installation; (2) the
effects of the white supremacists' campaign on the citizens of North Carolina,
including- the exclusion of many from the benefits of the university; and (3) a
statement decrying- the history of the statue and publicizing- Carolina's commitment
to diversity and to promoting- the achievement of Carolina community members
from historically underserved groups. Even this path imposes costs on people of
color by asking- them to tolerate the return of a statue erected to promote white
supremacy, and it risks undermining- the priorities of the university. It also risks
any future display becoming- a flashpoint for demonstrations that disrupt the vital
work of the university. It is not clear whether it is possible to sufficiently
contextualize the statue, but any attempt to do so must be judged on whether the
display advances Carolina's mission of fostering- a productive educational and
research environment and supporting- the cohesion and mutual growth of students,
staff, faculty, and guests at Carolina. For this reason, I recommend removing- Silent
Sam from the university campus completely. But if you see fit to return it, any
display must include these steps or it will unacceptably risk Carolina's mission.

I recognize that making- such a recommendation could engender reluctance or


resistance, even from people of good intention. Yet the statue's history is as
inescapable as its ramifications for the university's priorities and future. If, indeed,
Carolina's values are what its leaders have said they are, then its leaders must hold
fast to them, even in the face of adversity. If Carolina is to enhance access to
learning- and to foster the success and prosperity of the entire rising- generation of
North Carolinians, if Carolina is to remain a great public university and a priceless
gem to North Carolina's citizens, and if Carolina is to secure access to light and
liberty for all people in the State, 7 then it cannot tolerate the restoration of the
statue to any place of honor, prominence, or uncontextualized display on campus. To
do so is an unacceptable threat to the very mission of our university.

I thank you for your careful consideration of this letter and for your stewardship of
the university of the people.

Respectfully,

James Allred
Student Body President, 2006-2007

7
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Mission and Values, https://www.unc.edu/about/mission/.

4
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chanc]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:44:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: FW: Relocating Silent Sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
9.19-962-.1586

· r :i:� :i::: ::.,:: ::::::: :).:·,:::·· �::: :::.::. n �: · r··t.:


::)· ::-�::<;�J:::.. 'r·n: -:::::::::i.:f.t,::>:t:f> L� 1

,::,i' ;::,:: *::: :if, :�e,:*:: :::. :r:� :r i:. �:

From: REDACTED
Sent: Saturday, September 1, 2018 7:49 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Relocating Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Holt and Members of the Board of Trustees--

I write you as someone deeply invested in the educational system of North Carolina, particularly the UNC
campus.

I am tax payer; a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (MA, 1990; PhD, 1996); and a
tenured full professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I also have a REDACTED who
currently attends UNC-CH.

Given its undeniably racist history, Silent Sam has no place on the campus of a modern state university.

Why would we memorialize a statue whose express purpose at the time of its installation was to degrade and
warn black people away from a college campus?

It's our duty to educate and welcome ALL the students of our state.

The shame waste of tax dollars to protect this monument to racism last year amounted to just under
$400,000. May I remind you that would have paid the tuition of at least 42 low income students? Our duty as
members of the UNC system is to use our resources responsibly to educate students--not protect outdated
memorials to racism.

Although my preference would be to see the statue completely removed from campus, if a building can be
found to house the statue where it can be historically contextualized, then that seems like a reasonable
compromise.

Sincerely,

Karen Wey1 er
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
REDACTED
REDACTED
REDACTED

REDACTED

T elephone: REDACTED
FAX: REDACTED
Email: REDACTED
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:48:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: An Absolute Shame on UNC to Reinstate Silent Sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

22~
.......... ...e.·
:J
From: Lindsay Jaacks •
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 3:07 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; juliagrumbles@gmail.com;
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry <wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews
<hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com;
Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>;
Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>
Cc: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: An Absolute Shame on UNC to Reinstate Silent Sam

Dear Board of Trustees:

My name is Lindsay Jaacks and I am an Assistant Professor at Harvard and proud UNC alum - I graduated from the
Gillings School of Global Public Health with my PhD in Nutrition in 2014. The 5 years I spent in North Carolina are my
fondest memories - it will always feel like home to me. And so you can imagine my disappointment when I heard from a
colleague at UNC that the Board of Trustees is even considering reinstating "Silent Sam" back at Mccorkle Place. I
entirely agree with the Faculty of Government's statement that, "Returning the statue to any prominent location would
reaffirm the values of white supremacy that motivated its original installation. Moreover, to do so would undermine the
moral and physical security of all members of our community." The inaction of the past was disgrace enough. To
reinstate the statue now would be an absolute shame.

