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Message

From: kynita Stringer-Stanback [atinyk@ucsb.edu]


Sent: 8/20/2018 11:54:29 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Deep Rooted Alumnist

Flag: Follow up

Good evening Chancellor Folt,

Today I was doing some research for an article I will be publishing next fall, the working title is, "From Slavery
to College Loans." My article looks at the arc of my ancestral history to my UNC academic career and how that
has shaped my career as a librarian for the past 18 years.

My research today focused particularly on the First Nation Indigenous Communities who were there prior to
Orange County becoming Orange County.

My fiance sent me a text this evening to tell me that Silent Adam had been toppled.

You see, my Great-Great-Great-Great Grandfather, November Caldwell was a "gift", from the estate of Helen
Hogg Hooper's first husband.

As such he came with her when she moved to Chapel Hill to become the wife & First Lady, if you will, of
NCU(what they called UNC back then).

I just want you to know as a descendant of November & Rosa, Wilson & Susan, Emma, Bruce & Minnie,
Catherine & Leon, that I stand with the students and you can too.

We are at a point in our nation's history where we can stand up to the white, heteropatriarchal, hegemonic,
supremacy that has infested our global society.

Right now, leaders with the same rhetoric as those who lead our nation, continue to actualize and mobilize
political power the world over. We must stand in the small victories that send positive tides throughout the
nation as well.

I believe that white supremacy is a societal cancer that rots away at the moral fabric of our nation and world
each day. Denigration & dehumanization of people is wrong and it is all right to say so. Most confederate
memorials were placed during reconstruction to intimidate Black political agency in the south.

Put Silent Sam in a museum, but it's time to put him away.

I thank you for your time and attention to this matter. May the good Lord bless you & keep you.

Aluta Continua,

kynita

kynita stringer-stanback
Black Studies & Sociology Librarian
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, California 93106-9010
REDACTED
r�k@ucsb.edu
Message
From: Susan Abken
Sent: 8/21/2018 7:13:15 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: for Dr. Carol Folt from an former UNC-CH T.A.

Flag: Follow up

Good Morning!
Please pardon She is brave, and a good representative of her generation. I hope you will invite her into
your office for coffee or tea, or take her out to lunch somewhere. I earned an M.A. in German years ago at
UNC-CH. I am thankful for last night's activities. Perhaps Sam could be dragged out to the NC beaches
somewhere and lots of waves could wash over him on his side, or perhaps he could be buried at sea in silence.
Maybe the art department could design a new, replacement statue, one with hope for a peaceful future, on top of
and to put the sad history of slavery and racism into place, or the pedestal could go out to sea, too.

Sincerely yours,
Susan Abken
Message
From: Hugh Deaner
Sent: 8/21/2018 7:48:49 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Alumnus supports removal of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Dr. Folt,

I received my masters degrees in regional planning and business administration from UNC Chapel Hill in 1996.
Acknowledging we could quibble over the methods of students who toppled the Silent Sam statue, I hope we
can agree it should *never* be reinstalled. In the strongest terms I implore you *not* to re-erect this monument,
which always reflected the white supremacy of its sponsors and in the present day threatens public safety.

To my mind, the only exception would be ifUNC Chapel Hill were to dedicate a museum to its racist past, then
Silent Sam might serve as a useful exhibit.

Thank you and best regards,


Hugh Deaner
Message
From: Don Baker
Sent: 8/21/2018 8:41:09 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: FW: Stature destruction

Flag: Follow up

From: Don Baker


Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 8:40 AM
To: 'president@northcarolina.edu'
Subject: Stature destruction

Mrs. Spelling, My name is Donald Baker I live in Youngsville NC. I sent two of my children to UNC Chapel Hill and the
both have degrees from you university and I am very proud of them both and up to last night was proud of your and my
university. To see part of it destroyed as I did on TV should not be tolerated. When I think of all the hard earned money
that I have spent with this university it really makes me mad. I hope that you will do you very best to prosecute the ones
responsible for this destruction and return the property as it was, in other words replace the stature to its original shape
before last night. I have always been proud to tell people that two of my children graduated from Carolina, but today I
am ashamed to say that. Please help to restore the university that I paid for my children to attend so I can again be
proud to tell people that my children went there.

Thank you for your time,

Donald Baker
Message
From: Dibbert, Debbie [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =50B021BE7F D44AEE95 E43F55BDDBF0E8-DE BBi E DI BB]
Sent: 8/21/2018 8:56:56 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]; Hertel, Amy Loe kl ear
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =92d8a 7a 8722f4 7 cfa35 ld3f9def5093 7-Amy Loe kl ea]
Subject: FW: Idea to forward to Carol Folt

Flag: Follow up

From: Parker, Rob


Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 8:56 AM
To: Routh, David S ; Dibbert, Debbie
Subject: FW: Idea to forward to Carol Falt

From:
Date: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 at 8:08 AM
To: Rob Parker <rjparker@emaiLune,edu>
Subject: Idea to forward to Carol Falt

Rob:

I don't have Carol's email, but wanted to give her an idea without editorializing.

She's faced with ah hard decision about 'what to do now?'. Here's an outside of the box idea:

Leave the statue in place, vandalized, as a statement about intolerance. Just that simple. Let people define it how they will, but the
statue can remain a stimulant of dialof:,'Ue on many fronts. If you put it up again, you run the risk of a repeat performance. If you tal<:e it
down, you cave to those who say they have the right unilaterally to determine what stays and goes in a public institution. As the Chair
of an Art Museum, I have to say I have strong views on the destruction of art for any reason....

Would you mind forwarding this to her? No reply to me of any sort is necessary.

Best,

Jim Alexandre
Message
From: Monica Eiland
Sent: 8/21/2018 9:29:55 AM
To: Dibbert, Douglas Steven [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =365d96a2f3d94d5eb948d4c lc9d7668f-Douglas Ste]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be 32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Why is it so hard to say goodbye to Silent Sam?

Flag: Follow up

Dear Mr. Dibbert and Dr. Folt,

In my first waking moments this morning I heard on the radio the jubilant hoots of folks pulling Silent Sam
down from his pedestal and felt a certain misplaced wistfulness alongside my pride. We've all known for a long
time what an awkward issue he represented, but for whatever reason, no one could seem to get around to doing
anything about him until this admixture of the current inhabitants took matters into their own hands. So now
that the protesters have done the hard thing by pulling Sam off his pedestal, I suggest the university do what it
does best, put on its thinking cap, and come up with a thoughtful solution to this problem that does not involve
expelling and firing people for taking a stand. In this letter I'll make my own suggestions.

I'll preface this by saying that I know the complexity of the issue (for white people at least). Some of my
forebears go back to the 1600's in North Carolina; I was born and raised in North Carolina; and I got my start in
adult life at UNC before setting off into the wider world. We have all kinds of people in my bloodline, including
willing and unwilling conscripts to the Confederate Army and the near-obligatory one drop of blood from
Africa. In the little NC town where I spent most of my childhood, we had our own version of Silent Sam in the
town square and de facto segregation in our living arrangements, which my parents used quietly for our own
teachable moments. Although a favorite phrase in the area where I grew up between parents and children was
"Let's not be ugly," it seems strange that for so long it was possible to ignore the existence of this huge statue
memorializing being on the wrong side of a gut-wrenching war. Why is it so hard to let go of these hurtful
monuments? Why shouldn't we melt them all down? Is it on account of how much money and artistry was
spent on them, or do we actually believe that the South was a better place with slavery? Do we feel chastised for
something we believe we personally had no part in (though we've benefited)? Do we have an emotional
attachment to the past, whatever it is, or to specific long-dead relatives lost in the fray? Do we need to feel we
haven't just swept everything under the rug? But I digress.

At Chapel Hill we are big on sculpture gardens and quiet contemplation and context. Now that Sam is off his
pedestal, I suggest we move him to some quiet corner with room for two statues and a bench, maybe
somewhere near the Southern Historical Collection. Maybe some folks could take a little "time out" over there
and think seriously about that question "Who [did] it hurt?" to keep Sam in his old place (though numerous
members of the student body and faculty have been answering that for quite some time). Sam should stand at
ground level with the rest of us, accompanied by a plaque explaining a bit about his history, his new scars
intact. Consider, if he had been taken down when people started asking nicely, he might not be looking so
bedraggled now, and protesters wouldn't have had to risk life and limb to pull him down on their own (and
consider, that was their own adult choice to take that risk). Maybe Sam could share his space with a statue of an
African family - father, mother, child - in the process of escaping their bondage on the underground railroad.
Or perhaps we shouldn't make them hide their heroism alongside the banished Silent Sam at all, but give them
his old place on the quad. Giving this decision over to the Black Student Movement and faculty seems like the
right thing to do. I'll bet if every alum sent in $20, we could do this with minimal financial pain to any one
party.
And what about that big, empty pedestal on the quad now? There's the BSM option. Or perhaps a place for
some World War II hero? My eleven-year-old son suggests an inanimate object such as a rocket, or a book, or a
vote by all students (might make a fun campus-wide contest to lighten up the proceedings).

Or maybe we should leave it empty, waiting for another hero worthy of the whole university. Maybe every
student who enters should clamber up there and consider: What makes a hero worthy to stand above that quad
for everybody?

Best regards,

Dr. Monica M. Eiland, PhD ('95)


Message
From: Judy Edwards
Sent: 8/21/2018 9:54:44 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]; Crisp, Winston B
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=9cebb5b9571a4744be32a1024bda3604-Winston BC]; Payne, Christopher A
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=4fd850e246e5411e8eb8b8ea7909dbe7-Christopher ]; Shuford, Bettina C.
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =68a289c739184179ae33d0319ea99ec9-Bettina C.]
Subject: FW: Silent Sam Buddy Bench
Attachments: Silent Sam Buddy Bench.pdf

Flag: Follow up

In light of last night's events, our Buddy Bench suggestion is more relevant than ever.
I do hope we have the opportunity to meet and propose a means to have peaceful discussions.
Sincerely,
James Edwards (UNC MBA 2007) and Judith Hagopian-Edwards

From: Judy Edwards


Sent: Monday, August 13, 2018 11:31 AM
To: chancellor@unc.edu; wbcrisp@email.unc.edu
Subject: Silent Sam Buddy Bench

Please see attached letter

Sincerely,
Judy Hagopian-Edwards
Judy Hagopian-Edwards

8/12/2018

Dear Chance llor Folt and Vice Chancellor Crisp,

I would like to meet with you to propose a solution to the Silent Sam situation. Have you
heard of the Buddy Bench? The benches are placed in playgrounds al! over the country.

My husband and I would like to donate 2 Buddy Benches to be placed by the Silent Sam
statue.

The purpose is simple. Instead of defacing the statue, encourage stude nts to sit on the
benches with those who may have opposing views and ta lk. Even t hough the ind ividuals
may never agree, they can learn to listen and try and understand the other persons
point of view. The key is to live and coexist and most importantly respect one another.

! don't think removing the statue solves anything but ignoring the feelings of those who
fee! so strongly about the past needs to be addressed.

As an Armenian-American, my parents and grandparents often reminded me of the


Armenian Genocide. ! have learned ; Forgiveness is not only a gift to the perpetrator; it
is also a gift to the one who forgives.

We look forward to the opportunity to meet with you.

Sincerely,
• ,I

l,.,..-v - ;.r 1.,v . . .t.-,F - -

(/I /
.,,·
Message
From: Anthony Bruno
Sent: 8/21/2018 10:31:11 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]; Terry Stoops
[tstoops@johnlocke.org]; Terry Weigers Trey Baldwin
Subject: What does removing 'Silent Sam' really mean?

Flag: Follow up

'Silent Sam' had stood silent for over 100 years, quietly observing
ten decades
of academic successes, including the historic acceptance of Black
students
more than fifty years ago!

Yet, such accomplishments are meaningless to those that find


displeasure
in every direction, and this statue is the latest, no matter the reason
it was
erected in 1913, a memorial to the nearly 300,000 men and boys
that lost
their lives in battle, a deserving remembrance, especially a 'silent
one'.

The University of North Carolina and its board of governors may


breath
a collective shy of relief, believing this will bring calm; it will not!
They
are mistaken to believe with 'Silent Sam' taken down protests with
end.

The students and others that cheered last night will not be cheering
today,
their pleasure will be short lived, their 'work' not done. One
tumbled statue
will not fill the desire for as many "pounds of flesh" they can gather.
This tyrannical behavior will continue until confronted by leaders
with
spines, not weakness as seen from university officials here and
across
the country.

The removal of 'Silent Sam' will not sooth those filled with this
feigned
outrage or end of similar demands on UNC and others schools
where
organized student groups ferret out even the slightest hint of
anything
that disturbs them, intent to weaken institutional structure, a goal
universities leaders have yet to grasp.

With 'Silent Sam' gone, what he represented should not be


forgotten,
the sacrifice of so many.

A memorial should be erected, fitting for lives given. Whether the


school has the courage is a question I cannot answer.

Regards,
Anthony Bruno
Cary,NC
Message
From: Mitch
Sent: 8/21/2018 10:31:47 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c];
president@northcaro lina.edu
Subject: Sale of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Holt and President Spellings,

I would like to purchase the remains of Silent Sam . Who should I contact about this possibility?

Thank you,

Mitch Parker
Message
From: Ted Leger
Sent: 8/21/2018 12:45:00 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam - offer to relocate to my farm

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Falt,
My name is Ted Leger and I own a small farm in rural Southwest Virginia.
I am contacting you to propose a solution to relocating Silent Sam.
You are more than welcome to transport the statue to my farm in Tannersville, VA.
I have a beautiful ninety acre farm nestled in the valley of Tannersville.
I have ten acres still in hay, and I would rather put those ten acres to better use.
This is a legitimate offer. We can work out the details.
I would love to turn my ten acres into a park that allow people to come and see the old confederate statues and
monuments, if they desired.
Why not start with Silent Sam. It seems appropriate.
Feel free to contact me at

Sent from Mai l for Windows 10


Message
From:
Sent: 8/21/2018 12:45:35 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: UNC Families [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=00aa67abb78e4a94830634a58478fb71-DSA NSCPP P]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt:

As a UNC alum (M.A. '88, Ph.D. '93), a historian chairing an academic department at a sister institution, and
lastly I write to express my sympathy with your office's almost impossible
situation in addressing the issue of Silent Sam--an issue that took a precipitous turn last night with the toppling
of the statue. Besieged by faculty and students on one side and by the UNC BOG and right-wing alumni and
legislators on the other, either option legally open to UNC (i.e., the removal of the statue to a museum or letting
it remain in its location) would have engendered strong opposition. I take your communique reacting to last
night's events in that spirit.

That said--and also recognizing the unlawful nature of what transpired last night--I do want to express my
strong elation at the statue being gone and hope that it will now be moved to an indoor location where it can be
properly contextualized and will also not cause any further harm to the campus community. and especially the
African-American students and faculty who had to endure the statue all of these years. Silent Sam was already a
divisive issue in the 1980s when I first enrolled at Carolina, and the statue should have and could have removed
long before the politics of this state took a sharp rightward tum some 8 years ago. Like Rosa Parks, the
protesters realized that lawful action could not achieve justice, and they took matters in their own hands. As you
confront irate descendants of Confederates threatening to withhold their donations, please know that tens of
thousands of alumni (and in all likelihood, a majority) feel very differently.

I'm proud to be a Tar Heel today.

Best wishes,
Message
From: william@walkercsi.com [william@walkercsi.com]
Sent: 8/21/2018 2:23:24 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Recommended solution for Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Dr. Folt:

My name is William Walker. I am a former US Army officer and a graduate of UNC-CH '84.

I would like to make a recommendation that would quite possibly make all concerned parties satisfied with the presence
(or not) of Silent Sam.

May I suggest that UNC-CH replace Silent Sam with a statue representing all UNC students (male, female, black, white
and other) who fought and died in all US wars from the Civil War to the present era.

I could easily see this as a solution to other cities and universities that are experiencing similar problem.

I would personally love to see two figures from the Civil War one North and the other South in a fraternal embrace.

If this idea is appealing to you and the board, I personally know a world class sculpture, Blair Buswell

https://www.b1airbuswe1Lcom/monuments-1 whose work includes dozens of pieces for the NFL hall of Fame, Oscar
Robertson, Charlton Heston, Mickey Mantle, Jack Nicklaus, John Wooden and dozens of others, who may also be
interested in solving this problem for UNC-CH.

I love my alma mater, and do not want to see the University torn apart by this issue.

Please let me know your thoughts.

Respectfully,

William G. Walker
President
The Walker Consulting Group
REDACTED
Waxhaw, NC 28173
REDACTED

www.walkerCSl.com
Message
From: Ev Dove
Sent: 8/21/2018 2:47:54 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: margaret.spellings@unc.edu
Subject: Next Step

Flag: Follow up

The Sad Silent Sam Saga needs to end.


UNC is so much more than how we are being painted with this media attention.
Please take steps to have charges and honor court hearings dismissed against the doctoral student,
move the statue to Ackland museum, and let this sad, sad, sad issue end.

Kind regards,

Evelyn Dove
1st black UNG-Chapel Hill Student Body Secretary
Message
From: E. Anise Simon
Sent: 8/21/2018 9:53:48 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: Hertel, Amy Locklear [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=92d8a7a8722f47cfa351d3f9def50937-Amy Locklea]; Canady, Joseph R
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3c1281d747c444c081f833b0fec9944f-Mr Joseph R]
Subject: In support of student organizers

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I hope this email finds you well. I am an alumni of UNC Chapel Hill & the former Chair of a UNC student
organization. Until recently, I was a community member and board member of several local organizations
supporting women's health and racial justice in the Triangle area.

I am also a person of color who had to walk past Silent Sam regularly while I was attending classes. North
Carolina slave owners and Jim Crowe supporters physically, sexually, and emotionally abused the ancestors of
the many in-state Black students on campus. The presence of Confederate memorials are harmful to the mental
wellbeing ofUNC's Black students. I am in support of the students who removed the statue in a non violent
way.

As a regular donor to the university and an engaged alumni, I am disappointed to hear about how many
resources have been spent protecting this racist monument and condemning the student organizers who
removed the statue.

I sincerely hope the university will use this opportunity to donate the statue to a Civil War museum, and
lead a conversation about how institutions of higher learning can confront racism within our communities.

We are at an important moment in our nation's racial history. Will you speak out against the supporters of
slave owners? Will you join me in supporting compassion and restorative justice for the organizers of
yesterday's protest?

Sincerely,
Anise

E. Anise Simon
UNC Class of 2011

E. Anise Simon

Pronouns: she/they
Message
From: Eddie Small [ESmall@palmharbor.com]
Sent: 8/22/2018 9:50:04 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Dr. Folt,
I writing to you in reference to the shameful act of the tearing down of a Historical monument. This is
sickening to me.
The reason I am wr1t1ng is because I am interested in buying the statue, preserving it as the incredible
piece of history that it is, and continue to show it off without it ever being vandalized again.
I am asking you at this time what the plan is to do with the statue? If it is to be destroyed I am
willing to stop this with a check to the University. I will pick it up, move it, do everything myself.
The University will have no obligation whatsoever, other than to accept the check to the University.
I would appreciate a call back, I am sure you are slammed fielding calls and emails, but I would still
appreciate a call or an email as to whether this is a possibility.
Please get back to me as soon as possible. Thank you in advance for any help you can provide.
Eddie Small
Message
From: James Spraker
Sent: 8/22/2018 10:20:43 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Fw: Please forward to Frank J. Ciri llo

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt:


I am forwarding you a message I wrote in hast to Mr. Frank Cirillo, who justifies the vandalism that occurred at UNC.
I received part of my education at UNC, and my family has roots that go far back in North Carolina . My thoughts are with
you at a time when wisdom appears to be in short supply.
I am in favor, under the circumstances, of relocating the memorial monuments in the South to cemeteries, where they
would be in a venue more in keeping with their original purpose. Perhaps that could be one option to consider for Silent
Sam (in Wythe County, VA, where I live, our monument was placed placed in our town cemetery. We have had virtually
no controversy as a result)
Respectfully,
Jim Spraker
----- Forwarded Message-----
From: James Spraker
To: communications@nyhistory.org
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2018, 10:08:28 AM EDT
Subject: Please forward to Frank J. Cirillo

Dear Mr. Cirillo,


I read with interest and consternation your article expressing your opinion on why protesters were justified in vandalizing a
Confederate monument at UNC Chapel Hill.
I received part of my education at Chapel Hill, and I am not only familiar with the statue but with the controversy
surrounding it.
There were several errors in your article.
First, Silent Sam is not a mass produced statue of an "anonymous" soldier. The statue was sculpted by Canadian artist
John A. Wilson. It was paid for by alumni and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, who funded many memorial
statues in the South.
Let me tell you about my background. My great-great grandfather, Jonas Spraker, was one of the casualties of a war that
claimed every male of age in his family. Many Germans in Wythe County, Virginia, were anti-slavery, and the Sprakers
were among that group. Contrary to your generalization that slavery gave a white underclass dignity, my non-slave-
holding German ancestors were among the more affluent of the Germans who settled in the western part of our county.
The war also took the life of all but one of my Great-grandmother Susan Caroline Lane's brothers who were old enough to
enlist. Her brothers were Tennesseans who fought for the Union (the eldest is buried at Andersonville). My great-
grandmother, whose family were unionists, married the son of Jonas Spraker. I mourn for both sides, and my family is to
this day affected by the after-shocks of the conflict in which both sides of my family took part. You, Mr. Cirillo , are a typical
revisionist who lumps everyone into a comfortable block, the better to condemn them as a whole. The latest to do this is
our president; others have been Hitler and Stalin.
The fact is, Mr. Cirillo, that the primary objective of the statues you malign was to memorialize young human beings who
lost their lives in a horrible war. These young human beings left mourning parents and siblings, all attempting to make
some sense of the the carnage they had experienced. That goes for both sides .
You are also aware, if you are honest, that the North enriched itself from the institution of slavery while they were at the
same time supplementing injustice by exploiting virtually every vulnerable ethnic minority that had the misfortune to work
in the sweat shops and factories of the industrial hell that existed in the nineteenth century. I would be remiss if I did not
remind you of the genocide perpetrated by the Federal army on Native Americans, Mexicans, and other "non-acceptable"
minorities under the rationalization of Manifest Destiny. And please read Mr. Carr's speech carefully. I believe that you will
find some mention of the part Northern universities took in the war. You will rationalize, of course; but facts are facts. It is
time that the North begins to accept responsibilty for its role in the history and perpetuation of racism through, among
other things, unequal educational opportunities and deplorable housing and to desist from deflecting blame solely on the
South. Your self-righteous hypocrisy is getting very, very old.
I hope with all my heart that the memorials to Confederate soldiers will be relocated to cemeteries; the vandalism of these
monuments is tantamount to the desecration of graves, and the perpetrators of these actions should be subject to
prosecution to the fullest extent of the law.
Message
From:
Sent: 8/22/2018 3:41:13 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Idea

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Folt: First thank you for your service to our great University. You have done a remarkable job during
some difficult times, and I am grateful as an alumnus ('84), for your
outstanding work leading our University.

I'm sure your inbox is cluttered with suggestions and advice on how to handle the current situation with Silent
Sam, so I am reluctantly offering another suggestion at the risk of further cluttering it. Once the dust settles
with respect to what happens to the monument, if there comes a time for the statue to be replaced, perhaps a
statue of Dean Smith might take its place. Coach Smith helped desegregate ACC sports, and as you know,
was instrumental in efforts to desegregate Chapel Hill. On top of that, he is nearly universally revered by UNC
alumni and presumably a statue of him would be accepted, if not welcomed, by the University community, if,
for nothing else, than for his legendary career as a basketball coach.

I don't envy your having to manage this delicate situation, but I am so impressed by your even and steady
hand, so I know you will navigate the course well.

On a personal note, and as a quick aside, I spent some great times in your home in Chapel Hill. Watts Hill and
his family were great family friends, and I actually lived in one of the small homes on your hill as a senior,
thanks to Mr. Hill's kindness. I hope to get the chance to meet you in the coming years as we travel to Chapel
Hill even more now

Again, thanks for your service and best regards.


Message
From: Scott Aycock
Sent: 8/22/2018 6:16:31 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I am a Chapel Hill native and a UNC-CH alum. I grew up with Silent Sam at the center of my community and
my university, and had generally positive feelings about the statue.

That is, until I learned more about what the statue stood for and read the awful dedication speech by Julian Carr.
Further, I have been spending a lot of time lately working to better understand what it would be like to be a
person of color in our society, in general but also specifically regarding the issue of Confederate war memorials
and the Jim Crow environment in which many of them were placed. It seems that they were indeed about
celebrating history but also about making sure that everyone understood the order of things in the South - that
the white race was and remained dominant.

So, I'm personally more than willing to let Silent Sam go. It's just about the least thing we can do to make UNC-
CH feel more inclusive and safe for everyone. I urge you to resist the calls to put Silent Sam back. He belongs
ma museum.

On another note, I think Dean Smith would be a nice statue.

Scott Aycock, class of '93


Message
From: Catelyn Spencer
Sent: 8/22/2018 9:12:48 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: public@bog.northcarolina.edu; president@northcarolina .edu; haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com;
Thom@goolsbylaw.com
Subject: The long awaited end of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I write as an alumna to say that students and community members did Monday night something that should
have been done years ago. Silent Sam was a shameful symbol that made students at best roll their eyes, at worst
feel unwanted and unwelcome in the Carolina Community. With UNC leadership failing for decades to do
anything about the statue, I'm proud to see these young Tar Heels take action to remove it.

Thank you in advance for helping new students acknowledge and move past the racist history of our state and
our nation. I am grateful that the statue is gone, and that the Carolina blue sky can shine on the quad
uninhibited. Perhaps a new monument acknowledging Dean Smith's contributions to desegregate Chapel Hill
would be an appropriate and beloved replacement.

Sincerely,
Catelyn Spencer, '05
Message
From: JillPainter
Sent: 8/22/2018 11:24:50 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Do Not Replace the Statue

Flag: Follow up

Dear Dr. Folt,


As a UNC-CH graduate, I implore you to let silent Sam move on to another resting place.
I was disappointed that the statue came down in the manner in which it did and would have rather had it
removed officially by the University. But it's down and it needs to stay down.
The dedication speech of Julian Carr is despicable and our University needs to rebuke THAT literal hate
speech in a strong and irrefutable manner.
I've read many comments the past couple of days regarding silent Sam's fall and so many of the ones who
are angry about the statue being removed are at best crude and at worst racist and violent. I'm appalled
at the ugliness that has come to the surface and I urge you to do the right thing. Put Sam in a museum
and tell his true story. Stand up against the evil of racism. I hope you, Carolina and all of us will be
able to be proud of this tale when it's told to future Carolina students.
Respectfully,
Jill Painter
Asheboro, NC
Journalism/Advertising '86
Message
From: Steve Martin
Sent: 8/23/2018 12:32:23 PM
To: Hertel, Amy Locklear [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =92d8a 7a8 722f4 7 cfa35 ld3f9def5093 7-Amy Locklea]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de781a-south_chanc]; Canady, Joseph R
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3c1281d74 7c444c08 lf833b0fec9944f-M r Joseph R]
Subject: NC Citizen request regarding Silent Sam and protests

Flag: Follow up

Dr. Folt, Dr. Hertel, Mr. Canady;


As a 66 year citizen (Caucasian) and
taxpayer in NC, I'm asking that you:
. dismiss criminal charges against
for her April protest,
and any protesters identified who
took down Silent Sam this week.
These people acted only after
insufficient action was taken by
the University and the NC
Legislature to address the issue. In
fact, the legislature doubled down
in 2015 to block attempts to
redress real concerns of many
citizens and students who asked
for removal of Confederate
memorials which were primarily
intended to send a message of
suppression, and to glorify a war
intended to keep an entire race in
slavery .
. If you can influence the Honor
Court, I think that
appearance/charge to
should be dismissed as well .
. Do not re-erect the monument, or
at least transfer it into a museum
atmosphere. The predominant,
then-contemporary intent of the
monument was to celebrate the
attempt to continue/protect the
institution of slavery and failing
that, to suppress Black citizens.
This clear awareness continues
today and impacts all races,
obviously African Americans
being the most affected .
. Perhaps a monument to this
terrible time should go in its place
that more broadly memorializes
the impact and lives lost from the
Civil War, understanding that the
real span of time and impact
begins on colonization, including
the impact on Native Americans
as well as other groups, and which
continues to this day. The dead
can be honored, and responsibility
placed on all the contributors to
this conflict. (An interesting
juxtaposition is the dilemma in
Germany to remember their WWII
dead, while not glorifying Nazism:
http://www.spiegel.de/intemationa
1/germany/for-whom-the-bell-
tolls-nazi-memorial-embarrasses-
german-community-a-
800003 .html In this case, a
governor steps in proactively to
get rid of the offensive aspects of
a memorial)
North Carolina's own Department of Cultural and
Natural Resources website clearly documents that the
cause of the Civil War resulted primarily from decades
of political and physical conflict over slavery in the
Southern states and subsequently, new territories.
Arguments otherwise are intentionally misleading.
https ://civilwarexperience .ncdcr. gov/narrative/narrative
-1.htm

Thank you,
Steve Martin
Charlotte
Message
From: Stephen Deal [sdeal@carolinadigestive.com]
Sent: 8/23/2018 9:10:56 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

As a UNC alumnus 1982 and 1986, I feel obligated to express my great disappointment at the event earlier this
week. The very nature of war means there are two vastly different opinions that led to hate and division. That
certainly is true for the wars of my lifetime (Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan) and it is certainly true for every
war between the Civil War and Vietnam. UNC students fought and died for their beliefs in every war since the
Civil and probably even before that. Perhaps a solution to this dilemma is to create monuments to UNC
students who fought and died during EACH of the major wars and conflicts. List their names on the side and
let's honor our classmates who made the ultimate sacrifice for their strong held beliefs. Ultimately these could
be located in the same area where Silent Sam once stood alone, but it would more appropriately recognize all
of our students.

There will always be some who want to silence those with whom they disagree. It seems more appropriate to
keep the focus on UNC students and not simply those from the Civil War.

Best of luck in this challenge.

Respectfu Ily,

Stephen E. Deal MD '82 & '86


Message
From: Eddie Small [ESmall@palmharbor.com]
Sent: 8/24/2018 8:30:40 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: RE: Silent Sam Monument

Flag: Follow up

Please respond ....


Eddie Small
Internet sales Manager
Palm Harbor Homes

-----original Message-----
From: Eddie Small
Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2018 9:54 AM
To: 'chancellor@unc.edu' <chancellor@unc.edu>
subject: RE: silent Sam Monument
Please respond ...

Eddie Small
Internet sales Manager
Palm Harbor Homes

-----original Message-----
From: Eddie Small
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2018 9:50 AM
To: 'chancellor@unc.edu' <chancellor@unc.edu>
subject: silent Sam Monument

Dr. Folt,
I am writing to you in reference to the shameful act of the tearing down of a Historical monument. This
is sickening to me.
The reason I am writing is because I am interested in buying the statue, preserving it as the incredible
piece of history that it is, and continue to show it off without it ever being vandalized again.

I am asking you at this time what the plan is to do with the statue? If it is to be destroyed I am
willing to stop this with a check to the University. I will pick it up, move it, do everything myself.
The University will have no obligation whatsoever, other than to accept the check to the University.
I would appreciate a call back, I am sure you are slammed fielding calls and emails, but I would still
appreciate a call or an email as to whether this is a possibility.

Please get back to me as soon as possible. Thank you in advance for any help you can provide.
Eddie Small
Message
From: Harper, Elizabeth (Beth)
Sent: 8/24/2018 3:54:58 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

As a Carolina alumna (M.A. 1975), I want to express my support for you and the university. You are in an
impossible position.

I remember walking past Silent Sam when I was a student and just shaking my head at the idea that a symbol of
hate and divisiveness had such a prominent place on campus. I grew up in the rural South and Confederate
statues were nothing new to me, but to have one on a University campus was incomprehensible to me. It still is.

I can't imagine the pain experienced by African American faculty, staff, and students over the years when they
had to walk past that statue.

When I saw the news articles about the statue's being toppled, my mind flashed back to film of protestors
bringing down the statue of Saddam Hussein in Baghdad. As a Virginian, I can only say, Sic semper tyrannis!

If it's necessary to preserve Silent Sam, it should be placed in a museum with interpretive material to provide
context. Statues are placed in public spaces to honor individuals or ideals. There is nothing to honor here. We
can't forget our history, but we can choose whom and what we honor.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth P. Harper, Ph.D.

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Mark Smith
Sent: 8/25/2018 12:58:14 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: what to do with Sam

Flag: Follow up

Hi Carol!
Good luck w the whole Silent Sam thing!!
I was wondering whether it would be possible to just give it back to the Daughters of the Confederacy, and let
them find a nice place to put it?
Maybe a private park with all the statues that are around the state capital now??
Hmmm.
At any rate, it seems to me totally logical to reverse the decision of the University to accept the statue in the first
place, since it is now (and was then) an inappropriate emblem for a piece of state property.
All the best,
Mark Smith out in White Cross
Message
From:
Sent: 8/26/2018 7:12:03 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Please Move Silent Sam to Off Campus Location

Flag: Follow up

chanellor Folt, I have a on campus and regardless of our views or views on the
historical importance of silent Sam his presence is a safety risk for the students and faculty on campus
and for this reason it should be moved to a less inflammatory location. I ask you to stand up for the
safety of the students and staff that live, and are educated, on the campus. Something bad is going to
happen when emotions run this high. A historical and premier institution such as UNC chapel Hill needs
to stand up against the Rules and do what is safe for it's student.
Thank you.
Message
From: Cindy K
Sent: 8/26/2018 9:05:44 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Proposal for the relocation of the Silent Sam statue
Attachments: Not So Silent Sam.docx

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

please find attached a proposal for your consideration .

Thank you
'Not So' Silent Sam

The statue of Silent Sam is anything 'but silent'.

It speaks in remembrance of students from UNG-Chapel Hill who died on the fields of
battle. Students turned soldiers who left their campus to fight in the Civil War.

Sons and brothers who surrendered their lives for what they believed in.

This statue speaks also of a time when many suffered and died in the fields of slavery.

Sons and brothers who lost their lives in a daily battle to exist. Who fought as well in
the Civil War surrendering their lives for what they could only hope for.

The campus of UNC today is not the campus of 1913. The doors of this renowned
university are open to a beautifully diverse population of students, entering from all
walks of life and securing the same grasp upon their futures.

In light of this I propose that the statue of Silent Sam be moved to a more appropriate
place than its current location and be installed on the grounds of the Old Chapel Hill
Cemetery.

A place where people come to quietly and reflectively remember the dead. A place
more fitting for this statue, placed upon the burial grounds where lay some of the Civil
War's student casualties.

Here Silent Sam can stand as a sentinel of the past and a memorial of its deaths,
sufferings and loss.

Our past should whisper but our tomorrows should speak of hope.

C.W.
Message
From: Spencer Everett
Sent: 8/26/2018 9:45:14 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: whargrove@brookspierce .com; ECarter_Voelkel@kenan-flagler.unc.edu;
cpan@uga.edu; forum@newsobserver.com;
McLean_voelkel@kenan-Flagler.unc.edu;
letters@starnewsonline.com;
letters@heraldsun .com
Subject: Preserve Sam

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Folt
The statue should be reinstalled, but not on its former pedestal which should be left and preserved as it stands.
Sam should be conspicuously placed in a building frequented by students during the day and locked and secured
at night. The lobby of Wilson Library might be considered.

The vandals who pulled the statue down should be prosecuted in court; fined and/or jailed. Student participants
should be expelled from the University, or at least suspended. The rule of law must be respected and enforced.
To do otherwise will only encourage more unlawful protests and anarchy.

The history of student involvement in the Civil War, the "War of Northern Aggression", should be highlighted.
Student soldiers (like Sam) did not fight to preserve slavery - they fought to protest the unlawful invasion of
their homeland. As an educator it is your responsibility to reveal and publicize historical truth.

Sincerely
H. Spencer Everett, Jr
UNC '60, UVA Law '63
Message
From: Caro l Strickland
Sent: 8/26/2018 12:12:59 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam replacement

Flag: Follow up

Dear chancellor Folt,

I am an alumna of UNC-CH, currently living a few miles away in Efland. I've been expecting for quite a
time that the university would do away with silent Sam in some way. He's extremely objectionable to many
people.

I was sorry that protestors took action on their own, but the university took far too much time to decide
what to do with him. However, it is NOT a good idea to reinstate Sam out there. That would be doubling
down on the insult.

Instead it's time to put Sam in some kind of historical context, maybe in a grouping somewhere MUCH less
public with other objectionable statues. Cities in Eastern Europe have done this, creating quiet spaces
where people could contemplate history's more egregious eras.

Instead of ol' silent Sam, I propose a new statue for that space: Senator Sam. Sam Ervin began as a
supporter of Jim Crow laws but later "converted" to help oust McCarthy and stand up for civil rights
laws. When I was in college, Sen. Sam was on TV every day, presiding at the Watergate hearings. I think
he stands for the great strides NC made in the Twentieth Century and the ability to become a better
person.

In conclusion: please don't put silent Sam back. Consider placing a muc h more positive symbol of society
and the university, like Senator Sam, in his place.

Thank you,
carol A. Strickland
Message
From: Tozzer, Meredith [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=E4C82D17F6094D87904CB0A4AE6D8CE4-MEREDITH TO]
Sent: 8/26/2018 3:06:42 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Fwd: Note from Carol Folt

Flag: Follow up

Get Outlook for Android

From: Joe Austin


Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2018 2:56:47 PM
To: Joe Austin; Tozzer, Meredith
Subject: Re: Note from Carol Falt

As a loyal alumnus (AB '73, JD '78), history major, and a Tar Heel through and through the debacle of this past
week breaks my heart. The time has come for a measured and imaginative solution. I think the best idea I have
heard lately was that of Dr. Brundage who proposed to put Silent Sam in a curated space, which certainly aligns
with what I was suggesting over a year ago. I myself still believe that Bentonville is the appropriate place for
this monument and the others which seem to create rancor where they sit instead of thoughtful dialogue. There
needs to be a repository where these civil war monuments can be retired to. I hope that Chancellor Folt will lead
UNC out of the current disgrace and toward a responsible solution that is consistent with the best UNC
traditions.

---------- Forwarded message---------


From: Joe Austin
Date: Tue, Aug 29, 2017 at 8:56 AM
Subject: Re: Note from Carol Folt
To: Tozzer, Meredith <meredith tozzer(a)unc.edu>

Thank you for your response.

On Tue, Aug 29, 2017 at 8:53 AM Tozzer, Meredith <meredith tozzer(a),unc.edu> wrote:

Dear Mr. Austin,

Thank you for contacting our office about the Confederate Monument, better known as Silent Sam. I
encourage you to read my recent messages to campus linked b©rn and I1s:1:©, which more fully explain the
situation. I very much appreciate your suggestions, and we continue to explore all options within the law
available to us.

The well-being and safety of the campus community are always our highest priorities, and we are especially
vigilant following the tragic and horrific events in Charlottesville and other demonstrations in the state and
country. If we had the ability to move the statue in the interest of public safety, we would, but the law does
not give us unilateral authority to do so. Last week, the Board of Trustees affirmed the University's obligation
to uphold state law, which requires us to receive permission from the State Historical Commission to move it.
I will not make decisions based on legal ambiguity, and we are seeking clarity from the UNC Board of
Governors about how the law should be applied.

Thank you again for calling.

Sincerely, Carol Folt

Office of the Chancellor

919-962-1365
Message
From: david dasher
Sent: 8/27/2018 6:52:16 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Front porch of our university

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt

I recently overheard a great idea regarding the space previously occupied by the Silent Sam statue and feel
compelled to share it with you.

As a UNC alum, I owe a great deal to this school. Living in Chapel Hill, it has been heart wrenching following
the story of the Silent Sam statue and the protests around it. That space is the front porch of our university.
Every year, we welcome students of all backgrounds and cultures. We need art that reflects that acceptance.

Unfortunately, we live in a charged political climate. I know that there is no solution that will please all parties.
However, this is a time to show what it means to be a Tar Heel. My friend David Greer, a development officer
for the Morehead Cain scholarship, recently told me that he would like to see a statue of Dean Smith with
Charlie Scott erected at that site. Coach Smith's relationship with Charlie Scott is a powerful demonstration of
the courage to do what is right. Furthermore, basketball has been a uniting force for this school for as long as I
can remember.

This is the time for decisive leadership. Move Silent Sam to a site where it can be properly studied and viewed
as a regrettable monument of our past, and let Coach Smith and Charlie Scott be the first people to greet
students as they start their education.

Thank you for your consideration.

LJ
Message
From: Laura Sell
Sent: 8/27/2018 9:36:05 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I am a UNC alum and I strongly believe the statue of Silent Sam should not be returned to a prominent place on
campus. For students' safety and because of the bigotry and hatred the statue represents, I urge you not to
restore it to its former location. If the state legislature requires you to display the statue, I hope you will put it
somewhere less prominent and surround it with contextual information explaining when and why it was first put
up.

I will add that my ancestors fought for the Confederacy, but I do not believe we should celebrate treason or
white supremacy on the campus of North Carolina's great university.

Sincerely,

Laura Sell
MA (History), 1997
Message
From: Schoonmaker, Nancy Gray [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=B94C9951E6F44FC59E57F99A3B1DDD5B-NANCY GRAY]
Sent: 8/27/2018 9:24:31 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam in context

Flag: Follow up

The core argument is that Silent Sam was erected in support of Jim Crow, and Julian Carr's dedication speech
made that impossible to deny.

As Fitz Brundage, a noted scholar of memorialization, observed: Silent Sam belongs in in on-campus museum.

Nancy Gray Schoonmaker, Ph.D.


Department of History '10
Message
From: Joy Reeber
Sent: 8/27/2018 10:11:29 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I urge you to put Silent Sam where it truly belongs - to wit, in a museum where its legacy of white supremacy
can be properly contextualized, and not on a campus that purports to be a welcoming place for all students. I
have never understood why, when the majority of faculty, students, and staff wanted it gone (and the University
had permission to remove it!), it was nonetheless allowed to stay standing. Now that activists have taken action
where University administration refused, the entire community can move forward; a choice to continue looking
backward will be anything but silent about where the priorities of the administration lie.

Very sincerely,

Dr. Joy Reeber


(UNC BA [Classics], 2004)
Message
From: Faye Brandon
Sent: 8/28/2018 8:22:48 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: A Proposal for change, George M itche ll, Artist
Attachments: GMitchellto Chancellor.docx

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Holt,

Please review the attached documents for a possible solution concerning the Silent Sam controversy.
August 28, 2018

This is a proposal for change.

Due to recent controversies and events on the UNC Campus surrounding the
statue of the Confederate soldier, "Silent Sam" : I would like to offer my
sculpture design entitled, Freedom, as an alternative for change.

i\-1y sculpture is an abstract interpretation of the Statue of Liberty. It was in-


spired by the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960' s.

Freedom can become a monument for change, diversity, unity and inclusive-
ness - for all people; no matter your race or ethnicity.

My name is George i\-1itchell. I am an artist/ sculptor, a UNC Alum, Graduate


School, MFA, 1974-75.

My relative was the first Black i\-1iss UNC. Professor Marvin Saltzman, Emeri-
tus, recruited me for the Graduate Program at UNC. Marvin helped to bring
diversity and change to the Art Department; while Coach Dean Smith was
bringing diversity to the Basketball Program with players like Charlie Scott,
Phil Ford, and Michael Jordan.

I was one of the first African-Americans to receive a MF A Degree in Sculp-


ture. I was the first in my family to attend college and I was also the only Afri-
can-American in my graduate class. UNC has done so much for me and my
family. I would like to show my gratitude and appreciation by giving some-
thing back - a monument of freedom!

i\-1y sculpture was done in 1976, while I was living and working as an artist in
New Jersey. "Freedom" was published in a book, Sculpture - Techniques,
Form and Content by Arthur Williams. I also helped construct the iconic life-
size replica of the Brontosaurus located at the Museum of Life and Science,
Durham, North Carolina.
The final project will be cast in metal and will be 6-8 feet in height, placed on
a marble pedestal.

Please make the student body, faculty, alumni and administration aware of this
proposal.

Sincerely,

George I'v1itchell, Artist


Silent Sam vs. Freedom

The choice is yours!

Silent Sam is a monument which represents a dismal past of slavery, embrac-


ing an ideology of racism, hatred, separatism and oppression.

My sculpture is a monument for change. Freedom is more reflective of a mod-


em, futuristic university; which embraces diversity, unity, freedom and inclu-
siveness for all people, no matter your race, gender, creed, or ethnicity.

Chancellor Holt I hope and pray that you will find it in your heart to keep Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.' s dream alive.

I hope your final decision will fall on the right side of history.

I would very much like your support; so that the dream can become a reality.

Please protect my identity. Do not share my address and geographical location


with anyone. This is for my personal safety.

Thank-you!

Sincerely,

George Mitchell, Artist


Message
From: Monica Green [Monica.Green@asu.edu]
Sent: 8/28/2018 11:12:55 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: 'Silent Sam'
Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I would like to add my name to the list of UNC alums objecting to plans to reinstall the 'Silent Sam' memorial. I have to
confess that I didn't pay much attention to the memorial when I was a Carolina Postdoctoral Fellow in 1985-1987.
There was plenty else in the atmosphere then that was still caught in the South of the Reconstruction Era and made me
feel uneasy as a Black woman trying to find a path for myself in academia.

However, 'Silent Sam' has since become the embodiment of a kind of celebration of the antebellum era that is simply no
longer tolerable in today's society. 'Silent Sam' belongs in your museum, as a relic of a terrible period in this country's
history, to be analyzed by historians, not venerated by the general public of North Carolina, this nation, or the world .

Please do the right thing: send 'Silent Sam' where he belongs. In the museum.

Sincerely,

Monica H. Green
ORCI D: orcid.org/0000-0001-8978-9631
Fellow, Medieval Academy of America
Professor of History
School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies
Box 874302
975 S Myrtle Ave
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-4302
U.S.A.
monica.green@lasu.edu
Message
From: Moye, Todd [Todd.Moye@unt.edu]
Sent: 8/28/2018 11:31:51 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,


I write to you as a historian of the South and a proud Tar Heel (B.A., 1992). I also consider myself a North
th
Carolinian living outside the state; my ancestors first arrived in NC in the 17 century, and others of them
fought for the Confederacy.
Over the past several years I have watched with dismay as Carolina's leaders failed to listen to those who told
them clearly that Silent Sam was a source of pain, and who warned (accurately, as it turned out) that it would
serve as an organizing symbol for antediluvian racists who continue to cherish the ideals of a society that
fought, killed and died to preserve the institution of slavery. I learned to value free speech at Carolina. I
learned to think historically, to stand up and speak out against racism and its enduring symbols. The activists
who toppled Silent Sam lived the values I began to cherish as a student at Carolina. They deserve our praise. I
know well that you will not offer that praise publicly, but I urge you to use your influence to see that any and
all criminal charges against them are dropped, and I implore you to quash any discussion of returning Silent
Sam to his pedestal. The statue belongs in a museum, if not a trash heap.

Sincerely,

Todd Moye
Professor of History
Director, UNT Oral History Program
University of North Texas
REDACTED
Message
From: Steve Estes [steve.estes@sonoma.edu]
Sent: 8/28/2018 12:33:53 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDL T)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam should be moved off campus.

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,


As a native North Carolinian, UNC alum, university donor, and as a professor of southern history, I oppose the
move to put the confederate soldier monument known as "Silent Sam" back on its pedestal at UNC. The
student protests that tore down the statue may have been unwise, but they were the culmination of years of
more moderate protests (like ones that I participated in when I was a student).
Have the courage to place Silent Sam where he belongs, in a museum off campus with an explanation of both
the history of North Carolina's role in the Confederacy and the politics surrounding the commemoration of
that period of our state's past.