Instead, this could be an opportunity to do something profound. For example, as suggested by Dean Rimer: "In place of
Sam, there could be erected a statue to a person or group who furthered the causes of peace, equity and prevention. It
could become a symbol of hope and healing, a visible commitment to move forward with intention." Now that is
something to be proud of.

Sincerely,

Lindsay
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:50:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: FW: Board of Trustees and Silent Sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

· r :;:� :i::: :;.,:: ::::::: i·,::t �::. :::.::. ·:-i �: · ;:--·=�,·


::::{ ::'i:::;.:,::J:::.·.r,'H: f:C::id/.:.-i:::i:tt>:{:�.
,f.:: :;:-:: :H: :::, :��::�::: '::.-. :r:� :f �:. �:

From: Magee, Carol L


Sent: Friday, August 31, 2018 1:55 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Board ofTrustees and Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I wanted to share with you the email that I have just sent to each of the Board ofTrustee members. I feel very strongly
that Silent Sam should not be replaced on our university now that it is down. I hope that you will work with them to find
an appropriate place for the statue where it can be historically contextualized that is not on our campus as I do not
believe such a site exists here.

As a faculty member concerned both with the emotional and physical well-being for those whom UNC-Chapel Hill is a
place of work, study or visit, I am writing to strongly urge you to work with the campus' administration to find a home
for the Confederate memorial known as Silent Sam in a History Museum. There the textured story of this statue's
commission, installation, celebrated and contested presence on campus and toppling can be told in the fullest and most
appropriate manner. The values of white supremacy that it represents run counter to those of the educational mission
of our University and any action that even implicitly supports those values sends a message to our public that we are a
racist institution; with that our actions lack moral integrity and harm everyone.

Sincerely,
Carol

Carol Magee
Chair and Associate Professor
Department of Art & Art History
University of North Carolina
CB 3405
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3405
REDACTED
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:51:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Thank you/yesterday's statement

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
9.l9-962-.lSl36

From: Lowery, Malinda Maynor


Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 4:42 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: Thank you/yesterday's statement

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I know that safety and security are your top priorities at this moment, and that messaging is understandably farther
down on the list. But I wanted to say thank you for not using the words "honor" and "prominence" in yesterday's
written reaction to the Board of Governors' directive about the statue. Though your oral statement at the press
conference promised to afford the statue a place of honor and prominence where it would be protected, I think our
students and faculty simply need to hear that the University community will be included in a process to "preserve the
monument and its history," as you said in your written statement. Many of us are glad to see it down from its previous
place of honor and prominence, and now I think more people understand that we will have a voice as the future of the
statue is decided.

Thank you again for taking us in the right direction at this moment.

Take care,
Malinda Lowery

Malinda Maynor Lowery, PhD


Associate Professor of History
Director, Center for the Study of the American South
UNC-Chapel Hill
410 E. Franklin St CB# 9127
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
http://rnalindaiowerv.web.unc.edu

Author, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle (forthcoming from UNC Press, September 2018);
https://www .uncpress.org/book/97814696463 74/the-lmnbee-indians/
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:55:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: silent sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

22~
.......... ...e.·
:J
From: Megel, Joseph Lawrence
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 11:00 PM
To: Haywood D. Cochrane Jr. <haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com>; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; Julia Sprunt
Grumbles <juliagrumbles@gmail.com>; Jefferson W. Brown <jeffbrown@mvalaw.com>; Caudill, Walter Lowry
<wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews <hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>;
Jefferson W. Brown <jeffbrown@mvalaw.com>; Allie Ray Mccullen <mccullenre@aol.com>; W. Edwin McMahan
<emcmahan@littleonline.com>; Hari H. Nath <Hnath45@yahoo.com>; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>;
Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>; Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>; Chancellor
<chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: silent sam

I want to express my full fledged agreement with this statement from the Chairs of the CAS. In my 15 years
teaching at UNC, I have personally experienced the hurt and sense of alienation that the statue has
caused students, faculty and staff It has made me uncomfortable to work at an institution that supports a
representation of white supremacy. To be clear it is not read as history or celebration of culture, rather than an
assertion of white supremacy. (one need only look at the Confederate flags and the statements that "the South
will rise again" - as seen and heard by our Alamance County visitors to understand what the message of the
statue is). And I know it has deeply affected the sense of "belonging" and "welcome" that African American
students have felt on campus for decades. From the original African American graduates from 1952 on, the
statue has been a contentious and insulting presence. I also feel that the act of taking it down was "not mob"
action, but rather an inevitable reaction to years of "inaction" by administration - based upon years of
expressed opposition to its presence on campus - a literal tipping point. There is no space for Silent Sam to
return on campus. It can not stand!

I support this statement by the CAS chairs ...

"We, the undersigned department chairs of the College of Arts and Sciences ofUNC Chapel Hill, strongly
oppose the return of the Confederate memorial known as Silent Sam to its original location in McCorkle Place.
Returning the statue to any prominent location would reaffirm the values of white supremacy that motivated its
original installation. Moreover, to do so would undermine the moral and physical security of all members of our
community.
The values that the statue represents are inherently opposed to the principles of light and liberty that guide the
educational mission of UNC Chapel Hill."
Joseph Megel
Artist in Residence
Di rector, Process Series
Department of Communication
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Offi ce: REDACTED
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 1:56:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: the statue known as Silent Sam

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

From: Mitchell, Charles E


Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 3:48 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; juliagrumbles@gmail.com;
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry <wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews
<hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com;
Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>;
Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>
Cc: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>; Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>
Subject: the statue known as Silent Sam

Dear members of the Board of Trustees and Chancellor Falt,

Please do not return the statue known as Silent Sam to its former location. To do so would be an affront to the
university's values. The statue's purpose, as described by Julian Carr at its unveiling, was to intimidate people of color,
and it was allowed to achieve that purpose for far too long. It should be placed inside, in a museum, where its history
(including its ongoing value to some citizens of our state) can be properly contextualized. Contextualization in its
previous setting would not be adequate because that prominent outdoor location, in combination with the size of the
statue, would visually overshadow the contextualization, rendering it largely ineffective, and allowing the statue to
continue to intimidate.

Thank you for your work on this issue, and more generally to making our campus a better place.

Sincerely,

Charles Mitchell
Professor of Biology
http://bio"uncedu/people/faculty/mitchell/
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 2:05:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: re-locating Silent Sam

Elizabeth A. Williams
Assistant to the chancellor
919-962-1586

-----original Message-----
From: Necochea, Raul Antonio
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 12:07 PM
To: Public BOT <publicbot@unc.edu>
cc: chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
subject: re-locating silent Sam
Dear members of UNC-Chapel Hill's Board of Trustees,
my name is Raul Necochea. I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Medicine, at the UNC
school of Medicine. I write to express my strong support for chancellor Folt's position, expressed in her
message to the Carolina community last Friday, that "silent Sam has a place in our history and on our
campus where its history can be taught, but not at the front door of a safe, welcoming, proudly public
research university."
Like most at UNC, I do not want to see the statue returned to its pedestal on Mccorkle Place. Instead,
the North Carolina Gallery in Wilson Library ought to be considered as a suitable place for the display
of silent Sam. It is a dignified space, accessible and secure, where it could be surrounded by other
historical artifacts that the university has acquired. There, the statue can be accompanied by an
appropriate explanation regarding the origin of the statue, including that infamous 1913 speech by Julian
Carr, and the different meanings that distinct sectors inside and outside the university have ascribed to
it.
Thank you for your consideration. Raul Necochea
Raul Necochea, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Dept. of Social Medicine Adjunct Associate Professor, Dept. of History u. of North
Carolina, chapel Hill
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 2:09:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: The world is watching