Sincerely,
Steve

Steve Estes, Professor


History Department, Sonoma State University
1801 E. Cotati A ve. Rohnert Park, CA 94928
ph) REDACTED
A uthor of Chalieston in Black and White
Message
From: Lynne Hicks
Sent: 8/28/2018 6:34:56 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: Convissor, Linda [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =5b0d87 la b28e4d828794801c07 c30991-Linda Con vi]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear chancellor Folt,


I am wr1t1ng in support of not returning silent Sam to its prominent position on Mccorkle Place. I am in
favor of placing it inside a museum with supporting documents of its history. I am writing on behalf of
my family, who have a long legacy at UNC beginning with my father-in-law, a graduate of the early 40's.
My husband Charles H Hicks, MD, FACC is an associate Professor of Medicine at UNC. (He is too busy
teaching and working at UNC to write a letter.) He was an undergraduate at UNC during the tumultuous
late 60's and was Roy William's teammate. He is also a UNC medical graduate, '72. He also teaches
cardiology for the UNC physician assistants program. Both of my sons are UNC graduates and residents of
this community with my younger son working tirelessly for social justice issues, proud lessons he learned
as a student here.
I feel as long as silent Sam stays on top of the pedestal, for all the world to see, there will be
continued conflicts and safety issues, all of which drain time, resources and energy for UNC and the
surrounding communities. silent Sam has held it's place on the ground at UNC for 100 years. We are in a
new era, like the Berlin wall falling, it's time to move on to more optimism and hope for the future
generations. We can become good stewards for positivity, not hate. Imagine, the OLD Well and the grand
oak trees as the focal points at Mccorkle place, gracing UNC and chapel Hill.
I copied Linda Convissor because she knows me as a resident and homeowner in the historic Cameron-
McCauley neighborhood, adjacent to the university. Also, please cc Thom Goolsby, president of UNC board
of directors. I read his statement regarding silent Sam. I also know of attorney Goolsby, as we resided
in the Wilmington area for 15 years.
Thank you for your time in reading this letter. I took the time to write it and let you know of our
connections here at UNC. I know my husband loves UNC and works tirelessly there. I also feel that the
majority of the people want silent Sam to be placed in a protected facility, where it can be visited and
studied. I understand all the controversy surrounding its takedown. As a daughter of a policeman,
mayor, and member of the PA state house of representatives, I have witnessed my father endure many
adversities. Hopefully, the right decisions will be made so that we can peaceably move forward.
Respectfully yours,
Lynne K Hicks
chapel Hill citizen
Message
From: JOHN T CHRISTINE
Sent: 8/28/2018 9:49:07 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Your were kind and thoughtful enough to respond to my letter, but I didn't write back knowing you had
enough on your plate and not in need of another letter. I was however, very, very appreciative.

Here you are, still struggling with this issue and I've been thinking for some time of an idea. Would it be
possible to simply rededicate the statue, since the resistance was (at least initially) was with the racist who
commissioned it?

He is still a soldier and Lord knows we celebrate a multitude of heros who were far from perfect.

If we don't somehow change what is happening in this country, there will be few statues left.

My heart goes out to you and all you have to deal with.

Sincerely,

John T. Christine

From: Chancellor
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 11:10 AM
To:
Subject: Silent Sam
Dear Mr. Christine,
Thank you for your thoughtful message about the Confederate Statue. I also appreciated your thoughts about service to
our nation as Carolina's 200-plus year history is deeply entwined with public service and support of our nation's armed
services and veterans. In fact, William Davie, who was a general in the Continental Army, founded Carolina in 1789.
Carolina's history is deeply personal to many in our community and state, and the current debate about that
Confederate Statue reflects a wide range of viewpoints. Back in 2015, I appointed a task force on UNC-Chapel Hill history
to make recommendations around implementing curation and education initiatives to tell all of Carolina's history. Last
year, the task force opened a permanent exhibit in the entrance of Carolina Hall and launched a companion website.
Now, the task force is developing a comprehensive interpretive strategy for Mccorkle Place that will include
recommendations for a mix of physical and virtual curation techniques with temporary and permanent art projects.
I guarantee that Carolina will always honor those who served our nation and continue to develop programs that support
active duty personnel and veterans. Thank you again for your thoughtful message about those who wear the uniform
and serve in defense of the United States of America.
Sincerely,
Carol Falt
Message
From: Harper, Joel Kenneth [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =BA5134F B9FA94 7 A19BFC668264A81D09-HARPE RJ]
Sent: 8/29/2018 9:23:42 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Suggestion for Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Hello Chancellor Falt,

While I suspect the great majority of campus would like Silent Sam to disappear forever, it is doubtful the more
conservative element of the NC power structure will allow that to happen. As a compromise, may I suggest the
following:

1. Find a room inside Morehead Planetarium and dedicate it to 'North Carolina and the Civil War' or 'UNC and the
Civil War'.
2. Place Silent Sam prominently on permanent display in this room.
3. Decorate the room with displays that tout how the University was affected by the Civil War, how NC was
impacted by the Civil War (before, during and after), etc.

Given the huge number of school children who come to the Planetarium each year, I suspect Silent Sam will get far more
exposure, and better advance the University's mission to educate, being on display inside the Planetarium than outside
on Mccorkle Place. The liberal element tugging at your coat sleeves should be modified, in that Silent Sam is in a
museum, in context, where such statues should be. The conservative element tugging at your coat sleeves should be
modified, in that Silent Sam remains on prominent display in a high-traffic area of campus. I realize the Planetarium is a
science building and not a history museum, so if you can think of a better high-traffic building for this statue and display,
by all means pursue that option. I don't think either the Ackland or Wilson Library has the cache the conservative
element seeks for Silent Sam. The Planetarium seems to be the best choice.

I wish you the best of luck between now and mid-November. Yours is a thankless task and no solution will fully satisfy
everyone.

Joel Harper
Account Tech
Finance and Research Service Center
ioel harper@med.unc.edu

UNC School of Medicine


Message
From: linda.little
Sent: 8/29/2018 3:04:03 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam
Attachments: Silent Sam
Flag: Follow up

Dear carol,

Here's an idea about what to do about silent Sam.

It could even be a sort of giant kiosk, maybe with bullet proof glass or lucite!

Been thinking about this a lot--you hang in there!

Linda
Message
From: linda.little
Sent: 7/31/2018 9:14:06 AM
To: forum@newsobserver.com
Subject: Silent Sam

so silent Sam can't be moved? How about constructing a small museum around it, showing its history not
only as an anti-black symbol but as an anti-female symbol?
I certainly didn't
appreciate the snickers and comments when I walked past Silent Sam!
Linda W. Little
MSPH,1962, and Ph.D. ,1968, Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, UNC school of Public Health
(and therein lie some other stories, too, abo ut "wome n 's place" in those years)
Message
From: Sandra Rich
Sent: 8/29/2018 7:36:55 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Stephen and I would like to voice our support for moving the statue of Silent Sam to a secure indoor location on
campus with accurate historical information .. .including Julian Carr's dedication remarks .
Regards
Sandra Rich
Message
From:
Sent: 8/30/2018 8:59:25 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam, please consider

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt, UNC BOG, and UNC Ad min,

the parent of a UNC 2018 graduate, a UNC 1989 alumni, the sister of a
UNC alumni, and the daughter of a UNC School of Education Professor, Eugene Watson, who worked for the
university for 30 years.

I am greatly concerned about the level of deference that has been given to the white supremacy groups with
regard to the Silent Sam Confederate statue. While I don't condone the way in which the statue was brought
down, I do understand the passion with which the protesters gathered in support of inclusion and against
racism. The history of the statue itself includes a grave speech upon the unveiling, during the Jim Crow Era, by
a white supremacist chest thumping about having whipped a black woman for saying something to a "white
Southern lady." This is not what we stand for in Chapel Hill. The idolatry surrounding this cheaply made,
massed produced statue cannot be allowed to be more highly regarded by the University than the inclusive
nature of Chapel Hill. I understand that your credentials when hired to the University were positive and
congratulatory on your own priorities for inclusiveness and interest in equality for minorities.

Now that the statue is down, please consider placing the statue in a museum, erecting a history-balancing
statue beside SS on campus that represents the conclusion of the War of the States, or simply leave as is, with
the concrete foundation in place as a reminder that history is not just in the past, but moving, shaping,
reminding, and hopefully educating.

As a University, we have to represent ALL of the people.

My Best Regards,
Message
From: Rummo, Pasquale
Sent: 8/30/2018 2:08:03 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78la-south_chan c]
CC: Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=d42915aef8014bc4896b876cf0d6ecf0-Mr Charles]; Julia Sprunt Grumbles
uuliagrumbles@gmail.com]; Jeff Brown ueffbrown@mvalaw.com]; Caudill, Walter Lowry
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr]; Hopkins, Kelly
Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=admin.live.unc.edu-
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8b8ab2d45c4 7400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e19-sakate];
haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com
Subject: Please do not reinstate "Silent Sam"

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor,

I am an alumnus from the nutrition PhD program (2016) and I am highly disappointed that the Board of Trustees is
considering reinstating Silent Sam.

This is a great opportunity to address any past mistakes and be on the right side of history. Consider adding Silent Sam
to a confederate museum, which acknowledges past wrongdoings while also acknowledging that UNC is a honorable
institution.

I'm sure a lot of folks are asking you to return the statue to a prominent location, but I am sure that any negative
repercussions will be temporary and worthwhile.

I have not donated since becoming an alumnus but I assure you that I will if the statue is not reinstated! That is an
honest promise.

Best,
Pasquale Rummo

Assistant Professor
Section on Health Choice, Policy, and Evaluation
Department of Population Health
NYU School of Medicine
180 Madison Avenue, 3rd Floor, #3-54
New York, NY 10016
REDACTED
REDACTED
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Message
From: Joey Fink
Sent: 8/30/2018 2:20:38 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDL T)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: alum of UNC voicing my concerns regarding Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Good afternoon Chancellor Folt,

My name is Dr. Joey Fink. I received my MA and PhD in History from UNC Chapel Hill in 2010 and 2015, and
I am now a Visiting Assistant Professor at High Point University. I had the pleasure of being in the audience
when President Qubein interviewed you in 2017. Many of your comments on the role of public education in a
democracy and the value of higher education resonated deeply with me.

I'm writing to express my concerns about the monument to white supremacy known as Silent Sam. As an
historian of modem U.S. history, with publications on gender and racial inequality in the American South, I am
deeply troubled that the institution at which I so proudly earned my dissertation might continue to be home to
this symbol of brutality, violence, and gross inequality. I doubt that I need to reiterate the troubling history
surrounding the creation and commemoration of this statue, just as I am sure that other students and alum have
articulated the pain and fear this symbol of Jim Crow and slavery evokes in men and women whose ancestors
were victims of white supremacy and racism.

Instead, I appeal to you as a fellow Tar Heel and American who, I believe, is deeply committed to the principles
and values of a free, open, and kind society. This statue belongs in a museum or historical site, where it can be
curated and contextualized, and where it can serve as a clear and useful teaching tool about our nation's past. It
does not belong on the campus of a university that purports to be a place of freedom and learning, and a place
where students are cared for by the institution and where they are asked to pledge, on their honor, to treat one
another with respect and compassion. I appeal to as a successful professional woman, to be a role model for our
youth (especially young women), to show them what real leadership and courage looks like. And I appeal to
you as an educated scholar, committed to enlightening those who come to your door to learn, to make UNC a
learning community that teaches about the past and the present responsibly.

I know that UNC administrators are, in many ways, limited by the Board of Governors, the Board of Trustees,
and the state legislature in the actions they can take. But I think you have a responsibility to put the interest of
UNC Chapel Hill first. If Silent Sam is allowed to re-occupy that prominent place on campus, the university's
reputation will be further damaged. It will affect the university's enrollments and alum donations. It will
negatively impact the current student body, and it will discourage UNC's out-of-state and international
applicants.

Thank you for your time, and I hope that the next email I write will be one thanking you for your leadership and
courage.

Joey A Fink, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History

High Point University

REDACTED
High Point, NC 27268
Message
From: Lora Holland [lholland@unca .edu]
Sent: 8/30/2018 4:03:27 PM
To: Public BOT [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]; Haywood D. Cochrane
Jr. [haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com]; Duckett, Chuck [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=d42915aef8014bc4896b876cf0d6ecf0-Mr Charles]; Julia Sprunt Grumbles
uuliagrumbles@gmail.com]; Jefferson W. Brown ueffbrown@mvalaw.com]; Caudill, Walter Lowry
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr]; Hopkins, Kelly
Matthews [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=admin.live.unc.edu-
58827-wkeyes87e]; Allie Ray McCullen [mccullenre@aol.com]; W. Edwin McMahan [emcmahan@littleonline.com];
Hari H. Nath [Hnath45@yahoo.com]; Stevens, Richard [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8b8ab2d45c4 7400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate ]; Chancellor
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip i ents/cn=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Confederate statue

Flag: Follow up

Dear UNC Officials,

As an alumna of UNC-Chapel Hill and faculty member at UNC Asheville, as a child of the South with ancestors
who fought and died in the Civil War (as well as the Revolutionary War), and as an American citizen who votes
I am writing to you today. I am reading with dismay in the media that you are considering returning the
Confederate statue commonly called "Silent Sam" to campus, I urge you not to do this. The statue in its original
context during the Jim Crow era is a sad reminder of the hatred and violence against African Americans that
followed the War Between the States. We must, for the sake of our United States, move forward from that
terrible time and continue to work on healing the wounds that still fester. If you return the statue to our beautiful
CH campus you are signaling that you care more about furthering the divides that currently haunt our nation
than about healing them. The Bible teaches that we must love one another; for the Christians among you, I urge
you to speak to your brethren and help them to see that this statue, this symbol of heritage to one group, and a
symbol of oppression and fear to another, has no place on an inclusive campus and in an inclusive nation where
everyone has the right to be loved and cherished and the constitutional right to "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of
Happiness." Its rightful place is a museum where it can be contextualized properly so that its message of hate
does not overshadow its message of heritage.
Thank you for reading this message, and for doing the right thing.

Sincerely yours,

Lora L Holland
Associate Professor and Chair
Classics Department
University of North Carolina at Asheville
Asheville, NC 28804
http://classics.unca.edu
http:llwwwoencyciopediaofancienthistory.com
Message
From: Julie Johnson
Sent: 8/30/2018 4:56:58 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Kelly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in.live.u nc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be 32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Retire Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

To the Board of Trustees,

As a Durham resident and former Duke employee, I have been lucky to have colleagues at UNC, one of the top
public universities in the country and a source of pride for my state.

I am dismayed at the possibility that Silent Sam might be returned to the spot where the statue has stood for
over a century. As Julian Carr's speech makes clear, the statue was always about white supremacy and racism.
It is an object of shame. Bad enough that it stood on public property; worse that the North Carolina Historical
Commission has concluded that there is no legal route to removing such monuments, and worst of all that there
is pressure to return the statue to the original site. Please find another location if necessary, but don't return the
statue to the campus.

Sincerely,
Julie Johnson
Durham
Message
From: MAC
Sent: 8/30/2018 5:39:05 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]
Subject: Sam
Flag: Follow up

Hello, chancellor Folt,


I'm a wake Forest-based journalist and history buff, and recently looked
into a trip to Richmond so my wife could see the American civil War
Museum. I learned that the museum has opened an annex at the historic
Tredegar Iron Works, and that construction is still ongoing. I wonder if
that location would be a good resting place for silent Sam and other
Confederate monuments from the area, provided museum officials were on
board, and, of course, that you and the board of trustees agreed. It
would preserve the monuments while displaying them in their historic
context, which might defuse some of the recent controversy. I don't
really have a dog in this fight, but felt it might be one solution to
the issue.
Best,
Mark Cantrell

www.markcantrell.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/markcantrell
Twitter: @maccanwrite
Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/pub/mark-cantrell/0/86a/6b4/
A Weird-oh World: The Art of Bill Campbell - http://www.schifferbooks.com/a-weird-oh-world-the-art-of-
bill-campbell-5537.html
Triang l e Association of Freelancers: http://www.tafnc.com
Message
From: Stremlau, Rose [rostremlau@davidson.edu]
Sent: 8/30/2018 6:27:55 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I am emailing as UNC alum. I earned two degrees -- my M.A. and Ph.D. -- from UNC Chapel Hill, and I cherish
the outstanding education that I received in the Department of History. I am a specialist in the history of the
American South, particularly of its Native peoples. I am now on the faculty at Davidson College. My students
know I am a Tarheel. My office is covered in Carolina Blue.

Since I was a graduate student at UNC, I have been involved in recruitment and retention efforts for minority
students, and three American Indian students who have completed or who are currently enrolled at UNC are
there because I actively mentored them to prepare them for grad school, worked with them on their
applications, and cheered them on as they succeeded and struggled as all grad students do.

I am disgusted by the failure of leadership re: Silent Sam. I'll give you that this never should have been your
problem. The statue should have been removed in the 1960s. But, now, truly, there is no excuse. Sam is relic,
and he belongs in a location where he, with proper context, can serve as a teaching tool and represent the
failure of white supremacy and a reminder that even those who are educated can engage in small-minded
thinking. He doesn't belong back on his pedestal or in a place of prominence.

Each year, I advise some of best and brightest students in this state to consider UNC for graduate school, but I
can no longer do that work for you while my beloved alma mater remains an unsafe place for students of color
and hostile for students of conscience. History is not kind to the white supremacists who put up these
moments to their Lost Cause, and it will be even less so to those who fail to act now to eradicate this toxic
thinking from our society.

I look forward to donating money to the graduate school and sending you my best students again in the
future, but I will not do either while this crisis in ongoing.

Sincerely,

Rose Stremlau, Ph.D., 2006

Rose Stremlau, Ph.D.


Assistant Professor

Malllng Address: Sox 7042., 209 Ridge RD., Davidson, NC 28035 ..7128
Phone: REDACTED
http://www.historyandacookie.com
Message
From: Martha Copp
Sent: 8/30/2018 7:22:02 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ient s/ en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrum bles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudil l, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Ke lly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipient s/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in. live.unc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccu llenre@aol.com; emcmahan@ littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8b8a b2d45c4 7400d9e8 lbcld88dee233-Richa rd Ste]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Admin istrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Ad ministrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]
Subject : Silent Sam reflects no hono r on UNC

Flag: Follow up

Dear UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and Chancellor Folt:


I am an alumna of UNC Chapel Hill (MA 1987 and PhD 1993, Sociology), and have been closely watching
recent events at my alma mater. The news that students and their community allies peacefully took down a
statue that commemorated white supremacy was encouraging and a positive step for UNC.

Protests that have occurred repeatedly over the decades indicate that the statue is a mark against the university's
educational mission, not a quaint piece of "tradition." Now is the time to take a cue from the will of students,
faculty, alumni, and those who are considering joining the university in the future: Please oppose any efforts to
put this statue back on its tainted pedestal. It is an embarrassment and a monument to hate.

If the Board of Trustees seeks to promote a positive future for UNC-CH, the statue must be permanently
relocated off campus. An additional step could be to endorse a plaque that explains the historical context from
UNC's days of racially segregated education that continued in the Jim Crow era. The actions of the Daughters of
the Confederacy in the early 20th century must be reexamined and shared with the public. UNC Chapel Hill's
racist history should not be whitewashed. And it should not be repeated.

Sincerely yours,
Martha Copp
Professor of Sociology, East Tennessee State University
Message
From: Eisdorfer, Erica [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=1252D220136F4E69BFB66DFCDF15ECF1-ERICA EISDO]
Sent: 8/30/2018 7:45:19 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I am a North Carolinian, born and rai sed. My mother worked for the UNC Press for twenty years. My brother
graduated from UNC. I worked at the UNC Student Stores for over 30 years. There is a Chancellor's scholarship
in my brother's name to which we give annually--the Marc Eisdorfer Award in Linguistics.
You can argue historical methodology all you want but one thing's pretty clear: the hundreds of UNC students
of color probably don't see Silent Sam as a brave young soldier. They likely see him as a symbol of state's
rights--in this case, the state of North Carolina's right to keep slavery legal. To them--to me, too--Silent Sam is a
perfect vicious reminder that UNC continues to honor evil.
Ifl were a Jew, say, I'd pretty much hate to have to pass a statue of Goebbels as I was walking to math class
every day.
Silent Sam should be in a place where his context is obvious--a museum devoted to North Carolina history, for
example--rather than in a place of honor in the middle of a major campus quad.
The time has come. Do the right thing. Get on the right side of history, Chancellor Folt.
Thanks, yrs, Erica Eisdorfer
Message
From: hwhawkinspublish
Sent: 8/31/2018 7:29:10 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Mccorkle Place: A Positive Solution

Flag: Follow up

Carol Folt, Ph.D., Chancellor


University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

As an alumnus, I propose that the UNC System replace UNC-CH's recently destroyed
Confederate monument with a ground-level, lifesize likeness of President William C.
Friday, who served the University so long, so honorably, and so wisely through a number
of crises.
I oppose any effort to salvage the Confederate statue or its message, because North
Carolinians are not going to forget what it stood for, nor the despicable racism with
which, a half-century after the Civil War was over, a Trustee unveiled it to our people. My
great grandfather in Stokes County owned a number of slaves, but I must say that this
ugly artifact's overthrow in our own time was courageous and conscientious. No legal
actions ought to sully the names of its demolishers, and clearly, it is futile to restore
anything so inflammatory and offensive. Let us therefore start anew with a more positive
alternative.
H.W. Hawkins
Message
From: Robert Dodson
Sent: 8/31/2018 8:34:07 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Idea

Flag: Follow Up

Good morning. Just an idea on the Silent Sam statue. We all have ideas of why the statue was erected but if we look at
what the plaque actually says about honoring those who left the university and died fighting we recognize the sacrifice
made during that period of history. Instead of removing the statue why not expand the monument. In other words, keep
the bronze placard depicting the student setting down his books to answer the "call", keep the confederate plaque but
add others to recognize those who left the university and died fighting in all the major conflicts, WWI, WWII, etc ..
Involve the veterans groups in the wording and this becomes a site of Memorial Day/Veterans Day recognitions. The
original intent of Silent Sam is not lost but the recognition of others who left the comfort of the university setting and
gave the ultimate sacrifice is also remembered. If there is a need to place something on top of the base, place two large
bronze flags joined together, one the NC State flag and the other the UNC flag. This way history is not lost but expanded
with the hope that all students will put themselves in the shoes of those who left the beautiful setting of the university
to give it all for the cause at the time. It truly was going from "blue" heaven to a real life hell. We should remember.

Thank you for "listening".

Bob
Message
From: Corey Frost
Sent: 8/31/2018 10:51:50 AM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudil l, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Ke lly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in. live.u nc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccu llenre@aol.com; emcmahan@ littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-R ichard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Admin istrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Ad ministrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be 32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject : Do not reinstall Si lent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dears Members of the UNC-CH Board of Trustees:

As an double alum of UNC-CH, I am deeply disappointed in the way the UNC-CH administration has handled
the controversy over Silent Sam, choosing to ignore the demands of students, staff, and faculty of color that the
statue be taken down and placed in a more appropriate location (e.g., a museum).

Chancellor Folt waxes poetic about how the safety of students is her utmost concern. But in allowing a
monument to Jim Crow and lynching to stand, encouraging white supremacists to come to campus, she has
shown that she cares much more about keeping wealthy, white donors and the Board of Governors happy. I also
learned that law enforcement used pepper spray on peaceful demonstrators on campus last night. I guess
Chancellor Folt and I have different understandings of what "keeping students safe" means.

If the Chancellor and Board of Trustees recommend to the Board of Governors that Silent Sam be reinstalled on
McCorkle Place, I will never give another penny to the university and will discourage all of my fellow friends
and family who are alums from giving any money as well. It's high time UNC-CH administrators and governing
bodies take a stand for human rights, and also recognize that those of us who care about human rights are a
financial force to be reckoned with as well.

You know what the right thing to do is. Please don't disappoint us any further.

Sincerely,

Andrew Corey Frost


UNC Law Class of 2016
UNC Undergraduate Class of 2008
Message
From: Jennifer Eichenberger
Sent: 8/31/2018 11:13:20 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam in museum
Flag: Follow up

Please put an end to the danger on campus by relocating silent Sam to the NC History Museum or some other
building where people can choose to go instead of having it forced upon them. And please announce it
quickly. This situation is creating a danger for the UNC students.
Thank you, Jennifer Eichenberger
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Kim Porter
Sent: 8/31/2018 12:06:44 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Alum supporting the permanent removal of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt and others who it may concern:

As an alumni of UNC-CH, I support the permanent removal of the Silent Sam statue. I would like to see Silent
Sam relocated to a museum or off-campus location where it can be viewed, fully contextualized, by those who
choose to see it. I will not support UNC as an alumni if Silent Sam is returned to campus. The dedication
speech when the statue was erected proves that this statue represents racist views, and causes harm and ill-
will for many students and alumni, and is not representative of the views of the majority of our UNC family. I
also request that the remaining pedestal on the central quad be removed from that location.

I hope that you will do the right thing and advocate for this stance.

Sincerely,
Kim Porter

UNC Chapel Hill Class of 1991


Message
From: stevearich
Sent: 8/31/2018 1:50:35 PM
To: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]
CC: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam, relocation

Flag: Follow up

I am sorry the monument came down as it did but feel strongly that it needs to be relocated. The information that has been revealed in
recent years, including Julian Carr's dedication speech 105 years ago, reveals one of the monument's most glaring purposes ... to
intimidate non-whites.

Let the monument and its base be relocated into a UNC-CH campus building. There should be information with it to describe all of its
perceived meanings.

Thank you for your attention.

Stephen Rich., Chapel Hill, 1964 UNC-CH graduate

Sent .from my Sprint Phone.


Message
From: Liz Lindsey
Sent: 8/31/2018 2:51:33 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Kelly Matthews [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in.live.unc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be 32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Alumni and Resident's Letter against Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

August 30, 2018


Dear Board of Trustees at UNC Chapel Hill,
I write as a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, a decade long resident and homeowner in Chapel Hill, and as a descendant
of a Confederate soldier from Guilford County, North Carolina.
I urge you to leave Silent Sam down.
Confederate monuments are a violent celebration of racism, white supremacy, and slavery. ,Julian Carr's speech
when Silent Sam was erected boasts of violently assaulting a local black woman. This leaves no room for doubt that
the monument is meant to be a reminder to black people of the violence they should expect -and indeed untold
numbers have incurred-when they challenged slavery, and an forms of inequality and injustice. To this very day,
there are black students and community members who have received verified threats of violence.
I am proud that Silent Sam is down. It is shameful that it loomed over us for over 100 years. The UNC and Chapel
I-ii11 community have respectfuHy requested in myriad ways over the decades for this to happen legally, and
nonviolently. Time and again the voices so brave to speak against racism were not given due respect. Today, please
find respectful ways to heal our sky blue community. Do not further rot our community-a bright, beautiful bouquet
of many colors-by resurrecting this hateful ghost. Please, heal and help grow the peace and justice. Please
reconsider officially proclaiming (Zora Neale) Hurston Hall. As a folklore graduate, I would be immensely proud of
UNC to connect to such a gifted scholar, writer and folkforist. What a powerful and healing statement you could
make by honoring a black woman near to where Carr's celebration of a violent assault of a black woman took place.
Sincerely,
Lizzie Lindsey, ALA. [!NC-Chapel Hill, 2003
Message
From: romason124
Sent: 8/31/2018 4:00:39 PM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudil l, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Ke lly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in. live.unc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccu llenre@aol.com; emcmahan@ littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-R ichard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Admin istrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Ad ministrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be 32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject : Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

To some Southerners, Silent Sam is a testament to their homeland, the South. Sadly, that understandable
affection for the place where many came from is tangled with the history of slavery. I am not African American,
but I can understand how African Americans feel about facing Sam in their educational home. Picture how we
who are of European background might feel if Nazi Germany were so honored on our campus by a statue of a
German soldier who fought for the Reich in World War II.

I regret the good aspects of Southern culture rest on the pain of others. Sam's presence causes pain for good
reason, and, therefore, he should find himself a home where those who want to remember him can seek him out.
He should no longer be welcome in the midst of us, but go, as other dead, to a place of remembrance.

Ro Mason
Message
From: Marc Jeuland [marc.jeuland@duke.edu]
Sent: 8/31/2018 6:11:51 PM
To: Marc Jeuland [marc.jeuland@duke.edu]
Subject: Please do not reinstall Silent Sam at Mccorkle Place

Flag: Follow up

Dear Trustees and Chancellor Falt,

I am writing as an alumnus (MSEE and PhD from the School of Public Health in 2006 and 2009) and (still) local who
participates actively in many UNC events, including serving on several faculty recruitment committees, collaborating
with UNC researchers on various projects, and regularly attending lectures and Carolina Performing Events (as well as
donating money to the school).

I am extremely disappointed that the Board of Trustees is considering reinstalling "Silent Sam" at Mccorkle Place. To be
sure, this "monument" has a complex and troubled history, which needs to be told, and not swept under the rug just
because it is offensive. But the correct way to do that is to place it in context with a set of appropriate and requisite
explanations, and not with little explanation at the entryway to the campus of this great university. A more appropriate
location, for example, would be in a building where its origins and history could be explained with accompanying text or
other media, as well as both academic and other perspectives on what it means to them.

You all have a unique opportunity to take responsible action that protects public safety, while standing for Lux et
Libertas, and not "sustaining and enforcing the symbols of human cruelty" as recently stated in a letter to you from the
faculty. We are fortunate that the events that toppled this statue were not more violent than they were; in fact I was
particularly shocked by language from some leaders suggesting that this was the doing of a violent mob. In fact, there
was nothing violent about the protests, unlike what has happened in other locations. For that we can all be thankful.

As a concerned alum, I thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Marc Jeuland
Message
From: Thomas W Murray
Sent: 8/31/2018 6:50:26 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam suggestion

Flag: Follow up

Put the statue in the campus cemetery..... undoubtedly there are UNC grads who fought in the war buried
the re ... and it's far enough out of the way not to cause a ruckus (I hope)

1W Murray
Message
From: Jade Dell
Sent: 8/31/2018 7:16:38 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D];
Hnath45@yahoo.com; mccullenre@aol.com; Hopkins, Kelly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl];
jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles]
Subject: The Silent Sam Statue

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor and Board of Trustees at UNC Chapel Hill:

I have been following the events at UNC for 3 years now as the issue of the Silent Sam statue have been in the
news, even going to Chapel Hill to see it (I live in Raleigh).

After reading about its history, I believed that it should be removed from the campus and put in a place where it
could be observed as a piece of history with that history explained: that it was dedicated decades after the Civil
War by persons who did not agree with the freeing of the slaves and the right of formerly enslaved persons to
take their part and role in this nation's destiny.

And now that it has been taken down, I am of the mind that it should not be replaced, but housed off campus
where people who want to be informed about how racism has poisoned this country can go to view it along with
other statues of Confederate Generals, etc.

I have also heard another disgusting story about why the statue was named "Silent Sam" - that Sam would only
speak if a "virgin" walked by. I understand that Mr. Carr who spoke at its dedication (and for whom the town of
Carrboro was named) was actually a member of the KKK. This story about the statue is damaging to any young
woman who has to function in that sexist atmosphere.

It is time to let that statue go.

Sincerely,
Jade Dell
Raleigh 27603
Message
From: Arthur Hayes
Sent: 8/31/2018 7:23:14 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Fwd: ANNOUNCEMENT from UNC: Message from the Chancellor - August 31, 2018

Flag: Follow up

=
Message
From: Kenley, Charles Robert [kenley@purdue.edu]
Sent: 9/1/2018 8:07:45 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Selling the Statue

Flag: Follow up

Your development people should be able to find donors who would be willing to contribute to a foundation that
could purchase the problematic statue and locate it elsewhere.

C. Robert Kenley, PhD, ESEP, INCOSE Fellow


Associate Professor of Engineering Practice
School of Industrial Engineering
Purdue University
Room 370, 315 N Grant St, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2023
Phone: REDACTED • Mobile Phone:
E-mail: kenley@purdue.edu
Web: http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~ckenley/
Message
From: Kathryn Reklis [kreklis@fordham.edu]
Sent: 9/1/2018 9:13:31 AM
To: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =94 fb6385ce9041a 19d4dcf447 a9d4009-South _pa pub]; Chancel Ior
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Do not restore Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Board of Trustees and Chancellor Folt,

I am an alumna of the University (class of 2001), a Morehead Scholar (now Morehead-Cain), and now an
Associate Professor of Theology at Fordham University, having earned my PhD at Yale University in Religious
Studies.

I am writing now to express my strong and unequivocal support that Silent Sam NOT be returned to any place
of public display at the University. Returning the statue to any prominent location would reaffirm the values of
white supremacy that motivated its original installation. We cannot erase the history of racism and racist
violence that are part of our University's past, but we can choose in this moment which values and principles
will guide our present action. The values that the statue represent are inherently opposed to the principles of
light and liberty that guide the educational mission of UNC Chapel Hill.

The only possible public display of Silent Sam that is fitting to the values of our university is perhaps a
museum, where the history of its creation and the controversy around it could be explored with true scholarly
and historical honesty.

I am a proud alumna who watches in hope that my alma mater will act in line with the principles that have
formed me morally and intellectually.

Yours sincerely,
Dr. Kathryn Reklis

Kathryn Reklis
Associate Chair of Graduate Studies, Theology Department
Associate Professor of Modem Protestant Theology
Affiliated Faculty, American Studies and Comparative Literature
Fordham University, Rose Hill
Message
From: chuckpeacehawk
Sent: 9/1/2018 9:32:36 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Davie statue for Mccorkle Place

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

As an alumnus and student of history, may I suggest what I think is the obvious and incontestable
winner of any contest to select a heroic figure to replace Silent Sam: William Richardson Davie,
patriot, war hero, Founding Father, and founder of the University. In sight of the venerable Davie
Poplar is where a statue of him would have a unique and appropriate presence, and nothing could
represent the University more dramatically from Franklin Street's perspective. Several portraits of
him exist, including an excellent profile view that hangs in New West in the Dialectic Society's
chambers. Please keep my suggestion in mind. Thank you!

Chuck Hawkins
Message
From: Jim Finigan
Sent: 9/1/2018 10:26:41 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: joanna.allhands@arizonarepublic.com; 'Robb, Robert' [robert.robb@arizonarepublic.com]; akwok@azcentral.com;
'Benson, Steve' [steve .benson@arizonarepublic.com]; ed .montini@arizonarepubl ic.com; 'Valdez, Linda'
[linda.valdez@arizonarepublic.com]; phil.boas@arizonarepublic.com; nicole.carroll@arizonarepublic.com; 'Roberts,
Laurie' [laurie .roberts@arizonarepublic.com]; elvia.diaz@arizonarepublic.com
Subject: Another college grapples with fel ling of Confederate statue - Frances Sellers, Susan Svrluga - The Washington Post -
Friday, August 31, 2018

Flag: Follow up

notes on united we stand....

To: Ms. Carol Falt, Chancellor


University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chancellor Falt, Re the "Silent Sam" statue at UNC, the issue really has nothing whatsoever to do with what it means
today. It's what was intended when the statue was built and installed by racists.

According to Wikipedia » "At the unveiling on June 2, 1913, local industrialist Julian Carr gave a speech espousing v,rhite
supremacy."[

Your attempt to mollify black citizens, civil war families and white nationalists with a back lot statue relocation and
scholarly history lessons is a solution where none is possible. This isn't Hanover NH.

Many in the south are still fighting a civil war that ended over a century and a half ago. Tear the statue down completely,
have a nice ceremony and donate its plaque to some elderly historical society.

Regards,JF
Message
From: Tom Barnette
Sent: 9/1/2018 1:57:07 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: jcanaday@unc.edu; Hertel, Amy Locklear [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =92d8a 7a8 722f47cfa35 ld3f9def5093 7-Amy Locklea]
Subject: Silent Sam announcement email, 8/31
Flag: Follow up

chancellor Folt,
Thank for the email update to the UNC community.
I am writing in response to that email to offer not a solution, but a process suggestion.
As the process to develop a recommendation goes forward, I urge your team to focus on surfacing ,
understanding and seeking to address the interests of the stakeholders, not their stated positions. Your
email was a good start in reframing the various interests. From what I have heard so far, a large
contingent of students, professors and staff and alumni want to ensure that their UNC does not
countenance racism or white superiority in any form. others want to not forget the sons of the
University who they believe were fulfilling a military duty that was often thrust upon them by their
families, churches and civic leaders. It's very early, but that may suggest an out of the way spot
(graveyard?) with written context that clearly states the going forward reason for the statue being on
campus. It should be somewhere that the university community would not typically encounter, but a place
where one could go if they so chose.
I retired last year from a career as a corporate ombudsman and my experience was that seeking to satisfy
interests can often lead to compromise solutions that multiple stakeholders can accept, if not endorse.
Tom Barnette
BSBA UNC 1978
MBA Harvard 1988

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Richard Sills
Sent: 9/1/2018 3:40:52 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC:
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

While I wish the statue could have remained exactly where it was, I would not want to see it subject to
being pulled down again.
I am not sure how tall the statue itself is, but perhaps it wo uld fit in the Nort h Carolina collection in
Wilson Library. The memorial plaque(s) could also be moved to the library.
Finally, I suggest leaving the base empty and blank.
Respectfully,
Richard sills, '76
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Carleton Barbour
Sent: 9/1/2018 8:59:08 PM
To: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =94 fb6385ce9041a 19d4dcf447 a9d4009-South _pa pub]; Chancel Ior
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam's future

Flag: Follow up

---------- Forwarded message ---------


From: Carleton Barbour
Date: Sat, Sep 1, 20l8publicbot@unc.edu at 8:51 PM
Subject: Silent Sam's future
To: Chancellor@unc.edu <Chancellor@unc.edu>

Chancellor Folt,

As an alum, I acknowledge Silent Sam's place in the history ofUNC Chapel Hill. I also realize that different
members of the UNC community attach various meanings to Silent Sam's placement at the university. I believe
that the best next place for Silent Sam is in a museum and not at another campus location. I always found Silent
Sam to be a peculiar symbol of the university. I also find it difficult to comprehend how fellow university
supporter could believe he is an appropriate late 20 th century or 21 st century symbol ofUNC.

Please add my input to that from other alums. I believe Silent Sam should not have a future at UNC-CH.

Respectfully,

Carleton J. Barbour, PhD

UNC-CH, 1991 (Chemistry)

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


Message
From: Mary Whee ling
Sent: 9/1/2018 9:41:06 PM
To: Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles]; jeffbrown@mva law. com;
Hopkins, Ke lly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=admin.live.unc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccu llenre@aol .com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste];
Stone, Dwight David [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate ];
haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; juliagrumbles@gmail.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
emcmahan@littleonline.com
CC: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/cn=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Do not al low Silent Sam return to Mccorkle Place

Flag: Follow up

Dear UNC Board of Trustees:


I attended graduate school at UNC-CH from 1987-1994, earning my M.A. and Ph.D. from the English
department. I am writing today with a plea for you to prevent the university from reinstalling Silent Sam in his
original position. He must not return to McCorkle Place.

In order to educate the public about UNC's and the South's history, the statue could usefully be displayed
indoors as part of a museum or educational exhibit, accompanied by information about the conditions of the
statue's original commission and dedication, as well as the 21st-century controversy concerning its placement
and its eventual toppling.

Whatever is done with it, it must not be replaced on its original pedestal to insult and degrade the University's
community. This is a moment to do the right thing. Do not tarnish our pride in the Southern part of heaven.

Sincerely,
Mary Wheeling (M.A. 1989; Ph.D. 1994)
Message
From:
Sent: 9/2/2018 8:02:58 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Fultz

My name is Thomas Cheek I am one of the direct dependents of the local farmer who
Donated the first piece of property for the University to be built on Matthew Mc Cauley.
I am contacting you with an proposal to keep Silent Sam. The problem we have is a Confederate Monument,
identity comes from definition. I am working on a design to redefine Silent Sam. Silent SAM would stand for a
monument that is Silent Supporting American Military. We would reidentify him not as a Confederate Soldier
but as a Minute Man. The Minute man was a farmer. shop keeper, a regular citizen who was prepared to pick
up arms and defend our rights for the freedom we have today.
I propose that we identify him as a Minute Man who is Silent Supporting American Military, Army, Navy, Air
Force, Marines, and our current time Minute Man the National Guard. There would have to be some
modifications made to the pedestal, and I have some ideas on that which i would like to share with you and
possibly The Board of Governor's. If you fell like this is a good solution to a bad problem that even with
modifications would be cheaper than moving the entire monument Please let me know and I would be happy
to share my ideas in the modifications needed. You can communicate with me thru e mail if you wish.

Thanks for taking a look at other ideas to save Silent Sam.

Thomas Cheek
Sent from Windows Mail
Message
From: Tori Reynolds
Sent: 9/2/2018 11:13:14 AM
To: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =94 fb6385ce9041a 19d4dcf447 a9d4009-South _pa pub]; Chancel Ior
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: re: restoration of Silent Sam
Flag: Follow up

Dear UNC Board of Trustees,


We are firmly against the restoration of silent Sam to the UNC campus. It's inconceivable to think that
UNC - an educational institution supported by public tax dollars and tasked with the responsibility of
teaching, learning and education - would even consider upholding the inequality and subjugation that the
the Confederacy stood for.
Statues are always and forever symbols. symbolic gestures, symbolic objects, symbolic practices - all
carry enormous meaning and weight in representing our cultural, political, moral and spiritual values.
We ask you, in the evolution of our democracy, what can silent Sam stand for other than a war that was
fought and over which countless lives were lost to uphold slavery and an economic system dependent on
slavery?
No matter how imperfect practices as a state and as a democratic country, slavery and the enslavement of
any people is not something we should aspire to morally, politically, spiritually or culturally. Period.
A commemoration of lives lost in the pursuit of such practices can no longer be valorized. To privilege
these lives in a symbolic statue represents a form of racism, and necessarily represents the values of
UNC if you choose to resurrect the statue.
Leave silent Sam down, put the statue in a warehouse, create a symbol that boldly and clearly encourages
an accurate view of our history.
Sincerely,
Tori Reynolds & John Beerman
Message
From: Julia Jessop
Sent: 9/2/2018 11:53:46 AM
To: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =94 fb6385ce9041a 19d4dcf447 a9d4009-South _pa pub]; Chancel Ior
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam needs to go

Flag: Follow up

Is this really the image that the University of North Carolina wishes to put forth to the students it welcomes to
campus? A statue commissioned by the United Daughters of the Confederacy and officially commemorated by
Julian Carr, with a speech espousing white supremacy? Certainly the Civil War is an important part of our
history, but should we be honoring the Confederacy and its support for slavery? That is the reason the UDC and
its supporters of that time erected the Statue. It may be a historical monument, but not one we should proudly
display in the Upper Quad ofUNC or in any public place at the University.

Please DO NOT display it!

Sincerely,
Julia Jessop

-J
Message
From: Phil Holland
Sent: 9/2/2018 12:38:12 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: the Monument

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt:

I see from the New York Times that you are open to comments from citizens outside of North Carolina.

It's not enough to repudiate Julian Carr's remarks at the statue's unveiling in 1913, as you have done -- Mr. Carr
perfectly well articulated the white-supremacist ideology that the statue represents, and that, apparently, a
majority of State legislators continue to support. Since the laws of North Carolina forbid the statue's destruction
(or even relocation), I suggest that one of those fine people be invited read out every word of Carr's speech at
the rededication, so that all in attendance understand what the statue stands for and what "Southern heritage"
really means.

That statue should be melted down, and that metal used for a new statue. Anything less extends the message of
bigotry that the now toppled statue stands for.

Sincerely,

Phil Holland
Shaftsbury VT
Message
From: Ennis Baker
Sent: 9/2/2018 10:44:34 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_ chan c]; Public BOT
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm in istrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =94 fb6385ce9041a 19d4dcf44 7a9d4009-South _pa pub]
Subject: Silent Sam needs a new home

Flag: Follow up

As an alumnus, class of 1992, and a permanent chapel Hill resident since 1999, I beg you to develop a
committee made up of stake holders who represent the diversity of the community to plan for where silent
Sam will be relocated and how it's honest and accurate history can be shared and discussed.

Ennis Baker
Message
From: Susanne Slavick [slavick@andrew.cmu.edu]
Sent: 9/3/2018 8:26:11 AM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr]; Hopkins, Kelly
Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Admin istrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=admin .live.unc.edu-
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@l ittleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c4 7400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate ]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: Andrew Ellis Johnson [ajlj@andrew.cmu.edu]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and Chancellor Folt:

As citizens, artists and professors, we urge you to refrain from reinstalling the Silent Sam monument that sows
so much discord, causes pain to so many, and propagates a racist cause that was lost long ago.

Let the space it occupied breathe again, absent of an offensive and oppressive symbol. Let it be gone forever.

Sincerely,

Susanne Slavick and Andrew Ellis Johnson


Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Art and Associate Professor of Art
School of Art, CFA 300
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes A venue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3891 USA
Message
From: Jessica Loverde
Sent: 9/3/2018 12:20:44 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Good morning,

I was watching the news this morning, and I understand you are taking suggestions from the public on where to
relocate Silent Sam. My name is Jessica Lo Verde, and I am a 2017 graduate ofUNC Chapel Hill. I feel that I
understand both sides of the issue regarding the statue; students of color feel that their ancestors' oppressors are
being literally put on a pedestal, but descendants of Confederate soldiers want their history to be remembered.

Silent Sam is to remember the UNC Students that lost their lives fighting for the Confederacy. Because of this,
it has always seemed like a gravestone or metaphorical resting place to me.

I think the best place to relocate Silent Sam would be the cemetary on campus. It would no longer be UNC
appearing to support Confederates, and descendants would still be able to pay their respects. I am sure some
students and members of the public would still take issue, but in this no-win situation I truly feel that relocating
the monument to the cemetary with a plaque putting the statue in historical context would be the best case
scenario for both sides of this difficult issue.

I appreciate that you are taking suggestions, and even if mine is not chosen I hope it is at least read.

Thank you for your consideration,

Jessica Lo Verde
UNC Chapel Hi 11 Class of 2017
Message
From: Holly Coldiron
Sent: 9/3/2018 2:42:05 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: ACTBAC rally and Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Folt

As a double alum ofUNC-CH (undergrad and law), i have watched the most recent protests calling for the
removal of Silent Sam, including the recent event where the statue was finally taken down. I first attended UNC
in the early 80's and even then Silent Sam was a symbol of deep racism and casual misogyny (only firing his
"weapon" if a virgin passes). Time has only deepened the heavy symbolism of this monument. And UNC's
continuing refusal to move or remove this statue is a reminder that systemic and institutional racism runs deep.
The UNC Board has continually shown that the feelings of a small group of white North Carolinians are favored
over those of the historically oppressed and powerless, why else fight this cause for so long over a memorial
with such a problematic provenance and history?

Recently I was at the event where ACTBAC was under UNC security and police protection given special
protected access to hold their event at the now statueless pedestal. I have some honest questions about this event
and why this group was granted such protection. did ACTBAC have a special permit for their protest? did they
pay for the additional security? And did they pay or register for the special event parking at the Morehead
parking lot?

The entire setup of the event by the security served to escalate the situation before even the first ACTBAC
member or counter/dance party protestor arrived. ACTBAC and the confederate memorialists were given a
special protected space, but at no time did the security or police grant similar protection to the counter
protestors. Both sides could have been offered equal protected space - you stay out of their space and they stay
out of your space. but this is not what happened. The confederate memorialists were protected from
counterprotestors, but the police at no time attempted to protect the counterprotestors from the confederate
supporters or other rightwing agitators. I am sure you have seen the video from the News and Observer that
clearly shows a police officer (identified as from Greensboro) assuring ACTBAC that they (the police) were
there for their (ACTBAC) protection (i.e. not everyone's protection) and the excessive violence and anger
exhibited toward the counterprotestors.

You now have an opportunity to stand up and take action to support your students and community against the
continued mythology of this lost cause. Do the right thing and if you must keep the statue, move it to a place
where it can be given full context, including the initial dedication, protests through the civil rights era and
eventual removal. Personally, i would rather it just be melted down, but there is a solution that can honor the
UNC community. I urge you to find it.

Holly Coldiron
Message
From: Charles Fazio
Sent: 9/3/2018 6:42:29 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt:

So much for Light and Truth. Now that the Commie/Nazis tore down a statue, it's time to strike back.
First of all, I understand from some news reports that the perpetrators weren't even associated with
the school but were just a bunch of rabble rousers who don't give a hoot about the issue of slavery.
Their only purpose in life is to find an excuse to destroy something; just like the Nazis did with the
Jews. Now, it's time to strike back. It's not the so-called white supremacists who are destroying
property and killing police. America is being torn apart by people who support democrats and are, in
turn, supported and encouraged by democrats. And sooner or later, they will burn down your vaunted
ivory towers.