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

22~
.......... ...e.·
:J
From: O'Hara, James J
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 1:49 PM
To: Haywood D. Cochrane Jr. <haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com>; Duckett, Chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; Julia Sprunt
Grumbles <juliagrumbles@gmail.com>; Jefferson W. Brown <jeffbrown@mvalaw.com>; Caudill, Walter Lowry
<wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews <hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>;
Allie Ray Mccullen <mccullenre@aol.com>; W. Edwin McMahan <emcmahan@littleonline.com>; Hari H. Nath
<Hnath45@yahoo.com>; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>;
Putnam, Savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>; Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Subject: The world is watching

To the Board of Trustees and Chancellor Folt,

I have written to you about the statue before, and will be as brief as possible now. In sum: please do not bring
shame and disgrace upon our beloved university before the eyes of the country and the world by restoring the
statue to a place of honor on McCorkle Place. I am as noted below the president of an international
organization devoted to the study of the poet Vergil, and at our conferences in Italy we have participants from
all over North America and Europe, with many of whom I maintain contact throughout the year. The world is
watching us now, and our reputation will suffer irreparable harm if you do the wrong thing. I understand that it
may have been possible in earlier decades for some to look at the statue with pride, and that during your years
associated with Carolina it may have taken on associations that you look back on with wistful pleasure. But the
evidence that the monument was meant to and in reality did serve to promote white supremacy is now
overwhelming, and cannot in good conscience be overlooked. I hope there are many of you who, like me, have
changed your view of the statue over the years as you learned new information about it: openness to change in
the face of new inform ati on like that is the essence of the kind of education and research we stand for. And I'm
sure you must know that this problem with never go away unless that statue is put in a museum or library. I do
thank you for your service, and I understand the challenges that you face in responding to a diverse
constituency. But there is only one choice here: please listen to your students and especially your learned and
devoted faculty, and do the right thing.

Yours sincerely,

James J. O'Hara
President, The Vergilian Society
George L. Paddison Professor of Latin, UNC-Chapel Hill
319 Murphey Hall
jimohara(@unc.edu
jimohara.web.unc.edu
vergiliansociety. org
surface mail:
James J. O'Hara
Department of Classics
CB# 3145, 212 Murphey Hall
The University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3145
Classics Dept is REDACTED, fax:REDACTED
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 2:18:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Input on BOT dec ision on the Confederate monument

Elizabeth A. Williams
Assistant to the chancellor
919 - 962 - 1586

-----original Message-----
From: Perrin, Andrew J
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 1:47 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, chuck <duckettc@email.unc.edu>; juliagrumbles@gmail.com;
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry <wlcaud@email.unc.edu>; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews
<hopkinsk@email.unc.edu>; Keyes, Bill <wkeyes@email.unc.edu>; mccullenre@aol.com;
emcmahan@littleonline.com; Hnath4S@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard <richardstevens@unc.edu>; Stone, Dwight
David <ddstone@email.unc.edu>; Putnam, savannah Kate <sakate@live.unc.edu>; chancellor
<chancellor@unc.edu>
subject: Input on BOT decision on the Confederate monument
Dear Members of the Board of Trustees:
I am writing as a dedicated educator and devoted member of the Carolina community. I respectfully
request that whatever decision is made about the confederate monument known as "silent Sam," the monument
never be returned to its original location, nor to any other spot of honor or reverence.
As the history of the monument over the past 100 years shows, it was conceived and erected in
racial animus. It has been a consistent indicator to many s t udents that they are not fu l ly welcome at
Carolina, and there is simply no way to reconcile reinsta ll ing the monument with the democratic ideals of
inclusion, mutual respect, and educational opportunity that are the core of Carolina.
I'm sure you regret, as I do, the way this matter has come to a head. I believe the current cr1s1s
is in l arge part the result of failing to take seriously the monumen t 's presence as a trul y moral and
educational question instead of only a bureaucratic one of treatment of state property. It is not too
late to correct that failure. I very much hope you will attend to the lessons of history, acknowledge the
moral importance, and permanently remove silent Sam from any position of prominence.
Thank you for your service a nd dedication to Carolina, our stude nts, and our state.
Sincerely yours,
Andrew J. Perrin
Professor of Sociology
Carolina "sell Ringer," 1793 Society
Message
From: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Sent: 10/16/2018 2:20:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: FW: Certain Remedy for Monumental Madness
Attachments: MONUMENTAL MADNESS Ed. 1112 17.docx; Transmittal to NC Hist Com 8 23 18.doc; IMG_0797.JPG

Elizabeth A Williams
Assistant to the Chancellor
919-962-1586

From: R Schoch
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 4:08 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@unc.edu>
Cc: amy_hentel@unc.edu; Canady, Joseph R <jcanady@unc.edu>; amy-hertel@unc.edu; amy.hertel@unc.edu
Subject: Certain Remedy for Monumental Madness

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I am founder and chairman of a N.C.- based foreign policy think tank (the "B.E.A." stands for
"Barristers et al").
Months before Silent Sam was felled by that loosely-knit amalgam of putatively-well-
intending miscreants, we sent to your trustees and the NC Historical Commission and the
Daughters of the Confederacy a proposal which--had they deployed it-- would have certainly
averted the events which have ensued. We sympathize and empathize -and want-with you--
to synergize with what has happened and what you elect to do by way of remediation (and
prevention) from this point forward.

In short, because the monument was criminally destroyed by vandals (setting asside the
diverse makeup of the stealthy crowd ), it should clearly be restored and the cost of
restoration taxed to the offenders by way of criminal (prosecution) restitution. But, much
more-by degree of importance-is what is to be done concomitantly with said restoration to
insure against future replications of the same potentially-catastrophic form of civil
disobedience?

The totally-failsafe answer(s) are outlined in the proposal we submitted previously to the
South Carolina legislature, the UNC Trustees and NC Historical Commission. The proposal
captioned "Monunental Madness" was widely published (AP), shared with select chapters of
the DAC, but despite its impeccably flawless tenets and features (as the optimum among all
generic modes of remedial options), it has not reached the authoritative desk that counts.
Presently foremost of which would be yours.

It is our guarantee to you that our proposal will eventually become the paradigm resolution
across the nation. It is our hope that you will take the time to read and consider it in time that
will enable my alma mater (I am a 1964 Chapel Hill grad, finishing a JD in law in Tuscaloosa, the
home of my forbears including the illustrious Confederate General (my namesake) Robert
Emmet Rodes. (I am Robert Rodes Schoch). Please do not surmise from that any leftist or
archaic leanings; I am descended from slave plantation owners in DNA only. That is not to say
my name was not on the bridge joining Tuscaloosa and neighboring Holt Alabama, separated
by the Black Warrior river. And that is not to say that the blog of the
B.E.A. www.Declaringlndependents.com) was not instrumental in getting NC to vote in our
first, partially-African American president.

While time is flying, as is your need for resolving your present and future problems as keepers
of the controversial monument, I implore you and your staff (whom I have CC'd the present
communication) IMMEDIATELY to read our proposal, affirm (as you instantly will) its
incomparable efficacy as the optimal resolution for our national (and local) dilemma in
managing these valuable ancient artifacts in our collective midst and keepings. Destroying
them in today's still
ethnically and racially diverse and still-melting pot of potential anarchy is the wrong approach.
The remedy is in the proposal. It is the only remedy which could work to quell the ancient
misplaced anger and angst on all sides (and there are far more than two). The Silent Sams of
U.S. antiquity are presently prone to catalytically become catastrophic by the opportunistic
machinations of every form of extremist our nation harbors--too numerous to list.