Put the statue back up. Encase it in bullet-proof glass and surround the area with vehicle barriers. We
protect building and politicians with layers and layers of security. Silent Sam is no different.

You may touch off a new Civil War; however, the time has come to take a stand. Do we defend
America against her domestic enemies? Or, do we allow the lowlifes of the liberal left to do to
America what their soulmates did over a hundred years ago when they overthrew and assassinated
Czar Nicholas and his family and brought living hell to over half the world? Our political leaders are
good at deceit. They keep talking about stopping Communism over there before it gets here. We
never stop to think that Communism is already here. It is the "democratic" party. There's nothing
democratic about it.
Chuck Fazio
Quincy, MA
Message
From: Edwin Fountain
Sent: 9/4/2018 5:26:52 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam - a suggested solution

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Folt,

I am literally in the business of war memorials. I am general counsel to the American Battle Monuments
Commission, a federal agency which builds and maintains U.S. military memorials and cemeteries around the
world. I am currently leading the development of the national World War I memorial in Washington DC. I was
also a member of the design jury for the National Native American Veterans Memorial being established by the
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. If my perspectives can be of any assistance in
addressing the current situation, I would be only too happy to be involved.

In the meantime, let me offer this suggestion. I speak as one who thought the memorial should remain and
would prefer that it be restored, and who objects strongly to the lawless way in which it was removed, in
defiance of the ongoing public discussion and process about its fate. I have much to say about that debate, but probably
nothing new. AU that said, if Silent Sam is not to be restored to his original location ------ and I think it likely that he will not------ then I
make two suggestions: One, that the statue be returned to some visible place on campus, not in some basement but also a place of1ess
prominence, in the interests of history and remembrance. Two, in keeping with the widespread practice in this countly of, for instance,
expanding the scope of World War I memo1ials to include World War II and later conflicts, that Silent Sam's surviving plinth remain
where it is and be rededicated, with an appropriate plaque or other additional elements, as a memorial to all the members of the
Carolina community who gave their lives in aII the nation's wars (both sides of the Civil War included), and who thereby, in the words
still written on the plinth, "taught the lesson ... that duty is the sublimest word in the English language."

As an aside, I noted that one of your recent posts on the issue alluded, as many others have, to the dedicatory comments of Julian Can-.
As I understand it, Mr. Can- was one of about a half dozen speakers at the dedication. A full context would require consideration of
what other speakers said. I believe at least one of them spoke of the memorial ve1y much in tenns of remembrance of the dead, with
no comment about the races or "the lost cause." Mr. Can-'s comments may be relevant, but they should not be taken in isolation as the
only interpretation of the memorial.

Again, I would be happy to contlibute to this discussion in any way I can.

Respectfully,

Edwin Fountain
BA '86
Message
From: matt ezzell
Sent: 9/5/2018 10:31:31 AM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudill, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Kelly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in.live.u nc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccullenre@aol.com; emcmahan@littleonline.com; Hnath45@yahoo.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-Richard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]
CC: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/cn=34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Plans/Placement of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

To the members of the UNC Board of Trustees and Chancellor Carol Folt,

I write to you today as three-time graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I attended as an
undergraduate Morehead Scholar and completed a BA in Women's Studies with honors in Creative Writing in
1999 before returning and completing an MA (2004) and PhD (2009) in Sociology. I am also a North
Carolinian by birth whose ancestors fought and died in the Civil War.

Silent Sam, erected on the "gateway" to campus 50 years after the end of the Civil War by the United Daughters
of the Confederacy as a part of the broader "Lost Cause" movement, was a stain on the UNC campus and
broader community. As is evident not only from Julian Carr's dedication speech (in which he refers to the
"pleasing duty" of horse-whipping a "negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds") but also from the
broader efforts and record of the UDC at the time, Silent Sam always stood as a decontextualized
monument to white supremacy in North Carolina. As Professor Jim O'Hara noted, in 1913 the UDC
"unanimously endorsed and promoted for use in schools a history of the KKK that praised the heroic
work they did to preserve white supremacy. So putting up these statues was unambiguously part of
the white supremacist movement of the Jim Crow era"

The statue was and remains an affront to peoples of color and all people who stand for racial justice and
equality. Monuments do not represent historical truths, after all, but interpretations of history. Silent Sam cannot
be separated from the racist interpretations and ideologies of the Lost Cause movement and the UDC, which not
only openly endorsed white supremacy but which effectively erased North Carolina's vibrant anti-Confederate
history in the process. Protest against the presence of Silent Sam in its place of honor was ongoing since
students of color came to the university in the 1950s. In truth, those in positions of power over the decades
should have heard the calls for change and a more grounded and contextualized commemoration of our
collective history and moved the statue from its literal and symbolic pedestal. In the absence of such leadership,
the people acted in an expression of civil disobedience and political protest.

Silent Sam is down, as it should be; but, the statue and its place in our history should not be forgotten. The best
way to provide the context needed to understand Silent Sam and reckon with the complexities and
contradictions of our past as we move forward toward a brighter future is to place the statue in a museum or a
local/state historical site that can provide the historical and material backdrop of North Carolina's past, present,
and future.

With hope for that future, and with appreciation for your service to UNC,
Matthew B. Ezzell, PhD
UNC Alum ('99, '04, '09)
Staunton, VA
Message
From: Duckett, Chuck [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF 23SPDL T)/CN=RECl Pl ENTS/CN=D42915AEF8014BC4896B876CF0D6ECFO-MR CHARLES]
Sent: 9/5/2018 2:18:06 PM
To: Jones, Alan M [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF 23SPDL T)/ en=Recip ients/ en =ba80698655f84319b90a lda95198897 c-AI an M Jone]
CC: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDL T)/en=Recipients/ en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: RE: No Censorship on Campus- Silent Sam Fate Deliberation

Flag: Follow up

Alan, Thank you for your thoughts on this. We will take this into account as we determine our path. My best, Chuck
Duckett

From: Jones, Alan M


Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2018 11:15 AM
To: Duckett, Chuck
Cc:Chancellor
Subject: No Censorship on Campus- Silent Sam Fate Deliberation

Dear Mr. Duckett,

I am writing to you as this pertains to your duty on the Board of Trustees, now deliberating on the fate of the
Silent Sam monument.

Let me state emphatically that I do not support censorship on campus and argue that we must leave the Silent
Sam statue in place. We must not judge the past by the present and we must not erase history at risk of the
present being interpreted by a single party.

The arguments on both sides are visceral, not log ical. Please take time to filter out those visceral arguments to
consider the consequences of deleting history. It is true that the monument has different meanings to different
people today but we cannot know what it meant to people before us.

Instead, use the monument to teach; a most fitting endeavor for a world-class university. One solution is to turn
Silent Sam southward accompanied by a plaque that explains our present discussion.

Thank you for your service to the university and for your due diligence in this matter.

Sincerely, Alan Jones

Dr. Alan M. Jones


Kenan Distinguished Professor
Department of Biology
CB# 3280
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280
REDACTED
fax REDACTED
ORCID 0000-0002-2365-6462
http://www.bio.unc.edu/faculty/jones/
info on graduate admissions: http://www.med.unc.edu/bbsp/
info on open positions: http:// labs.bio.unc.edu/Jones/AJTEMP/Currentyl Open Positions.htm
Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail transmission may contain confidential or legally privileged information that is intended only fo r the individual or
entity named in the e-mail address. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribut io n, or
reliance upon the contents of this e-ma il is strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail transmission in error, please reply to the sender, so
that he can arrange for proper delivery, and then please delete the message from your in box. Thank you.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/5/2018 3:00:51 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: idea for Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I've been following with interest developments related to Silent Sam and his future. I am an alum and
as of this semester,

I also had the privilege to participate as a community member in UNC's Leading for Racial Equity
mini-course a few years ago. I learned so much in that experience and also how much I need to learn
about white privilege, policy and "gate keepers," with relation to racial equity. Since taking that course
I have tried to listen and read about the history of racism I never knew. Of course the situation with
Sam brings out all sorts of perspectives. I hope that in planning Sam's future you will be bold and
stand up to white privilege, which I believe is at the heart of much of the clamor to return him to the
UNC campus.

I also wanted to offer a suggestion for relocating the statue of Sam and perhaps other similar
statues/memorials. Have you heard about the NC Civil War and Reconstruction History Center
underway in Fayetteville? It's envisioned as telling North Carolina's full story during the Civil War, and
for the first time Reconstruction. The advisors and board members include a distinguished group of
people, including some with UNC ties, such as retired history professor James
Leutze, for example. Here is a full list: http://nccivilwarcenter.org/about/advisors-d irectors/

I propose that your commission consider approaching the history center about becoming a home for
significant artifacts such as Silent Sam along with full context of their commissioning, art, funding,
history, etc.

Thank you for consideration.


Message
From: Louis Weeks
Sent: 9/5/2018 4:31:42 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Possible solution for the Silent Sam statue

Flag: Follow up

I am writing to you as a graduate of UNC and a relative of several generations of students and graduates of
UNC. As your recent letter stated, this statue symbolizes many very different things to many very passionate
people. I am sure that there were students, graduates and staff that fought and died for both sides of the Civil
War. I have a relative that was a student there that left to fight in that war and died at home from infection from
wounds sustained in it. It seems to ask very little to honor those students, staff and graduates that died as a result
of that war. I suggest that the current statue be remodeled to have no markings to indicate either US or CSA
affiliation and be re-established as a memorial to ALL UNC students, staff and graduates that perished in that
needless war. It seems that most wars, like the war in Iraq, the Vietnam War and the Civil War are entered into
at the direction of just a few people and then many men and women must suffer much loss due to the decisions
of those few. The Civil War forced many people in NC to fight for reasons other than to preserve slavery or
white supremacy and it is unfair to place the stigma of those horrendous reasons upon them because of the
thoughts and actions of a few. There needs to be a memorial for ALL UNC students, staff and graduates that
suffered from that war. Just as the actions of a few should not be able to send so many to war neither should the
lawless actions of a few be allowed to disgrace the lives of former students, staff and graduates that fought for
honorable reasons. This solution allows for both viewpoints to obtain the main goals that they are seeking: to
honor those from UNC that died in that war and to not honor racial injustice or white supremacy.

Very truly yours,

Louis Batchelor Weeks


Message
From: Kasey Poole Decosimo
Sent: 9/5/2018 8:54:24 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Support for removal of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

As a UNC alumnus ('04 and '06), North Carolina native, and descendant of Confederate soldiers, I am in full
support of the removal of Silent Sam. I'm so glad no one was hurt in the removal, and I hoped it would come
down with support of all involved, but its prominence on a public university campus (and its Jim Crow
memorialization of a past where people of color were not considered fully human) is completely inappropriate. I
agree it should be in a museum or library instead. I know you are faced with a tremendous amount of pressure
from all sides. Please know there are many to support you in making the right decision for Tar Heel history.

Best regards,
Kasey Poole Decosimo

Kasey Poole Decosimo


Message
From: Moreton, Elliott [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =EAFB301AA69F402BA34 7B4 7B9A453 FC8-E LLIOTT MOR]
Sent: 9/7/2018 1:53:25 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Re: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt

Flag: Follow up

Dear chancellor Folt,


Thanks for circulating this information. The University now has an
opportunity to move the silent Sam war memorial statue (and, I hope, its
pedestal) somewhere less prominent, preferably a dignified but secluded
place where people can see it if they want to, but don't have to pass by
it every day. I have heard that you are getting a lot of complaints from
donors who want the statue back where it was, and I hope that you are
getting enough emails like this one from faculty, staff, students, and
alums to offset them.
I would be interested to know if the students who are memorialized were
officially encouraged by the University to join the Confederate army. If
they were, the University did its own students a disservice, and it might
want to consider acknowledging that fact in the memorial 's new location.
Sincerely,
Elliott Moreton

on Tue, 28 Aug 2018, no_reply@email.unc.edu wrote:


>
> Message from the chancellor
>
> Dear Carolina Community:
>
> Today, the UNC system Board of Governors passed a resolution directing the UNC-Chapel
> Hill Board of Trustees and the University administration to develop and present a plan
> by November 15 for the Confederate Monument's "disposition and preservation." I am
> grateful to the Board of Governors, chair Harry Smith and President Margaret Spellings
> for the opportunity to provide a "lawful and lasting path that protects public safety,
> preserves the monument and its history, and allows the University to focus on its core
> mission." I also wish to thank the Board of Trustees for their leadership and
> unwavering commitment to your safety and the mission and guiding principles of
> Carolina.
>
> I also am very mindful that this is the second week of the term. We just welcomed more
> than 5,000 new students, and I continue to be grateful for the way our students,
> faculty and staff come together to achieve the important work that takes place in
> classrooms, labs and offices every day. The Board of Trustees, my leadership team and
> I also know that you care deeply about the plan for the monument. We will work with
> you and find ways to engage and keep you informed throughout this important process.
>
> Sincerely,
>
>
>
> Carol L. Folt
>
> This message is sponsored by: office of the chancellor
>
>
Message
From: Campbell, Frances Alexander [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =F0201644CDB9406AABBC711C1695D03 7-FRAN CES ALE]
Sent: 9/7/2018 3 :30:01 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam reaction from an elderly alumna now UNC Affiliate Emerita
Attachments: LettertoFoltreSilentSam.docx

Flag: Follow up

I hope this letter will be read by someone in a position of influence.

Frances A. Campbell, Ph.D.


September 7, 2018

Chancellor Folz

UNC at Chapel Hill

South Building

Campus

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for leading us through this difficult period concerning the commemoration of
the history of North Carolina for its citizens. I speak for a minority of the UNC community in
that my grandmother spent most of the childhood living as an au pair-type member of an aging
brother/sister bachelor/spinster household who needed a pair of youthful legs to help out and
run errands. Her post-war poverty stricken county family agreed for their 11 year old daughter
to take the position ($3/month plus a home to live in). The old couple agreed to send the girl to
school and they did, provided they had no errands they wanted done that day. However, as
reflected in my mother's stories of that time, my grandmother became a much loved member
of that family and maintained a relationship with them even after she married a UNC graduate
and moved to Alamance County. During my mother's childhood, the family enjoyed coming
back to Chapel Hill each year for "Commencement" and they stayed with "Aunt Belle" on
Franklin Street. Mother recalled when the cement horse trough now tucked behind the
Planetarium was up on the street, fulfilling its proper function of watering thirsty horses. My
mother never referred to Silent Sam at all.

What I knew of Sam is that I met him when I came to Chapel Hill as a graduate student
in Psychology in the fall of 1955. Word was that, if a virgin ever walked past Sam, he would fire
his gun. Hence the name, Silent Sam. That he commemorated a Confederate dead soldier was
just background noise to a white person reared in North Carolina. However, my family history
is that my great grandfather, whose son was the UNC graduate, died ingloriously of measles in
an army camp in Halifax, having been conscripted along with his brothers after the Civil War
started. A letter, never sent, written to him by his young wife talked about "our babe" who was
six months old. The young husband was already dead when she wrote it, so it was put away by
our family of packrats, and I still have it, silverfish holes and all.

Our family did not own slaves: we were too "poor" but rather made a modest living as
small farmers and tradesmen. The death of the husband and father meant that my great
grandmother had to try to farm her small acreage herself, plowing the fields with a single horse
or mule to grow the corn necessary for them to survive. Long story short, she remarried an
elderly widower whose frankly unsentimental proposal was that she leave baby and
grandmother in their modest farmhouse and come to the neighboring large farm, marry him to
make it respectable, and keep house for him, his slaves having deserted him (a fate he richly
deserved from what I know of him). Her second widowhood gave her the basis for survival and
the eventual graduation of the baby son from UNC in 1891. He was almost 30 years old.

Growing up, all that history was just wallpaper to me as I made my way through UNCG
(WCUNC. Class of 1955) and to Carolina where my fate awaited me. However, I never lost a
certain sense of poignancy when I thought of what my Great Grandmother went through all
those years ago. I admire her determination to survive. I respected the deep grief that the lost
Confederate soldier represented. Therefore, I was offended and grieved last summer when I
read in the Tar Heel an editorial where the young editor referred to Sam is "xxxx" (I won't
dignify it by quoting it). It seemed so obvious to that, to her, any right-thinking person would
agree with that designation. For her information, here is one who did not. Nor would I have
referred to her ancestors as "XXXX" since my mother never tolerated that word.

I acknowledge that much of our past is a very painful story and I abhor the entire system
that treated human beings as property to be bought and sold. I wish I could wipe it from the
face of the earth. But the griefs of none of our forebears can be undone. I respect the pain
that all involved suffered, and my prayer is that we can all move forward and let the past
remain dead. I think Sam might be accepted in a corner of the Southern Historical Collection in
Wilson Library, out of sight. What we need is to work toward a better future for all our citizens
and the University is a major means of bringing that about.

Signed:

Frances Alexander Campbell, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist Emerita and Affiliate of the FPG Child Development Institute
Message
From: Janelle Royal Harris
Sent: 9/7/2018 10:47:48 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Greetings from Concerned UNC Alum

Flag: Follow up

Chancellor Folt,

I am concerned about the next steps the University will be taking in regard to the return of Silent Sam. It is my
strong belief that the statue should not return to McCorkle Place, and I encourage you to engage with the
University's History Task Force to maintain the historical accuracy and truth of our shared Carolina past, to
assure a more inclusive Carolina future for all students, faculty, and alumni and leave the statue down.

As a black alumna of UNC, the history of Silent Sam is saddening to me and a reminder of the Jim Crow era
that terrorized my family through fear, intimidation and murder. Jim Crow institutionalized economic,
educational, and social disadvantage for people who look like me. The era restricted my grandparents
and parents' generations from equal rights that should have been given to all citizens of this country. Silent Sam
and memories of the Confederacy of this time have a place in a museum, but not on our campus. This painful
reminder of the past and this obvious blemish in the nation's history should not be monumented at Carolina.

Please consider leaving the monument off of our campus and placing it at Bentonville Battleground or another
local Civil war museum.

Best,
Janelle (Royal) Harris
UNC Chapel Hill Class of 2002
Message
From: Elizabeth Elsen
Sent: 9/8/2018 12:31:29 AM
To: president@northcarolina.edu; Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Greetings to the person who checks this email account.

I know this will likely go into a huge pile of emails that you all are getting about this, but it's been on my mind
for 2 weeks, and so I'm sending it.

I am grateful that Silent Sam in no longer on campus. I wish that you all had been able to take it down, and that
you had fought harder for it's removal into a museum where he belongs.

I have family who have gone to Carolina before me (and after me) and family who fought in the Civil War (and
hopefully no one after me will have to fight in CWII) so please know that I'm not some random yankee
weighing in.

I am proud that this year the new Black UNC students will not have to walk past that statue and wonder if they
belong at Carolina. How you respond to this incident will impact that feeling, however.

I beg you to not return Silent Sam to the quad. Put him in a museum. Put him somewhere with context, put him
somewhere you have to choose to go to, and know what you are going to see and read about.

Please also act compassionately toward the students, faculty, and staff protesters and people who have stood up
against the statue. They do not deserve to be punished for doing something that you were not able to do, but that
needed to be done.

I appreciate your taking the time to read this message. If you are making checkmarks for votes, please consider
checking this box twice because that's how much I love Carolina. 200%.

Thanks,
Liz Elsen
Class of 2004
Message
From: Francis F. Hobart
Sent: 9/8/2018 11:32:13 AM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam Location

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Falt,


It is suggested that an appropriate location for Silent Sam would be in or adjoining University Memoria Grove
on South Rd.
Let the dead bury its dead.
Thank you for your service to UNC-Chapel Hill.
Sincerely,
John D. Hobart
Message
From: Jeff Morgan
Sent: 9/9/2018 4:58:58 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam Location Proposal

Flag: Follow Up

Dear Chancellor Falt:

I am writing in regard to the Silent Sam statue and all of the controversy. In this day and age, it seems that half the
people are for something and half the people are against. Unfortunately, we are living in divided country at this time.
Hopefully, this will change in the near future.

I am an architect in Charlotte, NC and went to North Carolina State University and Georgia Tech. I also have an MBA
from New York University. I worked in New York City for eleven years and met my wife while there. She is also an
architect and went to Syracuse University. We moved to Charlotte in 1999. We have two sons who are recent graduates
from UNC Chapel Hill.

This Silent Sam controversy has been a topic of conversation between us recently. My wife and I would visit our children
a few times each year while they were students and we enjoyed our walks thru the campus. We have covered all areas
of the campus and have given some thought about where this statue could be placed that would not cause so much
angst and controversy.

First, realize what the true purpose of this statue should represent. In simple terms, it would be to honor the 287 UNC
alumni who lost their lives fighting the Civil War. Were these individuals heroes for fighting for their cause and beliefs or
were they traitors to the United States of America? This can still be debated. What cannot be debated is that they lost
their lives for something they felt was worth fighting and dying for.

When I saw that the UNC Board of Governors was seeking ideas on where this statue should be located, I started giving
this some thought. So, where are lost lives honored ? The answer is a cemetery. The Old Chapel Hill Cemetery on the
UNC Chapel Campus is the ideal location for Silent Sam to be relocated to. A small pavilion should be created with brick
columns and iron gates and a solid roof that the statue would be placed in. Thus, the statue would be visible, but it
would also be protected from future vandalism. Silent Sam should not be placed on a giant pedestal as before, but on a
modest pedestal only a couple of feet high. On this pedestal, a simple inscription should read: "Silent Sam: this
monument is dedicated to the 287 University of North Carolina alumni that lost their lives during the Civil War".

Even in our family, there are differences in opinion on what should happen not only to Silent Sam but other Confederate
monuments in our country. But, we all have reached a consensus that honoring the dead in a cemetery is appropriate
and that if Silent Sam must be placed on the campus somewhere, then the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery is the least
controversial location. We are hopeful the he could find peace at this location and that both sides of this issue would
respect this decision, location and final resting place.

I would appreciate a response just stating that you have received and reviewed this suggestion.

Thank You.

Jeff Morgan
Message
From: Carney, Bruce William [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=0647DDAEOFF548EFA6BC8905EA0D83B6-BRUCE WILLI]
Sent: 9/10/2018 2:31:14 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: Blouin, Bob [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =54 7ffd82f924402289daa60e213 ldbd7-Bob Blouin]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hi Carol and Bob --

I have followed the news about Silent Sam and sympathize with the challenge you and your colleagues in
South Building face. Like almost everyone else, I have thought about whether the statue belongs on campus
and, of so, where. To the first question, I believe strongly that it should not be replaced at its former site. It
was placed there with intentions that might have been common a century ago, but definitely not now.

So if it is to be erected somewhere else, where might that be? I have heard suggestions of the Bentonville
Battlefield, but in my view, Bennet Place in Durham would be even more appropriate. It was where Johnston
surrendered to Sherman (after Appomatox) and where the latter offered generous surrender terms in a spirit
of what Sherman felt Lincoln would have wished (but which was repudiated by Congress). As I recall, the
displays paid homage to the North Carolina dead, which exceeded in number those of all the other states.

But what if you are compelled to re-erect the statue on campus? This came to my attention in an article in last
week's N&O, which mentioned that the Administrative Board of the Library had rejected that suggestion, and I
believe will be the subject of a Friends of the Library telecon later today (which I cannot join, but I have shared
my feelings with Elaine). No library nor any building on campus is appropriate, for it only moves the lightning
rod indoors. As I see things, the only place on campus that might be appropriate is the old cemetery. That
could provide a quiet spot and, perhaps, some historical context for the campus, while being somewhat out of
the way. Who knows? Maybe over time the statue could lose its sexist name.

An advantage of relocating it would, of course, offer the University an opportunity to erect a more forward-
looking monument in its place, as I assume you have already considered.

Good luck with this, Carol. You have my best wishes here.

--Bruce
Message
From: Alyx Beckwith
Sent: 9/10/2018 3:04:28 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Please keep our campus free of Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I want to thank you for your leadership of my alma mater and university that I love deeply. As a graduate of the
class of 2002, I firmly stand against Silent Sam and ask that the campus remain free of Confederate statues that
seek to glorify a painful time in our history. I am saddened that it has taken so long for this statue to come down
and I believe that it should be in a museum, not in a place of prominence on our beautiful upper quad. Thank
you for taking the time to read my email and for your public service.

Best regards,

Alexandra Beckwith
Class of 2002

11
"Never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.
- Cornell West
Message
From: Allan
Sent: 9/11/2018 4:01:19 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administ rative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Davies

As a North C arolina Mason, I believe that William Richardson Davie (1756-1820) now deserves unprecedented honor
and visibility at the University of North C arolina. Davie is one of our country's Founding Fathers, the third Grand Master
of North Carolina's Ancient, Free, and Accepted Masons, a heroic cavalry officer of the Revolutionary War, governor, and
founder of the University of North C arolina. As you likely know from recent news accounts, UNC-CH's statue of a
Confederate soldier was lately removed from its pedestal and may henceforth occupy a more secure place on the
campus, thus vacating the historic and conspicuous spot where the University was first conceived. Five good likenesses
of Davie exist, two in Philadelphia's Independence Hall and three at the University of North C arolina, providing the basis
for a splendid sculpture. If we take part in an effort to ennoble this historic and conspicuous site with a tribute to the
founder's memory, North Carolinians will forever thank us. Will you kindly keep my suggestion in mind, and possibly
lend your own support to the idea?

W.Alla n Mann
PM. CM Setzer Lodge #693
PM Knights of Solomon Lodge #764
Secretary KOS# 764
YORK RITE
KCCH _ SCOTTISH RITE
Ce//:REDACTED
Message
From: bob schmitz
Sent: 9/12/2018 10:03:55 AM
To: haywoodcochrane@yahoo.com; Duckett, Chuck [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d42915aef8014bc4896 b876cf0d6ecf0-M r Charles];
juliagrumbles@gmail.com; jeffbrown@mvalaw.com; Caudil l, Walter Lowry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange
Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=3c7c4c42b6b4419bbb9ec677799af080-Walter Lowr];
Hopkins, Ke lly Matthews [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=787a6f65dd034d188a9827f0e3a55e78-Ms Kelly Fl]; Keyes, Bill
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=adm in. live.unc.edu -
58827-wkeyes87e]; mccu llenre@aol.com; emcmahan@ littleonline.com; Stevens, Richard
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=8b8ab2d45c47400d9e81bcld88dee233-R ichard Ste]; Stone, Dwight David
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/en=Recipients/en=302b69d16blb491d9dc58f1657645e4e-Mr Dwight D]; Putnam, Savannah
Kate [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Admin istrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8035964fb67f49eca339d4530e249e 19-sa kate]; Chancellor
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Ad ministrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fdd ad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject : Silent Sam,

Flag: Follow up

Dear Members of UNC Board of Governors,

I have lived in North Carolina for 40 years. My daughter, Jessie, attended UNC Chapel Hill and I feel a great
affinity for this great university and it's dedication to all the people of North Carolina and to public service. My
daughter was a Public Service Scholar and I was very impressed that the school would have an organized,
funded program to encourage public service and that the sash that my daughter wore at graduation was Carolina
Blue.

I have often heard from my Southern friends that the civil war was about states rights and not slavery. I looked
up the Ordinance of Secession for the first state to secede, South Carolina. It is short and makes interesting
reading and it is clear that the only right that they seceded for was the right to have slaves. The words slave and
slavery are mentioned 14 times in the short document. The war was about slavery and the rebel soldiers were
fighting for a cause whose main purpose was the right to enslave African Americans. With Jim Crow statues of
rebel soldiers were placed in front of court houses, town squares and on the UNC campus clearly to mark the
cause of slavery and intimidate blacks. Why else would they be put where they were put? If they were to honor
the dead why not in grave yards or battlefields?

I do not agree with pulling down public statues, however, I am glad to see them disappearing from prominent
public spaces. If UNC is truly dedicated to the well being of all the citizens of our great state then it should not
prominently display a symbol that represents to many of its citizens both black and white a horrible aspect of its
past. If the statue is put back up, and I prefer that it is not, it should be placed on a battlefield such as Bennett
Place State Historic Site. It belongs there as a tribute to the brave men who fought.

Thank you,

Bob Schmitz
Message
From: Whitney Brown
Sent: 9/17/2018 1:09:47 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: Public BOT [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=94fb6385ce9041a19d4dcf447a9d4009-South_papub]
Subject: Regarding Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I hope this finds you safe from flooding and storm damage.

It seems the wrong moment to address the Silent Sam situation, given all that is happening across the state, but
it's the weather that has finally given me a moment to write you. I've been fired up about this since long before
Silent Sam toppled to the ground.

I am a 2010 alumna of the University (MA, Folklore), and I realize that my voice is needed in the larger
discussion over the fate of that lump of racist metal.

I'll give you the meat of my feelings upfront, and I'll justify after: if that wretched, racist statue EVER goes
back up on that pedestal or anywhere else on campus, the university will never see a CENT of my money. I was
proud to have graduated from a university with a long, clear history of progressive work and values-
particularly where the south and southern culture and society are concerned--and that seems less and less the
case these days. I don't know whether that is due to the Board of Governors, you, President Spellings (whose
installation I protested from the SECOND it was announced), or wealthy donors, but many of your alumni are
disturbed by what we see.

Firstly, on the matter of Silent Sam's recent fall, I would like to praise the work and leadership of the Center of
the Study of the American South, which is increasingly the only part of the University I feel any connection
with. In most university communications, all we hear about sports, medicine, and sciences, and increasingly
from a global standpoint. That's fine to a point-globalization is real-but I feel UNC has begun to neglect and
even ignore what is happening in its own region despite its mandate to serve the people. CSAS cares about what
is happening here and now, and they want to be on the right side of history BECAUSE THAT'S THE RIGHT
THING TO DO. Though I know she did it in full consultation with her staff, it took great courage for Professor
Lowry not only to allow it, but to encourage the discussion-and to take that discussion public. Professor
Lowry does not shy from complex issues. May she be recognized and rewarded for that. These discussions are
more important that ever given the political climate in this country right now and the obvious and unchecked
uptick of racial violence and racist speech and gatherings.

Like CSAS, I want to examine the truth of the statue's installation. It's not as if we are pulling down a statue of
a specific person-a war hero like Robert E. Lee, for instance. It's not as if this statue has murky origins either.
The message it was meant to send was explained quite explicitly by the people who attended its dedicated. Carr
was an avowed racist, and a violent one. This garbage has no place on our campus. I'm sorry if it is now
considered a historical artifact by some, but it has to go. Have you asked your African-American students how it
makes them feel? Do they feel welcome? I'm particularly interested in whether they feel welcome walking past
that statue on their way up from predominantly white Greek party houses on Franklin Street, and on their way
up to buildings often bearing the names of other politically questionable individuals. Note that I'm not asking
for every sketchy building on campus to be renamed, but for a racist statue to be left off its pedestal now that
the damage is done.
Why, by the way, did you wait so long to deal with this? Why did you leave the students no option but to take
matters into their own hands? Why didn't you listen to them?Gov. Cooper had already given his blessing for it
to come down. Most of the faculty want it down, and many departments have publicly decried its presence. You
did nothing. I'm sorry if what they did was illegal, but no one was hurt, and in my opinion, this was the best
way it could have happened, all things considered. This is what happens when people feel they have no voice.
This is what happens when people feel insulted and embarrassed by something they are forced to live with, all
while they are paying to be there on campus.

Why, while we're at it, didn't the conflict-avoidant university administration do the smart thing and quietly take
the statue down over the summer while the students were away so that it wouldn't become such a political
football?

I don't understand why. And I don't understand why there is ANY discussion of putting the horrible thing back
up. I don't want it anywhere on campus, but it certainly better not go back where it came from. There's NO
legitimate justification for that except for appeasement of racists-period. People need to stop using the
"historical significance" cloak, and those in power need to stop kowtowing to it.

Please don't. UNC is supposed to be a beacon of tolerance and learning and enlightenment in the state. It no
longer feels that way. Sports scandals have been embarrassing. The state has embarrassed itself with those
ridiculous gendered bathroom bills. Enough. NC needs to right the ship. UNC should lead the way.

May all the hurricane news wash the conflict away and let Silent Sam quietly die.

Thank you for your time. I know you don't have an easy job, but it's time for you to take a stand. Please join us
on the right side of history.

Sincerely,
Whitney Brown
Message
From: William Harding
Sent: 9/18/2018 12:43:40 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Re: Dedication speech

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for your reply to my email. A lot of time and effort has been required to address this issue-and even more is
deserved.

Addressing the contents of the 1913 dedication speech directly, and more forcefully repudiating its message, might help
to ensure that this clear-cut moral issue is not reframed as a matter of historic preservation or honoring our soldiers.

Some Confederate monuments have been moved to cemeteries. As a founding member of the Association for
Gravestone Studies, I wish to forcefully express my opinion that they do not belong in cemeteries, and placing
monuments in cemeteries invites vandalism.

The most eloquent example of balancing the complex messages of historical monuments is the juxtaposition of the
African American Museum of History and Culture with the Washington Monument. Placing "Silent Sam" in a secure
indoor location with educational information and an appropriate contrasting memorial is worth the investment to
prevent future conflict and to promote healing.

Thank you for your attention to this very important decision.

Respectfully yours,
William E. Harding MD

On Sep 18, 2018, at 12:09 PM, Chancellor <chancellor(@unc.edu> wrote:

Dear William,

Thank you for your email and we apologize for the delayed response. We understand that people
feel strongly and deeply about the Confederate Monument and its future. We regret the
impersonal nature of this response, however due to the large volume of emails we have received
and the complexity of this issue, we are unable to personalize each response. Please know that
each email is being read.

On August 28, the UNC System Board of Governors passed a resolution directing the UNC-Chapel Hill
Board of Trustees and university administration to develop and present a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." In the near future, Chancellor Falt and the Board of
Trustees will announce a process to create a "lawful and lasting path that protects public safety,
preserves the monument and its history, and allows the University to focus on its core mission of
education, research, economic stimulation and creating the next generation of leaders."
You can find the most recent statements about the Confederate Monument here. We encourage you to
read these statements and to check back for the most up-to-date information.
Respectfully,
The Office of the Chancellor
-----Original Message-----
From: William Harding
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 8:30 PM
To: Chancellor <chancellor@uncedu>
Subject: Dedication speech
Dear President Falt,
In the light of excerpts from the 1913 dedication speech for "Silent Sam" by Julian Carr-easily
accessible online - reinstallation of the monument would be shameful.
William E. Harding MD
Message
From: Michael Thomsen [Mike .Thomsen@asu.edu]
Sent: 9/19/2018 6:43:10 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

Dear Chancellor Folt,

As suggested below, I did take the opportunity to read your Labor Day message regarding Silent Sam. I was
heartened by your acknowledgment that the Confederate monument does not belong "at the front door" of the
UNC campus, near the Davie Poplar. Ironically, the same powerfully emotional but opposite sentiments that
place the University in such a difficult position also dramatize the importance of taking immediate and decisive
action.

The reason sentiments are divided is that the same reprehensible mentalities that characterized the antebellum
South survive and prosper today among an alarming proportion of citizens, legislators, and perhaps even
trustees of the University.These were a racially defined and privileged people who, by and large, considered
themselves entitled to imprison, oppress, exploit, buy, sell, beat, torture and murder another racially defined
group of people. To what end? To promote their own wealth and comfort. How dedicated were they to this
repugnant goal? So dedicated they were willing to take up armed rebellion against their country and even give
their lives to preserve and promote these profound injustices.

That the oppressors were spared the gallows was an act of mercy, intended to heal the wounds of war, and to
lead to a society united in brotherhood, justice and kindness. Again ironically, this act of mercy had the opposite
effect. It permitted the defenders of oppression to assume positions of honor at parity with the defenders of
freedom and human rights, laying the foundation for a century or more of "Jim Crow," enshrined in the law in
many places through the mid-twentieth century, and practiced more furtively by employers, law enforcement
agencies and commercial enterprises to this very day. It is this loathsome surviving mentality that permits a
police officer in today's news reports to claim he was justified in firing sixteen bullets into the body of a young
man of color who was walking away from him, some of the shots fired while his victim was lying on the
ground.

One more observation about Silent Sam. Perhaps you know that, in addition to symbolizing and honoring
Confederate soldiers, Silent Sam was also used by twentieth century male students as the basis of a beloved
tradition of insult and degradation of women. Legend had it that Silent Sam would fire his gun if a chaste
woman ever walked by him. No gunshots, no chaste women. The tradition, it appeared, was part of the
mystique of the "Carolina Gentleman."

My suggestion? If Silent Sam deserves to be displayed, it would be in a Museum oflnfamy, "cheek by jowl"
with Attila the Hun and the rest of the murderous oppressors that have plagued human history. Lest we forget
that humans can be the most inhuman species on our planet. Thank you again for your attention.

Sincerely,

Michael.A., Thomsen, Ph . D, Amanda M. Thomsen


MAC UNC 1967
On 9/17/2018 11 :44 AM, Chancellor wrote:

Dear Michael,

Thank you for your email and we apologize for the delayed response. We understand that people
feel strongly and deeply about the Confederate Monument and its future. We regret the
impersonal nature of this response, however due to the large volume of emails we have received
and the complexity of this issue, we are unable to personalize each response. Please know that
each email is being read.

On August 28, the UNC System Board of Governors passed a resolution directing the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and university administration to develop and present a plan for the
Confederate Monument's "disposition and preservation." In the near future, Chancellor Folt and
the Board of Trustees will announce a process to create a "lawful and lasting path that protects
public safety, preserves the monument and its history, and allows the University to focus on its
core mission of education, research, economic stimulation and creating the next generation of
leaders."
You can find the most recent statements about the Confederate Monument here. We encourage
you to read these statements and to check back for the most up-to-date information.
Respectfully,
The Office of the Chancellor

From: Mike Thomsen


Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 3:57 PM
To: Chancellor
Subject: Silent Sam
Chancellor Folt:

I earned my master's degree at Chapel Hill a bit over fifty years ago. I don't agree with
vandalism, but the statue we called Silent Sam should never have been erected in the first place,
and should long since have been removed from a place of enlightenment and social justice such
as the UNC main campus. The monument honored those willing -- nay eager -- to kill their
fellow citizens in order to preserve an economic system based on the barbaric practice of slavery.
The lives of the leaders of the armed insurrection were spared only because of the compassionate
desire of Lincoln and others to forgive, heal the wounds, and reunify the nation. Since the end of
that war, the descendants of those whose blood and sweat enriched those more privileged, have
time and again been denied security, justice and equal opportunity by those hoping to reverse the
outcome of that war, ranging from Jesse Helms to David Duke. While we cannot condone
vandalism, we can, and should, temper our reaction with some understanding of the injustices
and the resulting frustration that led to it. Tar Heel leaders should be ashamed of having given
Silent Sam a haven for so long.

Dr. Michael A Thomsen


Mesa, Arizona
Message
From: Simmons, Randy L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=40bae0173bec4c5e8ddd9e3b2a0a8e63-Randy L Sim]
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:59:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave the statue where it has always be e n. You can't erase history, To me it does not stand for racism

Randy Simmons
Facilitie s Manager
UNC Che mistry Dept.
Ke nan Labs B024
REDACTED
Message
From: Swanstrom, Ronald I [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=b3f95f6800f94d9882888be8flf34b35-Ronald I Sw]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:00:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestion

Move the statue and pedestal to Durham Station where the Civil War officially ended. This is already a
historical site nearby and context for the statue could be provided.
Message
From: Robert H. Vickery [rhvickery@northcarolina.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:05:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Option 1 - move the statue and pedestal to a museum and create a new monument to the recent events at the original
site.

Option 2 - move the statue to a museum and create a new monument to recent events at the same site using the
existing pedestal somehow.

(short and simple)

Robert H. Vickery
Director of Financial Reporting &
ERP Systems Integration
Finance and Administration
140 Friday Center Drivel Chapel Hill, NC 27517
p: RE DACTE D I f: REDACTED
rhvickery@northcarolina.edu
www.northcarolina.edu
Blanchard, Bob [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =d0b0ee lc452e494096dc69a923ad349e-Bob Bian cha]
9/24/2018 11:05:42 AM
UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
South Building Lobby
Message
From: Criffield, Robin R. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDL T)/cn=Recipients/cn= 7cfae85610674bflb8d31297eac3d7a1-Robin R. Cr]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:05:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: International Civil Rights Museum in Greensboro

Hello,

I was in a meeting last week with John Swaine the CEO of the International Civil Rights Museum in Greensboro and they
would be interested in having the statute as part of their permanent collection. This is where the permanent exhibit of
the Woolworth lunch counter and A&T sit-in in 1960 is housed https;//www.sitinrnovement.org/.

Regards,

R�RCr�
Program Administrator for Myron S. Cohen, MD
Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2116 Bioinformatics Bldg, CB# 7030
Chapel Hill, NC, USA 27599-7030
REDACTED; REDACTED fax
http://g_lobalhealth.unc.edu/
Message
From: Bunch, Ricky S [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d32f294a67f64 f27b064c9035948b2b0-Ri cky S Bun]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:07:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

To whom it may concern:


Put that sculpture in a monument or art gallery, whom ever wants to worship it, let be available to them 24/7,
365 days! Problem solved
Message
From: Southey Blanton
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:09:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument Plans

As a class of '05 alum, and now a current employee of UNC I am ashamed at the way this university has bent
over backwards to placate racists and white supremacists just because they have threatened to stop donating big
bucks to a university with a multi-BILLION dollar endowment.

Get rid of the statue, if racists want it, then just donate it to someone in the ACTBAC group that continues to
come to campus and punch students and activists and they can put it in their backyard.

The statue is a symbol of hate and evil, and it should not be present anywhere on campus, not even in a broom
closet.

Melt it down and make it into a bench and then throw that bench into the ocean.

STOP PROTECTING RACISTS AND RACISM BECAUSE YOU ARE SCARED OF LOSING
DONATIONS.

YOU ARE BEING COWARDS AND EMBARRASSING ANYONE WHO HAS EVER ATTENDED THIS
UNIVERSITY AND BELIEVED IT TRULY WAS A PLACE WHERE DIVERSITY MATTERED.

-Southey Blanton
Class of 2005
Message
From: White, Peter S [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =3f539c4db60e49719bc40852b3258509-Peter S Whi]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:11:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Where a statue once stood

Dear Chancellor Falt and others involved in the plan for the Silent Sam monument,

I write because I think this moment is an opportunity not just to discuss the fate of a single statue and not just an
opportunity to talk about historical context, but also a moment to proclaim the University's values in a way that is as
much about the future as the past. The arc of history bends towards human rights and better lives-and universities play
an irreplaceable role in that arc. Thus, I wanted to explore the ways that we could create a positive and forward looking
statement in the place where Silent Sam once stood. I can see this taking three possible forms: 1) a welcoming plaque,
sculpture, or monument to the University's values, the role of universities, and the unfinished work ahead, 2) a
gathering circle (a low stone wall in a circular pattern) to invite all University folks into the place that formerly felt
exclusionary, and 3) an empty stretch of lawn within that beautiful quadrangle, returning it to the pre-Silent Sam
conditions and conveying the sense that this was always a place to walk through on the way to class, library, meeting, or
laboratory, the places that are a reflection of the University's values.

I can't think of a way to retain the Silent Sam statue on campus, even if accompanied by the story of the historical
context. When I imagine this, I keep thinking that you would need the Silent Sam statue placed among other statues or
monuments that would show the historical development of which Silent Sam is a part and embed him or surround him
with the diverse human world that is North Carolina now, perhaps including North Carolina slave descendants and North
Carolina civil rights figures. To develop the historical context in text only (whether on plaques, brochures, or the web)
while Silent Sam is so prominent as a physical statement feels unbalanced. Perhaps Silent Sam can go to a museum or
civil war battlefield where many other statures and monuments have already been placed and the historical context for
the Civil War, slavery, and racism is the established purpose.

Peter
--------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------
Peter White peter,white(@unc.edu
Department of Biology- Campus Box 3280
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280 USA
REDACTED
http://bio.uncedu/people/faculty/white/
---------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------
Message
From: Dozier, Tammy Carroll [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =ad4387a99a7f 4612baf83b6e206ef9f9-Tammy Carro]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:12:29 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

Hello,

I suggest putting Silent Sam in Wilson Library with other North Carolina historical artifacts. This way, it will be better
preserved and available to anyone who truly wants to learn more about that period of our state's history. Thanks!

Take care,
Tammy

TAMMY C DOZIER
Scholarship Develop1nent Coordinato1·
UNC Office of Scholarships and Student Aid
REDACTED
Message
From: Gray, Clark L. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=F771C4A880A348BD8E9918F31FFF2AC3-CLARK L GRA]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:13:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The statue should not be returned to a place of prominence given its historical context as a monument to
slavery and racism. Preferably, it should not be displayed on campus at all. If it must be displayed, it should be
displayed with its historical context front and center. The display in Carolina Hall is a good example.

Clark Gray
Associate Professor of Geography
Message
From: Williams, Michael [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =b3e 726cf0bb340ccb 1ffdf64e 142cb0b-M ichael W il]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:14:50 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam's Future

Petitions, requests, and polite conversation have been used for ha lf a century to point out the pall Si lent Sam casts on the
experience of the University's students of color and its credibi lity as a diverse and welcoming environment. Those polite entreaties
fell on deaf ears. Now activists have done the work the University should have done. A year or more ago I was one of the people
calling for something creative: a contest to have students redesign or replace it, some way of engaging the University community in
ridding ourselves of something none of us should want in a constructive and educational way. Too late! The statue is gone and it
should stay gone, and the University should drop any charges or investigation into who did that work for them.

The Un iversity's plan to restore the statue, if one is required by law, should be to find the farthest and dimmest corner of the North
Carolina Collection, stand it up there, throw a sheet over it, and hang a sign around its neck that reads, "Please excuse our mess." It
should never see the light of day again, and the University should disavow such monuments altogether. Does that mean renaming
Carr? Or other buildings? Other sites? Probably so. Rename Carr after the first woman of color to attend UNC. Rename it after the
most prominent abolitionist alumnus. Rename it - and every other reminder we've given ourselves of the Confederacy's treason -
after someone who deserves acclaim, and put a sign next to it explaining the history of its name and why it was changed. The
University was created to look to the future, not to glorify the worst of our past.

Regards,
Michael Williams
Class of '99

Michael G. Williams
michael_williams@u nc.ed u
UNC Information Security
Message
From: Ca labrese, Mauro [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =ld752219b 70a48f4a6aa lbfec3ba2fb 7-M au ro Ca lab]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:23:44 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea about the future of the monument

I would love for UNC to commission a separate monument to sit adjacent to Silent Sam. This new monument would
highlight our unity, our diversity, and the strength that we derive from our shared experience. It would be a symbol of
strength and beauty, and of hope. A new monument would make UNC a cultural leader. It would set a precedent for
others who are struggling with similar relics of their past.

Rather than tearing Silent Sam down, let the old monument stand, so that we will never forget our past. History is not
always beautiful. Those who forget that destine themselves to repeat it.

The alternate views that Silent Sam espouses still exist and poison the minds of a minority of young people in our
society. Let them have their monument, and give us our own.

Mauro Calabrese
Message
From: Storrie, Mindy [Mindy_Storrie@kenan-flagler.unc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:25:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Confederate Monument

I urge you to put the monument in a museum where facts from both sides of what the statue represents to our
community can be included. I recognize the value of freedom of speech on our campus, but we should never be using a
reminder and symbol of slavery to represent us (students, faculty, staff.) Perhaps since it is related to a war, it should go
in the ROTC building to honor soldiers who answered the call of their country, even if that call was misrepresented
and/or a mistake, when we look back on history.

THANKS for offering the opportunity to express personal opinions on this matter.

Mindy

Mindy Storrie
Executive Director, Smith Leadership Initiative
Director, Hodges Leadership Center, Undergraduate Business & Master of Accounting
M indy Storrie@unc.edu •· www.kenan-flaaler.unc.edu/Leadership
REDACTED

Shaping Leaders & Driving Results


Message
From: Tsuruta, James [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =87b20a 6c0397 460f8b 766a3d bc70facf-Ja mes Tsu ru]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:27:14 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think that if we don't destroy Silent Sam, that the statue needs to be displayed on campus along with a statue
of a prominent civil rights leader. Both of the statues need to be accompanied by historical information and
interpretive information at a minimum.