When you finish your read of the proposal, "Monumental Madness", please contact me so
that I can share the nature (content and aesthetic composition) of the plaque memorials we
only briefly sketch in the proposal. My personal vision includes--ancillary to the Universities'
central proclamation--bronze-relieved images of R.F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King,
underscored by carefully-chosen words of civil and racial peace and accord, such that any and
all future on-lookers would be able to quote only something from Karl Marx to justify further
assault on a monument clearly designated as one representing and celebrating what our
Nation has become, in spite of what it came through in the process of becoming what it is-
the freest nation on planet earth. (To garner some PR-positive media launch and affirmation,
we've also envisioned your replacing fallen Sam IMMEDIATELY (within 2 days) with a weather-
proof composit digital image of the fallen statue virtually identical to its bronze predecessor at
a distance of 20 feet. A temporary stand-in at best, but what an astoundingly resilient
immediate [albeit interim] retort to the abrupt/criminal toppling of Silent Sam. After all, the
message and image are the same. What could possibly militate against Sam's representation
being a modern poly composit while his bronze avatar is recovering in our monumental
recovery rooms? I can hear the national uproar of praise and ... light-hearted approval for
this ancillary gesture of determined enforcement of the law and homage to a democracy
subject only to voluntary the rule of law.) Yes, I'd like to be on the writing teams for all the
proposed plaques. I've said as much to the Daughters of the Confederacy in Tuscaloosa who
have (when I attended law school there) paid me honors in respect for my "heritage". I fully
believe that if General Rodes were alive today, he'd approve of what I am proposing to you.

Our proposal is our first attachment hereto and it is attached both in the form initially drafted
and the edited form appearing in the newspapers. Also attached you will find our letter of
transmittal to the individual members of the N.C. Historical Commission.

I ask you, Chancellor Falt, to telephone me at earliest convenience so I can share with you
further visions on the implementation of the proposed plan to silent your problems with Sam
and at the same time serve to make our University's solution of this national nemesis
paradigmatic as the natural exemplar of monumental remediation.

Best,

Robert Schoch *

Cc: Amy Hertel , Senior Advisor


Joe C

*Robert R. (Dusty) Schoch

REDACTED (regular parcels and letters)

High Point, NC 27262

Phone: REDACTED

Fax: REDACTED

Robert R. (Dusty) Schoch (www.Robertrschoch.com) is a writer, attorney, inventor (author of Milton Bradley's "Crack the
Case"; "CROSS EXAMINATION - The Mystery Game That Improves Your Brain" (available on Amazon.com this link:
htlp://www.amazon.com/Cross-Examination-Mvsterv-Improves-
Brain/dp/1493744755/ref= sr 1 l?s= books&ie=UTF8&gid=l41357060l&sr=l­
l&keywords= cross+examination+the+mvstel)'+game+that+improves+vour+brnin ).Most recent environmental patent
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6048407.html; designer (United Features Syndicate-licensed "Snoopy's Dream
Machines") htlps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOFbfl\lI922jQ and manufacturer (D.C.S. International, Inc.), inventor's
representative and broker of novel inventions (President and C.E.O. of I.D.E.A.S. , "Invention Design Enhancement And
Sales") and writer (novels, essays, screenplays) living in High Point, N.C. Melding of legal/writer/cinematic arts illustrated
in on-line composition "Search for Excellence" at: http://www.iatl.net/files/public/78_search_i4a.pdf BA (English) degree,
UNC Chapel Hill, JD (law) U. of Ala., Tuscaloosa. Dusty is founder and scribe of the B.E.A. ("Barristers et al") a N.C.-
based, politically-independent, peace-oriented foreign policy think tank. He is also co-editor (foreign policy) of
www.Declaringlndependents.com , through the contact link of which readers are invited to correspond with him. His recently
published novel, screenplay and soon-to-be-released movie, "EX MACHINA" are the story of an environmental hero who
succeeds in saving the world from ... us. "Ex MACH/NA-A Revolution of One" now available on Amazon.com.
https://www.amazon.com/Ex-Machina-Revolution-Robert-Schoch/dp/1499276869
MONUMENTAL MADNESS

Shameful lack of leadership in solving


Simple Problems like Silent Sam

The fighting and racial strife sweeping the Country regarding statues of Civil War soldiers and
other icons is insanity, and the blame for it must fall on our pathetic present leaders. The most
recent racial rant in the news is (Durham Herald-Sun's) report of protests of "free speech"
violations by a cop doing undercover Tweeting to tap into the intentions of those demanding the
demolition of Silent Sam--the UNC Statue of a lone rebel given UNC (Chapel Hill) by the
Daughters of the Confederacy in 1913 to honor the UNC boys who (among 260,000 others)
forfeit their lives in America's darkest-of-all historic annals.