Personally, I'd advocate that we need a civil rights center that encompasses the history of all peoples that have
had to struggle to have their rights recognized, including but not limited to:

• African Americans,
• Female Americans,
• Japanese Americans (WWII internment camps),
• Italian Americans,
• German Americans,
• Polish Americans,
• Jewish Americans,
• Muslim Americans,
• Gay Americans,
• Trans Americans,
• Arab Americans,
• Native Americans,
• Americans living in poverty

Sincerely,

James Tsuruta, PhD


Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Message
From: Matt W Reinheimer
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:27:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: What To Do W Silent Sam

To Whom It May Concern,

As a Southerner born and bred, I believe that the Silent Sam statue either should be placed in a Civil War
museum where proper context can be included (e.g. images and true accounts of the true circumstances of
chattel slavery) or should be melted down to make hats for all the people who are super concerned about
honoring their slave-holding heritage.

Hats should read:

"My great-grandfather 'earned' his fortune thanks to free labor secured by murder, rape, sales of babies, and
countless other forms of unimaginable violence ..... and all I got was this hat (and the continuing benefit of that
fortune which I enjoy today)"

If possible, I'd also like one of these hats as I'm sure they'll be collectors items once the rest of the monuments
celebrating slavery around the state and the South are rightfully taken down.

Cheers, and happy Monday!!!

- Matt Reinheimer
Message
From: Platts-Mil ls, Timothy [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =c4ba 183c711048e6943ae3998bc06297 -Timothy Pl a]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:28:29 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: 3 thoughts

Thanks for all your work on this and considering these suggestions:

1. I think the monument should be physically standing somewhere.


2. That place should be inside - which seems like it would make it less a rallying point and less a danger to
the campus.
3. The speech that was given at the time of the dedication - particularly the offensive parts - should be
next to it somewhere - so that someone who doesn't understand the issues can see why so many
people are offended by the statue.
4. Additional contextualization about the statue - including the contributions/sacrifices of soldiers from
the area/University during the Civil War should be provided.

I thought Dr. Folt's recent e-mail on this - describing the many different views - was outstanding - and provides
a really healthy starting point for the contextualization. The goal is not to erase this past, but learn from it and
let other people learn from it.

Yours,

Tim

Tim Platts-Mills, MD, MSc


Vice-Chair of Research
Dept. of Emergency Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
tplattsm@med.unc.edu
Message
From: Baron, Laura A. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=FBD0E9F972E24D46BDDC3ACA81950CB3-LAURA A. BA]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:30:18 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Removal of Silent Sam from its Current Location

Hello ~ I'm writing about the future of the Silent Sam monument I foel this monument can provide many
opportunities for discussions of the history of the Confederacy, the slavery of African-Americans, the Civil War. etc
, b ut that it must aU be put in the context of today's racial dynamics in our country, I believe i t is wholly
lE?.PPropriate for this monument to be restored to its original locatio n at the entrance of our fine University, I
trust members of the History Department, the Stone Center, the Center for the Study ofthe American South, etc. to
find a 21st century solution to the dHemrna of hov; to preserve this monument

If vve restore SHent Sam to its previous location, we wffl lose aU credi.hi.Hty in terms of our mission of diversity and
inclusio n. not only amongst our fc a ulty, staff and students., but th roughout our country and the vvorld. Please do
the right thing! Thank-you,

Laura Baron /HR Consultant


I

Phone: REDACTED/ FAX: REDACTED laura


baron(i:DmecLunc.edu

UNC Department of OB-GYN


3009 Old Clinic Bldg,/CB# 7570
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7570
h.tt.p_;/ /'vv·vvw, me cL u n c ed u i ob gyD../.

Caring for women at evet}' stage of their lives,


Message
From: Kimrey, Travis Elton [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=0a96fb7b27f2422395a5c828ee60cc31-Travis Elto]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:31:14 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam

Please put this monument back up and put a fence around it

Get Outlook for iOS


Message
From: Farrar, Kandace Davis [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=845a ld 3aad544a07b7a642a207ebf731-Kandace Dav]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:31:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Idea for monument

Good morning. As part of Carolina's "Arts Everywhere" Initiative, I would love to see some sort of artistic display made
out of the monument that encompasses stories and sentiments from both sides of the aisle. From the student who put
her own blood on the monument, to the groups holding up large confederate flags, the slaves for which the civil war was
fought, the soldiers who lost their lives in that war, etc. I think we could take something painful and divisive and make
something beautiful out of it that tells everyone's stories and adds to the overall Carolina story. I am even award of
potential funding opportunities for such a project and believe we could find others. Thanks for the opportunity to
provide some input.

Respectfully submitted,

kcmdoce Dovis i::or Tcir -, J,D,


.Assistcint Director- d Corpctote und Foundotion Re lotions for Ace es'; F'rogrrnYis
Office of Unlw)rsJy Devdopm,0rrl
Com pus Bex # 6410, Chopr)I HilL NC 27599
206 \/-/, Fronklin SlreeL :Sulfr) 200 Chopel Hill, I�(:: 27516
Office: REDACTED I kcndoce fr.;i,ror(}unc,c0du
Message
From: Rosen, Maureen Dolan [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =lba17a0ef33d459da60c00b397ed021f-Maureen Doi]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:31:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Suggest you brick in such monuments to comply with the NC state law prohibiting
removal of same, and add a plaque explaining in detail the abhorrent activities in which
those represented by such monuments engaged.

Maureen Dolan R osen, MGA


Staff Writer, Office of Student Affairs
University of North Carolina, School of Medicine
1060 Bondurant Hall, Campus Box, 9535
Chapel Hill, NC 27599

Phone:
Fax: REDACTED
Message
From: Hudnell, Marla [Marla_Hudnell@kenan-flagler.unc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:34:08 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Confederate monument

Hello,
I think it makes sense to donate the Silent Sam monument to some kind of museum for those who wish to preserve it. Is
there a museum for the history of the South, or something similar?
Or ... another option ... how about a Hollywood prop studio?
I do not think it should be housed anywhere near Chapel Hill, or even in North Carolina, since many people find it
upsetting to have around.

Thanks for the opportunity to comment!

Marla

Marla Hudnell
As·sot!ate Dfrcctor Donor !-?elations

UNC l<enan-Flagler Business School


The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ca mpus Box 3440, l<enan Center 406G
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3440
P REDACTED !: marla.hudnell@unc.edu

�h�
C:A.MPA!GN
.{t�r
CAilOL!N.A

(A_M_i'_I\IG_t·l.U_Nf .[DU
Message
From: Dittus, Christopher [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =8c9d0cd3216e4fc392 bea3d2fd3434d7-Christopher]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:34:12 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Museum of History Donation

Hi,

A relic such as this deserves a home in a museum. I recommend donating it to the NC Museum of History in
Raleigh.

Regards,

Chris Dittus

Christopher Dittus, DO, MPH


Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Lymphoma Program
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
REDACTED
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7305
Phone: REDACTED

Fax: REDACTED
Message
From: Keeler, Andrew George [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=B5C2726AC4494F369B3D899760460466-MR ANDREW G]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:36:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: monument disposition

I was born in Chapel Hill in 1956 and grew up seeing "Silent Sam" without even thinking about it until my
family moved away in 1969.

When I returned to Chapel Hill as an undergraduate in 1974, all I knew about the statue was the hackneyed
story about when the soldier fired his gun. My friends and I dressed up the statue as a witch and an MX missile
on successive years in the late 70s, but never spared a single thought for its historical context. I was a member
of the North Carolina Fellows Program, which at that time was housed in Pettigrew Hall by Silent Sam and had
a racially diverse membership. I never heard a single comment about the fact that a monument to a Confederate
soldier was so prominent on campus from either Caucasian or African-American students.

In looking back at this, I am appalled at my own cluelessness and the collective ability to ignore what was -
literally -staring us all in the face. I join what I believe to be the overwhelming sentiment that this statue
should absolutely not be returned to its former place unchanged. But I also think it represents an opportunity
for us all to be able to reflect and learn from the way that history matters, and how our collective conception of
public morality changes over time and, hopefully if slowly and haltingly, "the arc of the universe bends toward
justice." So I strongly favor an outcome where the history of this monument - from the hateful speech that
marked its unveiling, to its long tenure on the campus with so little comment and notice, to protest and violent
removal -- can become a part of the public and visible historical record on the UNC - Chapel Hill campus. I
defer to those with expertise and background in archiving and display about how this should take place - but I
add my voice to those who think this should be part of the UNC community's ongoing reflection and
understanding of our highly imperfect history and our effort to understand the past in order to avoid at least
some of its mistakes.

Andrew G. Keeler
Program Head, Public Policy and Coastal Sustainability
UNC Coastal Studies Institute
Professor of Economics
East Carolina University
Director, Outer Banks Field Site
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://coastalstudiesinstitute.org/about/faculty-and-staff/andy-keeler/

REDACTED (office)
Message
From: Frye, Stephen [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en= 79218c995d8e45f3b22815ef4585abc8-Stephen Fry]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:37:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Future of Silent Sam

I am writing in response to the request for comments to the Chancellor, UNC System President, Margaret Spellings, and
the Board of Trustees on the future of "Silent Sam".

To place a person on a pedestal is to hold them in honor or reverence. The practice of slavery and the erection of
monuments like this one on our UNC campus are the product of a philosophy of white supremacy that is antithetical to
the ideals of this University and our country. The glorification of the Confederacy is an ongoing and shameful part of the
legacy of the Southern states that rebelled against the USA over the right to own slaves. As a NC resident since birth, I
am all too familiar with the misinformation and inadequate teaching of this horrific history in our State.

Southern states have yet to face the reality of slavery, the civil war, and years of Jim Crow and racism that continues
today- there is much to learn from this history, but there is nothing to be proud of based on the actions of the majority
of whites in the South. In contrast, there are many stories of courage and perseverance among African Americans in the
South and some whites that stood against the injustice of slavery and racism. Let's put up a monument to honor and
revere some of them and take Sam permanently off the pedestal and put him in a setting where the history is clearly
visible and the persistent, romanticized version of Southern rebellion is rejected. Germany is not proud of the Nazi's or
the holocaust, and they teach this painful history instead of re-writing it. You will find no Nazi's on pedestals in Germany.
Slavery is the American Holocaust and should be taught as such.

Sincerely,

Stephen V. Frye, Ph.D.


Fred Eshelman Distinguished Professor
Director, Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery
Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Eshelman School of Pharmacy
125 Mason Farm Road
3012 Marsico Hall
UNC-Chapel Hill 27599-7363
Message
From: Briggs, Thomas Dane [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =ef9404556a05435c97a6ff38dbf0a3eb-Thomas Dane]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:39:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It's unfortunate that some people have mistaken a memorial to those who fought for this state as a hate
symbol. At no time was this monument erected in the name of Racisim. Misguided youths have once again
invoked their own will to remove a historic monument and change history to their liking.
Message
From: Bradley, Richard A [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=0la5c9b086b14d209b317e824a04dea0-Richard AB]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:39:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_ comon]
Subject: Feedback

I like the idea of the statue being in Ackland where they can contextualize the history of the monument, the
Confederacy, and slavery.

I also like the idea of replacing the former site of the monument with a welcoming and unifying symbol for the campus.

Rick Bradley

carolina
Department of Housing & Residential Education I The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
SASE North Suite 1213 I 450 Ridge Road, Chapel Hill NC. 27599-5500
T: REDACTED IE: rbradley@email.unc.edu I W:
:,;;;,:;;J; ,:, ;); I I I I
Message
From: William
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:40:12 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I have read the posted statement about the plans to submit some kind of
plan to the UNC Board around Nov. 15. Unfortunately for the University,
that date does not comply with state law. I know you do not wish to be in
violation of state laws. A North Carolina law, adopted in 2015 and
codified as North Carolina General Statute (G.S.) § 100-2.1, requires that
objects of remembrance on public property cannot be removed or
relocated except in certain circumstances. "1\n object of rcn1en1brance
that is te1nporarily relocated shall be returned to its
original location within 90 days of completion of the project that required its
temporary
removal, An object of remernbrance that is permanently relocated shall be
relocated to a site of
silnilar prominence, honor, visibility, availability, and access that are within the
boundaries of
the jurisdiction frorn which it was relocated. An object of remembrance may not
be relocated to
a museum, cemetery, or mausoleum unless it was originally placed at such a
location. As used
in this section, the term "object of remembrance" means a monument, memorial,
plaque, statue,
marker, or display of a permanent character that commemorates an event, a
person, or military
service that is part of North Carolina's history. The circumstances under which an
object of
remembrance may be relocated are either of the following:

You must replace it within 90 days. The clock is ticking.


Message
From: Ackall, Viviane [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=AF0E436D9E5044B2A953AB97A75B14CE-VIVIANE ACK]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:41:14 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam
Attachments: ATT63889; ATT09137

I would like to add to the list of people supporting the moving of the statue to another location for a series of reasons:
1 I am afraid for my personal safety and the safety of my students
2 Our student with psychological issues do NOT need to be worried about riots and safety issue because of a block
of dead material (a monument)
3 I understand that Sam is part of the NC state history as much as Hitler is part of German history, and that does
not mean I want a statue of Hitler on my backyard
4 This statue was placed here many years after the end of the war, therefore, it could be placed somewhere else
where one will appreciate it
5 You are not destroying the statue. You are just moving it to a better place where it can be liked
6 The money saved on not having to protect a statue, can be directed to constructing new parking lots which are
much more needed that a statue.
These are my 2 cents.
Thank you for putting time and effort on trying to please all pe ople . Good luck with that.
Viviane

Viviane Ackall (she, her, hers) - Coordinator


E:- vackall@unc.edu IV:- REDACTED

Accessibility Resources & Service I CB# 7214 - SASB (North) I Suite 2126
UNG-Chapel Hill I Chapel Hill I NC 27599-7214

ars@unc.edu I REDACTED (V) I 711 (NC-RELAY) I https://ars.unc.edu I


CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE:
This e-mail, including any attachments, is intended for the sole use of the addressee(s) and may
contain legally privileged and/or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient, you are
hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying or retention of this e-mail or the information
contained herein is strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please immediately
notify the sender by telephone or reply by e-mail, and permanently delete this e-mail from your
computer system. Thank you.
Message
From: Ziegler, Christopher Michael [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8 lc4e36b68ed453bbd3c8fb5554a 1569-Ch ri stopher]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:41:23 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put i t back where i t was.

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Hudson-Barr, Diane [Diane.Hudson-Barr@unchealth.unc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:42:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: monument feedback

I am a Carolina grad times 3 (BSN '81; PhD '93; MSN'18). As a white woman, it is difficult to understand what
the presence of that statue MEANS to people of color. I had the opportunity to read several pieces recently
about whiteness - I found the second one below to be the most helpful in increasing my understanding of the
experiences of those of color.

I don't think the NC Legislature will permit the statue being disposed of and not replaced. If that is the
constraints that the University must function under, then I support the idea of placing it somewhere that it can
be avoided by those who are hurt and/or offended by its presence. We cannot change history, but we can try
to put it in its proper place. And listen to the voices of the students and faculty who support UNC-CH as a
progressive institution.

Here are three essays that help open conversations about whiteness:

"What I Said \Vhen.1Vfv \Vhite .Fri.end Asked for1Vfv Black O inion on White Privik!\{e'' by Lori Lakin
Hutcherson
\Ve can begin to understand each other by asking the right questions - and listening to the stories we
receive in turn. Lori Lakin Hutchinson sheds frank and essential light on the reality of racism in
America.

"Transforrning \Vbitc Fragility Into Courageous l.mperfection'' by Courtney E. Martin


A passionate, grounded plea to recognize white privilege and the gut level pushback - the "white
fragility" - that happens when talking about race.

''(·),,-rr·1'1;1,,.
·th) ·t.·c·,•i .l\i{V ,.l.'c1v1',. ·1·1 i : >s··,,.,('" b I> arker J. J>al.mer
... � ,. ' . , ' .. '·" t..,, ' ., ..... � ,,, .........')
' .... ·?-----···,!: y '

Parker turns a critical eye to his ovvn convictions •


about race and white privilege. He finds there's
always room to face our hubris - and in that ' ' humbling
' experience, we find hope to do better the next
. . . .
time around.

Diane Hudson-Barr

Diane l··ludson··Ban-, PhD, RN, CNS, CPNP


Clinical Nur·se Spec1al:st,
Newborn Critical Care Centi?r,
UNC Hospitals, 4th F!oor Children's Hospita!
101 Manning Drive, Chapel l·-1:11, NC 27.514
office: REDACTED

fax: REDACTED
email: Diane. H ud5on-Bcirr(wu nc:hea:th.unc:.edu
----- c:onjidentiality Notice -----
The information contained in (or attached to) this electronic message may be legally privileged and/or confidential injbrmation. Ifyou
have received this communication in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete the message.
Message
From: Horowitz, Jonathan [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =fcc2daf6135348009fa04efae 7b965bc-M r Jonathan]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:43:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where Silent Sam should go

I feel very strongly that Silent Sam, as a piece of history, belongs in a history museum ... on a section about Jim Crow.
Monuments erected during that period were an important part of public intimidation and separation, and should be
remembered as such.

I do not feel that it belongs in any public, outdoor space, and especially not on UNC's campus. If it needs to stay
affiliated with UNC in some way, I think you need to put together a museum exhibit to deal with it. The History
department would at least consider an offer to lead the effort.

Jonathan Horowitz
Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carolina Population Center
PhD in Sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill, 2017
Message
From: Gale, Judy A [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=0831fafa70fb41d4ad66700b149c40d2-Judy A Gale]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:44:36 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument's Future - Idea Submission

it

Judy Gale
/\drninistraUlve' Support Specialist
, l .cm1c
.ncac ' .A.crv1smg
' p. rogram
CoHege of /\rts & Sciences
Steele Building, CB#:3110
HllI
University of North Carolina at Chapel
Cbape1 Hill, NC 27599-;3110
REDACTED (o)
REDACTED (f)
httnJ./.b�,µvising�_gn��gqµ
Message
From: Smith, Michael [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =06c4e4144b704546a4d2338cf24 7e89f-Michael Sm i]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:44:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Monument comment

Personally I would not want the monument to be plac ed back on campus at all. If you can't destroy the thing, just lock it
in a basement somewhere; however, if you do have to put it back up, I suggest you place it at the Center for the Study of
the American South and contextualize it with a historical marker explaining its original dedication and role as a marker
for white supremacy.

Michael Smith
(he, him, his)
Administrative Director
UNC Summer School
rnichael srnith@unc.edu
REDACTED
Message
From: Seagroves, Bethsaida S [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =b08f5a0eff544fc7bebf0c24d b0ac096-Bethsa i da S]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:44:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument Relocation

Dear Chancellor Falt,


Since the Silent Sam monument was erected to honor Carolina students who fought and/or died during the Civil War, it
is most appropriate to have it relocated to the University Memorial Grove, if space allows it.
Respectfully submitted,
Bethsaida Sanes Seagroves
Message
From: Gleason, Zamira [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =4bff7 49acd264d79ad bc42e 781213452-zgleason]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:45:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Statue idea

Hi /\II,
I propose the statue to be re--located to the museum of history or any other museum in Triangle.

Zarnira

From: no_reply@email.unc.edu <no_reply@email.unc.edu>


Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 11:01 AM
To: Gleason, Zamira <zgleason@email.unc.edu>
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC
System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument(a),unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.
Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Message
From: Paul Thompson
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:46:20 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Put Sam in a space that honors the memory of those for whom he was dedicated. Open a UNC southern History
museum. We have a southern history after all.
Paul Thompson (1968)

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Reed, Teresa [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =ec9845099f734a978d3e32416d59379c-Teresa Reed]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:46:47 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Confederate Statue input

Greetings, thanks for providing an opportunity to voice my opinion.


I believe that the statue should not go back to its original spo t, but should go into a museum or other venue that
acknowledges the divisive nature of Confederate monuments while documenting the historical significance o f related
events.
Sincerely, Teresa Reed

Teresa Reed, RN
Nurse Coordinator I Division of Cardiology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
160 Dental Circle I Campus Box 7075
6013-B Burnett-Womack Building I Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7075
Office:REDACTED I Fax: REDACTED
teresa_reed@med.unc.edu
Message
From: Boyer, Mary V.L. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=c94b11802b164c6a8f8e4695da37d763-Mary V.L. B]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:48:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think it should be put into a museum. I suggest signage like in all museums that gives the history (the good, bad and
ugly) of the monument. (Who it represents, bring in the Jim Crow era, and the recent protests.) It's historical and should
be a museum piece. It's also a piece of art and should be treated as such despite it's history.

Mary Boyer
Business Services Coordinator
Construction Management
University of North Carolina
103 Airport Dr., Giles Horney Building
Campus Box 1080
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1080
(P) REDACTED
Email: mary.boyer@facilities.unc.edu
Message
From: Jarstfer, Michael Bruce [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=a51 ld5e255 ld4af6b8e374079cd84139-Mi chael Bru]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:48:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Placement of Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,

I am of the opinion that Sam should be placed in a museum. Or better - the confederate cemetery in Atlanta.

If the Board of Govs insists that it stay on UNC's campus, then it must be made clear at the site what was said
when the statue went up, what the goals of the statue were (to reminds blacks of their place) and it must be
noted that UNC rejects the philosophy and culture the statue represents.

To me, this is not morally ambiguous. They statue was built to reinforce white supremacy and nothing
else. To defend it, is to defend white supremacy.

Sincerely,

Campus Box 7363


4102 Marsico Hall I 125 Mason Farm RD
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7363
�l!¥.... '�l!¥.... �l!a=.... �:ill¥....

rharmacy.unc.edu _
Message
From: Hodgkinson, Jennifer C [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =43cf47d9c7d043f5ba96e3243f09abOl-Jennifer C]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:48:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: This monument is a safety hazard

Thank you for setting up this email for comments from our UNC community.

The country is changing and people will continue to draw attention to all monuments erected to glorify the
Civil War and those that fought to defend southern succession and the system of slavery.

The statue cannot go back to where it once stood. One of the stipulations in the recent law enacted to protect
monuments is that safety should be considered. The toppling of the monument could have injured some of
those present - even if they were the ones who pulled it down. If it goes up in the same area or erected
somewhere else around campus, it will be toppled again.

I feel that it make sense to make a space for it in Wilson Library - Southern Historical collection area, perhaps?
I would also leave the paint and blood stains on it, and include this new chapter of history in a description. I
know there are relics and artifacts of UNC history located here.

It is bad PR to learn UNC has spent $400,000 protecting and preserving. Costs will only increase if it is erected
where it stood or in another area of campus not designated for history research.

Best,
Jennifer Hodgkinson

Jennifer Hodgkinson
Social/Clinical Research Specialist
Sheps Center for Health Services Research
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
725 MLK Jr Blvd, CB# 7590
Chape!Hill, NC 27514
telephone: REDACTED
fax: REDACTED
email: jhodgkinson(a)unc.edu
Message
From: Korchnak, Angela Gail [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8441elff7273476ca47ec20610eb63fc-Angela Gail]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:49:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestion for Confederate Monument

Dear Board of Trustees members,


Thank you for the opportunity to make suggestions about the disposition and preservation of the Confederate
Monument.

I think this monument would be "at home" in a civil war/ confederate cemetery in the general vicinity of Chapel Hill
(within 50 miles). I would suggest the Historic Confederate Cemetery on Oakwood Avenue in Raleigh, NC. Another
option would be the Maplewood Cemetery in Durham, however this cemetery has had vandalism in the past.

May I also ask the following questions and ask that they be addressed (not necessarily to me) as part of a press release
in the near future: What plans are being put in place to ensure that the statue is not damaged? If it is damaged, what
plans are being put in place for the repair or replacement and who would be responsible for the costs?

Thank you kindly,


Angie Korchnak
UNC employee
Message
From: Stoval l, Heath D [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=48da38f333e1405ebd3490cdfe20686b-Heath D Sto]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:52:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I feel like it should be put back up and better protected and maybe better education on t he history of
this monument. For the people who took it down are much more racist than the statue. For it doesn't stand
for racism. Witch I'm sure you are aware of that.
Message
From: Abreu, Maria de los Angeles (Nana) [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=a317ec6403fb4f37ba730fe8600f6ba4-Maria de lo]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:53:53 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: In a museum

Dear Board of Governors,


I believe Silent Sam should be placed in a museum where he can be displayed safely as part of the US North Carolina
history.

Saludos,

�� MPA, CCRP
Social/Clinical Research Specialist
UNC- Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center
123 W. Franklin St., Suite 450, CB# 8030
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
Phone: REDACTED
Fax: REDACTED
mdla abreu@unc.edu
Message
From: R Kagan
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:57:33 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees

Thank you for this forum .

Despite restrictive, regressive oriented state law and policy, as well as UNC's direct responsibility thereunder, I would
suggest:

PLEASE, Look at WHEN (1913) this statue was created and erected, AS WELL AS the abhorrent dedication speech,
which will be attached to it forever.

IF you:

1 - cannot publicly destroy this thing;


**2 - cannot melt this down and create a newly sculpted paean to the slaves who built UNC (perhaps with some further
explanation of its history); then,
3 - Allow some regressive, racist, hateful descendant of treasonous slaveowners to claim it and put this in his own
backyard, but do NOT put it in public - With OR Without further explanation.

Good luck to us all,

Looking forward -

Rick Kagan
UNC lecturer
Chapel Hill

-----Original Message-----
From: no_reply@email.unc.edu
Sent: Sep 24, 2018 10:58 AM
To: spacedreams@mindspring.com
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNG-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees
Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC
System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument@unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Message
From: Wilhelmsen, Kirk C [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=902a3d20df3348eab38f8b8a740df93e-Kirk C Wilh]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:57:35 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: RE: [FO RMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-ChapelHill Board ofTrustees

Chancellor Falt

The monument was an attack on the mental health of the LJNC and Cha pel Hill con11rn.mity. Silent Sam was an att ractive
nuisance that put the safety of the UNC c ommunity at risk.

Please do not put it back where it was unless it is enclosed in a shell that limits its visibility and historical context is
provided.

I want to use the relocation of the relic as a teac hing moment.

Suggestions:

1) Put the monument i nto a repurposed part of C arr Hall with a new entrance. Sil ent Sam should be disp layed
exhibi ts that describe the con text from the time of its dedication and the h istory of Julian Shakespeare Carr.
2) P ut the monument into a multimedia museum on ca mpus tha t gives a data--driven picture of the c ause and
effects of the civ il war, the history of recons truction., Jim Crow, the Kl an, Redlining, "the Bell Curve," and t he civil
rights movement.

Thanks again for your service and leadership of the University.

Kirk

Kirk C. Wilhelmsen MD PhD

Carol Master Schiller Distinguished Scholar in Neurology


Professor LJNC Department of Gene tics and Neurology
Chief Domain Scientist for Biology and Director of Biolnformatics at
Renaissa nce Computing Institute
Carolina Center for Genome Sciences

5093 Genetic Medi cine


120 Mason Farm Rd
CB# 72.64
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7264
LJNC Phone REDACTED
RENCI Phone REDACTED

Fax REDACTED
e-mail kirk@med.unc.edu
http://kirkwilhelmsen.web.unc.edu/

From: no_reply@email.unc.edu <no_reply@email.unc.edu>


Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 10:54 AM
To: Wilhelmsen, Kirk C <kirk_wilhelmsen@med.unc.edu>
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC
System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument(al.unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Message
From: Sorensen, Kathryn [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=221716e831b7431eb3c2c78220365107-Kate Sorens]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:58:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: statue suggestion

I think it should be moved to the cemetery. It was built to serve as a memorial for those who lost their life in the civil
war. Move it to the UNC cemetery or other place of remembrance within the state.

Katie

Kathryn L Sorensen, OTD, OTR/L, J\D/\C


Clinical Assistant Professor
/:\.drnissions Committee
Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Bondurant Hall 2052, Cl3 #7122
Chapf.':I Hill, NC 27599
kathryn_scm:msen@med.unc.. edu
REDACTED
Message
From: Bousquet, Debbie Johnson [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=0aa2673fa3864e509d1840340622e4c4-Debbie John]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:59:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/en=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Monument Relocation

Hello�

Could the Stone Center be considered for a possible relocation site? This would allow for teaching, continued
education as a learning example of the history of this statue.

Debbie

Deborah J. Bousquet LEED rM AP ID+C

carouna
Department of Housing & Residential Education I The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Teague Residence Hall Office #08 I 105 Stadium Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-5510
T: REDACTED IE: •.• •······ ·······•·•. ,···•.• I W:
?.),;::;;,I;;,;;,;;,/ I I
Message
From: Ethan
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:59:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam proposal

silent Sam should be restored to his last resting spot, face down in the dirt next to the pedestal. The
existing bronze plaques should be removed from the pedestal, and replaced with new ones depicting the
crowd that toppled the statue.
Message
From: Daniel Read [readlawl@gmail.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:02:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Not on UNC campus

I am opposed to placing the monument anywhere on UNC campus. The crimes against humanity that it
represents, both the holding of slaves and sending young men to die to protect that system, are just too
heinous. I suggest that the University reach out to those who want to preserve the monument and suggest that
they raise funds for a Confederate memorial park on their private property and then give the statute to them.

Dan

Daniel F. Read '78, MA '81, JD -83


Attorney at Law
REDACTED
Durham, NC 27701
REDACTED FAXREDACTED
EMAIL readlawl(q),gmail.com or readlaw@aol.com

Trial practice in Durham since 1986


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:03:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument destination

I am a parent - The monument needs to be in a museum.


Done and done!

Best Regards,
Message
From: Swindler, Luke [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDL T)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=C732F441D5ED481185E60A2997 A6D27F-LU KE SWINDL]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:05:51 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF 23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Thoughts on the Silent Sam monument

• Writing as a librarian, libraries are not museums while those at UNC are
physically not suitable for such a large structure, ranging from inadequate
building physical infrastructure that was would be required to support such as
massive structure to its large size being totally out of scale visually with
available spaces.
• Given the level of controversy about the appropriateness of the Silent Sam
monument, housing it in library space would pose significant dangers to
patrons and to the collections, especially the unique and irreplaceable items in
Wilson Library-and do so even if the University found the funds to provide
around-the-clock close surveillance on an on-going basis.
• Writing as a historian, because the Civil Was was fundamentally a treasonous
rebellion to enshrine states' rights to preserve chattel slavery and absolute
white supremacy at all costs, it is morally inexcusable and offensive for the
University to display a monument to those who fought such a war precisely
because it is absolutely in conflict with basic morality in general and
American ideals in particular.
• Writing as a member of the UNC Chapel Hill community, insofar as the
university and its libraries represent intellectual and social commons in the
best sense of the words, displaying Silent Sam in a prominent campus space
absolutely sends the wrong message-and does so in an especially
objectionable and offensive manner.

*******************************
Luke Swindler
Collections Management Officer
Davis Library CB #3918
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA
luke_swindler@unc.edu
TEL REDACTED
FAXREDACTED
*******************************
Message
From: Malekoff, Robert [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =9413677CF5434359B3DCE63ABA1843 BE-ROBE RT MALE]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:12:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

I do not believe it appropriate for the monument to be returned to the UNC CH campus. I base this viewpoint
in no small part as reaction to Julian Carr's 1913 remarks which - for me - contexualized the monument's
dedication and purpose in disturbing ways. Differeing opinions and perspectives must be encouraged on any
college campus, but not necessarily celebrated in this form.

I know that this is a highly controversial issue - one fraught with a variety of political land mines. I appreciate
your reaching out to seek community input.
Message
From: Minchew, Heather [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=0a472c31e6ae4c60a9a81370ac6ac4ce-Heather Min]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:15:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam ideas

Dear Chancellor Falt and the UNC-CH Board of Trustees,

Thank you for the opportunity to weigh in on the fate of the confederate monument known as Silent Sam. As both an
alumna (class of 2010) and current staff member (Dept. of Romance Studies), it is very important to me that Carolina
fosters an inclusive, safe, and welcoming environment for all students and continually strives for improvement in that
regard.

Recently Dean Guskiewicz posed a series of three questions to those of us employed in the College of Arts & Sciences. I
am choosing to share with you my personal responses to those three questions below, as I am proud to sign my name to
them.

Knowing what you do now about the history of Silent Sam and what this statue represents to different people, what
would you like to see done with it and the site where it stood in Mccorkle Place?

The statue absolutely should not be reinstalled to its former location, a place of prominence on this campus. We cannot
credibly call ourselves "the university of the people" while boasting a monument to white supremacy on our front steps.

The statue should instead be moved to a museum or an appropriate historic site (such as a confederate cemetery or a
civil war battlefield) where it can be studied in its proper context. Any such context should not omit the remarks made at
the statue's dedication and the timing of the erection of the monument during the Jim Crow era.
While initially I thought Wilson Library might be an appropriate location, I have read the concerns of the Library Board
and now understand that the statue would likely pose too much of a disruption and security threat to that venue.

I find it difficult to think of a realistic and appropriate on-campus venue and instead think an institution with more
resources, such as the NC Museum of History, would be best. It is an affiliate of the Smithsonian, and admission is free,
so there would be no more financial barriers to the public than when the statue was installed on Mccorkle place.
Furthermore, UNC's civil war dead already have a place of remembrance at Memorial Hall, so I see no reason why the
statue must remain on campus.

As for the pedestal and original site, I would like to see some recognition of the African-American members of the UNC
community who persisted in contributing to this University, despite the long shadow cast by Sam's presence here for
more than a century. Whether this could best be achieved by removing the pedestal or by adding to it could be left up to
artists who would submit proposals/plans for consideration. The nearby "unsung founders" memorial is merely one
small (and often overlooked) part of the story, and the juxtaposition of it with Silent Sam appeared to exalt the latter, at
least physically and visually.

How do you think we can take this moment as an opportunity to lead and to teach-showcasing that this is what a great
public university does best?

We can use this moment as an opportunity to lead and to teach by emphasizing the historical context around Silent Sam
in particular and the erection of Confederate monuments across the South during Jim Crow in general, and by using that
context to inform our decision. While the monument may "represent different things to different people," ultimately we
have documentation from the time that allows us to illuminate the patterns throughout the region as well as the
intentions of the individuals (such as Julian Carr) involved. We should also use this opportunity to point to the historical
record to dispel myths about the "true" aims of the Civil War and a disturbing tendency among certain groups in the
South to try to completely divorce the war from the institution of slavery.

Do you have any other constructive feedback you would like to share on this topic?

It is imperative that the University leads on this issue. At times it has not felt like the University has considered all of its
options or used all of the resources at its disposal to tackle this issue. Administration has seemed far too content to sit
back and claim its hands are tied to reinforce the status quo, which resulted in ~$4D0K spent over the course of one year
to protect the statue, which certainly sends a message as to who or what the University prioritizes.

Best regards,
Heather

Heather Minchew
Managing Editor, Publications Office
237 Dey Hall, CB# 3170
Department of Romance Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3170
Schedule: Mon-Thurs B am - 4 pm
Message
From: Jimmy Fay
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:16:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Plan for Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt, Board of Trustees, and others concerned,

I write to express my support of reinstalling Silent Sam at his previous location. I am against the capitulation to mob
justice which does not represent the will of the people. UNC is the flagship university of our beloved state, it belongs to
all of her citizens and such politicized subjects should be decided by elected bodies, not the protesters. With the above
in mind, it is clear that reinstallation alone fails to heal any division caused by its installation, dedication, and continuing
presence. I suggest two courses of action.

The first is much more difficult for those involved, but thus are the burdens of leadership. At the reinstallation there
must be a rededication of the statue. This involves our honored chancellor who must swallow her pride and suppress
her personal feelings. This rededication must denounce the evils of slavery, Jim Crow era laws, and the confederate
cause (the easy part). However, perhaps more importantly, she must assert that this monument is to UNC students who
went, fought, and often died not in service to philosophical ideals, political leanings, nor the dread institution of slavery.
Rather fought and died for their homes, their families, and countrymen. These students, while often the scions of
wealthy, slave-owning families, were not the ones who chose succession nor acted to perpetrate and propagate slavery.
Who amongst us can judge them on actions not taken, potential unmet, lives unlived. The chancellor must recognize
they were us, students here to learn but torn away from our Alma Mater in some ways to die for it. For UNC belongs not
the United States, it belongs to North Carolina. They too were tar heels, attendees of our precious jewel and we should
offer them honor.

Secondarily, and perhaps much more palatable to the chancellor and protesters, we should commission a similar statue
honoring a black figure or cause. Here is my suggestion though perhaps a better can be found. Backing Silent Sam and of
equal stature, should be a figure of a black man on a pedestal facing south. Let there be broken chains around the man's
bare feet. Rising up the clothing should change to a professional jacket and slacks reminiscent of the late SO's or early
60's. In the man's hand there should books symbolizing education and the other raised, in a fist, towards the
administration and lands that kept him oppressed. Victory must be apparent. It is a proud statue representing the brave
and valiant men who withstood the slings and arrows of powerful men and his peers to attain acceptance and excellence
at UNC. I think this would be a poignant and powerful statement that UNC recognizes its past and finds honor and pride
in its students.

Sincerely,

James Fay

Class of 2012
Message
From: Zamora, Daisy [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =bfec694 f4d58448e833a529980e28f52-Da isy Zam or]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:17:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board ofTrustees

Thank you for addressing this issue. When I was a graduate student at UNC-Chapel Hill, I remember feeling very weird when I
came across Silent Sam. I was confused. I did not understand what it meant for it to be there, in a place of honor. While
some people may have different interpretations of history, we all know Silent Sam is not a symbol of peace, of community, of
wisdom, of greatness and good for humanity. I'm not of African American descent, but I now have a and cannot
imagine attending a school with a statue that when built was meant to honor a German war commander during the
Holocaust.
I believe Barbara Rimer's essay on the topic is worth reading, if you haven't already:
http://mondaymorning.web.unc.edu/toppling-of-the-silent-sam-statue/

As for the future of Silent Sam, a photograph of it, along with the fundraising letters and photographs of the dedication, could
be put in a museum as an example of common actions during the Jim Crow era, or as part of a study of the long-term
repercussions of slavery, through Jim Crow times and today. But there is no need to keep the actual statue, it could be
disposed the way other University property no longer useful is disposed. Or it can be used as a base to build a monument to
hope and healing. I believe keeping the statue in a museum, regardless of the inscription, would keep honoring Jim Crow
values.

Sincerely,
Daisy Zamora
Message
From: Andrew Sullivan
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:19:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Dwayne Dixon has to go!

Hello Chancellor,

I understand your receiving many emails regarding Silent Sam and you have established a group to work on
such matter. However, this is not enough. The rational for taking down Silent Sam is completely idiotic and if
such rational arguments are taken to their logical conclusion, there is no end to what will be done. The whole
history of UNC Chapel Hill could be used to burn the University down.

You need to fire Dwayne Dixon and expel and suspend the students involved in taking Silent Sam down. This is
the only way UNC Chapel Hill will be able to preserve history and appreciation of the arts. If you leaves these
people in place, they will look for something else to tear down. The accreditation and credibility of the
university is at state.

Regards,

Andrew L Sullivan

Honesty is violence to the ego.


PS Hindsight is known for its accuracy, foresight is known for being absent.
PPS I am not the Andrew Sullivan of New Republic fame and I am not related to Mort Sullivan
Message
From: Gist, Jacquelyn Michelle [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8d2cbff9dd924aa8a 7 5ff90c7 c4fbe88-Jacq uelyn M]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:19:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Move off campus

Thank you for this opportunity

The statue and its base have no place on our campus.


I suggest moving it to the NC History museum to be part of an exhibit on Jim Crow in NC and how these statues were
used to assert white supremacy
I would also suggest that UNC follow Carrboro's example of creating Truth Plaques to tell the story of racism
Message
From: DuVa l, Kathleen [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=8202BCA0F5A8489E967 AF880D5A8ED9C-KATH LEEN A]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:20:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument plan

Dear All,

Thank you for providing this opportunity to convey opinions.

I strongly believe that the statue should not be returned to Mccorkle Place or any place of
public prominence and that the pedestal should also be permanently removed.

Thank you,
Kathleen DuVal

Kathleen DuVal
Bowman and Gordon Gray Professor of History
History Department, CB #3195
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
http://kathleenduval.web.unc.edu/
Message
From: Turner, Jessica Anderson [turnerj3@indiana.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:22:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: suggestion--monument

Have a funeral for the statue as a respectful symbol of its passing and then place it in a
vault. Hold remembrances and teach-ins on the history (and current climate) of racism and bigotry. But do
not preserve for display what has become a symbol of division and hate.

I am not currently connected to UNC-CH, but I am a graduate of the larger UNC system.

More importantly, I have two sons nearing their college years, with a third son trailing behind. I will not allow
any of my children to attend schools who do not choose to stand on the right side of history, regardless of
their longstanding connections to complicated Confederate/Southern history.

Respectfu I ly,
Jessica Turner

Jessica A. Turner, PhD I Executive Director I American Folklore Society


Indiana University, Classroom-Office Building, REDACTED, Bloomington, IN 47405-3657
REDACTED office I REDACTED cell I afsexec@indiana.edu I www.afsnet.org
Message
From: Zach Paulovits
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:26:20 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Please replace silent Sam with Coach Dean Smith statue.


Best regards,
Zach Paulovits 06'
Message
From: Farrell, Crista [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =8E48676D 251844 78A 70A0798355 FF91A-CRIST A FARR]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:34:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam statue

To Whom It May Concern,

Thank you for setting up this account to receive emails from people who wish to share ideas about the future of the
Silent Sam statue. I previously emailed comments to Chancellor Falt, but I wanted to send some of my comments to this
account as well. Here they are:

In my understanding, when the statue was dedicated many years ago, it was clearly done so as a means of preserving
a racist paradigm championing white supremacy, one in which violence against people of color, especially Black
people, was not just tolerated but glorified.

The statue's existence on campus was a towering, in-your-face, and appalling reminder of a racist and oppressive past
that is still all-too-present in the lives and experiences of many Americans today.

It would have been beneficial for that statue to come down long ago at the direction of both University and State
leaders. But in absence of that historical leadership, it was inevitable that public opinion would evolve such that the
statue would come down one way or another-in an authorized manner or not.

Regardless of the manner in which the statue came down, it should never ever be put back up on UN C's campus, and
the base of it should be removed too. The fact that the statue formerly existed prominently on UN C's campus for
over 100 years provides a more-than-sufficient opportunity for the University to continue to discuss it and teach
students and other citizens about it in the context of history going forward. Outside of it being discussed and
understood in an historical context, the statue should have no place in and be no part of the University's future.

Thank you for taking the time to read my comments.

Sincerely,

Crista Farrell
UNC Employee
Message
From: Anne Trent
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:38:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think the statue needs to be replaced nobody alive was a slave and nobody alive owned slaves the statue
represents part of American history and it should be shown a lot of respect because a lot of Americans
died defending everything that statue stood for
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Waybright, Jarod Michael [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =5c77a91118ce4a59a e 714de 14934 73cd-ja rodw]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:38:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
CC:
Frye, Stephen
[/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en= 79218c995d8e45f3b22815ef4585abc8-Stephen Fry]
Subject: Replace Silent Sam with Michael Jordan Dunking Statue

I believe there is nothing that would tie the Carolina community together more than the greatest to ever
play the game of basketball and UNC's own: Michael Jordan.
Picture this- you're walking through Mccorkle Place on a beautiful Carolina morning, and ascending into
the sky is a Michael Jordan statue getting ready to slam a dunk on an opponent .. probably from duke. The
fact that we do not currently have a Michael Jordan statue on campus should seriously be evaluated and
what better of a time and place than now and replacing silent Sam? Tarheels old and young alike would be
inspired by such a monument.
As far as silent sam- throw it in a museum somewhere and make space for Jordan.
Sincerely,
Jarod Waybright, PhD
UNC class of 2017
Message
From: Arbuckle, Benjamin S [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =104 fa9cbcc5b44f 4980a6843d2 7a3060-Benja min S]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:43:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]

To whom it may concern,


I have a couple of suggestions for how to deal with the 'Silent Sam' statue.
1) relocate the statue to one of the peripheral but accessible areas of old campus such as the quad in front of
the Asian Studies Building. Display the statue at ground level (without the pedestal) and place the bronze
plaques from the pedestal somewhere nearby along with information on the historical context of the statues'
dedication including details of the dedication ceremony, the finances, and the generally oppressive behavior
of the university and the State government towards many of its citizens at the time.

2) In addition, I would suggest planning a new large monument to be located where 'Sam' once stood. This
monument should be a clear signal for how the University hopes to welcome people to its campus and what
the institution stands for moving forward.

3) It would not be a bad idea to raise money for a modest monument or commemorative object
respectfully acknowledging the UNC alumni who fought and died in the American Civil War. This could be
added to the other commemorative objects located, I believe, near Person Hall.
Sincerely,
Benjamin Arbuckle
Message
From: Kime, Jeremy Wayne [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =ef9d4c35 722d4c93a40e441ecff3e23c-Jeremy Wayn]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:44:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

I believe the monument should go back up to where its stood proudly for over a century. I understand that some may
see it as a "racist" monument but in my personal opinion it stands for all the brave students that left there safe campus
lifes to fight in a civil war either side doesn't mind the statue stands for both sides north and south and should not be
moved and forgotten. You cannot erase history or it will always be doomed to repeat its self

Thanks for giving us the opportunity to express how we feel as we are as much a part of this university as the students
Message
From: Travis Hardy
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:45:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument's disposition and preservation .

Chancellor Folt,

I would like to suggest the monument be moved to Bentonville battlefield in Bentonville, NC.

- Travis
Message
From: chris jordan
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:51:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to put Sam

To the esteemed whomever,


I am a 20 year Chapel Hill resident and small business owner. It has been brought to my attention that you are
seeking a new location for the historic and historically terrible idea known as Silent Sam. I would like to help.
My ideas are as follows:
1) trebuchet it in the general direction of Alamance county
2) use it for anti-personnel shot the next time the new Confederate States of America invade
3) melt it into a giant bronze power fist for Thom Goolsby to sit on.
NC gs 100-2.1100-2.1. Protection of monuments, memorials, and works of art. Subsection c3. An object of
remembrance for which a building inspector or similar official has determined poses a threat to public safety
because of an unsafe or dangerous condition.
Question: Is civil unrest a threat to public safety? Maybe your building inspector doesn't think so, but maybe
a similar official could determine an elbow from Uranus with a map and a flashlight.
Please do not re-erect that monument to hatred and glorified revisonism. It never belonged.
Thank you,
Chris Jordan
Message
From: Ken Chamblee
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:52:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam should be placed upon the pedestal from which it was unlawfully removed. Under state law the
University has no choice but to do so. If it is not restored then I guess we live in a state of men rather then
laws. Thus, if we do not agree with the law we can, through unlawful and violent acts, violate the law
whenever we feel justified. Sets an awfully bad precedent doesn't it?

Ken Chamblee
Class of 1976
Message
From: Kilb, Megan Griffin [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=1FD2B41127A64ED0B85B2F2E90F92D95-MEGAN GRIFF]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:52:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: considering Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt and members of the Board of Trustees:

Thank you for taking the time to deliberate this important issue. As you consider the best place to relocate the Silent
Sam monument, I hope the safety of UNC students, staff, and faculty is your primary concern.

No matter where you choose to relocate the statue, Silent Sam will pose a safety threat to all members of the UNC
community who occupy and move around the selected building/ location. To maintain the bare minimum of campus
safety, the university has had to divert thousands of dollars to security at the previous site of Silent Sam, dollars that
could be used to directly support classroom teaching and learning, faculty excellence, and other, more important
campus initiatives that don't tacitly support a longstanding symbol of racism and discrimination. Housing the statue in
any other prominent place on campus will continue to support an unsafe physical working and learning environment on
campus and prolong this diversion of resources away from the university's core mission.

To many of our students and staff, Silent Sam represents a symbol of hate and oppression. Elevating the statue to
another place of prominence on campus continues the unfortunate campus tradition of centering whiteness and the
white experience at Carolina. Re-positioning the statue elsewhere on campus further perpetuates an unwelcoming,
hostile learning and working environment for many members of our campus community.

Finally, continuing to house the statue and condone its presence on campus directly defies many of the supporting
themes listed in the Blueprint for Next - embracing the state's evolving diversity; commitment to being a humane
community that cares how we treat each other; embracing change and possibility, willing to take risks. No matter what
other successful initiatives the campus may launch in the backdrop of this issue, if it mishandles the placement of Silent
Sam in a way that willfully jeopardizes the health and well-being of students and staff who are on campus every day at
the expense of appeasing external stakeholders, the campus will have fundamentally failed to fulfill the strategic vision
outlined in the Blueprint for Next.