Why even consider the current arguments!? Sure it's rational to claim that the statue--in 1913--
constituted a symbol of Confederate Pride, nostalgia for the "lost cause" and respect for the
Southern sons who perished following the orders of their warrior leaders. Sure it's correct to say
there was a racial issue in the Civil War-which along with arguments over state's rights to
secede will be debated forever (if you actually lack that much to do).

But then again, look to Egypt: There is zero debate over the fact that the great pyramids were
built by slaves under the threat of death by demagogic nutcases claiming to be gods in need of a
place to sleep for all eternity. And no one is demanding we demolish those mounds of
monumental madness. Ditto for China's Great Wall all and Trump's planned anti-Mexican one.

So far, our puny putative "leaders" have permitted Dylan Roofs madness successfully to spawn
more bigots to rekindle Civil War emotions and mentalities that have wreaked havoc---from
Charleston through Charlottesville and now to Chapel Hill.

What should our leaders have done? It's so simple it's shameful. Statues don't "speak" for
people who are living today. Like pyramids in the sand, they speak for the archaic mentality
which existed at the time they were conceived and chiseled. That's why they're called
"monuments" -- the root of the term implying "memory" (L: "moneo''-"to remind"). What we
don't remember in history--sages teach us-we're most apt to repeat. Yeah, let's tear that statue
down until enough of us forget the 620,000 American boys sacrificed by their foolish elder
leaders so we can revive that insanity and have another war based on the beliefs and bigotries of
Americans 156 years ago.

Again-instead of toppling our "monuments" (Confederate and/or Union), what could our
leaders have done to prevent the past and brewing racial tension and violence? Simple: Review
the facts and change the plaques and leave the monuments (statues) as they are. The plaque
under Silent Sam on Franklin Street could (and should) tell the "true/new story" about the people
who erected the monument and what they were feeling and implying when they decided to
memorialize those poor innocent and obedient boys led to their deaths by orders of officers and
statesmen too stubborn and stupid to negotiate a peaceful resolution of political and economic
differences between friends, cousins and citizens of the most blessed nation on earth.
I made one mistake in writing this op/ed: I implied that times have changed since the real Silent
Sam was blown off his horse in battle by union shrapnel. They really haven't. The leaders who
led us to that monumental madness in 1861 were no more foolish and inept than the ones today
who can't "detox" our archaic art with fresh plaques which remove the taint of old bronze and
paint.

After all-just like the mummies in those pyramids of Egypt-UNC's celebrated rebel, Sam is
quite silent-and thoroughly dead. So let's put the fighting and fiction behind us-- Let's put a
plaque under his statue saying-among other things-- "Sam, we're so sorry our leaders got you
involved-and killed at such and early age-for such a cause as secession from our great Union.
But we're all grateful for your sacrifice because, since you and your 259,999 (southern)
companions fell, there hasn't been another Civil War, and slavery went away as a result of the
conflict in which you gave your life.

A challenge to our wannabe leaders out there: Why not end the conflict with truth and fact:
Leave the monuments intact-by putting facts on the plaque? How could any hyper-righteous
racist claim that Silent Sam is facing North in an offensive pose of defiance when the plaque
beneath him is telling us the whole truth (including the fact that his ammo belt is gone). The war
is over, people. Please forward this message to any actual leaders you know and insist they put
up the necessary plaques that put our ancient monuments into temporal (and temperamental)
perspective. Let monuments stay where they are in the context of a new era of enlightenment as a
reminder of how heroically we have emerged from our era of monumental madness.

Dusty Schoch*

Robert R. Schoch is a High Point writer and lawyer who can be reached on his website
www.RobertRSchoch.com
ROBERT R. SCHOCH
ATTORNEY AT LAW
REDACTED

Ph: REDACTED Email: Rschoch@triad.rr.com FAX: REDACTED

TRANSl\fITTAL MEMO

TO: N.C. Historical Commission

DATE: 8 2318 FROM: R. Schoch

NO. of PAGES

RE: Confederate Monuments " Monumental Madness"

Dear Commissioners,

As founder of the B.E.A. ( a North-Carolina based foreign policy think tank;


website: www.Declaringindependent's.com, ) , I wrote for media publication
and to assist the UNC Trustees in solving their "Silent Sam" conundrum, the
attached article, sent herewith both in typed document form and a (blurry) copy of
the published news feature.