It is my strong belief that this statue does not belong anywhere on campus that is publicly accessible or in close
proximity to where any UNC affiliates work and learn. I encourage the board to think creatively and consider solutions
that will prioritize the safety of the campus community and its members over deferring to the political will of the state
legislature in a way that still follows the bare letter of state law - a hostile law that was constructed to uphold the state's
regrettable legacy of glorifying the white experience at the expense of other populations who our campus and state
university system supposedly seek to serve.

Sincerely,
-Megan

Megan Kilb
E-Resources Librarian
UNC-Chapel Hill
PO Box 8890
Davis Library CB#3938
Chapel Hill, NC 27515-8890
REDACTED
From: no_reply@email.unc.edu <no_reply@email.unc.edu>
Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 10:55 AM
To: Kilb, Megan Griffin <griffma@email.unc.edu>
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

-------------· --

Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC
System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument(al,unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Message
From: Eric Riley [eric@crescentstructures.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:55:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Opinion about Silent Sam............

Ms. Falt,

Good afternoon ma'am. I trust that all things with you today are well.

I am writing to you today to express my concern for the Silent Sam monument being placed back into its original location
in its original condition.

A few items of note are:

1) The only course of action available to the University under the law is to restore and protect the memorial. This is a
state law that we as citizens must follow. This law is not up for debate nor review or opinion. The law is the law and as a
citizen of the great State of North Carolina, I am expecting those responsible for re-installing this statue and monument
to its original state to do just that.

2) Because of the terms of the existing state law, no one has the authority to move Silent Sam so that they can re­
contextualize or curate it with modern-day lies about white supremacy. This is a subject very near and dear to me and
my family and should be near and dear to you and yours. Using the political or public education platform to promote lies
and non-truths should scare us all to death as the results of those actions could take YEARS to correct - if ever. Don't be
fooled - what we see going on around us today with these monuments and these protests has so much more to do with
a much bigger, ill-intent movement to totally change the landscape of our culture and society - that we all should be
outraged and therefore not stand for these injustices. And all of those folks guilty of participating in the breaking of this
law should be held to the highest level of the justice system so as to send a message that these type of actions will NOT
be tolerated!

3) The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of paid activists. Let us not
project the wrong message to our state citizens nor anyone around us who would think otherwise!

I truly appreciate your time today and I look forward to Silent Sam going right back in place - in his original, undamaged
condition.

Eric L. Riley
REDACTED
Gastonia, NC 28056
REDACTED
eric@crescentstructures.com
Message
From: Dennis Johnson
Sent: 9/24/2018 12:59:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Sent from Yahoo put silent sam back soon as possible please u have broken the lawMail on Android
Message
From: Kainz, Kirsten [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=3FlB15451E7E4FlA940F22A74626CBE6-KIRSTEN L K]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:00:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: respect for Black faculty

Chancellor Falt,

Thank you for the opportunity to provide input regarding next steps following the removal of the statue called
silent sam. Considering the letter circulated by Black faculty at Carolina (pasted below), I cannot see any
future for the statue on our campus. The letter sent by Black faculty makes a clear and logical argument: "A
symbol of racism, violence, and white supremacy has no place on our 21st century campus often called the
"University of the People."

There may be strong and diverse feelings shared by stakeholders in Carolina. However, strong feelings should
not dissuade us from doing what is right. Wisely, Black faculty members have reminded us that: "there are not two
morally valid sides to the history the monument represents nor to its current significance."

November 15 brings with it an opportunity to be clear, to be logical, to be just.

With respect,

Kirsten Kainz
Social Work
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute

Statement from UNC Black Faculty on Silent Sam

As UNC Black faculty, we occupy a unique position relative to the Confederate monument
known as "Silent Sam." When the Daughters of the Confederacy commissioned the monument
for the University, when University donors offered resources to support its completion, when
the University paid the remaining balance, and UNC Board of Trustees member Julian Carr
delivered his racist remarks at its dedication, we doubt any envisioned Black faculty as vibrant
and necessary members of the University's intellectual, cultural, and social community. In
1913, the Confederate monument did not stand in opposition to the stated values and mission
of the University. In 2018, it most certainly does. It has done so since the University chose to
admit the first Black student or offer the first Black faculty member a contract for employment.
We have witnessed a monument that represents white supremacy in both the past and present
be venerated and protected at the same time that we have been asked to serve as examples
of diversity and inclusion. That is a demoralizing burden.

A monument to white supremacy, steeped in a history of violence against Black people, and
that continues to attract white supremacists, creates a racially hostile work environment and
diminishes the University's reputation worldwide. For us, arguments of moral equivalency are
extremely problematic; there are not two morally valid sides to the history the monument
represents nor to its current significance. Without brave acts of civil disobedience that changed
the moral character of the nation and advanced the cause of justice, Black faculty, staff, and
students would not be here. To reinstall the Confederate monument to any location on UNC's
campus is to herald for the nation and for the world that UNC is not a welcoming place for
Black people.
We, the undersigned faculty, urge the Chancellor, Provost, Board of Trustees, and Board of
Governors to permanently remove the Confederate statue and its pedestal from the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There is no way to re-erect the statue without valorizing an
incomplete version of history. A symbol of racism, violence, and white supremacy has no place
on our 21st century campus often called the "University of the People."
Message
From: Mary C. Whitton [whitton@cs.unc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:00:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Give it to the NC History Museum as a start on a new, permanent exhibit on Jim Crow.

Mary Whitton
Research Professor
Department of Computer Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
whitton@cs.unc.edu
Message
From: Mucha, Peter J [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=8a07c453f72645fca161bfd2182d4bd2-Peter J Muc]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:01:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Build an educational and historical wall

I wrote the following suggestion and circulated it among various colleagues back when "silent Sam" was
still standing. My own preference would be to never see him back in any place of prominence. I am also
aware of the language of the current law. In the unfortunate circumstance where he goes back to anywhere
prominent, I believe this general idea to amend his context with educational information retains merit.
Good luck.
cheers,
Peter

Build a wall. Not just any wall: an educational wal l . We're an educational institution, after all. We
could even have part of the top of the soldier peek out the top and stay visible, as an historical
teaching monument.
side 1, off the soldier's left, could be an entire panel of text devoted to the role of slavery in
pre-civil War society and the importance of the unsung founders of the University.
side 2, in the front, could describe the context of soliders fighting for the Confederacy. Some of
the motives involved were terrible; but not all. Particularly here in NC, as one of the last two states
to secede and with an economic diversity aligned with our geographical diversity impacting the feeling of
our residents towards slavery, I think there is a lot that a knowledgeable historian could write on this
panel about the variety of reasons that NC residents took up arms in defense of their home state.
side 3, off the soldier's right, could be used to describe the societal context at the time of
erecting the statue in 1913, including lessons about the atrocities of the Jim Crow era and raise
questions about the purpose of the statue.
side 4, in the back, could describe the debate over the statue over the past 50+ years, and the
decision to act.
I'm not wedded to any of the specific details of the above, but I believe in our role as an
educational institution and that this kind of preservation with appropriate context is within the scope
of our mission. surely others have great ideas that might be merged with which this kind of historically-
accurate contextualization.

Peter J. Mucha
http://mucha.web.unc.edu
Professor of Mathematics & Applied Physical Sciences
chairs Leadership Program Director, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
University of North Carolina-chapel Hill
Message
From: Stacks, Stephen Andrew [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =B632856E B541484C94B93 DCAE9D3F94B-SSTACKS]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:04:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for disposition of Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,


I would like to offer a suggestion for a way to deal with silent Sam that may give the University the
opportunity to reverse some of the damage it has done in this process. As a clear symbol of white
supremacy's historical and contemporary hold on American life, I don't believe the statue deserves to be
afforded any respect or deference in its disposition, and in fact, giving it such only props up hatred
and violence in a way I'm sure the university's leadership is eager to avoid. Therefore, I propose that
the University plan a silent Sam demolition ceremony-a public event at which the university repudiates
its white supremacist past and destroys the statue in full view of the university community. This event
should be protected from white supremacist violence and interference by campus police, at least as
zealously as the white supremacists who have been demonstrating on campus have been protected. This is
the only option, in my opinion, that will allow the university to move forward healthily from this crisis
of moral leadership and signal to the student body that people of color and other minorities are welcomed
and affirmed unequivocally.
Thank you for your consideration,
Rev. Stephen Stacks
Associate Pastor of Worship and Faith Formation, Greenwood Forest Baptist church, Cary NC
Master of Sacred Music, Boston University
PhD candidate in Musicology, University of North Carolina at chapel Hill
Message
From: Joe Farrar
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:04:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

I recommend removing the base and planting some flowers in its place.

The monument has no place on our campus. It was and is a symbol of racial oppression and bigotry.

Joe Farrar, Jr. AB '76


Message
From: GLENDA JONES
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:10:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As someone who loves and supports this university and its mission, I urge you to take this opportunity to
remove the statue from our campus.
Sincerely,
Glenda Parker Jones
Message
From: John Eick
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:13:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:

Thank you for the opportunity to submit comments about the future of the Confederate Monument on UNC's
campus.

I would be remiss if I did not first express my disappointment in how the UNC administration and campus
police allowed the events of August 20, 2018 to transpire in the way they did. While the placement of the
Confederate Monument has become an emotionally-charged and painful subject for many, mob action is never
the answer and can never be condoned. I sincerely hope the UNC administration, campus police, and the town
of Chapel Hill work together to pursue criminal convictions against as many of those involved as possible so as
to dissuade this sort of activity going forward.

As to the future of the Confederate Monument, I would recommend placing it within or adjacent to the Old
Chapel Hill Cemetery. Symbolically, this would be a fitting place for a monument memorializing a bygone era
while still allowing those who may be interested in viewing the monument the opportunity to do just that. At the
same time, by being in a less prominent location on campus, the monument can be more easily avoided by
anybody who would prefer not to walk alongside it.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

John Eick '11


Message
From: Hofheimer, Julie A. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDL T)/CN=RECIPl ENTS/CN=3EFB7176FBC84620B4B829DBB83CE603-JU LIE A. HO]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:13:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDL T)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Suggestions for dispensation of Silent Sam statue

Dear Chancellor Falt,

As a UNC-CH faculty member for 30 years, I have observed many campus-wide struggles here and want to
express my appreciation for your invitation to all for responses. Also am sending support for your reasoned
and calm approach to this horrendous situation.

My suggestion is to propose 3 alternatives to President Spellings: To transfer the statue to either (1) the NC
Museum of History, or (2) the NC Civil War Center in Fayetteville, as those curators will likely have the
resources to best decide next steps. If that is not agreeable to either of those sites, it would seem reasonable
to next propose to (3) transfer it temporarily to the NC legislature to decide and dispense it to its most legally
appropriate location.

I am speaking as a developmental psychologist here, but it seems within legal and historical guidelines to
conclude that no symbol of slavery, racism, bigotry, or hatred of any kind belongs on this inclusive and diverse
campus - or any State of NC campus for that matter. Regardless of what alternative explanations its
proponents put forth, to have that statue here creates the equivalent of a "hostile" learning environment for
all of our students, faculty, and staff. This statue has also invited and prolonged violent conflicts that are so
out of reason and context on this campus. There is plenty of First Amendment freedom afforded to all citizens,
and those afforded by law and UNC practice do not include the safety threats of this current statue's
magnitude.

Wishing you, the Trustees, and the BOG the best of luck with this!
Julie

Julie A. Hofheimer, PhD


Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Phone: REDACTED
Message
From: Lasater, Drew [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/CN=RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN=34F109065981455BB1EO0F1358E39FF6-DREW LASATE]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:13:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/ cn=Recipients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Put the statue

Somewhere in the South ern Historical Collection housed in Wilson Library.

Drew Lasater
HR Specialist - UNC School of Social Work
REDACTED
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
REDACTED
Message
From: Reisner, Howard M [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=8BB2AACBEABA4173B4B5D78D39227BCC-HOWARD M RE]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:14:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: A Suggestion

Let me start by thanking you for the opportunity to express my somewhat preliminary ideas. I should start by saying that
given my political and social background if the decision were solely mine to make I would remove and destroy the
monument. But we live in a world of many opinions and political necessities which often constrain our ideas and desires.
Hence, we need a solution which is sensitive to the concerns of those who find the monument an insult (and to be
truthful I am in that group) and those who see it as homage to their ancestors and a period of Southern history to be
remembered. If there is anything good for me to say about the monument, it commemorates fallen Confederate youth
who were students at UNC. Whatever the cause they died for, they believed it to be noble and necessary. I would move
the monument to a location in the campus cemetery; a traditional and fitting place to commemorate the deceased. But I
would go further. I would start a process to design a monument to the Black folk at UNC, students and others, which
taught about the suffering and inequalities that group suffered. I would have a design committee certainly including
black and minority students and faculty work out the plan for such a monument to also be placed in the cemetery in
some proximity to "Silent Sam" I would solicit ideas and contributions from all those associated with UNC. I believe the
setting would tend to engender respect for both monuments-and if not respect, at least consideration for the location.
Respectfully,
Howard M. Reisner PhD
Message
From: Birken, Wi lliam Joseph [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=A734DBA6B5A74C8697EFDB36DE6219AA-WILLIAM JOS]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:15:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I suggest Alumni Hall, subject to their approval from Alumni. Alumni Hall has the scale and the security necessary for the
plinth and monument, and Sam was a part of the lives and campus life of those who attended UNC. Barring that, I doubt
that there would be a safer place on our campus and that would protect Sam from the elements and vandalism. There is
no guarantee even here, but we could cross that bridge when we come to it. Sam is not a monument to UNC's students
and faculty who died in the Civil War. Memorial Hall already does that. Putting Sam and the plinth into storage would
probably be best for right now. I suggest in that spot a statue to William Friday or Howard Lee, Moses Horton, or the
black students from Lincoln High School, who did so much for Civil Rights in Chapel Hill. A new meaningful monument
would ease some of the angst over Sam, particularly alumni who I think would react positively to a Friday memorial
where Sam stood. This is a very difficult issue. Ultimately, Sam might eventually show up in an unbuilt Civil War
Museum, which should also include the Reconstruction period, which has been virtually erased from North Carolina
history, as has the period of restored white supremacy that Sam represented. Recently, I caught a glimpse of what
Estonia has done with its many monumental depictions of Stalin, etc. They now sit in a park for that purpose. Hopefully
that park would be available for those interested, but far enough away and secluded enough, as to not offend anyone.
There Sam could be placed, within the context of Jim Crow, segregation, and the re-awakening of white supremacy, in
the South and elsewhere. I think the black community should be given a large voice in this, while the Daughters of the
Confederacy might join into the discussion. I also think our many fine historians of the South should also be brought into
the debate on a better location for Sam. There is also the possibility of leaving the plinth unmoved in place, with
extensive contextualization, to provide educational lessons on the nature of history. I think Governor Cooper's idea of
the Bentonville battlefield as a collecting area for all such monuments, is an excellent one. Joining forces with the
Governor on this, a united front, makes sense, too - William Birken
Message
From: Danielle Parini
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:17:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam removal

To keep Silent Sam on campus is a direct insult to our African-American student body, neighbors, friends,
colleagues, and professors in the Carolina community and beyond. This statue has no place on campus and is
not only a disgusting symbol of America's horribly racist past, but is a safety hazard to students and community
members on campus.

The statue should be permanently removed from UNC's campus.

Danielle Parini
Message
From: Charles Mozingo
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:18:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group

Subject: re: Silent Sam

Ms. Folt, you & your group must restore the monument to its pedestal
and start protecting it.

This University, should not, & can not move it., as the 2015 Monument
Protection Bill states.

The University belongs to the people of North Carolina, and


not the the extremists minority of PAID ACTIVISTS.

The Young Men of UNC, who left their studies in 1861/62 and took
up arms against a northern agressor - to fight for North Carolina.

Charles Mozingo
Message
From: Cogan, Elizabeth Sara [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/CN =RE Cl Pl ENTS/CN =F 15 710DE4 73C4F8D8FE253F88E5A42AE-COGAN E]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:21:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam statue

Hello,

The place for confederate status is a museum, not on our campus. It is oppressive, offensive, and disgraceful
to the ideologies that the university publicly claims to ascribe.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Cogan, PhD.


Postdoctoral Trainee
McElligott Lab
Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Message
From: Emily Reisner
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:31:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Future home for Silent Sam

In a sense Silent Sam is a memorial to all the young people lost in war. Suggest the statue be moved to a guiet
part of the old UNC cemetery to be coupled with a modem memorial to all the young people lost in non military
actions such as lynching. Further suggest that the statue be laid on it's side (gun side down) and incorporated
into a planted garden modeled on the picture of Gulliver in Gulliver's Travels where Gulliver is tied down by
the Lilliputians. This changes the context of the statue in a very meaningful way.

An interested citizen of North Carolina


Message
From: Kevin Pierce
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:32:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Quit playing coy, chancellor Folt. You are well aware of the context of the erection of silent Sam at the
height of the racial nadir. Julian Carr's speech makes clear that the statue is a beacon of white
supremacy and an ominous symbol of oppression.
As a veteran of the 82nd airborne and a NC native, I am disgusted that these symbols of hate are allowed
to stand in my home.
what's worse is that your leadership during this issue has been abysmal. You have failed to protect your
students and have allowed armed fascist groups to do harm and promote terror. That is unforgivable. Your
final act before your resignation should be the absolute and final removal of the statue.
We will continue to fight. There is no room for compromise.
Message
From: Schuler, Mary E [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=47C902BBBF024A80BDB649242DC33372-MARY E SCHU]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:38:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Thoughts on Silent Sam

I believe the statue should be placed in a museum like enclosure with the background and history of the statue
presented. This should include the controversy surrounding the statue from both sides. If it is destroyed the history and
how it is a symbol of racism may be lost. I am basing this thought and concept on a memorial park I witness in Budapest
Hungary that truly moved me. Link: https://eru1vikipedia.org/wikf/Memento Park

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Mary Schuler

Mary E. Schuler, Ed.D., R.N., C.N.E.


Statewide AHEC Nursing Liaison
Assistant Professor
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Carrington Hall, CB# 7460
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
REDACTED
meschule@email.unc.edu
Message
From: Ziegler, Christopher Michael [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =8 lc4e36b68ed453bbd3c8fb5554a 1569-Ch ri stopher]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:42:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Leave i t where i t was


Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Chuck Holley
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:43:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent San and other Confederate monuments

Dear chancellor Folt and UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,


silent Sam should be restored to its original location and other Confederate monuments, as well as other
monuments to war dead and veterans, and American historical figures should be not removed or relocated.
We should be using our energy and resources to discuss and address actual problems in our communities and
with our society.
Allowing groups like ANTIFA to damage or destroy historical monuments only encourages more unlawful
actions. Having law enforcement stand down and not enforce law and order is outrageous and in complete
contradiction of their title and reason for existing.
In closing I will simply state that true diversity involves recognizing the op1n1ons of all members of a
commun ity and realizing that even though you may vehemently disagree with an individual or group's
viewpoint, it should be respected if one wants the same courtesy in return.
Sincerely,
Charles E. Holley,DVM

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Trapp, Brenda B. [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=CF2EDC6A82944103936D631067EC023E-BREN DA B. T]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:44:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

It belongs in a history museum which should satisfy anyone wanting to preserve the historical significance.

Sincerely,

Brenda Trapp
Message
From: West, James Christopher [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =94d8ee3621724aed9 lb0e429256856de-Ja mes Chris]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:48:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument put it back up.

The Silent Sam Confederate statue at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill was erected in 1913 in honor of UNC
alumni who died in the Civil War. Now while that part of U.S. history is a black mark on our country and Americans died
on both fronts due to the war there are somethings that should be considered.
After the civil war in 1865 other battles were taking place. The battle between U.S. military troops and Lakota Sioux
Indians at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota on December 29, 1890, resulted in the deaths of 300 Sioux men,
women, and children. The massacre at Wounded Knee was the last major battle of the Indian Wars of the late 19th
century. This is just one example of different injustices during the time frame of the civil war.
Being part First Nation Peoples (As you might say Native American) on my father's side, I ask this question where is the
line drawn. Should the Lakota people demand the removal of Mount Rushmore as the sacred land was stolen? Should
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial be removed? How about the Jefferson Memorial? The list goes on and on. If we start
removing those things that remind us of our history no matter how terrible it may be; no matter how people may feel,
as history has shown we will repeat it.
In conclusion, the monument should stay where it is and history should be taught completely and accurately.

Thank you for allowing me to speak on this matter.

James C. West
Message
From: David Farrow [daf467@nyu.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:55:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Permanent Removal of the Confederate Monument Known as Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,

As an alumnus(' 17) of the University, I was delighted when anti-racist activists tore down the reprehensible
conferate monument known as Silent Sam. The statue was a stain on our campus and actively made the lives of
students of color more difficult.

The confederate monument should never be returned to campus. A reinstallation of the confederate monument
would only embolden white supremexists and neo-nazis, creating a more hostile campus and contributing to the
normalization of racist politics. If the University reinstalls the conferate monument, I will never donate or
support the University again as it will be showing it prioritizes the opinions of bigots over students and the
community.

David Farrow

David Farrow

New York University '19


Masters in Media, Communication, and Culture
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
B.A. in Cultural Studies and Public Policy
Message
From: Eddie
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:56:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The statue is part of history, US history and should be put back up where it was once standing and anyone who
damages it in any way should face charges. If it is a student ofUNC they should be expelled. A small group
should not be allowed to rewrite history to suit them. This isn't a racist thing except they are trying to make it
into one.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Chris Fonville
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:57:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and Monuments In General

st
Being so far removed from the Civil War and now in the 21 century, perhaps the overriding question should be if a
University should have monuments and if so, to whom should they recognize and honor? Depending on one's view
point, I offer three suggestions:

1. It would resolve a lot of issues to go to a "No Memorial Statue" policy. This would eliminate the tangible signs
that generate conflict, such as honoring the segregated South and by association, the myth of the "Lost
Cause." This policy would apply to all monuments, including honoring African Americans (or any minority group)
that toiled on campus or perhaps broke a barrier.

2. If the University feels that we must have monuments, then perhaps the criteria needs to change to honor only
UNC's most esteemed educators. A statue of Bill Friday or Frank Porter Graham would be an ideal replacement
for Silent Sam. If an administrator or educator helped advance equal rights, fine. But the honoree's
contributions needs to be for a long-term body of work to the university. One needs to avoid identifying a single
event such as the first XYZ person to be admitted or for a single accomplishment.

3. If the Silent Sam issue is entrenched as opposed to a broader conversation, then I ask the following, "Why Just
Sam?" UNC alumni and students have fought in all wars, including those who fought for the Union. Perhaps as
part of ROTC and the Curriculum of Peace, War and Defense, the University could establish a special area or
park, to honor ALL students who left to answer the call. Is a Confederate Civil War solider any more brave that
a UNC student that was drafted mid-term for Vietnam? Were enrolled WWII vets that were called for Korea any
less noble? A new park would ironically require additional statuary along with appropriate contextual signage
that could explain the history while honoring all. The names listed in Memorial Hall could be moved to this area.
"UNC's Warriors" - regardless of conflict. This would finally put Silent Sam into its military context and help
remove the continual and I suspect purposeful symbol of aggravation to African American students.

th
I am a native, 9 generation North Carolinian and UNC graduate I can name a great grandfather and several great-
great grandfathers who fought for the Confederacy. None were UNC students or alumni and as such, I do not view
Silent Sam as a tribute to my specific ancestors. In contrast, I suspect that the vast majority of the most vocal "Silent
Sam" enthusiasts and demonstrators have absolutely no connection to the University, be it themselves or their
ancestors.

Thank you,
Wilson Christopher Fonville
UNC 1976
Message
From: May, Stephanie [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=C25508F3BED647F9A23CA03CD217540E-STEPHANIE M]
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:59:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: recommendation for statue

Confederate monuments of NC should be given a new home somewhere else if they should be preserved. Since they
create so much discomfort (understandably!) for folks at universities or other public or state locations, why not give
them a designated home elsewhere? Perhaps an NC outdoor confederate monument museum of sorts where people
can visit and view them safely, but also not be forced to view them if they do not choose to.

Good luck with a peaceful solution!

Stephanie May
Payroll Tax Accountant
Office: REDACTED
Fax: REDACTED
stephrriay@ernail.unc.edu

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::::,f N::{i�::f::ii t·:�:t :f:(..:�:: :�i�!.*:if.:.!!! :�: :Mli:
:,o::.::: · :t :H!A: :ii!:: :�( :t. :H:J :�:.-l
1

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


104 Airport Drive
Suite 3600
Chapel Hill, NC ?..7599-1.260

http://finance.unc.edu/controller/payroll-services/
Message
From: Stephen Uhalley, Jr.
Sent: 9/24/2018 1:59:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam

The statue was unlawfully removed. The hoodlums who committed this crime should be punished accordingly.
The statue should be restored. Any future plans for Silent Sam should be made by due process.

Thank you,

Stephen Uhalley, Jr.,


Message
From: Shauna M Hines [shaunah@clemson .edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:00:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Hello,

I am an alumnus (Class of 2018), and during my time at UNC the Silent Sam had a negative impact on students. I
understand the history and initial intent behind the statue, but the intent no longer matches the desired impact. If the
university wishes to respect the wishes of its students and remind UNC of those who fought/died for their cause, then
resurrecting Silent Sam is not the solution. Instead, I think a permanent/stone podium where students can speak about
whatever topic they feel prevalent would be helpful. Or to continue promoting the arts at UNC a piano with an
overhand/cover should be bolted down for free play.

Please let me know if there is anything else you need!


Thank you,
Shauna Hines

Shauna Hines
M.Ed Candidate
Graduate Assistant
Cooperative Education Program
Clemson University
Message
From: Sam Newell
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:02:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam"

The issue of Confederate iconography is more complex than it appears at first view.

Confederate memorials have currently become a vehicle for special interests to advance a political
agenda. Their meaning has been "hijacked" to gain visibillity for certain groups. Regarding "Silent Sam" it
appears from what I've seen in the media, that the people involved in illegally destroying this monument are not
Chapel Hill students or even of Southern heritage. And, some are claiming that the memorials, in general, were
put up to cower or intimidate African-Americans during the "Jim Crow" years. I do not believe this to be
true. Almost one-third of military aged men from NC who fought, died in the Civil War meaning wives,
daughters, mothers, and sons, etc., lost a loved one and a family breadwinner.They left families whose futures
were terribly damaged by this horrible conflict. By the late 19th Century the remaining veterans were dying off
and these families wanted to honor or memorialize their family members the same way we do today with
Vietnam and WW II memorials. .

North Carolinians did not want war; after initially rejecting a convention to even consider secession, a
convention was finally called and the state voted to seceed because President Lincoln was believed to have
exceeded his Constitutional authority in calling for troops to put down the secessionist movement. In North
Carolina's case at least, preserving slavery was not the motivational issue in secession. Instead it was Lincoln's
decision to use force to stop state voters from exercising their right of self determiniation under the Constitution
as it was then written.

These monuments were erected to our family members who fought in a war they didn't want but supported,
however reluctantly, because their state governments, to which they felt a primary loyalty, told them they were
needed for defence of their homes and families from the horrors of war. And those horrors came in the form of
raids which brought widespread destruction in the form of looting, burning of property, in some cases rape, and
other forms of terrorism. The historical record bears this out plainly.

The memorials deserve to be seen in this broader light, not solely as some claim, a tribute to a horroribie
slavery system, but as a tribute to men who answered their state governments' call to defend their homes from
an invading enemy. Therefore the monuments should stay and deeper explanations as to their meaning need to
be provided. I am not so much concerned about "Silent Sam" as I am concerned about this single perspective
smear campaign against all things Confederate.

Chapel Hill is an educational institution. Be that, and tell the full story of the conflict by keeping Silent Sam
and adding to the story as professional historians, who are qualified to see all facets of the conflict, see fit.

[I think the Chapel Hill History Dept. is too close to the issue to be objective. Please cast a wider net.)
Message
From: Sit, Roger C [/O=EXCHANGE LABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=CFCEOE8EOCF54D75A5D9A4266FC1E3B8-ROGER C SIT]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:03:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBO HF 23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Suggestion from a victim of racism

Bkgd: I am Asian American and I grew up in Mississippi, so I have a lifetime of experience with racism. Asians were even
victims of "legal" racism with the Chinese Exclusion Act that did not get fully reversed until about 1965. My hometown's
(Vicksburg, MS) livelihood is due to Civil War history tourism. The concept of "removing" confederate statues, if applied
to a place like my hometown would lead to the demise of the town and I don't think that's constructive. What works for
my hometown is that there are as many, if not more, Union Soldier (Army) memorials for balance.

Suggestion: Replace Silent Sam and raise a Union Soldier (Army) memorial next to Silent Sam for balance and full
revelation of history. I don't know for sure but I would guess that there were North Carolinians who served in the Union
Army so the idea of a Union soldier memorial would not be wrong.

Respectfully,
--Roger

Roger Sit, Ph.D., CHP


Radiation Safety Officer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Adjunct Faculty UNC Schools of Medicine and Public Health
Adjunct Faculty NCSU School of Engineering
Department of EHS, 1120 Estes Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
REDACTED
Message
From: Hirschey, Rachel [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=A734E93B1A49428298A5E6A1D487E02D-RACH EL HI RS]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:05:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please do not put the monument back on campus property.
Message
From: Lauren Fine
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:07:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Folt and Board of Trustees,

As a former employee at UNC, it is of grave importance to me that Silent Sam not be put back up. The students
and community have spoken countless times and in countless ways to make it clear that Silent Sam is a
detriment to the campus community. It is the job of administration to make UNC a safe and productive place of
learning and to be an example to the surrounding community and the world of how to create inclusive anti-racist
spaces. So far, UNC has failed to do that.

In this moment, the community is holding their breath waiting to see what action you will take. What an
opportunity to be that example, especially because UNC has fallen so short of supporting students of color so
far. This could be a moment we all look back on with greater shame or it could be a moment we recognize as a
shift in the campus climate. It could be a moment when the students finally feel seen by the administration. I
urge you to take this opportunity to be on the right side of history.

As for what happens to the statue itself, I don't think it's of much importance. If you decide to put it in a
museum, fine. If you decide to put it in storage, fine. What should be of greater concern to you is how you will
support students going forward. Will you leave them to heal alone? Or will you provide resources for students
to heal together as a campus community from the violent arrests that took place and from the constant physical
reminder of white supremacy that was on this campus for so long? Will you give them a platform to voice their
concerns in the future? Will you listen?

Support students, not a statue.

With urgency,
Lauren

Lauren Fine
Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Message
From: Darwin Roseman
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:13:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern:

Silent Sam is a historical memorial and is protected by state law. This


accumulation of comments is a waste of time and a delaying action. The
LAW is the LAW. Silent Sam should be placed back at its original
position on UNC campus. I cannot believe that this university has no
longer become the people's university but a university of violent activists
and anarchists bent on breaking the LAW and getting away from it.

I sure hope cooler and more historical heads prevail over this matter. It is a
memorial to honor UNC students who fought for the Confederacy and it is
not a memorial to white supremacy. As a native North Carolinian, I am
proud of this memorial even though I am not a UNC graduate. It is history
and you cannot rewrite history to make a person feel better.

Please uphold the LAW. You have no other choice.

Thank you for your time.

Darwin Roseman
Holly Springs, NC
Message
From: Kannappan, Shei la [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=1A13 7649A37 A488E85CFBA0F206A6656-SH EILA KANN]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:20:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: rep lacement for Confederate monument

Building on the idea that the Confederate monument does not belong "at the front door of a safe, welcoming,
proudly public research university," I would like to suggest what should greet our visitors instead. I vote for a
statue of Dean Smith, a true hero who represents the best of what unites Carolina. For 36 years, Coach Smith
stood for academic as well as athletic excellence at UNC, and was an exemplar of ethical leadership in college
sports and the wider world. As an early leader in promoting equal opportunity for African Americans, he
perfectly represents the proud and welcoming values of our public university.

- Sheila Kannappan, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy


Message
From: Perry Childers
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:26:47 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

The Boy Soldier/ Silent Sammy memorial should be placed back just as he was standing for nearly 100 years!
Thanks
Message
From: Kannappan, Shei la [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=1A13 7649A37 A488E85CFBA0F206A6656-SH EILA KANN]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:26:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: where to put the Confederate monument

It seems to me that the location that would strike the best compromise between allowing some people to
venerate and honor the Confederate dead while allowing others to place these soldiers and their outdated
values firmly behind us is a graveyard. I am not familiar with all the cemeteries on or off campus to be able to
recommend a specific one.

- Sheila Kannappan, Associate Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy


Message
From: Horace Ledford
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:36:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Follow the dictates of the N.C.law concerning monuments that celebrate those that went to defend N.C. against
an unlawful invader.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Jeff Bowley
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:43:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Carolina:
Place Silent Sam in the Wilson Library (maybe in the Southern Historical Collection section). After all, a
library is a central repository for controversial ideas ..

Sincerely,
Jeff Bowley
Carolina '89
Message
From: Seymour Phillips
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:50:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Dear Counselor,

I hope Anarchy does not rule over the law and the majority of people of this great state of North Carolina. I
hope Slint Sam can be put back up where he belongs. And recognized for the time and era and the values for the
noble students that fault the aggression that was wrecking all inhabitants of the South.
Message
From: Bob Andrews
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:51:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Memorial "S ilent Sam"

We the people will not be satisfied until Sam is put back as he was. If this is not carried out In an already stated
reasonable time, we the people will be forced into taking legal action.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:52:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam
Attachments: IMG_1400.jpg; ATTOOOOl.txt

I am a parent of a current student. I loved the statue and thought it was representative of our nation's
history which as we all know is not perfect. I live in and recently saw a monument in the square
in Santa Fe built with a etched narrative to honor the men who fought as "rebels" and against the
"savage" Indians. Now we would all agree those characterizations and terms are not politically correct
for the times in which we live. But I thought the plaque below on the back of the monument did a good job
of putting the message and the monument in its proper historical perspective. Maybe something similar
could be placed on the silent Sam monument so that we can learn from rather than hide our history?
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Jeremiah Rosen
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:53:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt and Board of Governors,

I am writing to implore you not to return Silent Sam to its original spot on campus. The public opinion about the
statue has been loud and decisive. For too long, the UNC administration has ignored students who articulated
how seeing that statue displayed so prominently on campus made them feel unwelcome at their own university.
Displaying a statue with such a damning history of despicable racism and violence sends the message to black
students that the university doesn't take them or their concerns seriously. Have you ever worried about the
damage you are causing by forcing students look into the face of that statue that embodies all the evils of white
supremacy on their own campus? Universities are supposed to be homes away from home for students and that's
impossible when the university prioritizes the wellbeing of a statue over its students. This is not a call to "forget
history" the way some have twisted this viewpoint. I think it's entirely necessary to remember and study our
history, but that doesn't mean it needs to be proudly displayed at the front of campus for all to see. There's a
difference between study and remembrance and glorification, which is what this stature is; a revision to history
that was erected during a period of civil change, well after the civil war, meant to intimidate black people from
exercising their rights. In case you have forgotten, this is a text from the dedication of Silent Sam;

"One hundred yards from where we stand, less than ninety days perhaps after my return from
Appomattox, I horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds, because upon the streets
of this quiet village she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady, and then rushed for
protection to these University buildings where was stationed a garrison of 100 Federal soldiers. I
performed the pleasing duty in the immediate presence of the entire garrison, and for thirty nights
afterwards slept with a double-barrel shot gun under my head."

This is what you are tacitly endorsing by keeping this statue up. I beg that you listen to your students and your
community and consider their thoughts and fears and choose not to put Silent Sam back up.

Thank you,

Jeremiah Rosen
Message
From: Reid Rhodes [rrhodes@jharm.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:56:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he WAS and SHOULD be. Reid J. Rhodes Class of 76. Thanks for asking.

RR hodes@jharmcom
Office -REDACTED
Direct----REDACTED

Fax---- REDACTED

John Hackney Agency of Rocky \if ounc, Inc.


950 Country Chi b Road
PO Box7807
Rocky Mount, NC 2/804

www.JHARM.com

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Message
From: Lew Brown
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:56:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam
Attachments: Silent Sam .docx

Please see attached.

Lew G. Brown
Silent Sam

Let me begin with a full disclosure: I am a white male southerner, born in Newport
News, who lived briefly with my family in Savannah, but really "grew up" in Charlotte. I
entered UNC in 1964 completing a degree in political science and then a master's in public
administration. I later returned to earn an MBA and a Ph.D. in Marketing. I have lived in
Chapel Hill since 1983.

My avocation is photography. I frequently go on campus to take photos. Early on a


January morning in 2013, I went to campus to take some photos after there had been a light
snow. The snow produced a low-lying fog on campus that added some drama, and I took the
photo above. I liked the photo and showed it to some friends who noted the growing controversy
over the statue and what some believed it stood for.

Despite having walked by Silent Sam probably thousands of time as a student and Chapel
Hill resident, I had never really thought about the different perceptions and feelings it motivated.
I knew its history, but it was just one of those things that has always been there. I had not been
aware of the controversy.

The ensuing discussions reminded me of the moment that I realized what racism is and
the moment I decided I would not be racist. I was riding in a car with several other members of
my high school track team as we returned from a meet. We were driving along Charlotte's
Wilkinson Boulevard when I saw an African American teenager just walking along the sidewalk.
I yelled the "N" word out the window as we passed by. Perhaps I was responding to the growing
controversy over desegregation, but I had no reason to yell that word. I sat back in my seat as if
someone had slapped me. It was my conscience asking me what in the world I had just done?
That young man had done nothing to me. What right did I have to yell such a thing? How
would I feel if the situation were reversed? I guess I was reminding myself of the Golden Rule.

I thought about this incident as I have considered the issue of Silent Sam's presence on
the UNC campus. The statue was dedicated in 1913, almost 50 years AFTER the war's
conclusion. Why would we erect a statue memorializing a war whose intent was to destroy our
union and our government and to ensure the continuation of slavery? Why would we celebrate a
war that resulted in about 620,000 deaths - almost half of the total number of soldiers' deaths in
All wars in U.S. hi story. Approximate 51,000 soldiers died in just three days at Gettysburg -
about the same number who died in the years' long Vietnam War. Apparently, many such
statues and memorials were erected in this time - a time when we were pursuing Jim Crow and
separate-but-equal approaches and denying the humanity and equality of many American
citizens. I am old enough to remember African Americans having to sit only in theaters'
balconies and to drink only from "colored" water fountains. Why would we be surprised that
African Americans and others would be bothered by such a statue?

This brings me back to the photograph. Silent Sam seems to be emerging from the fog.
The lights along the brick paths behind the statue are there to help pedestrians see their path in
the darkness and fog. Those who question this statue and others like it are encouraging us,
finally, to emerge from the fog of the Civil War. Perhaps they are illuminating our way forward
- forward to a "more perfect union" where all citizens are created and treated equally, "based on
the content of their character, not the color of their skin."

This statue does not belong anywhere on the UNC campus, especially at its front door.
There are plenty of books, movies, cemeteries, and museums to educate us about the Civil War.
We can learn from our past and move forward as Americans, together.

LewG. Brown
Message
From: Don Carson
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:59:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It's a shame for administration to bow down to a few. Needs to be put back where it was. I'm a '71
graduate and long time Big Ram with seats in footba ll and basketball. If they move silent Sam and rename
buildings, I'm through.
Don Carson
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Mary Stevens
Sent: 9/24/2018 2:59:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: RETURN SILENT SAM

RETURN silent Sam to his original positionl. Place him on a taller pedestal to keep the Communists
away!!!
Thanks.
Mary Stevens
Message
From: sshehdan
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:01:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please Move Silent Sam

Please move Silent Sam to a more appropriate place. If it is necessary to honor any war activity, erect a statue
honoring all people who died in ANY conflict, not just those who died fighting to preserve white privilege &
slavery.

Sharon Shehdan
Message
From: Joseph Levin-Manning
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:01:47 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam needs to stay gone

To whom it may concern:

I find it deplorable that the university administration left the statue of as long as it did, even after the governor
gave person to take it down. If it is replaced, I will never make a donation to Carolina again.

I was a student on campus when Eve Carson was Student Body President and this it is dishonest to talk about
the "Carolina Way" and try to have a discussion about how Silent Sam could even possibly be replaced.

As a gay, black, Jewish student, now alumnus, of Carolina, it was troubling to see Confederate statues and
buildings named after KKK members. Being on campus and seeing the names of people who want to kill me for
each identity that I possess caused a lot of distress throughout my studies and compounded the stress that I felt
at home already for being gay. If it had not been for the staff on campus who supported through those difficult
times, I'm not sure how I would have survived.

I urge and beg the administration to end this depravity and uphold the true spirit of Carolina.

Joseph Levin-Manning, '11


Former Speaker Student Congress
Message
From: D. Krotoszynski
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:07:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocation of Confederate Memorial (Silent Sam) on UNC Campus Grounds

To Whom it may concern,

While the University must recognize and acknowledge its history, the roles played by institution and
student body during the U.S. Civil War, the University should not attempt to forget, nor rewrite said
roles and with this in mind, I suggest the University of North Carolina Confederate Memorial, better
known as Silent Sam, be maintained and relocated to the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery on campus.

I am sure that as a premier institution of higher education, the University of North Carolina - Chapel
Hill, shall make this a learning moment - a teachable exercise.

David Krotoszynski
Class '94
Message
From: John Prince
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:08:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Proposal for Silent Sam statue resolution

I think that a long hallway/exhibit that contextualizes the whole UNC history of race relations from employing
slaves/excluding Black students, through the NC part in the Civil War, the Jim Crow era, Civil Rights
movement on campus and integration, to today with many races participating and the changing perception of
the Confederacy and the statue. I think the statue would be among the various exhibits but not central to the
experience. I would hope the focus would be on a progressive evolution in thinking about the subject and
treatment of people in a more humane and just way. Also, the scale of the exhibit should be large enough to tell
the story well but not so large that the potential for large scale demonstrations is reduced.

Thank you.

John Prince
Message
From: tom terriffic
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:09:53 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he has been standing for all these years. Lock all the vandals and rioters up and make the
charges stick. Or my taxpayer money should not go to fund UNC. You people are letting kids tell you what to
do, like the prisons are being run by the prisoner's. Need a change of leadership if you ask me.
Message
From: Flick, Jodi [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =b90d043bfa0946539c78683cca6a284f-Jod i Fli ck]
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:10:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: remove the statue to a museum

To me, the situation with Silent Sam placed on our campus seems analogous to having statues in Germany celebrating
the sacrifices of those who fought for the Nazi party during the war. Anyone who was a descendant of those soldiers
might feel that there sacrifices deserved recognition, despite the underlying cause for which they fought. But those
whose relatives were persecuted, tortured or killed would undoubtedly resent walking by such a monument every day. I
don't understand why people cannot see the similarity between those two situations: young men, often drafted but
sometimes volunteering to fight for their country, whose victims do not see their cause as noble in any way.

Yes, I see the beauty in the art itself, so I do not think it should be destroyed. But I think the monument should be put
into a museum with explanatory signage, in a place where those who want to see it may do so, but which does not
require the rest of us to have to look at it.
Message
From: Eric Dimarzio i
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:10:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Alumnus Regarding Si lent Sam

I am a proud member of the 2011 graduating class of UNC. I love our University and the values it represents.
That is why I believe Silent Sam does not belong on our campus. I have read the dedication speech, and its
intention is unmistakable. To honor those who fought to defend slavery and preserve the inferiority of non-
whites in the South. To honor this statue is to admit that these sentiments still exist in our culture and at our
school. We have a memorial and Memorial Hall itself to honor our fallen Tar Heels, and the tragic loss of
students during the Civil War should not be forgotten nor left unmourned. However, Silent Sam is and has
always been a symbol of racism and bigotry. Please, do what is right and never return the statue to our proud
campus.

C , 0 "JU ,
&"ttt Vfrncwyw
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C/0 2011

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i~ltE :-.-\:-.,:\\:·v,ri ~ pt:r;;:~d nt: i::~.d .'.X9/cn-~~~/C)nt: :~t~. r::x?D'.~~LthES:L::§2ZI~~ .: •~s,:~\~ ::('. :~~:< n· ' ·: :-~ -''.'
Message
From: William Richardson
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:12:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and the Law

The only course for the University of North Carolina to take is to abide by the law. This nation was
built on abiding by the laws, this nation is a nation of laws. Silent Sam is to be replaced on the
location that it stood on before ILLEGALLY being removed. If you and the University believe in, and
support mob rule, then you must understand and accept that mob rule runs both ways. take a
moment and allow that to sink in. Under the current law, you have no authority to relocate Silent Sam .
The only authority you have is to abide by the law.

The University belongs to ALL the people of North Carolina, not a small minority of unlawful
vigilantes, that you pander to. By not taking firm action, and abiding by the laws of North Carolina,
you and the University of North Carolina will only embolden criminal acts by criminals, and will also
yourself become viewed as a University that supports and breeds criminals and criminal activity. The
time is NOW that you and the University of North Carolina must step up and abide by the laws of
North Carolina, or forever be a part of the problem that plagues this nation.

William Richardson
Message
From: Kerry Traynum [kerry@alexanderricks.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:21:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To Whom It May Concern:

I am a 2004 graduate of the UNC School of Law. Silent Sam should remain down and the pedestal should be
removed. The only mention of Silent Sam should be some sort of memorial put in its former place of honor that
commemorates its removal by peaceful protesters who had the moral courage to do what those in leadership positions
refused to do. Silent Sam commemorated soldiers who fought for a country that seceded from the USA in order to keep
black slaves in bondage. We are now over 150 years removed from that conflict. African Americans still suffer from the
effects of slavery even today, yet they are North Carolinians and valuable members of the community and the
university. To honor any soldiers that fought for a cause to keep them slaves, whether intentional or not, is a
disgrace. Enough deference has been given the Confederacy in the 150 years since it lost the Civil War. It is time to give
deference to the causes it fought against. There is no honor in Silent Sam. If people desire to honor soldiers in their
family, let them do it on their own time. I grew up in a small town in SC and there were many African Americans with
the same, uncommon, Scot-Irish name as me. I know what that means, and I cannot fathom ever wanting to honor that
ancestor no matter his intentions or well meaning. I will never give another dollar to or attend another event at UNC
until this issue is resolved

Regards,

Kerry Traynum

Kerry L. Traynum

Alexander Ricks PLLC


4601 Park Road, Suite 580
Charlotte, North Carolina 28209
REDACTED-Direct

REDACTED-Fax
Licensed in North Carolina and South Carolina

kerry@alexanderricks.com
www.alexanderricks.com
Message
From: Kristopher Nordstrom
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:21:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Location

Silent Sam is garbage. Please recycle or send to a landfill as appropriate.

Thanks,
Kristopher Nordstrom
Message
From: Chris Faulkenberry
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:27:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Since the statue has come down, it seems like a good time to call its era to a close. I would suggest moving it to
a museum or cemetery, as it is a memorial to the dead, and replacing it with something that better represents the
future of UNC. To return the statue to its place would be a slap in the face of students of color and others who
feel threatened by the white supremacy that drove the Confederacy and still smolders today.
Message
From: Robert Henry Ricks Camp 75
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:30:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Folt,

Regarding Silent Sam please keep in mind the University itself belongs to the people of North Carolina and not
a group that seems to extreme.
Many people hold dear that memorial.. .just think of all those young men who gave up their education to go fight
in a terrible war and never return. Some their families lived the rest of their lives not knowing what happened to
them, where they might be buried, etc. Can you imagine the heartbreak of a mother, a wife or a child?
Those like myself that admire such bravery and self sacrifice wish no harm on anyone who may think
contrary ... we simply want to be left alone.
This is history and nothing anyone can do will change that.
The only option under law is to restore the monument and protect it.
I thank you for reading my email and hope you have a wonderful day!

Craig Bone
Commander
Sons of Confederate Veterans
Robert Henry Ricks Camp 75
Rocky Mount NC

WITH FEW, WE ACCOMPLISH MUCH


Message
From: Missy Bizzaro
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:34:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument

Display it in/ in front of your history department building with a plaque that explains the detailed history of the
piece including it current status and include another statue or piece of art next to it that exemplifies the modern
student or the minority student or minority leader of the college that deserves recognition. - Missy
Message
From: Davis, Howard Todd [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =62085555b95a493d b46604c44 77f2655-H owa rd Todd]
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:35:52 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

I think it should be placed inside Morehead planetarium , in the Rotunda


Message
From: Elizabeth Hays.
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:39:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear UNC Board of Trustees and Chancellor Folt,

It is true that we are living in difficult times in North Carolina and in our country. There is no doubt that our collective
history is painful. It is also true that we cannot go back and change the past. But we can make just and honorable
decisions about our future . Silent Sam and other Confederate monuments have no place in civil American society and
absolutely no place of celebratory honor in our public institutions of higher education . Please do not return Silent Sam to
the prominence on the UNC campus where it had been. To do so would be a symbolic endorsement to all that the statue
represents and would be toxic for UNC, Orange County, Chapel Hill, and to all of North Carolina . Please embrace a
healthy future and do NOT return Silent Sam!

Respectfully,

Elizabeth Hays
Hillsborough, NC
Message
From: R. N. Ferguson
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:44:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keeping the memorial
Attachments: rnfergus.vcf

Just because some want to take the value of the Silent Sam statue as a direct insult does not mean these few
have the right to impose their views on the rest of us.

This statue memorializes those North Carolina boys who were inducted into a war between Lincoln and his own
people, a civil war about saving the Union, albeit in a very divisive way. The war was a bad idea and thousands
of North Carolinians were killed over this spat.

The War between the States was less about slavery than it was about control. In fact, New York City itself had
more slaves than any southern city except Charleston. So why the distinction? Why was it labeled a war to end
slavery? As Henry Ford said, "History by and large is BUNK."

These young men, killed in their prime, deserve to be remembered.

Silent Sam should remain on the UNC campus. Where? In its original place. The radicals who object should be
educated, something that has not been done adequately.

RN Ferguson, UNC 2005


null
Message
From: Mark Sfeir
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:46:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and other confederate statues

I can't think of any place other than a Civil War museum where a confederate monument could be placed and
received as an object of purely historical interest rather than as a continuing monument to white supremacy and
the Confederacy. Even in our museums it is important to place Confederate monuments-with descriptive
annotations of their origins-in a narrative of the great moral failure of slavery rather than enshrine them with
placards of praise, as Silent Sam previously was on UNC's campus.

Furthermore, in view of Chancellor Folt and the Board of Governors' failure to right this historic wrong, even as
most all but Confederate sympathizers determined that the status quo could not rightly remain, and many of
your own students voiced their fears resulting from the statue's presence, Chancellor Folt should resign.

Writing as a concerned member of the public and frequent visitor of the UNC campus,
Mark Sfeir
Message
From: Julius Weiss
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:54:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam to Museum

Hello,

I am a member of the Class of 1995, a son whose mom and grandmother were Daughters of the Confederacy
members, and a product of the NC public school system. My education was steeped in the Confederacy, all the
way through John Shelton Reed's courses. Silent Sam needs to stay off the campus for the sake of all the
students who find the celebration of the Lost Cause abhorrent. Move it to a museum in Raleigh or a section of
the campus museum that makes sense, but it is not art, it is a commemoration of insurrection. But you all know
this, unfortunately the rednecks are in charge so what the hell am I writing you for other than to scream into the
wind.

Best,

Julius Weiss
Class of 1995
Religious Studies
Message
From: Justin Trushell
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:54:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Donate Silent Sam to a museum.


Message
From: Glenn Hennessee
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:56:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I suggest that the statue of silent Sam be placed in the Alumni building since it was created to
acknowledge the sacrifice of the alumni.
Message
From: Frank Johnson
Sent: 9/24/2018 3:58:51 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put it back in its original location! ! !


Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Farsi de
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:00:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Statue

It is a shame to let a few "protesters" dictate how North Carolinians live. Some of the "protesters" are
NOT even students at our fine university. Some of the students protesting our heritage are not even
assigned to the school system .. . yet, they are the ones seemingly in charge of how we deal with a
North Carolina issue.

And, now we have faculty/staff slow-poking the remounting the "Silent Sam" statue to its original
pedestal. We were told, by law, the statue must be remounted within 90 days. But. .. the school
system is telling us a decision will be made within 90 days. The police were told to stand down and
while the students were busy destroying property belonging to the People of North Carolina and the
police should department and its leadership should be thoroughly investigated for allowing the
destruction of property belonging to the citizens of North Carolina.

So, what's next for the school? Buildings being renamed, statues torn down, rename anything that
could be associated with "slavery" in hopes of appeasing a few thin skinned "terroristic" protesters.
How long before the title "Tarheels" has to go??? History has taught us the moniker "Tarheel" came
from our Civil War past. The university newspaper proudly took the name, so does that go as well?
Do we let outsiders dictate our daily lives from now own?

Maybe, it is time for some of you to rub a little tar on your heels and stand up to those that want to
destroy and remake North Carolina. I for one say ... Put Sam back in his place of honor.
Message
From: Jonathan Holland
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:02:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument

Dear Sirs

I do not believe it is appropriate to maintain a statue honoring an avowed white supremacist. Why not replace the
statue with someone who fought against slavery and/or for civil rights. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely Jonathan Holland


Message
From: David Abuin [dsabuin@ncsu .edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:07:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam idea

To whom it may concern:

The Silent Sam statue should go to a museum or a Civil War battlefield.

Sincerely,
David Abuin
Message
From: Jan Marable
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:11:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for Silent Sam issue

As an alumnus of UNC, I would like to see The silent Sam Statue replaced at its location on Franklin
Street, BUT TO THAT AREA, I would like to see additional monuments built to honor alumni who have helped
to achieve our university's progress in civil rights through the decades and centuries.
That way, we can still review history, reflect and learn from it, honor our high achievers past and
present, and set our sights on the future.
Jan Marable
UNC BSN 1987
Sent from Jan's iPhone
Message
From: Dustin Sloop
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:14:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Smelt the statue or use it as part of an artificial reef off the North Carolina coast
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:16:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_comon]

I suggest you put silent sam back up and rededicate it to all soldiers who died in the civil war

This message was sent from a student email account at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools. All
mail correspondence to and from Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School students is subject to monitoring
by district administrators and may result in disclosure to law enforcement.
Message
From: mitchel l hawks
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:17:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The best place to put it is right back where it was, with the guilty parties footing the bill, as a message
against lawlessness and destruction. Then, talk about relocating it, if that's the general consensus.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: L.F . Eason
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:22:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: jswaine@sitinmovement.org
Subject: Placement of Silent Sam

Thank you for establishing this email address for suggestions. I was born in Chapel Hill and am a lifelong resident of
North Carolina. Returning to Chapel Hill in my teen years, I am a 1974 graduate of the University. My dad was a 1954
graduate. We both felt very protective of Silent Sam until we heard its shameful history. I actually found the copy of
Governor Kerr's notes from the day online in the Wilson Library. I do fault the University for not teaching students about
this horrific piece of the University's history, but of course, there are buildings carrying a similar guilty association in
th
their names across the UNC system campuses. My dad passed away June 5 of this year, but he and I had the
opportunity to discuss what we felt was appropriate for the Jim Crow era monuments, especially Silent Sam, on several
occasions before he passed. We were in agreement.

I feel the logical location for Silent Sam and other Jim Crow era Civil War statues would be the International Civil Rights
Center & Museum, 134 South Elm Street, Greensboro, NC 27401, (336) 274-9199.

I had the honor of sitting with Mr. John Swaine at an ACLU awards banquet a few years back. Since I am volunteering the
Civil Rights museum, I am also copying him on this email!

Regardless of their place in the attempts to impede the progress of the civil rights movement, obviously these statues
are large and a logistical problem. They could also pose a security issue. Mr. Swaine will know what the museum has the
capacity to display at the current time. Since the museum is an archival repository as well, it might be they could be put
monuments into storage until the NC General Assembly could fund an expansion (possibly a memorial garden to those
who lost in the civil rights movement and Jim Crow mentality).

Thank you again for the opportunity to comment. Mr. Swaine, I hope I have not volunteered the museum out of turn,
but I do really appreciate the history you are working to preserve. I do think these monuments to Jim Crow are an
important piece of that history that need to be known for the true role they played.

If

L.F. Eason
Message
From: Miranda Day
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:23:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Literal Statue Commemorating Slavery

I was recruited in high school to go to UNC Chapel Hill. I didn't go specifically because of things like this
statue.

- Miranda Day
Message
From: Jeremy Quattlebaum
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:26:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Melt it down

Melt the statue down and replace the statue with one dedicated to Civil Rights leaders from the UNC
community.
Message
From: Bob Lynch
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:31:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I have been a resident of Chapel Hill for 20 years. Please put Silent Sam back where he was standing- the exact same spot. I have
walked by the statue many times with my children when they were growing up. We discussed its history and the context of the War
Between The States, slavery, and many other issues around the statue. We cannot erase the past but we certainly can learn from it so
not to repeat it. Silent Sam belongs back where he was so we do NOT repeat our past.

Thank you,
Bob Lynch
Chapel Hill, NC
Message
From: Barbara Hatcher
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:37:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

The entire monument including the pedestal belongs in a military cemetery. That is where it should have
been pl aced years ago.
Thanks for the chance to give input.

Barbara Hatcher
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: tmay8920
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:43:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

I think Silent Sam should be put back in its proper place. It's to honor the UNC family that went and fought in
the war. Moving it would only disgrace those UNC family members. Also putting it back myself and others that
might want to visit it can do so easier than if moved to a library or building on campus. I know we will not be
allowed to go to library and visit. Plus latest polls say majority wants monuments left alone. So please put Silent
Sam back up and honor the UNC family

Sent from my Samsung smartphone.


Message
From: Cheryl Ann Walkup
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:43:47 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The Silent Sam memorial should be reinstalled where he previously stood. He is a memorial to the brave sons
of UNC. You are destroying a part of UN C's history! A history that you may not agree with, but it is still
history!

Thank you,
Cheryl Ann Walkup
Message
From: beverlyflynn
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:43:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam, needs to be put back where he has stood all along!! It would Bea disgrace to silent sam and the solider that he
represents!!!
#LEA VE SILENTSAM WHERE HE HAS STOOD FOR MANY YEARS!!! !@@@@mmmm
Sent.from my Boost Mobile Phone.
Message
From: Tennyson, Sydney Alexandra [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =fb3d2415c2aa4dc4a lcd9778117d9a26-Sydney Alex]
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:49:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: silent sam ideas from BOV members
Attachments: silent sam ideas from BOV members.docx

Attached are the compiled list of ideas we received from the Board of Visitors members.

Sydney Tennyson

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Office of University Development
208 W. Franklin Street
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
P REDACTED E svdneyte(01unc.edu

�h:r
CAMPAh'.iM
f�r
CAIH)UNA

C,\_M_I" I\ IG_!'J. U\IC .[[) u


• Leave historical monument where it is but provide historical context for the monument with
other monuments and place an iron fence around all monuments. For instance, there are lots of
African -Americans who fought in the war that could be honored.
• North Carolina Museum of History- relocate and remove pedestal
• Ackland Museum- including contextual exhibit on the Civil War
• Archives in the Southern History Collection
• Wilson Library
• Morehead Planetarium
• Offsite State Museum
• Campus Museum or Library
• Stored in the basement of a museum, it should not be publicly displayed
• In a Museum
• Return statue to location for 6 months to obey the laws, then move to Wilson library
• Davis Library, Southern Historical Collection
Message
From: Leobino, David I _
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:51:09 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
CC: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Case for Silent Sam

Chancellor Falt,

Good afternoon Ma'am. I felt moved to write to you this afternoon regarding a controversial matter that has
tugged at my heart lately. I have to admit that I was not aware of the article in the Daily Tar Heel asking for
our opinion regarding this matter.

One of the most important things we as a society should do is to remember. Silent Sam tries reminds us
to honor those who fought for the South; much like we do today for those during World War I & II, and other
recent wars. I can relate to that as a veteran with combat experience. The difference here is that he
resembles those who fought for what Confederate States stood for in those days. Yes, I agree that he may
represent a one-sided view of the whole story that may be offensive to some. But every story has differing
views deriving from differing perspectives that we can learn from.

But however offensive, we need to be able to not only see the whole story but also the parts of the
whole. When examined, the parts of the whole can help us to see the whole more carefully and thus can
enrich our learning experience. We need to see and experience what The Civil War and what our nation
looked like at that time, however horrid. That period was a milestone that contributed to our development as
a nation. For this reason, there is no institution other than The University of North Carolina that can tell that
story.

A story of how we have gradually grown and emerged as a nation to respect the rights of others and our racial
differences. He represents a watershed moment for the United States and we should honor that by loving one
another and treating each other with respect.

Silent Sam answers the question of how we got to this point in time to begin with. He is one of the
corner pieces of our American Puzzle. Without him, we risk forgetting to treat others without prejudice,
hate, racism, greed, and selfishness. Silent Sam should be re-installed on campus. And because he represents
a veteran of the South, he should be transferred to the ROTC Building where he can best tell the story of what
it was like to be a Soldier fighting for the cause of the South.

Sincerely Yours,

David Leobino
SFC, U.S. Army (RET)
UNC-CH Alumnus 04-09 (part-time student)
Message
From: Roger Williams
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:52:39 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The Silent Sam monument should be put back where it was unlawfully removed from. This statue like the
many others has hurt nobody and is a part of history. The University receives money from all the taxpayers of
North Carolina and a small group of people that do not think they have to obey laws removed it and it should be
put back where it was right away and the University should insist that the people responsible for tearing it down
are punished to the full extent of the law. As an educational facility, you should make an example of people
that do not follow the laws of our state and nation. Please begin to teach the true history of the Civil War as
well. That war was fought for states rights and not just over slavery. The Southern history is history, not
hate. Be a responsible example to the people of North Carolina and put Silent Sam back where he
belongs. Roger D. Williams Graham, NC
Message
From: Don
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:54:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

silent Sam is a memorial to deceased UNC students and faculty that died in a war. It's essentially a
tombstone. Put him back where he was and stop having a knee jerk reaction to the politics of the day.
show some spine and stop letting bored 19 year olds dictate policy.
Message
From: Levon Martin
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:54:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The statue needs to be put back where it was. It has stood for over 100 years and should have been protected by the
University. It is an absolute disgrace that the University stood by and watch it being vandalized and then pulled down.
Any student, faculty or staff member who participated in or stood by and watched this disgraceful action should be
expelled or discharged and not permitted back on campus. If the law enforcement officers were told not to interfere
then the head of the respective police departments and their superiors up to and including the Chancellor and/or
Mayor/City manager. There is no place for this type of destruction of property in North Carolina.

Levon Martin
Message
From: Michael May
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:58:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please restore the stature exactly like it was. We cannot allow mob rule - we must protect and follow our laws.

Respectfully - Michael May

"Make a Commitment to Making a Difference"


Message
From: Kris Morley-Nikfar
Sent: 9/24/2018 4:59:57 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggested location for Silent Sam

Hi there,

I just read the article in the News and Observer about this opportunity to submit recommendations for a new
location for the Silent Sam Statue. As a significant part of North Carolina History, the Civil War, and the racism
that fueled its efforts shouldn't be forgotten. That being said, public statues should be dedicated to heros. And to
me, a hero isn't someone who fights to keep a group of people enslaved, for any reason at all. So I recommend
placing Silent Sam in the NC History Museum. They have an exhibit called "A call to arms" where it might fit.
But they really should have an exhibit on how racism played a part in the state's history and how the struggle for
equality for multiple groups of people continues. Just my two cents. Thank you for listening.

Kris
Message
From: Clay Johanson
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:01:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Location

I can't speak for anyone else, but if you don't restore Silent Sam to the position he's occupied for his entire history, then
I for one will no longer support UNC-CH athletics in ANY way -- I am a lifelong Tar Heel fan, but I will cease and never pull
for Carolina ever again if Silent Sam isn't put back exactly where he was.

Sincerely,
Clay Johanson (Charlotte, NC)
Message
From: Lane Somers
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:02:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

There is no room for suggestions. He needs to be put back up where he previously stood. No question. If he is
moved to a "alternate location" he will be pushed into teaching a history that he does NOT represent. Silent Sam
is to remember the sons ofUNC that fought honorably. The lives lost and the sacrifices made. He is UNC
history, He is North Carolina history, He is Southern history, He is our history. Remember, to get respect, you
have to earn it. Understand moving Silent Sam is unlawful and does not represent the speech of one man , but
the lives of over 1000. Every poll ever done in our state has proven that 2/3 of the state does not approve of
removal of any monument. The socialist views in Chapel Hill do not reflect the views of our state as a whole.
Silent Sam is our monument and history.
Message
From: Alec Rebello
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:05:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to move Silent Sam

silent Sam shou l d be moved to the inside of a building away from the public.
Message
From: Debbie Carraway
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:07:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Contextualize Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Holt:

Silent Sam is divisive and offensive largely because it is presented as a symbol worthy of honor while
representing a gruesome, violent and oppressive past whose effects persist today.

However, there are people for whom the statue represents something entirely different than its history. They
do not seem to understand or appreciate the historical facts or context of the Confederacy. For them, it
represents a link to family and a sense of pride in their identity and cultural experience, and it feels offensive
for them to be, in their view, erased.

As a public school student in North Carolina in the 1970s and 1980s, I was taught that slavery wasn't so bad:
slaves had food and shelter and work and were brought to the true religion, Christianity. I was brought up in a
culture where Confederate flags were seen as harmless symbols of our tribal identity as (white) Southerners.
The Confederate flag was an image infused with humor as it decorated the General Lee on one of my favorite
childhood shows, Dukes of Hazzard. I even referred to myself as "Deb the Reb" when I was a child, oblivious to
the suffering and brutality that the rebellion was determined to continue and the carelessness with which I
treated one of the most vicious institutions ever to plague this country. I knew vaguely about the Klan and
burning crosses, but did not have a visceral knowledge of what white supremacist terrorism is about or what
the lived experiences of its victims are. My understanding was merely abstract.

My peers told me that the Civil War was about "states rights" but never mentioned that the "rights" they
referred to were the "rights" to continue the institution of slavery. It is only in my adulthood that I have
learned about the realities of that era and the enduring repercussions of white supremacy that shape the lived
experiences of African Americans and other people of color in the present day.

I suggest that whatever the disposition of the statue, it would be a tragedy not to use it as an opportunity to
educate the people of North Carolina about the truths of slavery and the Civil War and the long-enduring
effects of white supremacy and associated terrorism that Silent Sam represents. As Americans, we hold
freedom to be a core value. We should face the facts about what freedom is and the depth of what was
denied enslaved people.

Silent Sam should be the focus of historical education about that essential American value, and the university
should invest substantially into this - make something engaging, interesting, and honest. Engage the
community of Black historians and other experts to design a historically accurate presentation of the statue.
Build it into your curriculum. Create resources for our public schools.

The university and the State of North Carolina have made substantial investments of time and resources to
protect this statue on the grounds that it is a part of our history. It is your obligation to get history right. We
should not honor the shameful, nor should we erase it: the history of Silent Sam is important, and should be
told.

Respectfu Ily,
Debbie Carraway
Message
From: Thomas Grizzle
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:11:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to re-locate Silent Sam

I was thinking he could either. ..

"Guard" the confederate graveyard already on campus

... or ...

Be placed into a museum somewhere.

Thomas B. Grizzle, Chapel Hill native (nee Memorial Hosp., 1958)


Message
From: Trey McDonald
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:13:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Statue

I just saw on the news where you are accepting feedback on the statue. Personally I don't agree with
getting rid of everything that offends because if we start with statues - where do we draw the line?
I saw l eave it there as history. If you have any questions on my feedback please let me know. Thx, Trey

Trey McDonald
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: jpflora
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:20:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: University Must Obey the Law - Silent Sam

Regarding the unlawful destruction of the silent Sam Monument at u NC chapel Hill, I believe the only
course of action available to the University under the law is to restore and protect the memorial and the
good names of our ancestors. The University does not have the authority to move it in order to re-
contextualize or curate it with modern-day lies about white supremacy.
The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of paid activists.
Thank you.
Message
From: David Stinson
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:20:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I advocate moving Silent Sam to a nearby local civil war battlefield park. Thank you for asking.
David Stinson, Hillsborough
Message
From: Melissa Davis
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:21:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Keep Silent Sam In place

Please consider keeping Silent Sam in its place. This uproar is nothing short of politics and simply cannot be
tolerated. History cannot be changed by toppling a statue. Add a plaque to provide some context, but to allow
the criminals that destroyed property in what equates to nothing more than a temper tantrum because they did
not get their way immediately will simply insure that this behavior continues.

Melissa
Message
From: John Fitzgerald
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:26:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam statue

It is a crying shame that people think that the destruction of historical monuments is a positive voice for some
twisted agenda that they think will change society. Breaking the law is never the correct answer to biases. This
statue is a historical monument that should be replaced and is a gauge of historical significance. If we continue
on this course we will stamp out our history and will have no direction for our future. Ask this question, what if
we tore down every historical monument of any significance from any period in time ? The future generations
will have no way of judging the mistakes of the past and certainly will repeat. In fact if you tore down statues
of any other race it would probably spark a horrific race war. A shame the ignorance of humanity is showing up
in an advanced and developed world. We're all just going backwards and don't even realize it. We all need
more than anything is to just show some love and stop destroying each other. Thanks Michael Fitzgerald
Message
From: Jere Lee Mcclendon
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:26:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Memorial

1) The only course of action available to the Un iversity under the law is to restore and protect the memorial.

2) The University has no authority to move it.

3) The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of paid activists.

4) Please let me know that you intend to follow the law and restore Silent Sam Memorial to its original place with the necessary repairs
to the damage done by the mob terrorist.

Jere Lee McClendon


Message
From: Todd Ferry
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:28:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The monument needs to stay put. I don't believe we should be BULLIED into moving this or ANY moment of
ANY kind. History, good or bad, needs to be viewed and remembered.
Message
From: John Mcduffie
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:29:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As a North Carolina native and a former contributor to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, my
opinion is that Silent Sam needs to be reinstalled back to the position it has occupied for over 100 years as a
memorial to UNC students who fought and died in the Civil War, regardless of who was right or wrong in the
reasons for the war. If the location of the statue is considered too much a "main" entrance to the University there
could be another entrance designed nearby that could be what most people would then consider as the main
walkway into the school. This new walkway could then be designed to plan for future educational and sports
star hero statues along that new route, starting with Dean Smith. A simple archway or gate could be the
beginning of the positive future and to reduce what some people think are negatives of exposure to Silent Sam.
Message
From: Cornick, Donna P [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=admin .live.unc.edu-58827-cornick3b4]
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:31:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Cornick, Donna P [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=admin.live.unc.edu-58827-cornick3b4]
Subject: Silent Sam

See if Arlington National Cemetary could add to other Civil War monuments
Message
From: Rick Minton
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:32:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Place it back in it's original position at the expense of the ones who tore it down.
Message
From: Mike Harris
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:35:40 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Confederate Monument

Dear Chancellor Folt:

The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and not


an extremist minority of paid activists. The only course of action
under the law is to restore and protect the memorial where it has
stood for over 100 years . The university does not have the
authority to move it, contextualize it or curate it with modern day
lies about slavery and white supremacy. Restore it to exactly as
it was and where it was before the university allowed a minority
opinion group of bolsheviks to destroy it and protect the State
of North Carolina history for the future.

Mike Harris
1971 Alumni
University of North Carolina System
Message
From: ca drane
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:38:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The purpose of this email is to advocate for the silent Sam Monument to remain where it is!
Please do not try to erase history. If one thinks by removing silent Sam, one can eradicate southern
history .... WRONG!!! southern History is America 's history!!
Do NOT move this monument to another location. Leave it where it is and teach the REAL history, as it
relates to southern history, because this IS America 's history.
Respectfully,
carol Ann Drane
Proud us Citizen
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Jim E Gray [jegray@waketech.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:38:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: "Silent Sam" memorial

I am a graduate of UNC-CH (1965, 1967, 1970). Although my subject major was mathematics, I did once have
a "minor" teaching certificate in history and have been a member of both the "National Trust for Historic
Preservation" and "Preservation North Carolina"for over 40 years. Therefore, I believe in preservation of
historical monuments, memorials, and artifacts, unlike groups that are motivated by nihilistic destruction,
being inspired by organizations such as the "Taliban" (destruction of Buddhist monument in Afgahanistan,
etc.) and "ISIS" (destruction of pagan temple in Palmyra, Syria,etc.).

The memorial should be repaired, put back in place, and protected. I believe this is required by law, but also
that we should not reward those who defy the law. I believe everyone is entitled to their opinions and have a
right to peacefully protest, but we should never tolerate destruction of property by mobs; otherwise, we
become a society not of laws but of mob rule.

"Silent Sam" is a memorial to students who served the state of North Carolina during the war of 1861-
1865. Desecration of this monument is equivalent to the desecration of cemetery monuments, something I do
not believe we should tolerate.
Email correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North Carolina Public Records law and
may be disclosed to third parties by an authorized state official (NCGS. ch. 132). Student educational records
are subject to FERP A.
Message
From: james Taylor
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:45:45 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

There is no salutation because God forbid I misgender you, Owning to the absolute insanity coming out of the institutions that pass for
universities these days.

I was born in the west and raised in the the north. In the past twenty-six years I am proud to have become a stepson of the south. As a
combat veteran who served in the infantry the sacrifice made by all who served in one of the early conflicts that brought the beginning
of the end to slavery in the western world holds a special place in my heart.

Concerning the statue that vandals destroyed and desecrated some time back, by North Carolina law needs to be restored to it's
rightful place within ninety days of the aforementioned incident.

As citizens of a republic we must abide the rule of law irregardless of how we feel about it. If we feel something is not rig ht, organizing a
mob and committing acts of vandalism is not how redress is obtained. There are legal ways. Do they take time? Yes. Do they provide
us with instant gratification? Most certainly not.

We once had a president who scolded we the working class with, "elections have concequences". I will guarantee you that destruction
of the rule of law will carry dire concequences.

Silent Sam is to be returned to his previous state. If the people of North Carolina wish him removed it is their call not you rs.

God Speed

Mr. James H. Taylor


Message
From: Liz
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:49:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocation of Silent Sam

It is not erasing or altering history to move the silent Sam statue to another, more appropriate,
location. Inside, or on the grounds immediately surrounding, a history museum, would be an appropriate
spot for it and similar statues.
Elizabeth Kelly
UNC '84
Message
From: j
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:50:43 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: George to Dr. Folt re Silent Sam

Flag: Follow up

chancellor@unc.edu

Dear Chancellor Carol L. Falt Ph.D.

Long ago UNC removed the tablets in Memorial Hall with the names of UNC Confederate dead.

Six of those men were likely related to me through the Whitfield side of the family.

I have no idea where those tablets went.

I graduated from UNC in 1972 and realize that it is no longer a Southern school as in the past.

Here is my idea: There is a cemetery on UNC campus property and I suggest that UNC bury Silent
Sam in that cemetery with a simple stone on the grave.

I bet you could get a government stone for him to settle the issue.

I think "he" needs his rest.

This way he will still be on campus, but no longer visible. You won't need to pay to remount him
elsewhere.

Thanks, L. George Williams UNC Phar 1972.


Message
From: Robbie Watson
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:52:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Falt and Trustees,

As both a proud North Carolinian and a proud Tar Heel I feel it is my responsibility to make my feelings on the recent
removal of "Silent Sam" from the University of North Carolina campus. I do not believe the monument was erected
solely to honor the memory of Tar Heel alumni who died in the Civil War. Julian Carr's speech at the dedication in 1913
stating his belief that the Confederate Soldier was solely responsible for the preservation of the Anglo-Saxon population
of the South after the war and his anecdote about "horse-whipping a negro wench" should tell you all you need to know
about the true reason for its erection on that campus I am a believer that many southerners have sought to
"whitewash" the causes of the Civil War. It is true that slavery was only one of many reasons the 13 southern states
renounced their Union with the United States of America, but it was the only one of the reasons that involved the
ownership of a human being . . I am not a fan of destruction of history, even monuments on the wrong side of history
have their place. I believe that just because an object has a historical significance that does not insure its permanence.
believe the General Assembly was misguided when they passed legislation to take the decision to remove monuments
out of local hands. Seems strange to me that a body dominated by folks in favor of local authority should make such a
rule. It is my opinion that memorials to the traitors who renounced their citizenship, fought for the cause of slavery and
lost should be remanded to the appropriate locations or should be accompanied by memorials explaining the context of
their existence. To replace this memorial on UNC's Campus at this time is to invite more violence and more waste of
taxpayer's dollars to protect it. Let's move Silent Sam to Bentonville where he can be regarded in the proper context
and not as proof that no virgin has passed him on UNC's campus since 1913.

Thanks,

Robbie Watson
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:58:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Ssilent Sam has done nothing to deserve the law breaking actions of those who rioted and tore him down. He needs to be placed back
in the same spot and history needs to have its lessons respected.

REDACTED. And a resident of Charlotte NC for 22 years Sentfrom my LG Phoenix 2, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Message
From: Steve Stutts
Sent: 9/24/2018 5:59:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam resting place

Without delving into rationale for relocating the monument, it would seem to be better suited at a
location that focuses on the civil war effort and not so much about the university. In that vein, perhaps
a state museum or better a battlefield that is already designated. A great example is how Gettysburg has
monuments located throughout their park .... perhaps Bentonvil l e's would suffice.

Steve Stutts
West Jefferson, NC

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Donald Hennig
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:00:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please restore Silent Sam to his rightful spot and leave them there.

Sent from ProtonMail, encrypted email based in Switzerland.

Sent from ProtonMail mobile


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:01:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam and other memorials

RESTORE SILENT SAM TO ORIGINAL LOCATION

Under the law, the only course of action available to UNC is to restore Silent Sam to the original
location, and restore and protect the memorial.

A plaque can be installed nearby the memorial but you have no authority to move it in order to re-
contextualize or curate it with modern-day untn1ths about white supremacy. There is no such thing
as "white supremacy" or "black supremacy" and neither should be hinted at in any way if a plaque
is placed. The NC Sons of Confederate Veterans President or his delegated representative must
approve the plaque before installation.

The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of activists
or dissenters. Anyone can say "I am offended .... " and organize a "protest", the best thing those
people can do is silently bypass anything "offensive".

I also do not agree with any faculty or staff of any educational facility speaking for or against any
type of monument. Educate the students properly and fully so they can reach their own conclusion.
Your faculty members that participated, in or out of class, with the recent protests and violence
should be severely reprimanded and required to teach actual history rather than violence and
untruths about the War Between the States.

SLAVERY WAS NOT THE CAUSE rather a side issue of many. In August 1862 Lincoln brought
five black ministers to the White House and told them that slavery and the war had demonstrated
that it would be "better for us both, therefore, to be separated.". He wanted to send freed blacks to
Central America, even calling for a constitutional amendment authorizing Congress to pay for the
colonization.
Message
From: David Hodges [dehodges@alumni.unc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:04:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Advice re: what to do with Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

I understand that you are seeking feedback regarding the best location for Silent Sam, which was finally removed by a
group of patriots at UNC after being allowed to remain on prominent display on campus for 105 years too long. See UNC
wants your ideas on the best location for Silent Sam, The News & Observer (Sept. 24, 2018), available at
https://w'ww . newsobserver.corn/news/local/article2.1897..82.60.html

As an alumni of the University who loves UNC with his whole heart, here are a few ideas, off the top of my head, about
where to re-locate Silent Sam:

1) In a landfill.
2) At the bottom of the ocean.
3) At the bottom of a volcano.
4) Launched into space on one of Elon Musk's (or some other weirdo tech billionaire's) private space rockets.
5) Entombed in concrete and stored in the dark recesses of Wilson Library. Visits will be by appointment only.
6) Buried in an unmarked grave in Old Chapel Hill Cemetery (so that white supremacists won't dig it back up or
treat it as a place to make pilgrimages).
7) Melted down and re-forged into lamps spread around campus to make it more well lit and safer at night.
8) Melted down and re-forged into a statue honoring Union soldiers. You know, the side that didn't support
slavery or the social and legal subjugation of an entire race of Americans.
9) Melted down and re-forged into a statue honoring any of the many honorable historical figures associated
with the University, such as Dean Smith, Mia Hamm, Karen Shelton, Thomas Wolfe, Stuart Scott, or Bill Friday,
among others.
10) Melted down and re-forged into literally anything else other than a symbol of white supremacy.

In all seriousness, I don't care where you put the statue as long as it is anywhere in the world other than our campus.
could maybe understand (but not agree with) the logic behind deciding not to remove the statue while it still stood,
whether out of a naive understanding of "heritage" masquerading as history, or perhaps simple inertia. But now that
the statue has been removed in what can only be described as a courageous act of civil disobedience, that decision has
been made for you. The decision that's left is whether to re-erect it, which will require affirmative acts by you to put it
back in the place where it once stood. Those affirmative acts will express your approval - and by extension, the
University's approval - of the statue's history as an ugly symbol of white supremacy.

You may object to the idea that you are expressing approval, and you will hide behind some fig leaf that the re-erection
is because of property rights, or because of some other lame excuse offered up by North Carolina's unconstitutionally
racially gerrymandered government currently controlled by Republicans. However, the history of the statue as a public
symbol of white supremacy is an objective fact that is well-documented and not subject to reasonable debate. It was
not erected contemporaneously with the end of the Civil War to honor fallen confederate soldiers, but rather it was
erected nearly 50 years later during the height of the Jim Crow South. The speech made at Silent Sam's dedication
ceremony contains some of the ugliest, most racist words ever uttered publicly on our campus. See,~ 'Silent Sam': A
racist Jim Crow-era speech inspired UNC students to topple a Confederate monument on campus, The Washington Post
(Aug. 21, 2018), available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2018/08/21/silent-sam-a-racist-
jim-crow-era-speech-inspired-unc-students-to-topple-a-confederate-monument-on-campus/

By re-erecting Silent Sam, either in Mccorkle Place or anywhere else on campus, you will express your approval of its
white supremacist message; that approval will be conveyed whether you actually intend the message or not. Actions
have consequences and what we do matters, and you can't erase or undo the racist history of the statue. Your actions
on behalf of the University are an expression of its shared values, and if you put that fucking white supremacist statue
back up, your actions will demonstrate that the values of the University are in fact not shared by me and many of my
fellow alumni. Your actions will bring new shame in 2018 upon the University - a shame that was finally addressed
when the students took the action that so many of our political leaders were too afraid to take for so long.

As a native son of North Carolina, I have loved, and continue to love, the University with my whole heart. I am deeply
saddened that in 2018 we are even having a debate about whether we should publicly re-express our approval for a
racist symbol of white supremacy. I pray that you will have the courage of your convictions to do the right thing. That
statue has no place in a civilized society, let alone on our campus, as it does not reflect any of our shared values as
members of the University community.

Sincerely,
David Hodges
Class of 2008

David Hodges
NYU School of Law 2012
dehodges(al,al umni.unc.edu
REDACTED
Message
From: Harrison Roberts
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:04:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

Hi, I am writing in regards to what needs to be done with the Silent Sam monument. He needs to be put back up
where he previously stood. No question. If he is moved to a "alternate location" he will be pushed into teaching
a history that he does NOT represent. Silent Sam is to remember the sons of UNC that fought honorably. The
lives lost and the sacrifices made. He is UNC history, He is North Carolina history, He is Southern history, He
is our history. It is truly disgusting what happened rob Silent Sam and that can not stand. Thank you for your
time.

Harrison Roberts
Message
From: Steve Humphrey
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:12:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Mr. chancellor:
There is no room for "suggestions." He needs to be put back up where
he previously stood. No question.
If he is moved to an "alternate location" he will be pushed into
teaching a history that he does NOT represent.
silent Sam is to remember the sons of UNC that fought honorably.
Despite the motivations of the speaker who dedicated the statue, the
statue itself is not and never was - a monument to slavery, racism or
any other such foul practices. You know that as well as anyone, or
else you are undeserving of your current position. The lives lost and
the sacrifices made. He is UNC history. He is North Carolina history.
He is southern history. He is OUR history.
I am constantly angered and disgusted with "protesters" who have no
knowledge or understanding of the things that they choose to protest.
The alleged reasons for their protests and their wanton destruction of
public and/or State property usually make no sense whatsoever - and
nearly always serve no worthy purpose whatsoever.
If such lawless behavior is allowed to continue, where does it end?
Topple The Statue of Liberty? Destroy Mount Rushmore? Level and raze
the Smithsonian Institution? Abandon all respect for the Rule of Law
and descend into Anarchy?
Where is your common sense? Where is your respect for history? Where
is your dedication to higher learning? Are you so easily panicked and
bullied by a small group of hooligans? Are you not ashamed of your
cowardice?
WE ARE.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:13:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: <No Subject>

I believe silent sam should be repaired and placed back where our ancestors placed it. It only represents our
veterans and not slavery. It is a part of our history and should be treated as such.

My name is REDACTED of Thank you


Message
From: Ed Bo ldin
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:13:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ient s/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: piblic@bog.northcaro li na.edu
Subject: Subject: UNC Boy Sold ier, AKA Silent Sam Memorial

Chancellor Folt:

I have read the 2015 law passed by the North Carolina Legislature and signed into law by then Governor
McCrory. You have but one course of action available legally. That course is to replace the
memorial/monument on the pedestal from which it was tom down within 90 days of its' vandalization.

Those persons in authority who watched this illegal action and did nothing to intervene are at least guilty of
dereliction of duty, if not a more serious offense.

Sincerely,

Ralph Edwin Boldin


Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C.
Message
From: Peppermint Zealy
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:14:16 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Keep him!!!
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:14:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Next to a Huey P. Newton statue!

The statue should go next to a Huey P. Newton statue that's twice as tall!
Message
From: Bob Shepard
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:17:51 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please put the statue in the foyer of the admissions building


Message
From: Ra lph Moore
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:18:35 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put i t back where i t was and should be!

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Dan Leeper
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:18:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think that the most appropriate thing to do with Silent Sam is to move
him to the old cemetery at South Road and Country Club. This will allow
Sam to continue to honor the Confederate dead as was his original purpose
but will remove him from official recognition by the University.

Daniel E. Leeper

UNC Class of 1970


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:19:24 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: I remember when illegal=against the law

FOLLOW STATE LAW.

Wouldn't that be a pleasant surprise.

Sent.from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone


Message
From: Sarah Emrich
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:19:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think silent Sam should stay on UNC campus. This whole movement is ridiculous.
Sarah Emrich
Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
Message
From: Beth Gross
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:20:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am an alumna from the classes of 1971 (undergraduate) and 1973 (graduate).


Please return the statue silent Sam to its original place. It is disgusting that the faux political
correctness has caused this issue.
We need to honor our history.
Beth Gross (nee Tingley)
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:22:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put silent Sam back where he belongs.


Message
From: Josh Crutchfield
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:22:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam

Put silent Sam back where he belongs, where he has always been, mob mentality does not govern this state or
this country.
Message
From: Ron Green
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:26:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

One option per law.Restore the Monument as it was.UNC belongs to the people of North Carolina, not some
radical group wishing to expunge all Confederate Monuments ....
Ron Green

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Eddie Cox
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:28:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: What I think.

Any action other than restoring the monument to its original design is not acceptable. What's worse is having to
waste taxpayer dollars to have to restore it in the first place. Stick to teaching history not ideology.

Eddie Cox
Message
From: Steven Triplett
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:32:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

UNCEdu,
I am sending email to you that my suggestion is to telling you listen what about our Silent Sam was
hero,because their bullets and black powders were empty before face to Unions division in NC during civil war
of 1864 or 1865. He knew about over 1000 lives were cost in bloody war,but he had an good wisdom to decided
to be surrendered to Unions division to prevent his college away from any kind of damage or loot.
This Silent Sam Status belong to our North Carolina of Confederate where his status is belong to our God's
ground is holy where our 1,000 lives and Sam were burial since our ancestors were established in many years
ago that cannot remove or destroyed. Because their scarface gave to our Father that were their bravery.
Any student who come from northern states that he or she dislike our status,then he or she is not belong to
UNC. Please put back our status to our Mounment ofUNC by NC law already made an suggest order to you in
90 days of deadline.
May God Bless UNC and NC,
North Carolina Confederate of Heritage
2nd Lt.Steven Triplett
Message
From: Sarah Moore
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:37:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: put it in storage or recycle it

The statue should be replaced with a statue that commemorates the lives and deaths of slaves or empowerment
of brown and black people, people in poverty, women or minority religions.

Sarah Moore, PhD, LPC-S


Message
From: Donald Mullis
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:39:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

PUT HIM BACK AND LEAVE HIM THERE!!!!!


my iPhone
Message
From: Paul Spencer
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:51:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Good afternoon,

As a native North Carolinian with a Southern heritage that can be traced to before the Civil War -indeed, before
the American Revolution - I feel very strongly on the issue of Southern "pride" expressed exclusively through
artifacts of the Civil War. Regarding the issue of Silent Sam's future location, it is my opinion that the statue
belongs in a museum. The Civil War was a brutal and taxing era in American history, and the scars the conflict
left on our nation can be seen today. Not only does casual racism still exist in America, but institutionalized
racism across multiple governmental and societal systems. Though the Civil War was ignited by a number of
factors, let there be no mistake, one cause sits at the root of them all: slavery. Slavery, predicated on race, led to
a conflict which led more than half a million Americans to their deaths. Given this undeniable fact of history,
we should not be preserving monuments that were erected in public spaces to honor and glorify a failed nation-
state that committed treason against the United States. The Confederacy is long dead and does not deserve a
place of honor in the public sphere. The monuments built in honor of the Confederacy must be moved to
museums and other places of education, where they can teach current and future generations valuable lessons on
the dangers of prejudice and hatred. So long as traces of the Confederacy retain symbols of honor on public
land, so too will their core ideals of white supremacy be honored on that same land.

Respectfully,
Paul Spencer
Message
From: E-Scrap
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:52:59 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam put him BACK!

I guess you did not learn much after Hurricane hit North Carolina,
went south tore up south Carolina then Went back North an did more
Damage in North al so! , seems the confederate dead sent the storm (or
you Pissed off the God's!), an Looks like more will later drown the
stare also !
so why not just put it BACK where it was an tell the Idiots an
snowflakes NO its now going any where an Allow officers to Lock up
Idiots who try to take it down! If they don't like it MOVE NORTH!
Message
From: The Ryan Maddox Show
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:54:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put Silent Sam Back!

My name is Ryan. I'm 18 from Garner, NC. Silent Sam is a monument dedicating the unc students that left to
fight for their freedom from what they thought was oppression. That monument has stood proudly for over 100
years and most of the time there was no issue. No student today was a slave or a slave owner. We have the 13th,
14th, and 15th amendments that free everyone and everyone is equal. A piece of metal cannot "oppress" these
black students as some have said. It is important to preserve our history. The good and the bad. Moving or
removing Silent Sam is erasing history. As the saying goes, "Those who erase history are doomed to repeat it".
We need to recognize the heritage of the South, not any hate. The Union owned slaves and had passed the
Corwin Amendment. Less than 25% of the South owned slaves. Slavery was mentioned in only 4 of the state
secession Constitutions and not in the preamble or the national Constitution. These liberals scream Nazi and
racism whenever someone disagrees with them despite the issue. And Nazis were socialist, which the left is
going towards.

Silent Sam should be put back on his pedestal and remain where he has stood for over 100 years. Bolt him down
and make sure nobody can tear him down and destroy property again (they better go to prison for the crime).
And make sure police protect the monument from the ground to the tip of the bayonette. Silent Sam is our
history and we need to protect it. God bless the Confederacy.

Deo Vindice,
Ryan
Message
From: David Young
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:58:28 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: boy soldier Sam

Sam represents UNC students at the time of conflict in our country who bravely stood for what they
believed in,PUT HIM BACK and charge all who vandalized STATE PROPERTY.The law cannot
be ignored and should not be.
Message
From: Charles Shieldslll
Sent: 9/24/2018 6:59:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

try following the law and you will be fine. reinstall the statue.
Charles Shields I I I
Message
From: Bill Marriott
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:00:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Idea

Dear chancellor Folt,


Thank you for the opportunity to submit ideas about what to do as the next step with respect to silent
Sam.
Although I don't wholeheartedly approve of the way the statue was removed, I think we need to embrace
this as an opportunity to create a new strategy for that space on the beloved UNC campus.
As a proud member of the UNC alumni, I think it wou l d be a fitting gesture to create a new monument to
honor our illustrious Nobel Prize winners to replace the silent Sam statue.
I think focusing attention on the members of the UNC-CH community who have won the award would be a more
appropriate way to welcome people to our beautiful campus.
The main focus of the University is and should continue to be to inspire young students to aspire to a
high level of academic pursuits. what more appropriate example could we present than those members of the
UNC-CH community who have earned a Nobel prize for their efforts.
Although we should honor our past as was exemplified by the silent Sam statue, this historical monument
does not point directly to the mission and goals of the University. It seems more appropriate that the
silent Sam statue find a permanent home in a museum or space dedicated to State history or civil War
history. We've all heard some excellent locations suggested in the past including historical settings
like the Bentonville Battle Grounds.
But, in my opinion, a new Monument firmly entrenched in inspiring academic achievement would be a more
appropriate and aspirational way to welcome people to campus at this prominent gateway location.
Thank you for the opportunity to part1c1pate in this information gathering exercise and I wish you much
success in finding an appropriate solution to this challenge.
Respectfully,
William J. Marriott
MEd 1976
Message
From: Thomas Ciszek
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:05:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: #SilentSam - 250 East Franklin Street

Put him next to the James K. Polk statue in the West end of the Morehead Planetarium.

Tom Ciszek
Morehead-Cain Scholar '03
UNCSILS '05
Message
From: Richard Hudson [richard@bmirinc.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:06:14 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My vote it to put silent Sam back right where he was. That statue is no more unwelcoming than any other
statue on campus. carol Folt should not play politics with our history. Did UNC students fight in the
civil War? Did many die in the civil War? can we not memorialize their deaths. Personally I could not
tell whether silent Sam was white or black, red or yellow. He's a generic replica of all soldiers who
fought and died for a cause. Times change, but history doesn't. This cow towing to the few that get their
feeling hurt needs to stop. The perpetrators of the tearing down should be kicked out of school, if any
were in fact students. Any faculty involved should be given their walking papers.
UNC BSBA ' '77

j. richard hudson iii


black mountain insurance & realty
REDACTED
black mountain, nc 28711

office REDACTED
fax REDACTED
richard@bmirinc.com
please remember coverage cannot be bound, canceled or altered via email or voicemail. you must confirm in
writing with a licensed agent.
Message
From: Joyce Newman
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:08:22 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Bentonville, NC was the site of the last major battle of the Civil War in NC. There is already a national historic
landmark there. Why not place the Daughters of the Confederacy's statue there?

Joyce Joines Newman, MA 1978


Message
From: Esther Mack
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:09:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: sam should be destroyed

I think the best place for silent Sam is where he was at the end of the
night of August 20, 2018 - facedown in the dirt.
Failing that, I think Sam should be destroyed. There is no virtue in
commemorating a symbol of hate. Let photos be shown in textbooks - we
don't need the statue.
As a last resort, put Sam in a museum exhibit about the lasting icons of
the Confederacy and racism. In the same exhibit, feature abo li tionis t
and anti-racist activists whose efforts led to the dismantling of
slavery and fought against white supremacy throughout the centuries.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:25:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put it in one of the overflowing hog manure lagoons.

Sent using Guerrillamail .com


Block or repo rt abuse: https://www.guerril l amail.com//abuse/?a=VE93CAIOVrkQhhqUSXAcPBHDWA%3D%3D
Message
From: Leslie Vanderkolk
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:34:00 PM
To: Chancellor [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34be32522a4549bcb309fddad4de 78 la-south_chan c]
Subject: Silent Sam suggestion

Flag: Follow up

Good evening,

My name is Leslie Vanderkolk, and I am a resident in Pittsboro, NC. I recently moved from Carrboro where I
grew to know and love the town of Chapel Hill, and I feel inclined to share my suggestion for the Silent Sam
statue.

Quickly following the incident, I shared the below thoughts with Governor Cooper via a submission on the
website, though I did not hear response. If you agree that contentious artifacts such as Silent Sam should be
located in places with historical context so that we do not hide from our past and we allow visitors viewing the
items to clearly understand why it is still in the public eye at all, then please feel free to pass on the below idea
in November.