We gave advanced copies of the article to the UNC Trustees (directing same to
Julia S. Grumbles on 11-12-17), in ample time for her Board to have averted the
recent vandalism (the toppling of Silent Sam).

I read in the news today your Commission's inchoate plans to change the
messages on (or contiguous to) the Civil War monuments. That is the essential
gist our earlier proposal made through the media.

In moving forward, it is our hope that some of the logic and suggestions in the
forwarded article ("Monumental Madness") may assist you in gaining support for
the continued course of remediation your Commission appears to be espousing.

As the great-great grandson of Alabama's (Confect.) General Robert Ern1net


Rodes, I would consider it a privilege to assist you in fashioning the verbal
etchings in the monument bases installed to preserve history, pay due respect and
honor to the fallen warriors, and deal with our culture's evolution at the same
time. Bigotry-always on both sides of these situations-is ubiquitous, but can be
dealt with. My favorite (auto-aphorized) is-"What do sane folk do when the
ROBERT R. SCHOCH
ATTORNEY AT LAW
REDACTED

Ph: REDACTED Email: Rschoch@triad.rr.com FAX: REDACTED

Klan threatens to exercise their Constitutional rights to march through the streets
of your town? Answer: Don't go. Don't watch. Don't "oppose". Do urge all you
know to do the same.

The gentleman with whom I spoke said that he would circulate this docmnent with
attachments to the Commissioners at large, with my compliments for the measures
they have already initiated to instill a modicum of remedial moderation and sanity
in the process of dealing with an X-generation's reaction to a 19 th Century social
expression. It is certainly a situation which must be dealt with, but as certainly not
a problem difficult to solve. So far, across the country, from the fiscal side, the
racial side and the governmental standpoints, there has been predominantly a
protracted succession of... Monumental Madness.

Thanks for what you are attempting. Your work so far smacks of promise that our
State may become the paradigm for efficacious resolution of this mounting
monumental madness.

Best,

Robert Rodes Schoch*

*Robert R. (Dusty) Schoch (www.Robertrschoch.com) is a writer, attorney, inventor (author of Milton


Bradley's "Crack the Case"; "CROSS EXAMINATION- The Mystery Game That Improves Your Brain"
(available on Amazon.com this link: http://www.amazon.com/Cross-Examination-Mystery-lmproves­
Brain/dp/1493744755/ref= sr_1_1?s = books&ie = UTF8&qid= 1413570601&sr = 1-
1&keywords= cross+examination+the+mystery+game+that+improves+your+brain ).Most recent
environmental patent http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6048407.html; designer (United Features
Syndicate-licensed "Snoopy's Dream Machines") https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOFbfM922jQ and
manufacturer (D.C.S. International, Inc.), inventor's representative and broker of novel inventions
(President and C.E.O. of I.D.E.A.S. , "Invention Design Enhancement And Sales") and writer (novels,
essays, screenplays) living in High Point, N.C. Melding of legal/writer/cinematic arts illustrated in on-line
composition "Search for Excellence" at: http://www.iatl.neVfiles/public/78_search_i4a.pdf BA (English)
degree, UNG Chapel Hill, JD (law) U. of Ala., Tuscaloosa. Dusty is founder and scribe of the B.E.A.
("Barristers et al") a N.C.-based, politically-independent, peace-oriented foreign policy think tank. He is
also co-editor (foreign policy) of www.Declaringlndependents.com , through the contact link of which
readers are invited to correspond with him. His published novel and soon thereafter to be released movie,
"EX MACHI NA" are the story of an environmental hero who succeeds in saving the world from ... us. "Ex
MACH/NA-A Revolution of One" now available on Amazon.com. https://www.amazon.com/Ex­
Machina-Revolution-Robert-Schoch/dp/1499276869