"Message:
Hello,

I am writing in regards to the Confederate Monuments around the state of North Carolina. I am currently
overseas on a work assignment, but was just informed ~f the toppling of "Silent Sam" at UNC. I personally
agree that cm?federate monuments should not be displayed in public forums without the proper historical
context provided to them. I think ive need preserve this history so that 1-1/e can continue to learn from it, but we
need to do so in a way that does not even appear to praise or glorify the wrongdoings of the confederacy. In
spending this time in Europe, I have spent time in various cities and seen a number of memorial parks or
museums that I think we could use as inspiration. A/Jost recently I was in Prague where they have "Communist
Hill. " This park was a point.fbr relocation ~f almost all communist era monuments to create an outdoor
museum ~f sorts. Everyone can still go and see the monuments, but they are in a setting with context and/acts
to show iv hat communism did to the country and 11/hy these monuments are no longer in places ofprestige or
prominence. I ivould love to see a park in Raleigh dedicated to the confederacy in the same ivay. Let's treat the
history of the state with respect so that those who have family members who had fought in the confederacy and
still feel pride in that can go, remember, and cherish. And those who are morally opposed to the values of the
confederacy can either avoid it or can go with context and facts and know that the current social settings and
government do not necessarily support those ideals.

I hope you take this suggestion into consideration. I will be back in the USA in about 2 weeks and ivould be
happy to fitrther this idea in any way that a state citizen can participate.

Thank you for your time,


Leslie Vanderkolk"

A concerned NC resident,

Leslie Vanderkolk
Message
From: Lew Borman
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:37:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Placement

How about overlooking the cemetery on campus.


Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Andy Edwards
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:46:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Permanent location for Silent Sam

Ya'll should put the statue as far up Phil Berger's ass as it can possibly go. Maybe break off a chunk and shove
that up Tim Moore's ass for good measure. Thanks, and have a blessed day.
Message
From: Moore, Erin [Erin.Moore@conehealth .com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:47:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

PUT THE STATUE BACK! Laws were broken taking him down and it disgraces the ancestors of those who
fought and died protecting others that the statue was torn down. Re educate those who are misinformed
about the reason it was put there.

Erin Moore, RN, BSN, CCRN


CVICU 2 HEART

NOTICE: This message may contain confidential information intended only for the recipient. If you have
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Message
From: Thomas S Miller
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:48:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Replace silent Sam to his original place. He represents honorable history


Message
From: M Sweat
Sent: 9/24/2018 7:54:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Placement of The Monument

I do not see how by giving into the demands of people who have demonstrated their willingness to engage in
criminal acts of vandalism, that you are doing the right thing in not replacing the statue in its original place. The
Confederate statue known as silent Sam represents a good number of students who followed their hearts in
making a difficult decision. Now, a group that knows little of history and respects none, is demanding that the
university commit an act of slander against people who cannot defend themselves nor answer any lies told about
them. They have shown the whole world on more than one occasion that they will stoop to any level and use
any level of criminal force to get what they want. They have proven that they do not have even an ounce of the
integrity that the students that monument was raised for possessed. The fact that their felonious behavior has
been approved of by various members of the faculty is certainly no reason to bend to their will. I sincerely hope
you will exhibit the kind of backbone that you should and place the statue in the original location.
Mark Sweat
Message
From: Gay, Bruce
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:13:11 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam recommendation

Hi,

My recommendation on a permanent location for "Silent Sam" is to make it part of an exhibit in the North Carolina
Museum of History in Raleigh. While this is outside Chapel Hill, the monument and its fraught history will be seen by
more citizens of North Carolina if housed at the NCMoH.

Thanks,

Bruce Gay, PMP (BA, Class of 1992)


Sr. Proaram Manaaer

This e-mail may contain confidential information of the sending organization. Any unauthorized or improper disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the
contents of this e-mail and attached document(s) is prohibited. The information contained in this e-mail and attached document(s) is intended only for
the personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender
immediately by e-mail and delete the original e-mail and attached document(s).
Message
From: Dwayne Brooks
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:14:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

There is only one place for Silent Sam. Exactly where it was.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:16:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Feedback on Silent Sam plans

Good Afternoon,
I am writing to share my thoughts on the Silent Sam statute next steps. (My thoughts about Silent Sam and it's
removal are posted below my signature line, if you wish to review my proposal in context). Frankly, I believe
that it should be moved and become THE center piece of a high profile proactive and ongoing educational
campaign. Lean into the challenge that it has presented our campus and state. Let the educators and the brilliant
students of one of the best Universities in the world, LEAD the way. As a campus we should move toward the
issue, not hide from it. Embrace EVERYTHING about the statue, owning the complexity and nuance of its
placement and removal, the harm it caused/s while prominently placed, and its educational potential for
building our multicultural tomorrow.

The campaign can and should:

- Create and distribute to every alumni, student, teacher, and legislator a video with no opinions, just the facts of
Sam's placement, the context of the moment, and its role in N.C.'s recasting of itself post-civil war. Include a
well-produced flyer highlighting the rationale for installation using primary sources - the text of its dedication
speeches, the fundraising letters, the approval for installation. Include the history of protest for its removal.
- Complete a survey of current students and alums to better understand the impact of Sam on their UNC
experience and their intercultural and ethical capacities today. Demonstrate to your alumni and students
(especially those who have been on the fringe of the university's priorities) that you mean it when you talk of an
inclusive campus and the Carolina way.
- Fund oral history projects to collect the voices ofUNC's past (those with love and affection for Sam and those
disenfranchised/negatively impacted persons talking about the statue). Be certain to ask them to reflect on both
THIER affective connection to Sam as a part ofUNC and then ask them to empathize with experience/emotions
of those who feel differently. Collect the stories of how it excluded others and snow ball fights at its base.
Collect the stories of past protestors and those who will admit to heckling or ignoring. Despite the current focus
on race, don't shy away from the sexist aspect of its nickname. And finally invest in using these resources to
inform the other resources proposed here.
- Create a significant high tech display, housed in the NC Collection with an online presence of educational
tool available for interactive lessons - history, Leadership, ethical decision-making, intercultural sensitivity,
and empathy.
- Do not repair the statue, intellectually examine and learn from the damage and how it happened. Document
the damage and process of revolt and include it in leadership courses and orientation dialogue.

If we include all perspectives, clearly represent all voices without judgement, the legislature won't have a leg to
stand on to challenge the university response and it will maximize the learning. That said we know THAT will
be the most difficult of challenges. Finding the bright minds to do the unbiased work of collecting, analyzing,
shaping, and disseminating the results of the above will make or break the success of what I propose. Society
and history will judge those voices and how we as a university community responded. Capturing what IS today
and sharing it, without varnish or embellishment will allow Silent Sam to educate us through today's and
tomorrow's racial and privilege-based challenges.

Thank you for creating a forum for me and others to express our ideas. I would be happy to participate in a
campaign to fund these initiatives (although as a educator and college administrator my financial resources are
sparse). I would be even happier if the alma mater I love could live up to its potential and rise above its most
recent embarrassments by its response to this moment in our history.
Karen D. Boyd
Class of 1983

My thoughts posted on Face book the night Sam came down


Silent Sam plays a huge role and fond place in many of my college memories. For those reasons I love that
damn statute and am sad to see the damage. That said, I did not know why it was erected and what it's dedicator
believed was its purpose. I should have known because protestors have been standing around that statute for
decades asking for it to come down. But even so, I had no idea that it was placed in the 1913 racist wave of
KKK strength commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Civil War. I did not know that at its dedication the
primary proponent of its installation (in his formal recorded remarks) boasted that he had whipped an##&* in
what would now be its shadow and Sam would stand as a monument to keep them in their place (my
paraphrasing, but the meaning is consistent with his words.) It was placed with an intentional message that I
was able to ignore, but was as effective as the speaker had hoped it would be in its message to black students-
-black students who only joined the campus 50 years after the statute was erected. Now 50 years later large
numbers of students wanted it removed. Those students did not want to honor the message of its dedicator and
wanted UNC to be better than a 1913 message of racial superiority and it's inhumane treatment of those not
white. It's history and the meaning of its presence was clear. But a law passed by the legislature prohibited the
campus from moving public statutes without the approval of the legislature, which they would not give. We've
spent a full year and $390,000 in taxpayer monies protecting it and now it sits damaged and removed in the only
way it was ever going to leave UNC's campus. So, yes, a 100 year old statute (that I loved and wish I didn't) is
laying on the ground. But tomorrow black students will feel a little more welcome on that campus. I wish they
had moved it, but can't be surprised that a decades long protest eventually ran out of patience ...... and dumped
the tea in the harbor.
Message
From: Scott Earp
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:21:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

I have made a statement on the FB page of the DTH, dated 24 September.

Please read the post.

Thank you.

Scott C. Earp DDS, PA


Comprehensive Dentistry & Orthodontics
earpdental .com
REDACTED
Message
From: Graham, Sherry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=a896dff437a1461ea085bfac0e6514e2-graham]
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:23:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a retired member of the staff and have both an MBA '2002 and a BA '72 from the University. I worked
at UNC for over 30 years and have lived in chapel Hill since 1970. I, unlike others who do not live here,
have a vested interest in silent Sam moving out of town. I cannot understand why it has taken so long to
address the fact that a confederate monument has no place on the UNC campus. It is an insult to all who
have fought for civil rights and will continue to be a flashpoint if it remains anywhere on campus.
I think it belongs at a battlefield or other location that tells more about the historical context of the
civil War. surely some site such as Bennett Place near Durham or Fort Fisher would be more appropriate.
sherry Graham
Message
From: Eric Collins
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:31:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

It is my recommendation that this monument be returned to its original location. This statue represents all the
UNC students who fought and died for at the time believed in. As a school of higher education you would think
that people would respect for this historical monument. It is part of UNC history,as well as this states history.
Let us not look upon this as offensive, let it stand as a monument to those who fought for their beliefs,as well as
a reminder that hopefully we never go down the path of Civil War again. This is our history! It cannot be
changed, it cannot be erased.
Message
From: Stewart, Paul W. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=decee8a572024913861dclccb1983d87-Paul W Stew]
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:43:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Stewart, Paul W. [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=decee8a572024913861dclccb1983d87-Paul W Stew]
Subject: confederate monuments: move them to historic confederate cemeteries (701 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh)

confederate monuments

Move them to historic confederate cemeteries.


For example, soldiers' Cemetery at 701 oakwood Avenue, Raleigh, NC.

Paul w. Stewart, PhD


Professor of Research in Biostatistics
Biostatistics Department
UNC School of Public Health
chapel Hill, NC 27599-7420
Message
From: John Sul livan
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:44:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

silent Sam shou l d be put back where he stood when he was e r ected. The problem we have t oday is t he fact
that true history is not being taught. The boys who went off to fight for there homeland from UNC should
be remembered and honored. Liberals and political correctness are destroying our country and if you can't
see that then you are part of the problem and not the solution. God Bless Dixie DEO VINDICE! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
John sull ivan
Message
From: Eric Hill
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:45:29 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,


I am a native North Carolinian and am very proud of the rich history of my state. I am writing this in support
of The Silent Sam Monument to be placed back on its base in McCorkle Place at the campus ofUNC-
Chapel Hill. I believe that all history should be preserved and tearing down monuments no matter what they
were erected for only leads to past mistakes being repeated. I also believe that the recent protests over
Confederate Monuments is because of them being misunderstood or just plain ignorance of history.
Ten years ago I had no interest in The War for Southern Independence. I just took what I was taught in grade
school as the gospel truth. I have always had an interest in history however, I focused more on the 2nd World
War. I began reading about The War for Southern Independence and haven't stopped since. I realized that the
whole story wasn't being taught but, what was being taught was to vilify the South completely for the cause of
the war. The entire country was involved in the Institution of Slavery long before the CSA was established as
well as up to the end of the War in 1865.
Silent Sam represents the students of UNC that got up and went to defend their homes and families from
invasion from a government that waged "Total War" on the Southern People. Total War means that not only
men who fight for the military are engaged but all non-fighting citizens as well. None of these students owned
slaves but sacrificed everything to defend the great state of North Carolina. Those very students came home
with the "Tarheel" name. It means that people from North Carolina do not back down from anything and are
forever honored by Silent Sam until it was unlawfully brought down.
Contrary to popular belief we do not live in a Democracy, we live in a Constitutional Republic, a nation of
laws. In the case of Silent Sam, "Mobocracy" brought down a monument that is protected by State Law. The
only option we have is to replace the Silent Sam statue in its original location and prosecute those responsible
for its removal to the fullest extent of the law. Without law we have Anarchy. If you allow this incident to go
without repercussions, then it will only open a door to future disorder. Today, Confederate
Monuments, tomorrow buildings or other landmarks could become targets of this radical ideology.
Sincerely,
Geoffrey Ambrose Hill
Message
From: Phillip Hall
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:47:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep the monument

A lot can be said about keeping the "silent Sam" monument where it stood. However in this format, I will
only state that the monument should be re-erected where it stood to continue to recognize the young men
who gave so much to their state and against Union invaders. It is not an object of racial superiority but
one of honoring their history of sacrifice to protecting their home state.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: wkirtley
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:48:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Location For Silent Sam

With tongue in cheek I suggest you put Sam in the Rams Club endzone seat section at the football stadium
because a. there's plenty of space available and b. since the "fans" there are virtually silent he would fit right in!

Sent from m)' Verizon 4G LTE smartphone


Message
From: Rachel Justice
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:48:51 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear UNC, I am the Old North State. My family has been here dating back to Jamestown. I am a daughter of a
Revolutionary War veteran who begat veterans that fought in the War of Northern Aggression who begat
veterans who fought in WWI, II and so on. I'm a Marine mom and we take our veterans to heart. Sam should be
put back up. This is stated in the law. Also, you are a state funded school which is funded by our tax dollars.
The will of the NC natives should be your first concern. It's a shame that you let history be RE interpreted by
activist and want to be known as a prominent university. You are mocking the families of these southern and
northern boys , yes teenage boys, who fought and died when their states called. You do not have the authority to
break the law or RE write history and give in to your antifa thug group ran by your professor Dwayne Dixon.
You are a disgrace to even try and associate yourself with the Old North State and a law school.
Message
From: Jason Lloyd
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:52:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: SILENT SAM

As a Orange County resident I am ashamed ofUNC and the way you allowed Sam to be torn down by a bunch
of thugs.

Sam is a part ofUNC and NC's history. Sam honors the memory of fallen UNC soldiers.

You have let these hooligans (many of which aren't even residents here) use one man's speech as a reflection of
thousands of NC residents that did not and do not hold that view. That is shameful.

Put Sam right back where he was and erect a small barrier around him so that he can still be honored and
viewed by the proud citizens of Orange County and NC without being damaged and/or destroyed by domestic
terrorist's bent on causing division within our community.

Anything less and many people (myself included) will continue to boycott your school and sport teams. I refuse
to spend one cent in Chapel Hill until Sam is placed back at his rightful home.
Message
From: Eric Avery
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:55:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am for returning Silent Sam back in his original position. I view this as history. It part of our history.
Let people learn from this. Slavery is abominable. Hiding it may be worse. Look at Kavanaugh's
situation. Whether is it true or not ... should we hide from it and not address it?
Many noble men like Robert E.Lee fought for states rights. He wrestled with his decision. He had
been the superintendent of West Point. We are not talking about a radical here, but a fervent
American Soldier. He said 'as Virginia goes; I go'
Let us keep the discussion going if it needs to. Apparently, we are not, as a country, done with this
discussion. Let us not hide.
Thanks so much. Eric

Eric Avery, PhD


Message
From: Jonathan Varnell
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:56:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The future of Confederate monument Si lent Sam

Dear UNG-Chapel Hill,

We were highly disappointed with the leadership of the university in their handling of the mob that
descended upon the campus and tore down the memorial dedicated to the students of the school that
went off to war to fight for their state. It almost seemed that it was "allowed," to happen. While we
certainly hope that this is not the case we implore that the university;

1) Restore and protect the memorial as per NC state law

2) Understand that the university has no authority to move it so that it can be re-contextualized or
curated with modern-day lies about its supposed connection to white supremacy

3) Understand that the university belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist
minority of paid activists

These are the points we want you to take into account as feedback from REAL North Carolinians who
pay the taxes that fund this university.

Sincerely,

Jonathan Varnell
Message
From: Caro lyn Green
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:56:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

What should you do with the monument?

The only course of action available to the University under the law is to restore and protect the monument.

Under said law no authority is given to remove a statute so as to re-sign textualist or curate it with lies told
about white supremacy.

Further, the University of North Carolina belongs to the people of North Carolina. NOT to an extremist
minority of paid activists.

Thanks for your regard in this matter.

Sincerely,

Carolyn R Green

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Message
From: Graham Patterson
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:57:56 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Folt:


It is apparent from where you were born and where most of your academic
life was spent that you have no appreciation for the South or Southern
history. You were taught the liturgy of Lincoln as a demi-God and that
since the South had slaves we must have been at great fault in staring the
war. But everything that you assume is probably wrong.
Lincoln started the war and instigated the firing on Ft. Sumter when he
promised to withdraw US troops and in contradiction to that promise
reinforced the troops there. By legislation and agreement of 1794 the
states gave the US gov't permission to establish forts at certain harbors but
the states were in perpetuity to have ownership of the land at those
harbors. Lincoln started the war with out legislative action (required by
the US Constitution) and his primary goal was to protect the revenue that
the South was sure to now keep for itself that the onerous tariffs delivered
to the Northern states for "internal improvements".
Silent Sam represents the devotion and honor of the sons of UNC who
sacrificed their lives and limbs to their state and their new country. They
were defending their homes and property from invasion by a tyrant who in
his own country dissolved the US Constitution and denied its citizens the
following rights: right to free speech, right to assemble, and the right of a
fair trial, right to know any charges that were being lodged against oneself,
the right to know who his accusers were, etc. The right to a free press
were also eliminated in the US by Lincoln (he either closed down over one
hundred newspapers or had printing equipment destroyed. It was the new
nation of the Confederacy whose Constitution in fact protected all those
rights that now under the US Constitution were denied by Lincoln. The
boys and young men of UNC joined with their fellow North Carolinians to
fight a tyrant.
This monument by NC law should be replaced at its former site and
should hence be protected by those who had previously sworn to protect
it. We are a state governed by laws not men Ms. Folt. Apparently your
time in Ohio, California and New Hampshire did not teach you that
concept. I posit that you were instrumental in the breaking of the
Monument Law and other laws by allowing ANTIF A to destroy Silent
Sam. To not repair Silent Sam to its former position and failure to protect
this hallowed statue is a crime against history and the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Shame on you and all your Northern
demagogues.
Sincerely,
Graham B. Patterson
Message
From: Robert Daly
Sent: 9/24/2018 8:59:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Silent Sam should be put back in the same place as he's stood for all these years.
Anything else would be a capitulation, and an insult to our Southern Heritage.
Furthermore, if True History were taught in school, instead of the vile lies, and distorted views of Yankee
history. We ,most likely, wouldn't be having these radicals destroying public property.
Message
From: Kate
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:04:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I'm a 1974/1977 graduate. I think many people are upset with the dedication of the statue and all of the
negative symbolism around the dedication. History is history and we can't change it. I'm from the
Midwest and believe Confederate soldiers have a place in our history and should not be lost. I appreciate
the memorial to the African Americans on whose back the university was built. If silent Sam is moved, so
should that Memorial.
Kathryn Whittington Enchelmayer '74, '77
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Christopher
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:07:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put the monument honoring veterans of both North Carolina and UNC back where it was. Do not allow
terrorists to rewrite history
Message
From: Heather Ahn-Redding
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:07:49 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,

As per your call for suggestions regarding the future of Silent Sam, I urge you to petition the NC Historical
Commission and request the statue's permanent removal from UNC grounds. As you know, its presence on
your campus is causing a disruption to the well-being and safety of your campus community. It is also a hate
symbol, which alone should suffice as reason for its permanent removal.

Alternatively, you could sell Silent Sam as government surplus. I'm sure a confederate heritage group would
love to take the monument off your hands.

Should you decide to relocate Silent Sam on UNC's campus, I fear the disruptions will only escalate and
continue until your university decides to stop paying homage to confederate symbols. Silent Sam and its
remaining pedestal are tributes to the NC United Daughters of the Confederacy, a group who perpetuate
historical inaccuracies, revisionist narratives, and white supremacist propaganda. The UDC endorsed the KKK
around the time Silent Sam was erected and has not changed since.
This 1914 publication by Laura Martin Rose venerates the KKK, and was endorsed by the UDC who wanted to
place it in schools and libraries throughout the country. This is the group whom you honor by keeping Silent
Sam and its pedestal on campus. This is the group whose interests you place above your own dedicated,
intelligent, and wonderfully diverse students.

https://books.google.com/books?id=l YivifAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Ku+Klux+Klan%3A+
or+Invisible+empire+Bv+Laura+Maiiin+Rose&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjv5uml-
5nKAhUBGh4KHZprB0oQ6AEII-IDAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

I call upon you to put your students of color, your faculty and staff of color, your campus community, and your
morals above the interests of donors and the NCGA. Do this for the sake of advancing racial equity; do it
because you care about the legacy of UNC and because Silent Sam is a stain on its reputation. Do it for your
graduates of color who would like to wave their diplomas with pride; do it to acknowledge the prevalence of
racism and white supremacy that exists in full force today. Do it to because it's your job and because your
community has asked you to repeatedly for decades.

If you cannot take the simple step to remove a symbol of white supremacy from your campus in the year 2018, I
urge you to resign your office, as you are unfit to lead the university.

Sincerely,

Dr. Heather Ahn-Redding


Orange County resident
Message
From: Gisele Crawford
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:10:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: NC museum of history

I suggest Silent Sam be placed in an exhibit at the NC museum of history. The exhibit can include facts about
North Carolinians who fought for the Confederacy and the Union, and quotes from the speeches made at the
statue's dedication, including the infamous one about horsewhipping a woman, as well as information about the
current controversy.
Message
From: Donna
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:15:48 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam should and must be returned to his original pedestal. You cannot destroy history and he
was illegally removed from his historical placing. And the text exchange from Winston Crisp published
by the DTH pushed me over the edge on this issue.

Return him to his place.

Donna Winston Laney RN -BC, BSN


BSN 1980
Message
From: Jenn Brock
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:22:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thank you for allowing everyone a voice in this. I believe Silent Sam should remain on school
grounds, but expand his meaning to represent UNC students that answered the military call through
all battles since the college's conception. Make that clear on the plaque & in the rededication
ceremony. Have VFW & reenactors present & show solidarity among all the generations of military.
Not every battle or war is honored in its lifetime or after, but we honor all our military who fought to
protect their homes & the freedoms of their loved ones.

Sincere regards,
Jennifer Brock
Message
From: Kim Piracc i
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:27:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ient s/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam display

There is an excellent Ted talk by black artist Titus Kaphar. I highly recommend that you watch it before you
decide what to do with Silent Sam.

Based on that talk, this is an excellent opportunity to educate people on the contributions of African Americans
in Southern Culture. Even if you put SS back where he was, you could erect another stature nearby, perhaps
depicting a slave woman having her small child tom from her arms, with a detailed explanation of the types of
cruelty slaves were subjected to. Put to rest the notion of benevolent slave owners.
But I do like the idea of also highlighting the contributions of slaves, making the "Southern way of life" even a
possibility.

Respectfully submitted,
Kim Piracci

Kim Piracci
Graduate Gemologist

www.ncjewelrvappraiser.com
Message
From: Jordan Hucks
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:29:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Good evening,
I am emailing you in regards to the silent Sam memorial. I believe it is our job to remember
history; not to try an decipher it. I am active duty Air Force and a North Carolina native. It breaks my
heart, to see the assaults on North Carolina history, by vigilantes. They must not win! Th is isn't about
trying to make people feel good. It's about remembering those brave students who answered the cal l to
battle. North Carolina and it's Governor demanded their service s in a time of need. Applying today's
logic and morals does not do them any justice. This memorial isn't just a reminder of the UNC students
who fought and lost their lives. It's a representation of all the North Carolina troops who served. I had
5 grand fathers serve in North Carolina and I'm proud of them. I served in Afghanistan myself. I know
about war and sacrifice. Their loyalty was tested and they passed the test. Now, it's our time to be
loyal to their memory and do what is right. silent Sam should be restored per state law and be forever
protected. I hope you sincerely t hink about your next steps. I love t he University of North Ca r olina in
chapel Hill. chancellor, I urge you to do what's right and restore the memorial.
God Bless!
Very respectfully,
ssgt Jordan Hucks
Message
From: Straughn, Kerry [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =384 fc6c3cdf043a4b5bde2 ldef9a05a 1-Kerry Scott]
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:31:09 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think a good place for Silent Sam is in the NC Collection in Wilson Library

Kerry Straughn
Life Safety and Access Control

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:33:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The students & people protesting the


Silent Sam statue are doing so, it seems,
merely for attention & publicity. A statue is NOT a public attack on any person. A Civil War statue has nothing
to do with racism or white supremacy. The Civil War is an important part of United States history. In fact, a
very significient part because it was the very root of the elimination of slavery & segregation.
No one can fault any generals, officers, enlisted soldiers, or anyone in the Lincoln administration, for the
bringing of blacks to America & enslaving them. It was what was happening in the world at the time. The states
went to war. People chose sides. Some military officers stood out as strong, competent leaders on both sides of
the war as did the determination of the soldiers in their cause. Any could have a statue, a commendation,
plaque, or other
award the same as one could today.
Everything is NOT about race. All races have equal rights these days. No one is trying to suppress blacks,
Latinos, Asians, anyone, hopefully, including white Civil War
heroes. Let the statue have its place in American History. Hopefully, the people will
want to learn the history of this country.
It should start in grade school, and should be reinterated through high school and college. We are a strong, free
country, the greatest on Earth. Let us be thankful and proud that we live in the US and can visit, enjoy, and learn
from all the heroes in our
past. Let the statue stand in a proud, special, conspicuous place on campus.

Sent ti-om my Verizon, Samsung


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:38:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for relocation of Silent Sam
Message
From: Barry Clendenin
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:40:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: A Recommendation

Thank you for the opportunity to offer a view on this issue:

In my graduate student days at UNC (1969; [US Army 1969-1972]; 1972-1975), I


occasionally walked past the Silent Sam statue, giving it some thought that it seemed
out of place given greater civil rights awareness arising from the 1960s. I did not
consider removing the statue but probably would not have objected. The timing of the
placement of many statues across court house lawns in the South puts them all at risk
it seems as one observes the rancor across our population on almost every public policy
issue. The timing issue recalls in 1ny mind that the statues were in many ways Jim Crow
endorsing statues supporting the policies of the Democratic Party in the South as
organized in the late 19th century through at least the mid-20th century.

Recommendation:

The University has a challenge in resolving how to deal with this particular statue. If
asked, I would recommend moving the statue to a museum in Raleigh. I would also
recommend that the university move quickly to resolve the location issue, recognizing
that there will be unhappy views whatever the decision.

Good luck

Barry Clendenin
UNC-CH, PhD [History, 1975]
Message
From: mary freeland
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:49:26 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I respectfully request that Silent Sam be put back where he belongs. I have lived here for 71 years and worked 28 years of them at
UNC-CH. I had never thought of this monument as a danger and looked upon it as history. So let him go back to his rightful spot on
this campus. The people against him half or more don't even live here to begin with. End of story. Mary Freeland
Message
From: Jessica Reinholz
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:49:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam should stay down

Thank you for taking public comment on this important issue. As a unc alum, it has troubled me how the
administration has not listened to students, staff and faculty's calls for the removal of silent Sam. It is my hope
that the statue will stay permanently removed and something honoring the complex history unc has had with
race is added-honoring the diverse people who have contributed to its history instead of a symbol of hate and
white supremacy.

Thank you,
Jessica Reinholz

Jessica Reinholz, MSW


Message
From: Danny Rymer
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:53:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Statue

I would stand firm and hold your ground. Tell the aggressors to pack Sand as we the southern people are
tired of being run over by the lies they print in their books and teach lies about the south. Now if they
insist in removing the statue still. Tell them to remove the statue and destroy every statue of their
pride illegitimate born President Abraham Lincoln. Nancy Hanks his mother was an illegitimate born child
too.
If they don't then stand your ground.
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Price, Wayne A [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=C5AC08A041C34533B27414264EB271BF-WAYNE A PRI]
Sent: 9/24/2018 9:59:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: my thoughts

I feel very strongly that this monument does NOT belong on campus but in a museum with the whole story of the
monument presented.

Wayne Price
Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:12:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

silent Sam must be installed according to the statute: "if an object of remembrance is removed, it must
be relocated to a place of equal honor, accessibility, prominence, visibility and availability." The
individuals who make "Sam" out to be a monument to "white supremacy" have not st udied the civil War as
some of us have. Until you read the words written by the people of the time, you cannot make an honest
judgement. It's a monument to the fallen UNC students. Nothing more, nothing less.
I am a white sout her n man and don't apolog ize for it. I am the great-great-grandson of a Confederate
veteran and I don't apologize for that either.
Jeffrey M. Clayton, M.Ed.
UNC class of 1990
Native North Carolinian
Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like crazy
Life Blu Health
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5ba999ce7ccf919ce740cst04duc
Message
From: Chris Goodson
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:25:02 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Let's move on

As a freshman in 1990, I walked by Silent Sam a lot on my way to Franklin Street. Growing up with good
parents, I already knew better than to romanticize the Confederacy, but the words on the side of the statue about
duty being a sublime word made me wonder. Maybe it was okay to honor the sacrifice of Confederate alumni.
It wasn't until a few years later after some exceedingly good history classes (thank you professor Leloudis) that
I realized that I had been hoodwinked. I learned about the resurgent white supremacy of the early 20th century
and how the lie of the Lost Cause was started in part to keep poor whites too busy hating poor blacks to notice
the rich man keeping everyone down.
Without context, without a grounding in the history of when it was erected, that statue is nothing but a lie. A lie
created to push the myth that the Confederacy was something more than a brutal, repressive horror show.
The UNC I attended didn't truck with lies. I learned to be honest at Carolina. Brutally honest if need be when it
came to the truth of things. Honest enough to even challenge my own preconceptions.
Leave it down. If there's space somewhere in a museum basement, fine. Put it there surrounded by excepts of
Julian Carr's reprehensible speech. Put of pictures of lynchings and descriptions of the racist politics of the
early 20th century in our state. Give it context so that students who see it aren't tricked by the lie.
But let's be clear. Don't put it back up. I don't want my university to be seen erecting a monument to the
Confederacy in 2018. Not only would it be an embarrassment, but it would be putting up a new lie. I won't
support a university that lies.
Leave it down.

Chris Goodson
Class of 1994

n
Chris Goodson
......................:
Message
From: Tim Tyler
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:26:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam ideas

Hello,

I am a resident of unincorporated Chatham County.,

I understand the feelings of people who support the Silent Sam memorial at its traditional location, and although
I think their sentiments are misguided I respect their sincerity and passion.

In my opinion, Silent Sam is, and has been for many years, a symbol of both division and racial inequality in
our community. This is remarkably punctuated by the recent protests that have not ended with the toppling of
the memorial. Silent Sam is perceived by many, rightly or wrongly, as a symbol of racial oppression and
political divide. The memorial is antiquated and does not reflect the diversity of our state, our community, or
the campus of UNC Chapel Hill.

I know many will suggest that we should melt Silent Sam down, or throw the statue in the ocean, or consign it
to a trash heap. I suggest that Silent Sam still has a place in our collective learning - we should not forget our
Civil War. It should be relocated to the Museum of History in Raleigh, where a proper and educational exhibit
can be created to describe it's history and significance - and it can be more conveniently observed by the total
population of the Triangle and more broadly the state, whether they come from Appalachia or the Outer Banks
or right here in the Piedmont.

At its previous location, on the pedestal that it previously stood, I propose we erect a new monument that
symbolizes the unity of our great nation and the amazing diversity of the citizens of North Carolina. This would
truly reflect the honor of our state, and the dignity of the UNC system of colleges, and the diversity and
academic greatness of our college that stands in Chapel Hill.

Regards,
Tim Tyler
Message
From: Lisa Gerardi
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:31:33 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please don't put that statue back up. I am an alumnus ofUNC-CH. I graduated in 2006. I thought it was
ridiculous that it was there in the first place and I'm even more offended that you would consider putting it back.
Put him in a museum if you want. But not on a campus where black and brown students who are pursuing their
higher education will have to see him and be reminded of a despicable past in which they would not be allowed
to receive an education and would not even be considered a full human with rights. White people need to be
reminded that this past was despicable then and should not be commemorated or remembered in any kind of
way that continues to inflict pain on another human. We need to honor that this stupid statue is a thing. A thing
that reminds human beings that they have been and to many extents still are viewed as less than white. It needs
to go. Lay Silent Sam to rest and take a stand for all students. Letting him go hurts no one. Keeping him does.
End white supremacy and join the right side of history.

Thank you,
Lisa Gerardi
Message
From: Jim Campbell
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:37:13 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam ... ..

I support restoration of the statue and returning it to its place on Campus prior to its destruction.

Regards,
Jim
Message
From: Adam Bolch
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:38:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please do not reinstate this monument. There are many other better uses for the university's funds.
Message
From: Judith & Arthur Marks
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:39:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposal of Si lent Sam

Donate it to some Confederate war dead cemetery. Appropriately placed he can remain there in dignity and
probably increasingly forgotten.

Judith L. Marks/Arthur S. Marks


Message
From: Emily Moose
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:49:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The monument

Hello,
Thanks for receiving public input on this. As an NC native and descendant of at least one Confederate soldier
(and a number ofUNC alumni) I urge you to permanently remove this monument from our civic space. For
those who want to preserve it I suggest a museum or a cemetery where it can be appropriately contextualized,
and people can choose to visit or not. A monument to an assault on human rights at a state educational
institution is inconsistent with the values of a representative democracy.
Thank you,
Emily Moose
Message
From: Chris van Hasselt
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:51:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: A better way to honor UNC service

First, I am frankly glad that someone finally pulled down Silent Sam. It had long ago lost any value as anything
but a flashpoint for protest.

UNC students and did serve on the Confederate side, as well as the Union side in the Civil War as I understand
it from reading. North Carolina as a whole mostly supported the Confederacy, but 8000 or so Tar Heels fought
for the North. ( http://www.ncgenweb.us/ncuv/forgotl.htm) There were four "Negro" regiments in support of
the Union as well.

So unlike the historical fiction Silent Sam portrays, there was a more complicated story to NC participation in
the Civil War. With the benefit of hindsight and historical knowledge - not supposition and fantasy - we should
present a truthful history. Both white and black North Carolinians fought for the North. Many fought for the
south. Yet all were intertwined by a common thread of being North Carolinians - some in bondage, to be sure -
who all spilled blood in the battle save the soul of our country. A proper memorial should confront the eternal
questions of why we go to war? Why can't we learn to live with respect for our neighbors in peace? Why do
we treat a people as inferior for the color of their skin, or the religion they choose?

I don't know how these ideas can be represented in stone or metal, I'll leave that to real artists. But lets not
return this work of historical fiction to a place of honor in the midst of the halls of learning and truth.

Sincerely,
Chris van Hasselt
Carrboro NC

P.S. I live in Carrboro, a town named for the racist Julian Carr, and every day I try to do something that makes
him roll in his grave!

p
Message
From: caldwell linker
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:54:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

A confederate graveyard, or a battlefield that already has memorials or is preserved in some way. Maybe
even a museum.
Thank you for not putting it back up on campus though.
Another option, somewhere on duke campus since so many high profile racists seem connected to duke these
days (mostly kidding).
I am a UNC grad and so are my father and uncle. Born in chapel hill and took my literal first steps at
the student union. 7+ generations North Carolinian on my dads side, 7+ generation southerner on my moms
including some roots that trace back to NC. Defendant of confederate soldiers and revolutionary
soldiers.
Thanks for putting time and thought into this. Wish you'd just taken the damn thing down awhile ago
though
Emma caldwell Linker
class of 2000ish
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Sherryl Kleinman
Sent: 9/24/2018 10:58:01 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Be on the right side of history

Everyone knows, at this point, that Silent Sam was put on campus at that particular time in order to
reinforce white supremacy and that the dedication speech was racist and violent. There is nothing to
be gained by keeping it. If anyone wants to tell the real story of Silent Sam there could be a
pennanent exhibit in Wilson Library, with photographs of the monument, text materials, and so on.
There is no need for the STATUE to be included. Also, UNC-Chapel Hill already has two
memorials to fonner students who died during wars, including Confederate soldiers:

1) "The Book of Names" (outside, between Memorial Hall and Phillips Hall), and 2) on the walls
(beside the stage) in Memorial Hall. There is no "need" for Silent Sam.

-Sherryl Kleinman, Professor Emerita of Sociology, UNC-Chapel Hill


Message
From: Tod Puckett
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:01:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,

Silent Sam was a memorial to fallen Alumni Soldiers. A "racist" stigma has been placed on it, but it is an
inanimate piece of art and although art always illicits different feelings in everyone, the actual meaning can only
be explained by the artist or the person who commissioned the piece.

Silent Sam should be placed back on its pedestal and dedicated to the fallen Alumni from all wars, and to the
vigilant pursuit of lasting peace that every Soldier prays for.

Tod Puckett
Rougemont, Orange County
Message
From: Jane BI
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:13:08 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monuments

Silent Sam needs to be repaied and returned to his original place. Period.
Message
From: Sharon House
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:17:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please put at Wilson Library or some other place

To whom it may concern:

Please put Silent Sam at Wilson Library or some other place, NOT back where it stood.

Thanks
Sharon House
Lifelong Orange Co resident, UNC Class of 2013, Long time UNC staff employee
Message
From: Leslie Kidder
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:19:38 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Please place the silent Sam statue in its' original location.


Opposite or beside it let's erect another complimentary statue that demonstrates freedom from slavery of
all races /he r itage.

Thank you.
Leslie Kidder
Message
From: Abner Wright [abner@freemancommercial.com]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:20:43 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Sam

Put him back. Do not reward criminal actions of destruction of state property by relocating.

Sincerely,

Abner Wright
commercial Broker
Freeman commercial Real Estate
REDACTED

Abner@Freemancommercial.com

Sent from my I-phone. Please excuse misspellings and incorrect wording


Message
From: Shannon Graesslin
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:23:21 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam ...

How about putting it in a hall somewhere on campus still and maybe include more of it's history along
with the original plaque and a retelling of what was/is going on at this time, the time of it 1st topple,
to ultimate removal and replacement.
Maybe including other photos, statues in question or mementoes of this happening elsewhere may help shed
some light on the why of t his existence.
Give the area a name? call it, "The Sins of our Past" or
"Forward Towards an Better Future" or "Forward Towards Equal Union"? ...
my idea. • □
Good luck•

Shannon Graesslin
Message
From: Ernest Blevins [blevinsee@g.cofc.edu]
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:33:41 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monuments and Community Memory

There are talks about how to address Confederate Monuments that entirely fail to understand the history and
context of the monuments when they were installed. I offer this piece which appeared about a year ago in the
Newnan Georgia paper as a guest column.

Confederate monuments are community memorials


By Ernest Everett Blevins, MF A Historic Preservation

• The Newnan Times-Herald


• Sep. 27, 2017 - 10:41 PM

In most cases, Confederate Monuments have existed over 100 years.

These were raised primarily in honor of the local veterans who never returned home, as most say "Confederate
Dead" on them. Many have funeral symbols incorporated into them such as the cut-off stump or log,
symbolizing a life cut short.e in the know the moment news happens

Clearly, these monuments are community memorials. Other communities have chosen to honor the politicians
and generals of the Confederacy during the post-war Monument Movement.

Before about 1877, many Confederate monuments were located in the cemeteries and post-1877 they began to
appear in public spaces. The Monument Movement was not a Southern movement. It was a national movement
as Northern states placed monuments to those who "Defended the Union" or "Preserved the Union" and their
generals. These occurred simultaneously to honor those that served. The Union monuments went up in public
spaces from the beginning.

The memorials served as a healing process of the nation. In both cases, ladies' associations, monument
associations, and veterans raised the funds for the monuments. Union veterans, organized as the Grand Army of
the Republic, were present and even spoke at many Confederate Monument dedications.

Monument inscriptions vary from Spartanburg, South Carolina's purpose to "teach our children's children to
the honor the memory and the heroic deeds in the Southern soldier who fought for his rights granted to him
under the Constitution" to Carroll County, Georgia's lines from "How Sleep the Brave" (1757) by William
Collins, an English poet.

Like Carroll County's, the Augusta monument takes an English poem. The entire poem is: "Thy Troy is fallen,
thy dear land Is marred beneath the spoiler's heel; I cannot trust my trembling hand To write the things I feel.
Ah, realm of tears! but let her bear This blazon to the end of time: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so
pure of crime. The widow's moan, the orphan's wail, Come round thee; but in truth be strong! Eternal Right,
though all else fail, Can never be made wrong. An angel's heart, an angel's mouth, Not Homer's, could alone
for me Hymn well the great Confederate South - Virginia, first, and Lee."
The poem is by Philip Stanhope Worsley of Oxford, England who wrote it about General Lee. However, as
common in literature, context is important. The references to white and fair are better interpreted as pure and
fair - such as to the ideas of the Constitution.

The interpretation of the Constitution was one of the multiple causes of the war. In the 19th century, it was
undetermined whether a state that voluntarily joined a union could leave it. The Constitution did not address
this, and it took a war to answer the question.

As for traitors, the 19th-century citizens generally considered themselves first as a state citizen then as a
national citizen. Lee, who considered himself a Virginian, notably went with Virginia. Other officers in the U.S.
Army before the war left to join with their states. Even the immediate past U.S. Vice President Breckenridge
was a Confederate general.

In the end, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was held for treason, but never put on trial. The fear, even
from Supreme Court justices, was if such a charge made it to the court that secession could be declared
constitutional - thus overturning the result of the war.

Monuments to the Union side are just as valuable, and, when appropriate, might be in similar locales to
Confederate monuments. However, monuments should not have to have a counterpoint of view. The writer
suggests placing "Northern figures like Lincoln and heroes like Harriet Tubman" for a balance.

In proposing this, should monuments to Lincoln be countered with Confederate monuments? Should Lincoln's
1858 quote be placed for context to put him in context as the typical man of the 19th-century? Lincoln stated, "I
will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political
equality of the black and white races - that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of
negroes, nor of qualifying them hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to
this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the
two races living together on terms of social and political equality."

We as Americans should condemn white supremacy. However, since 2015, the racists are rising for a war just
as Dylann Roof hoped to provoke with his murders. Sadly, the liberals are fulfilling it by attacking American
cultural artifacts of remembrance, inaccurately putting presentism of meaning into historical resources.

As the monuments fall, the nation fractures. Instead of destroying monuments, it would be better to build
monuments and expand the story. That's what Charleston, South Carolina did. A monument was placed in a
park to the slave revolt leader Denmark Vesey. In 1822, he was a criminal and hanged. When installed before
Roof's shooting some thought him as a hero. No matter the view, he was an influence on history. His monument
attests to that.

The Union and Confederate veterans themselves did much better at unifying. As we continue down the
Monument Removal path, Dylann Roof wins and America loses.

****end article***

Ernest Everett Blevins, MF A


Message
From: Anna Watkins
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:44:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Melt him down, and have a new statue made to honor an African American woman since Silent Sam only
represented hate toward African Americans and disrespect toward women.
Take a picture for a museum, and get rid of him. He's taken up too much space for far too long.

Anna Watkins, MSW, LCSW


Class of 2004 and 2007
Message
From: Vernon & Susan Strickland
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:46:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Historic Monument

Restore the historic monument!


Message
From:
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:58:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: UNC monument disposition

Dear chancellor Folt and Trustees,


I'm writing to ask you to put the "silent Sam" monument in a basement archive somewhere, and to not
reinstate it in its former position on campus, or in any publicly visible position on campus. It is
hurtful and a shameful part of our North Carolina history.
Thank you,
RED ACTED UNC '91
Message
From: Anne McLaughlin
Sent: 9/24/2018 11:58:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Melt down the statue or put it in a confederate graveyard

Option 1: Melt down the statue


Option 2: Put it in a confederate graveyard with a plaque explaining why it is not a monument, just a
relic of a racist era
Message
From: Cayce E Dorrier [cdorrier@ucsd.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:05:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument movement

To whom it may concern,

As a former student I believe the monument can no longer remain in its previous location. Placing the monument in any
highly trafficked area of campus would be a sign that UNC is stuck in the past and not looking forward. I recommend that
the statue be moved to deep inside Battle Park. Preferably not along any trails, so it can technically be on campus while
not being easily viewed or accessible. In the place of the old statue erect one of Michael Jordan.

Good luck with this difficult decision .


Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:34:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
CC: Kirk Lyons
Subject: NCMRP NC SILENT SAM

Dear Ms Falt

uncmonument@unc.edu

1) The only course of action available to the University under the law is to restore and protect the Silent Sam memorial.

2) UNC has no authority to move it so that they can be re-contextualized or curated with modern-day political
correctness.

3) The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist marxist minority of paid thug activists.

Sincerely,

REDACTED Black
Mountain
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:39:53 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

While people want to do away with Silent Sam you have to remember that he represents the students from UNC
who went to war. Some of them did not return. Put silent Sam back upon his pedest al. Thank you, REDACTED
Fayetteville
Message
From: Alana Cagle
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:42:37 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

Place the monument back where it belongs it is the law. Then build some type of protection around it.
We cannot allow people to destroy monuments based on feelings. This is like allowing a child who does
wrong to get by with it. They were allowed to destroy that monument which was the biggest mistake the
police department made.
Thanks,
Alana Cagle
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: angela cheek
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:56:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Memorial Statue

Dear chancellor Folt:


Thank you for the opportunity to let the community weigh in on the memorial statue for students who
served in the War Between the States. The only course of action from a legal and moral standpoint, is to
immediately restore the statue to its rightful place, and institute whatever measures are necessary to
guarantee the future security of the memorial . Moving it to another location in the name of "safety" or
"proper context" or "correcting the historical record" is not an option, period. This is the
University of North Carolina, established and funded by the people of North Carolina, who have repeatedly
expressed their support for Confederate memorials like this one. To let savage vandals determine the
University's policy is insanity.

Cordially.
Angela cheek
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 1:13:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt,

silent Sam needs to be restored to his place at UNC. As the people of North Carolina' s university and
the nation' s first public university, you must hold and exemplify steadfast resilience and conviction.
We must not shrink to the ever changing whims of the hateful few. our history can not and will
not be destroyed and redefined by hoodlums and malcontents.

I' m certain my ancestors, who trained at UNC and practiced medicine in The Great North State, would want
our fine history preserved and protected. Relocation of the monument is not an option as it would isolate
and minimize the meaning of the Boy Soldier.
The only historical, ethical, patriotic and legal course of action available to the University is to
restore and protect the Silent Sam monument at its original and intended location, properly honoring
those North Carolinians who served and fought with conviction and honor in their time, in their place for
a cause they truly believed in. This is our history!
Sincerely,
REDACTED
High Point, NC
Message
From: et morgan
Sent: 9/25/2018 1:59:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: New Location for Silent Sam ...

Ms. Folt is wrong to want to re-install it ANYwhere on campus.

Take it down to the North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center in Fayetteville.

Thanks ,
ET Morgan
Message
From: Cindy
Sent: 9/25/2018 2:01:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Since the monument will get no respect from your institution, faculty, or students, I would strongly suggest turning it over
to the local Sons of Confederate Veterans, or the United Daughters of the Confederacy, since they are the ones who paid
for it, out of love, honor, and respect for your patriotic military veterans.
Message
From: marty shamb ley
Sent: 9/25/2018 2:09:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The memorial statue for the students ofUNC, who participated in the Civil War, should be returned to its
original location.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 2:31:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My opinion about what should be done with all Confederate themed statues is that they should be placed in a
museum as an historical piece so those who wish to view them can do so and those ofus not wanting to see
them may avoid the negative representation.

Sincerely,
REDACTED

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Message
From: charles Moore
Sent: 9/25/2018 5:55:37 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam monument

Hello, I would like to say that the Silent Sam monument was put up for the one's that went to UNC
and fought and died during the War between the states. I don't like to say the " Civil WAR " because
there was NOTHING civil about it ! Most of the one's that fought for the south had NO idea what they
were even fighting for . It was NOT about slavery , because Pres. Lincoln had slaves . The North
came down here and murdered, killed and even RAPED thousand's of men, women and children.
This monument belongs to the people of North Carolina . NOT theses PAID activist who destroy
ANYTHING if they can't get there way! They came to UNC and destroyed Silent Sam . The UNC
Police and Chapel Hill Police stood back while they put up the wood, ropes and tarps around him
and WATCHED the mod pull him down, and THEN went over and stood around Silent Sam when he
was on the ground. I know that because I WAS THERE ! I was one of many that stood in support of
him . People like me NEVER show hate or violence. WE believe in what is the TRUTH and NOT the
racist lies these people and the media want you and others to believe . This is monument is there at
UNC for a reason ! DON'T let these uneducated idiots get there way. The students at UNC didn't pull
him down, THEY the activist mob did.
Also it is the LAW that it must be put back up within 90 days. You know it and I know that . So I BEG
you to PLEASE put Silent Sam back where he belongs. He is a boy with a unloaded gun and NO
bullets , no words just Silent .The people of North Carolina's Boy !
PUT HIM BACK. The people want him where he was meant to be . At home at UNC. Thank you and
God bless.
Message
From: Lance Spivey
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:08:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Chancellor Falt,

My name is Lance Spivey. I am writing this letter in support of placing the Silent Sam Monument back upon its
pedestal in Mccorkle Place on the campus of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

I am a twelfth generation North Carolinian and Adjutant of the Sons of Confederate Veterans Captain Winfield
Scott Lineberry Camp 92 in Asheboro, North Carolina. I am extremely proud to be a native of a state with such a history
as North Carolina has, and to have roots here that are over three hundred years deep. My ancestors served this nation
in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the War of Northern Aggression. Members of my family also served
this country in World Wars I and II, Korea, and Vietnam. Each and every one of them fought for the cause of freedom
and the destruction of monuments such as Silent Sam dishonor them all.

The destruction of these monuments is nothing more than an attempt to erase history, both by those who are
ignorant of the true facts of our nation's history and those that would destroy our way of life, and history forgotten is
history that shall be repeated. Our schools are, in great part, responsible for the ignorance of the greater majority of our
nation's citizens, because they conform to standards that not only hide the truth, but also pervert that truth to fit a
greater political agenda.

The truth is that the South did not secede from the Union in order to preserve the institution of slavery; slavery
was not even an issue in the War until Lincoln began to lose support for his unconstitutional invasion of the Confederate
States of America in 1862, at which point he decided to make it an issue with Proclamation 93, issued September 22,
1862. The Thirteenth Amendment was not even introduced to Congress until January 11, 1864, two years, eight
months, and twenty-nine days after the first shot of the War. In the Border States of Kentucky (recognized as a
member-state by both the Union and the Confederacy) and Delaware, there were approximately 40,000 slaves that
were not freed until the Thirteenth Amendment was ratified on 6 December, 1865; there were slaves in Northern states
not only during the War, but for six months and four days after it ended; ten months and six days after Congress passed
the Thirteenth Amendment. On the other hand was the Corwin Amendment, the first proposed thirteenth amendment
to the Constitution of the United States, which would have made slavery a permanent institution in the slave-states and
territories.

The Corwin Amendment was passed by the United States Senate on March 2, 1861, and signed into law by
President James Buchanan that same day. In his first Inaugural Address, Abraham Lincoln said of the Corwin
Amendment, "I understand a proposed amendment to the Constitution [the Corwin Amendment] ... has passed
Congress, to the effect that the Federal Government shall never interfere with the domestic institutions of the States,
including that of persons held to service ... I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable." The Corwin
Amendment was ratified by Maryland on January 10, 1862. The fifty counties in Northwestern Virginia which would
eventually become the Union state of West Virginia ratified the amendment on February 13, 1862, and Illinois ratified it
the next day. All three were Union states, yet they were willing to make slavery a permanent institution in this
country. As to the origin of the Corwin Amendment, my research shows that not only may Lincoln have had a hand in its
creation; he may have actually penned it himself. Either way, the fact remains that the "Great Emancipator" had no
problem with the institution of slavery being made permanent by Constitutional Law. In Paragraph 4 of that same
address, Lincoln said, "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States
where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so." In a letter to Horace
Greeley, founder and editor of the New-York Tribune, on August 22, 1862, Lincoln wrote, "If I could save the Union
without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by
freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that." So, I ask you, how could slavery have been the cause of the
War when so many Northerners, including Federal government officials, were willing to make it permanently legal?

I would also make the point that only ten to fifteen percent of the men in the Confederate forces were
slaveholders. Is it in any way logical that over one million non-slaveholders would go to war, would literally walk into
the jaws of death, so that somebody else could keep his slaves? I think not. My great-great-great grandfather, Private
th
James Scott (1825-1926), whose family was part of the Underground Railroad, served in Company E (Turtle Paws), 44
North Carolina Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia. He saw action at Seven Pines, Tranter's Creek, Goldsboro Bridge,
Deep Gully, Bristoe Station, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, Globe Tavern, Ream's Station,
Peebles' Farm, Burgess' Mill, and Five Forks, among others. He participated in the freeing of slaves, yet he wore the
Gray... Does that sound like a man fighting for the preservation of such an abhorrent institution as slavery?

The truth is that the War was about money. South Carolina seceded because of the inevitable passing of the
Morrill Tariff by the United States Congress. Virginia and the other Confederate states seceded because Lincoln
intended to make war upon South Carolina in order to collect taxes unfairly levied by the United States government, and
they felt this was a violation of states' rights and the Constitution. On September 27, 1860, Representative Thaddeus
Stevens of Pennsylvania, during a speech in New York City, said that of the two most important issues of the Presidential
campaign, preventing the expansion of slavery into new states and passing the Morrill Tariff, the new tariff was the most
important. He said that the tariff would bring great prosperity to the Northeast, and would impoverish the South, along
with the western states. It was, he told the crowd, essential to the advancement of national greatness and to bringing
prosperity to the industrial workers of the North. He also said that if Southern leaders objected to the tariff, that they
would be rounded up and hanged. In October of 1861, Karl Marx, who favored the North like most European socialists
of the time, said in an article published in England, that, "The war between the North and South is a tariff war. The war,
is further, not for any principle, does not touch the question of slavery, and in fact turns on the Northern lust for
power." In December of that year, Charles Dickens, famous English author and a strong opponent of slavery, said about
the War of Northern Aggression: " ... the Northern onslaught upon slavery is no more than a piece of specious humbug
disguised to conceal its desire for economic control of the United States ... Union means so many millions a year lost to
the South; secession means loss of the same millions to the North. The love of money is the root of this as many, many
other evils. The quarrel between the North and South is, as it stands, solely a fiscal quarrel." That, sir, is why the
Southern states seceded.

It seems to me that an educator, at least one with any decent code of ethics, would want to teach the truth, no
matter what that truth is, instead of contributing to the indoctrination and ignorance of their students. Teaching is a
most honorable profession when done with honor, but to propagate lies is in no way honorable; in point of fact it is
dishonorable, disgraceful, and disgusting.

As to the "removal" of Silent Sam, contrary to popular Leftist beliefs, America is not a Democracy, it is a
Constitutional Republic, a nation of laws, and North Carolina has a law protecting monuments such as Silent Sam. I refer
you to the Cultural History Artifact Management and Patriotism Act of 2015, General Assembly of North Carolina,
Session Law 2015-170, Article 1, Section 3, § 1002.1:

Protection of monuments, memorials, and works of art.


(a) Approval Required. - Except as otherwise provided in subsection (b) of this section, a monument, memorial,
or work of art owned by the State may not be removed, relocated, or altered in any way without the approval of the
North Carolina Historical Commission.
(b) Limitations on Removal. - An object of remembrance located on public property may not be permanently
removed and may only be relocated, whether temporarily or permanently, under the circumstances listed in this
subsection and subject to the limitations in this subsection. An object of remembrance that is temporarily relocated
shall be returned to its original location within 90 days of completion of the project that required its temporary
removal. An object of remembrance that is permanently relocated shall be relocated to a site of similar prominence,
honor, visibility, availability, and access that are within the boundaries of the jurisdiction from which it was
relocated. An object of remembrance may not be relocated to a museum, cemetery, or mausoleum unless it was
originally placed at such a location. As used in this section, the term "object of remembrance" means a monument,
memorial, plaque, statue, marker, or display of a permanent character that commemorates an event, a person, or
military service that is part of North Carolina's history. The circumstances under which an object of remembrance may
be relocated are either of the following:
(1) When appropriate measures are required by the State or a political subdivision of the State to
preserve the object.
(2) When necessary for construction, renovation, or reconfiguration of buildings, open spaces, parking,
or transportation projects.
(c) Exceptions. - This section does not apply to the following:
(1) Highway markers set up by the Board of Transportation in cooperation with the Department of
Environment and Natural Resources and the Department of Cultural Resources as provided by
Chapter 197 of the Public Laws of 1935.
(2) An object of remembrance owned by a private party that is located on public property and that is the
subject of a legal agreement between the private party and the State or a political subdivision of the
State governing the removal or relocation of the object.
(3) An object of remembrance for which a building inspector or similar official has determined poses a
threat to public safety because of an unsafe or dangerous condition.

What this means, sir, is that your university and/or its administration are, by proxy, in violation of North Carolina
State Law, and as such, could, and, in my humble opinion, should, be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. According
to the law, as the circumstances of Silent Sam's "removal" do not fall under the guidelines of said law, the ninety day
limit on replacing the monument in its original location does not apply in this situation. Legally, it would be in the best
interest of your institution to re-erect Silent Sam immediately; the State Attorney General may decide to enforce the
Cultural History Artifact Management and Patriotism Act of 2015. Is that the kind of publicity UNC-CH wants or needs?

Leftists claim that monuments to Confederate soldiers are monuments to racism, slavery, and hate, yet they
deify Abraham Lincoln, the most famous racist this country, possibly the world, has ever known. They claim the same
thing about our flags, yet they hold in high esteem men who had no honor; men who waged Total War upon the South, war
against defenseless civilians, including women and children, black and white, freedmen and slave alike. They claim to be
about "love," but their actions prove otherwise, as I personally witnessed on your campus on Saturday, September 8, of
this year. What I witnessed that day was a pack of uneducated, ignorant, cowardly Neanderthals who not only are filled
with hate towards something they can't even begin to understand, but have to gather in packs in order to find the
courage to project that hate outward, and to whom honor is just a word in a dictionary. Honor, sir, is not merely a word
in a dictionary, nor is it something a man is born with. Honor is a gift, a gift which a man gives himself; a gift of courage and
fortitude, of humility and compassion. It is more sacred to a true Southerner than life itself.

The truth is that our flags (the Stars and Bars, the Unstained Banner, the Blood-stained Banner, the Southern
Cross [a.k.a. the Cross of Saint Andrew or the Battle Flag], and the Bonnie Blue), and monuments like Silent Sam are
there not as symbols of racism, slavery, or hate, but to remind those of us that carry Confederate DNA of the incredible
courage, fortitude, and astounding ferocity in battle of our ancestors who fought for the righteous Cause in the last
American war for freedom and independence; the men of the Armies of the Confederate States of America. They are
there to remind us that the ground we stand on is sacred ground, consecrated with the blood of men of all races, the
very men of whom I just spoke. They are also there to remind all Americans that a terrible tragedy happened here, a
thing that should never have happened, and wouldn't have, but for the greed of men of lesser moral convictions than
those whom they sought to subjugate. They are there, just as are the empty ovens and gas-chambers at Auschwitz, to
remind us to never let it happen again, because as I said before, history forgotten is history that shall be repeated.

I pray, sir, that God will bestow upon you the insight to understand the many things Silent Sam stands for other
than the remembrance of the many University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill students and alumni that left everything they
knew behind to fight for the Confederate States of America. I pray that He will see fit to impart you with the wisdom and the
courage to do the right thing concerning the restoration of Silent Sam to his rightful place; the pedestal upon which he has
quietly stood guard over the souls of the Confederate dead for one hundred and five years.

Sincerely, K. Lance Spivey


Adjutant, Sons of Confederate Veterans,
Captain Winfield Scott Lineberry Camp 92,
Asheboro, North Carolina
Deo Vindici. .. [><]

~
~ Virus-free. www.avg.com
Message
From: O'Hara, James J [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=bf9af020cd5a44b3bf0bef8294203efb-James J OHa]
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:16:32 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: the statue

Dear Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees,

I have no good ideas about where to put this statue, except that it cannot go back where it was. There are many
factors to consider here, but one leaps out at me: with so many faculty and so many departments denouncing the
statue, to return it to its position of honor would be to repudiate the entire faculty. How can you recruit students,
raise money, get jobs for our students after graduation, etc., if the Chancellor, Board of Trustees, Board of
Governors, and President repudiate the faculty in this way?

Thank you,

Jim O'Hara
President, The Vergilian Society
George L. Paddison Professor of Latin, UNC-Chapel Hill
319 Murphey Hall
jimohara@unc.edu
jimohara.web.unc.edu
vergiliansociety.org
surface mail:
James J. O'Hara
Department of Classics
CB# 3145, 212 Murphey Hall
The University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3145
Classics Dept is REDACTED, fax: REDACTED
Message
From: Jeff Greene
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:37:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Placement

In my role as a resident of NC, I request the monument NOT be returned to its former position but instead
moved to an indoor location with historical and educational materials created and displayed for it.

Jeff Greene
Carrboro, NC
Message
From: Rick Homan
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:39:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam re-location

I) In on-campus cemetery with memorial plaque and explanation of statue history

2) In on-campus museum with plaque explaining statue history

3) In building where dept of history is located with plaque explaining statue history.
Message
From: randy
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:43:39 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he was!!!

Randy Adcox
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my U.S. CeUulJr,ii.:, Smartphone


Message
From: Stef Mendell
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:43:48 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I received my BS from UNC in 1972 and my MSLS in 1978.


I am a life member of both the UNC Alumni Association and the school of Information and Library Science
Alumni Association.
silent Sam does not belong in a prominent location on campus.
Regards,
Stef Mendell
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Howard Snow Sr
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:45:39 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Silent Sam should be put back up on his pedistal where he belongs and has been since 1913 before he was
pulled down by ignorant children that need to learn history. He was not put up for any other reason than to
honor the students and faculty ofUNC that layed down their books and took up arms to defend their homes and
family against the northern invasion. I love my state and my daughter is a graduate ofUNC. Please put Sam
back where he belongs and protect him. It is part of our heritage.

Howard E Snow Sr
Message
From: Cathy Dyer
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:54:20 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put S Sam in a Confederate Cemetary

Put it with dead Confederate soldiers in a Confederate cemetary. Those who want to revere the Confederacy
would still be able to, the rest of us wouldn't be bothered by it.

This is what Mayor Dyer of Orlando, Fl did.

Cathy Dyer
Message
From: James Smithson
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:58:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition of the Confederate Memorial to UNC Students

Under the law of North Carolina you have 90 days to return the memorial to its rightful place where it was
standing before it was illegally removed. The ones who removed it should be prosecuted in the most strenuous
manner so that this does not happen again. I feel that the influence of the ones who destroyed the memorial in
Durham poisoned these young people into thinking that it is ok to destroy public property and to take the law
into their own hands. I also feel the complacency of the law enforcement on the ground that night contributed
to this and their leadership should be held accountable for allowing a crime to be committed right before them
with no action. What will you do if another mob decides to destroy something at your school no matter their
political agenda? This has set a dangerous precedent for future incidents I am afraid. Lawlessness cannot be
tolerated as you well know this ANTIF A organization is very destructive and ought to be labeled as a Terrorist
organization if not already.
My recommendation is to put the memorial back, enforce the law and do your job.

Thank you
James Smithson
NC Resident and Taxpayer.
Message
From: Lance Spivey
Sent: 9/25/2018 6:59:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: My mistake

Chancellor Falt,

I would like to apologize for referring to you as "sir" in my previous email; I made assumption, and that was
wrong of. Please accept my apologies.

K. Lance Spivey
Adjutant, Sons of Confederate Veterans,
Captain Winfield Scott Lineberry Camp 92,
Asheboro, North Carolina
Dea Vindici ... [><]

~
~ Virus-free. www.avq.com
Message
From: Skip Wilson
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:08:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put Silent Sam Back

Allowing outsiders to dictate the rewrite of North Carolina history is very disappointing to a proud UNC grad
(75). Put Silent Sam back where it belongs and defend our history.

This is not about racism, its about history and tradition.

Expel any student trying to damage it, or any school property. Prosecute outsiders who are responsible for the
entire fiasco.
Message
From: Claude Burgess -
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:11:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I would love to see silent Sam back. It is the history of North Carolina and a l l the southern States.
Sent from my iPhone
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Armstrong, Jeffrey A
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:19:41 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

It is part of NC history. There are confederate monuments all over the state. Not stating whether right or wrong, but
they do represent a state that fought for separation from the North. It should be placed in a museum or other setting
representing the Civil War.

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Message
From: John Fitzgerald [jfitzgerald@saundersyacht.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:22:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam statue

Chancellor Holt,

I am a 1987 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I am strongly opposed to the restoration of the
Silent Sam statue to the location at Mccorkle place. I am also deeply disappointed that the University officials were not
able to remove the statue ahead of the protestors. Removal of the statue for the right reasons would have been a strong
statement by the University that it did not stand for the racism that it was originally established to promote and defend.

I applaud the courage of New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu who, when he removed the statue of Robert E. Lee from
that city, stated, "These monuments celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy. Ignoring the death, ignoring the
enslavement, ignoring the terror that it actually stood for." I am sorry that the University that I attended and continue to
admire did not take the same stand .

The protestors have created a new opportunity for the University that should not be lost. The Silent Sam statue can go
into a museum or some other historical display that explains the Cult of the Lost Cause. The cult had a goal to use
monuments like Silent Sam and the ones removed from New Orleans to celebrate the ideals of a defeated Confederacy.

As a student at the University, I had no idea of this history. As an adult graduate, I am appalled by it. There were many
good people who lost their lives in the Civil War. I am glad to honor their sacrifice in a solemn memorial at a graveyard
or a museum.

This morning, I read the University's mission statement. "With lux, libertas-light and liberty-as its founding principles,
the University has charted a bold course of leading change to improve society and to help solve the world's greatest
problems." Racism and discrimination would certainly to on the list of the world's greatest problems. Restoring Silent
Sam to Mccorkle Place would surely be a step backwards.

Thank you for the opportunity to express my opinion and best of luck to you with this challenge!

Best Regards,

John Fitzgerald

John Fitzgerald I
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Message
From: Mil lie Rosen
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:25:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Do NOT put Silent Sam back up

To whom it may concern,

Silent Sam is a reminder to every student on campus that this country is built on the backs of slaves. I can't
imagine what black students go through having to see a monument to the people who oppressed them for
hundreds of years treated like revered royalty on campus. It's also appalling to me, as someone who grew up in
Chapel Hill, that the university has been spending so much money to protect a metal statue when they could
have been spending it on setvices for students' mental health or on scholarships.

Put the statue in storage or in a museum. But don't put it back up where it will continue to cause more
controversy and more heartache for people of color on UNC's campus. Be on the right side of history. I know
that there are many donors to the university who want it to be restored to its pedestal, but please resist the urge
to cater to their money. Do the right thing and keep it down.

Yours,

Millie Rosen
Message
From: JP
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:26:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent SAM

Ms. Falt, In the matter of the Boy Soldier-


1) The only course of action available to the University under the law is to restore
and protect the memorial.

2) You have no authority to move it so that they can re-contextualize or curate it


with modern-day lies about white supremacy.

3) The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist
minority of paid activists.

History and our monuments are not the rule of mobs or extremest regardless of
how society changes. Put the monument and Boy Soldier back in place and leave
it for generations to come.

John Pippin
President, Fremont Historical Society
Message
From: Taz Flyr
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:30:53 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The Civil War was a disgraceful time in our country's history. We need to remember so that we do not continue to
perpetuate the mistakes that led to that war. However, the Silent Sam statue was erected as an honorable tribute when in
truth, there was no honor in that war. There is no honor in keeping people in physical or economic bondage. Period. The
statue definitely belongs in a museum but not in public view on the campus of an institution that wants to set itself up for
the future.

Thanks for your time.

Tracey Hines
Camp Lejeune, NC

"Be careful who you choose as an enemy, because that is who you become the most like." Nietzche
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:38:55 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am a parent of a UNC student. I believe Silent Sam should be moved to a different location. This monument
creates a great deal of sadness for many students, faculty, etc. thus will further divide the UNC community. If
the monument is re-located to a less visible place (one where someone will have to make an effort to visit) then
it will hopefully satisfy those who want to preserve its history while not continuing to cause pain for minority
students, faculty and visitors.

Best,
Message
From: JUDY
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:42:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

The statue should be reinstalled. It is part of history and has nothing to do with discrimination.
As far as I am concerned the students that protest should be told to pack up and go home. Get a job and contribute to
society instead of protesting about a symbol of our history. The people that destroy public property should be
prosecuted.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


Message
From: James Perry
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:42:52 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: UNC Monument

I am very disappointed in your public comments and actions. It is impossible for me to trust that you \vill make good policy
decisions when you broadcast your stance to the \vorld in advance of information gathering.

I have no particular interest in the Silent Sam statue, and I am not someone with a particular interest in civil war era history. I
am an average North Carolinian who believes too many work too hard to cater to extreme ends of the spectrum. Would you
next work to change the names of buildings and streets on campus? \\Those life was better the morning after vandals pulled the
statue dm:m? Did your grades improve on campus? Did your academic scandals disappear? If I were to travel to your campus
and spray paint one of the buildings, would I be charged, or celebrated? It seems the outcome would depend on whose view I
supported with my vandalism.

My suggestion is that you arrest vandals and punish bad behavior. I suggest you punish students who purposefully damage
University property. You can't condone breaking the law just because you agree with the lawbreakers thoughts. Those are
dangerous actions which encourage others to break the law .... and you may not agree with their thoughts.

Senate Bill 22 became Session Law 2015-170. You can make all the recommendations you wish. The Board of Governors can
make all the recommendations it wishes to make. The Town of Chapel Hill, and every instructor your campus can offer their
opinions .... but you must abide by the General Statutes of our Great State.

James Perry

l.
Message
From: Danan Smith [dnsmith2@ncsu.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:43:44 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to put it.

Howdy,

Put them on the NC/VA border, facing north.


Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Carlyle Woodard
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:45:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam.

He should be replaced just where he stood forl05 years.Thugs should not be allowed to mock our laws and our
heroes. That would just be the start of their plan to destroy our society and replace it with failed socialism. These
students represented by Sam were our heroes defending their homes from a cruel invader.As an alumni this
travesty is a monumental insult to me.

Carly
Message
From: Kristen Eshleman
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:45:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: UNC alum '92

Hello -

Thanks for seeking public input on ideas for Silent Sam. I am a '92 alumna and NC native. I would welcome
some establishment of a "University of the People" museum - one that includes a back comer 'Hall of Shame'
collection for this statue (with full historical context) and any other artifacts connected to principles of
oppression that stand in opposition to our charter. Drive home the point by juxtaposing the majority of the good
work of many alumni and friends of UNC over the years.

Good luck,
Kristen Eshleman
Davidson, NC
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:54:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: Silent Sam

Please see previous email.


Sorry I meant a tar heel remembrance garden, not target
Susan

Sent frorn rny Verizon Wireless 4G LTE rnnrtphone

-------- Original message --------


From:
Date: 09/25/2018 7:51 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: uncmonument@unc.edu
Subject: Silent Sam

Good morning, I would like to submit the idea that a Remembrance garden for all our target heels that have
been lost to war would be nice.

Susan Jastram
New Bern, NC

Sent t\-orn rny Verizon \Vireless 4G LTE


Message
From: Will Eccleston
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:54:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Preservation without celebration

Chancellor, et al,

I appreciate that you would create this portal. I believe such engagement around an issue is vital but
rare. Anyone who has really paid attention to these issues and spent time pondering them should, in my
opinion, understand both sides. I believe that no part of history should be destroyed. But as society evolves, it
is wrong to continue to celebrate an historical effort to maintain a condition that would be abhorrent by today's
standards. Confederate statues belong in museums, with well-written interpretive copy that gives them proper
context and reflection.

Thank you for your consideration,

Will Eccleston
Kinetiscape Media, Inc.
www.kinetiscapemedia.com
Message
From: Krystle Morales
Sent: 9/25/2018 7:59:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Do not support return of silent sam

I do not support the return of silent Sam to UNC' s campus.

Regards,
Krystle Morales
UNC 2011
Message
From: Josh Martin
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:00:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: KEEP SILENT SAM

KEEP SILENT SAM

Josh Martin
Message
From: Audrey and Jimmy Schwan kl
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:02:11 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ient s/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Instead of just meting it down

To whom it may concern,

While it would not bother me at all if the statue were melted down or dropped into a lake or buried,
I'd like to suggest that the statue be auctioned off to the highest bidder with the proceeds going to further the
educational goals of the university.

That way, individuals who do care about the statue can have a say in its future placement and the university can
benefit from its removal.

Even better would be if the proceeds could somehow be used to right the wrongs of systemic racism that have
existed for hundreds of years.

Thank you for your time.

Best regards,
Jimmy Schwankl
Message
From: Sally Osmer
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:08:22 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear UNC leaders,


I am a UNC graduate and chapel Hil l resident.
Please work with the legislators and state leaders to MOVE the statue to a museum or storage space until
a museum can be built.

This statue is not an appropriate welcoming symbol for UNC! Its historical value is best interpreted as
part of the south's history of slavery and the subsequent years of violence and slow inclusion of people
of color!
Thank you for leading N.C. through this.
Sarah T Osmer
BA 1972

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Rogers, Rusty [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=f9f4553c5 laa4ff8bf04cb3b835f54c7-Rusty Roger]
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:09:33 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put President James K. Polk's statue that is in the M orehead Rotunda where Silent Sam was and put Sam in the Rotunda.
If this is not acceptable to the M orehead Foundation then put Sam in the old cemetery on campus. Another option is to
put Sam in M emorial Hall with a plaque that tells his history from dedication to being moved to the new location. The
statue is part of history so let's tell the truth about that history and try to educate everyone without honoring what the
Confederacy was really fighting for which was the continuation of slavery. Thank you.
Karl R. Rogers, UNC '79

Rusty Rogers
Facilities and Administrative Mgr.
UNC Inst. for the Environment
100 Europa Dr. Suite 490 Rm. 4031
Chapel Hill, NC 27517-2394
Office REDACTED

Fax REDACTED

"Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights"


Robert Nesta "Bob" Marley
Message
From: Raymond Karnes
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:16:50 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

silent Sam should be melted down and miniature replicas made and sold in the gift shop so everyone who
want a copy cou l d have one.
Ray Karnes
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:20:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: UNC Student Civil War Monument

Dear Dr. Falt:

I wish to encourage the UNC community to support the needed repairs to the UNC Student Civil War
Monument at UNC in its original location with a protective fence and security cameras. This monument is
dedicated to UNC students that served their country when attacked by the US in 1861. Many did not return
alive and many were injured for live, thus giving great personal sacrifice ofthemselves for others.

This monument was paid for by wide public support in the memory ofthe heroic UNC students of that long ago
day and the monument should return to its proper place.

Thank you,
REDACTED
Statesville, NC
graduate of three UNC system colleges
Message
From: Jaye Curtis
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:20:41 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Put the Monument BACK!

Si nee when is it OK to destroy a statue in the name of "Mob Rule!???

Put that monument right where it was, and arrest and prosecute the first person that dares to try and
harm it!

Jaye curti s

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:27:07 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: History

Silent Sam is a historical symbol. It represents a tribute


to those who fought for that which they believed to be
right 150 years ago. Ifwe do not learn from history,
we are doomed to repeat our mistakes.
Return the statue to its original si te. Teach by remembering
the past, not by its destruction.

REDACTED UNC '72


Message
From: Deborah Pedersen
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:28:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument

As a retired faculty member and parent of a UNC graduate I urge you to move this statue to a location
that make it available for history and not continue to be divisive.
From a historical perspective, a statue memorializing the rebellion of the southern states and their
bloody attempt to secede from the United States of America seems to be strange to put at the front door
of of our nation's oldest public university.

UNC continues to struggle with racial issues and this statue does not encourage thoughtful discussion.
Please be thoughtful in your decision and help our campus to heal.

Deborah P. Pedersen
Message
From: Pam Currie
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:34:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Melt down Si lent Sam

Please do not put silent Sam back. Any flag, monument, or meme that's purpose is to suppress a group of
people should not be displayed. We have huge confederate flags along major highways. The same kind of
people with the mindset that raised money for these flags, erected this monument years after the war.
I'm 63 years old, and I say take it away and melt it down.
Pam Currie
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:36:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: MEMORIAL TO CIVIL WAR FOOT SOLDIERS--SILENT SAM

The Correct Answer was to not allow MOB RULE!!!!


Which is exactly what authorities did by standing back, away from the statue, and allowing a mob
lead by off-campus agitators to destroy University property.

The second Answer is to finally get the truth out concerning the REAL CAUSE for the War
Between the States or the Civil War, The War Between North and South -- or whatever
anyone calls it. (Reality is, the victors WROTE U.S. history from 1860 through 1960, ignoring tariffs and declaring the
non-issue of slavery to be the only issue.)

From any perspective, the war started at the military installation supporting Northern Customs Agents
at Charleston Harbor.
The basic and only causative factor behind that early attack -- Oppressive import duties (tariffs)
imposed through the Missouri Compromise on all European manufactured and processed goods --
Skillets, Clothing irons, hammers, axeheads, anvils, wagon wheel parts, wagon "steel", rifle barrels,
fine furniture, medicines, fabrics, shoes, corsets, hats, boots, shoes, etc. -- in short the needs of every
day common-man living.

In reality, the majority of Southerners, in particular Confederate President and public abolitionist
Jefferson Davis, and at least 95% of common soldiers, were strongly opposed to slavery.
Davis and his fellow 2nd Lt. (Both recent West Point Graduates) Bobby Lee, joined the Western Army
headquarters at Baton Rouge.
There they engineered building projects and "taught school" for army recruits, civilian workers,
freedmen and reservation slaves.
Their commander and future father-in-law Zachary Taylor used his taxing powers to acquire "Slave
families" from large plantations.
He then educated the entire families, trained the men and young boys in trades and crafts, and after
moving Western Army headquarters to Fort Smith, Ark. and Ft. Gibson, Indian Terr., emancipated the
now educated slaves, helping them and freedmen in establishing black communities north of Ft.
Gibson. (This early 1830s program resulted in Oklahoma having more independent, self supporting black communities
than any other state.)
Lee took slave building craftsmen, and some families to San Francisco to build Fort Point.
These men, and some women, were paid according to inflated Gold Rush wages, gaining freedom in
the process.
Lee, by his actions, clearly favored freeing slaves, and from the Baton Rouge classrooms was aware
of their academic capabilities.

The Missouri Compromise in its several phases of political generation had already settled the issue of
slavery, which existed in virtually every state and territory, including 'apprenticed children of every
race" in most northern industries, indentured servants from throughout Europe contracted to ten,
twenty, even forty years indenture to pay shipping passages for entire families-- who also became
indentured servants for decades, often their productive life.

These unpaid slaves were present in the coastal, New England and Great Lakes regions through the
1930s.
Silent Sam represents the hundreds of thousands of Confederate Foot Soldiers who were fighting
only against the oppressive protectionist Import Tariffs imposed for the profits of the North's Wealthy
One Per Cent which owned the mills, smelters, factories and shipping.
Again, in reality, not even the Cavalier Plantation Owners were fighting for slavery. That issue had
been settled with the Compromise and the largely European large plantation slave owners (Most
major slave holders were English, Dutch, French, German and Scandinavian investors who had
acquired major land holdings, often buying slaves in the purchase.
In the 1860s, the One Per Centers controlled education, communication (And thereby Politics), banking,
access to the legal world, the mercantile world and direct access to smuggling schooners.

[This writer is a direct descendant of abolitionist eastern Kentucky Wagon Traders who operated throughout the South
with ten to twelve Conestoga freight wagons, acquiring smuggled goods around the Carolina Sounds, Georgia's Gullah
Islands, Mobile Bay, etc. and selling and trading for profit throughout the south.
Secretly, of course, they contacted slave families on the plantations, coached them in preparing, providing "scent
materials" to lay false trails to the north, with "drags" behind a horseback rider, then escape to the south with covered
trails, before climbing into empty barrels and crates on the trade wagons and rolling non-stop SOUTH for 48 to 72 hours
enroute to one of the smuggling ports where they escaped, usually north to Canada.]

They could not have operated their combined trading and escape program without the help of the
many abolitionist southerners.
Young local men who would ride north two and three days with scent drags covering escapes.
Others who would watch the trade wagons' back trails as they rushed south with the escapees.
Families who provided or at least maintained relief relay wagon teams, and provided hot food for the
team drivers and escapees.
The wagon trader escape program could not have operated except with widespread local and
regional help.
Message
From: Robert Stoothoff
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:37:55 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

offer silent Sam to any organization that wishes to place it on private property.
The history of the war between the states does not need a statue that was conceived and erected in the
crucible of anger and defiance that followed the end of that conflict, in order to teach and learn.
Contextualizing silent Sam would mean exposing the hate that created him a good deal later after this
bloody war. It is beyond me why anyone would want that story to be represented by a soldier doing his
job.
However, if a board of governors wants to err on the side of punishing those who see this statue for what
it was erected for and those who angrily tore it down, then they will return the statue to the pedestal.
I hope they don't.
Bob Stoothoff
chapel Hill, NC
Sent from my iPad.
Message
From: Damon Webb
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:39:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Boy So ldier

As a taxpaying and law abiding c1t1zen of North Carolina I was sadden by


the lawless action of a few .Abetted by the actions of persons who are
suppose to enforce the law of this state. The only recourse is to
replace the statue at the same location and prosecute those responsible
for this disgrace.
Damon c Webb
Message
From: Knittel, Andrea [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =317bbecd80f545a2bb9b la 190e lb4906-a kn ittel]
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:40:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Budapest monument park

In Budapest, outside the city, there is a park where they have collected all of the old soviet monuments that
represent a terribly repressive time for most people, and probably still hold some treasured memories for
others. There is a video that is viewable before you enter, with some contextualizing history, and then the
monuments are on display. This would be a great option for Silent Sam and any other confederate monuments
that remain.

http://www.mementopark.hu/

Memento Park Budapest I Com mun ist statues and ghosts of ...
wwv✓.1nen1entoparLhu

Opening times/ Tlckets / Address All si9hts of 1viemento Park are open for visitors every day from 10 ztm, till dusk.
Tickets are valid for a single entry to all sights. Photos and videos for private use are allowed to be taken free of

Andrea K. Knittel, MD, PhD


Program Director for Incarcerated Women's Health
Assistant Professor, Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of ~forth Carolina, Chapel Hill
andrea_knittel@med.unc.edu
Message
From: THOMAS PAGE
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:40:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

As a Vietnam Veteran, I was accused of many things by people when I returned, some of which were, "how
could you go there when you knew that war was wrong?". so I know how veterans can be treated if they
happen to fight in a war that is not popular.
The Confederate Veterans were treated exactly the same way as the Vietnam Veterans after their war! They
were told by their leaders that they were fighting for the protection of their homes, which they were as
the Union invaded the southern States! The silent Sams were fighting for their homeland, not necessarily
for slavery or oppression of the black man! In fact, the silent Sam statue showed a soldier that
probably did not even own a slave and may not even have owned his own land! Those men were the colonels
and Generals, not foot soldiers, so to argue that silent Sam represents the institution of slavery is
ludicrous, and you leaders of UNC should know better! silent Sam was a victim of slavery as much as the
slaves! He may not have worn chains, but he had to compete against the slaves in the economy! Why pay a
non-slave for a job you could have a slave do?
Finally, if you allow a mob to tear down these statues of the Confederacy, are you going to approve of a
mob taking sledge hammers to the Vietnam Memoria l on the Washington, DC Mal l , or wil l you approve a mob
taking sledge hammers to the Martin Luther King, Jr. monument on the DC Mall?
If you let a mob control what and who gets a monument or memorial without due process, will your
organization be the next entity to fall to a mob?
Sincerely,
A Vietnam Veteran from Louisburg, NC
Message
From: Thomas, Susan G [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=34de9df57720428fb0ef40efa164d178-Susan G Tho]
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:41:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Placement of Silent Sam

As a long-time staff member of this university my personal opinion is that the statue should be mounted back in its
original location. How can we let a group dictate to us what they want? Do we want to be known as a place where no
rules apply? It seems we are moving more towards that every day. Maybe we should just destroy every statue in this
country and erase all history since I am sure that each statue offends someone.
Message
From: D.P. Snyder
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:46:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam statue and pedestal

To Chancellor Carol Folt and the Board of Trustees:

There are times when those who lead our nations great universities have to lead with moral authority:
This is one of those times.

UNC is a public university and as such serves its students, its faculty, this community as well as the
greater population of the state of North Carolina. The students have spoken: We do not see students
in great numbers appearing to defend the Confederate statue known as Silent Sam. Indeed, we do not
see any North Carolinians in great numbers defending this relic of Jim Crow. We do see, however, the
Chapel Hill business community, citizens from surrounding communities, faculty, and local, national
and even international media calling for the removal of the statue. My own article at Public Seminar,
the online magazine of The New School in New York City, is here.

I was injured by Greensboro police while covering a student protest, so I have flesh in the game, as it
were. But more importantly you have flesh in the game, because in your refusals to contemplate the
history and present reality of racism at UNC with any degree of humility, you fail in your moral
leadership.

Monuments stand to glorify. There is no glory in this state's history of the defense of slavery, or of Jim
Crow. You are educational institution: Do not bow to the poorly-educated rabble who appear wrapped
in their battle flags in utter defiance of the principle of social equity and racial justice. Do not bow to
those among you who insist that the raggedy stars and bars is the true identity of UNC. UNC should
wish to stand for its better angels: The people it cures of cancer, the scholarships that allow working
class people to rise to become professional people, the important research it does. Do not allow UNC
to become an apologist for and panderer to ignorance and hatred.

Sincerely,

D.P. Snyder

@Dorothy Potter.corn
@Wordpress
@Editorial Freelancers Association
Message
From: Shaheen, Nicholas J [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=a163c40cae8e4b88be488 le7e68a3906-Ni cholas J]
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:47:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
CC: Folt, Carol Lynn [/o=ExchangeLabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=8 77baca e3ca54c928844cfa9654163e 1-Carol Lynn]
Subject: U Texas and their monuments

Dear Colleagues,

I happened to be in Austin, Texas this past weekend for a meeting. I noticed 4 conspicuously empty granite
pedestals on their main quad, and was wondering if they had similar problems to ours. I looked into their
situation, and they made a thoughtful study of the problem in 2015 that we can learn from:

http://diversity.utexas.edu/statues/wp--content/uploads/2016/01/Task-·Force-·Report--F1NAL·08 09 15.pdf

Ultimately, after the Charlottesville tragedy, their president decided to move their statues to a museum:

https://president.utexas.edu/messages/confederate-statues-on-campus

I suspect that you might already be aware of this, but given the many parallels to our situation, as well as the
thoughtful way in which they addressed the problem, it seemed appropriate for us to consider this work. I
think a similar resolution here would both address the political sensitivities of our situation, as well as aligning
the campus with the university's values.

Thanks,

Nick Shaheen

Nicholas J. Shaheen, MD, MPH


Bozymski-Heizer Distinguished Professor of Medicine
Chief, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
CB#7080, 130 Mason Farm Rd, Suite 4150
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7080
REDACTED
Fax REDACTED
http:ljwww.med.unc.edu/gi
Message
From: John McKee
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:51:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

I suggest moving the statue to Bennett Place in Durham. With a new base characterizing the involvement of
UNC student soldiers in the War. Bennett Place could use a few statues.

Thanks
Message
From: Eiring, Andrea [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =ld5300e9ed434a8e9e850ccf05e566d3-And rea Ei ri]
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:55:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam disposition

Thank you for the opportunity to express my opinion as a part of the UNC community regarding the disposition of the
"Silent Sam" monument. I would like to suggest that the monument be returned to the United Daughters of the
Confederacy with a thank you for their gift and an explanation that the statue does not reflect the current values of the
University on diversity and inclusiveness.

Andrea Eiring, MSM, CCRA, CPHRM


Message
From: jleppart
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:56:10 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

A great place for Silent Sam would be Bentonville, N.C.

Jerry Lepp art


Raleigh

Sent from my Samsung smmtphone


Message
From: The Masons
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:57:20 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestion on Silent Sam

The University has a separate monument to all UNC students who died in all wars and lists them by
name. Silent Sam is, therefore, redundant.

However, if you decide to keep it or are forced to keep it, you should place it on a smaller base with an
inscription that does not glorify war but memorializes the tragic loss. Maybe something like "In memory of
UNC students whose precious lives were lost along with so many other soldiers and civilians in a civil war. We
pray that it never happens again." would be appropriate. I have no idea where you would place it although I
think a cemetery or battlefield would be more appropriate.

Mourn the loss. Don't glorify the war. It would be nice if it was endorsed by all the descendant groups on both
sides, Confederate and Union. That might help with the healing process.

My great grandfather and his wife each lost two brothers in the war on the Union side. There was nothing
heroic about it.

John Mason
Message
From: Jessica Edgar
Sent: 9/25/2018 8:58:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Please Place It in a Museum

Hello!

Thank you for creating this email account - as an alumna, I appreciate you taking into account everyone's
perspectives, not just donors and folks on a board.

I think Silent Sam belongs in a museum. I think the whole monument, statue and base, do not belong on
campus. The people who it commemorates were traitors to our nation, and they should not be memorialized out
in open air for all to see. In keeping with "not erasing history," we can easily place the statue in a museum
somewhere on campus, perhaps a totally new museum even, that illuminates the whole history of the university,
including both how it was built by slaves and how students who went there died fighting for the Confederacy.

Thank you for considering my perspective!

Best,

Jessica Edgar
Class of 2015
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:02:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Put him back , where he has stood for centuries.

Sent fron1 .my Venzon 4G L'TE smartphone


Message
From: Bill Starnes
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:03:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

We are a nation of laws. We have a law here in NC, properly passed by the NC General Assembly, to protect our
Historical Monuments. Therefore, as the Silent Sam Monument was illegally removed, by law it must be returned to its
original location within 90 days of the date of the illegal removal. As a law abiding NC taxpaying citizen, I can settle for
nothing less than our laws being properly enforced.
If we are to discuss the so called "Jim Crowe" laws of the South in the time period of the placement of the Silent Sam
Monument, in the interest od fairness, let us also discuss the Black Codes of the north . Whereas the Jim Crowe laws of
the South did in fact disenfranchise some Black voters, the very same laws also disenfranchised some White voters as
well. Just as some Blacks could not pass the literacy tests, nor pay the poll tax, the same held true for some White voters
as well. In comparison, the Black Codes of the north actually forbade Blacks and Mulattos from even coming into, or
residing in, some northern States . While I disagree with both the Jim Crowe laws and the Black Codes, at least the Jim
Crowe laws did not forbid Blacks from coming into and residing in Southern States.
Was there "white supremacy" in the South in those days of our National history? Yes, just as there was in the north in
those same days. Did some Southerners own slaves? Yes, just as some northerners owned slaves. In fact, to be
historically correct, it was the north than controlled nearly 100% of all the slave trade in this country. It was from the
northern seaports that the slave ships sailed, under first the British Flag, then the US Flag, to go to Africa, trade rum and
other goods to the Africans for their slaves, and then sailed all over the world, wherever there was a market for the slaves,
and sold them for the highest price they could get. That included ALL of North America, Central America and South
America. Slavery was NOT confined to only the Southern States in the US.
Was slavery wrong? Yes, absolutely. Were the Southern States fighting to protect the institution of slavery? Absolutely
not. Based on over 18 years of research, I find the numbers ranging from under 10% to about 15% of Southerners who
owned slaves. Most working class Southerners did not support slavery due to having to compete with the institution of
slavery for jobs.
Was the north waging war against the South to free the slaves? Absolutely not. Why would the slave traders of the north
wish to go to war to destroy their trade? And, we find that before, during and after the war of 1861-1865, that there were 3
slave States in the Union. Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri. And later, the State of West Virginia.
Lincoln clearly stated in his first inaugural address that he had no intention of interfering with the institution of slavery in
the Sates where it then existed. He clearly stated he felt he had no lawful right to do so, and added he had no inclination
to do so. The War Aims Resolution, adopted by Congress in July 1861, clearly stated the war was to maintain the Union
and the slavery issue played no part in the decision to go to war.
Obey and respect our laws . Return Silent Sam to his original location as soon as can be done. Prosecute the law
breakers who illegally removed the Monument. To me, and many others, those Monuments are grave markers for the
many, many Southerners who lie in unmarked and unknown graves. Men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for
their country. An illegal and unconstitutional war waged by Lincoln to collect a tariff.
Bill Starnes. Mount Holly, NC.
Message
From: Anondo Banerjee
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:03:39 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The fate of Silent Sam

If it's too much to ask for to melt it down, then place it back on the quad, but have it toppled from its pedestal as
it was when it was finally pulled down from its perch. As a proud Alabamian, let it fall just as The Lost Cause
of the Confederacy should fall.

Sincerely 2015 Alum,


Anondo Banerjee, MPH, CHES
Message
From: Joe Austin
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:04:32 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Here are the thoughts of one UNC alum (AB '73; JD '78), a lifelong citizen of North Carolina:

1. Retire Silent Sam along with all Confederate monuments to a Monument Avenue at the Bentonville
Battleground park. This could be a joint project ofUNC and the State of North Carolina. Information should
be made available to visitors about the original locus and provenance of each monument.

2. Create a course in the History Department or American Studies that studies the Agrarian Movement in the
post-Civil War South and sheds light on the full range of people's motives in the decades following the
war. How did the proliferation of Civil War monuments fit in? Yes, take a hard look at the Jim Crow racism,
but also develop the account of how people in the South took positive steps to recover from the devastation
caused by the war. Don't just vilify the Confederate veterans but demonstrate the positive contributions they
made to the recovery. After all, the South as part of the Sunbelt is in ascendency. How was the foundation for
the resurgence and renewal laid post-war and by whom? Also take a serious look at the modern progressive
leaders such as Luther Hodges, Terry Sanford, and Jim Hunt who were instrumental in the process of making
the turn in the economy from agriculture to modern commerce.

Thank you for asking.

William Joseph Austin, Jr.


Message
From: Peter Cashwell
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:10:25 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Dear Chancellor Folt, Trustees, and members of the Board of Governors,

My love ofUNC is lifelong. I grew up in Chapel Hill, where my father worked in the admissions office for a
quarter-century. I was always aware of the presence of Silent Sam near my dad's office, and when I entered
Carolina myself, I would often walk past the statue on my way from Old West to Franklin Street..

And then I started learning more about what that statue actually meant.

Part of education is the process of putting away old ideas when they are shown to conflict with the facts. This
sometimes painful wrestling with the truth can be seen in every classroom in Chapel Hill, and it gradually took
place in my own mind as I studied the history of our nation. By the time I earned my second degree at Carolina,
it had become clear that the statue I'd grown up with was actually celebrating something far older and more
insidious than I'd known.

We can, and should, mourn the UNC students who died during the Civil War, but it is unconscionable to
celebrate the Confederate cause: a system that violates the principles on which our nation and our university
were founded. A state dedicated to denying light and liberty to the people should not have a place of honor on
UNC's campus.

Silent Sam should not be returned to his pedestal. He or some other monument to the dead might be suitable in a
cemetery or museum, but the system of chattel slavery is not something UNC should endorse in word or
symbol. The University of the People must do better.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak on this issue.

Sincerely,

Peter Cashwell '85, '89


Message
From: Alexander Rike
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:12:06 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Entomb the monument at Mccorkle

Dear Directors:

I understand the pressures facing the University and the toll that this debate is having on our community. I
graduated from Clemson University, a Southern school that has faced the difficulty of contextualizing a
tormented past while upholding the modern values expected of a world-class institution. While there is no easy
fix to the protracted problem of racialization in America, I do not believe that the monument should remain in
the open at UNC.

I propose that the monument be entombed and encased in situ in McCorkle Place as a symbol of shifting
American values. I envision submissions from landscape architects to create a structure, a modern obelisk,
around Silent Sam. In this way, the monument to fallen dead is sufficiently preserved at its current site while
honoring current beliefs that its visibility is widely offensive.

Thank you,
Alex Rike

Alex Rike
Message
From: Scott Trent
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:12:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to put the monument

It is my understanding that this email address has been set up to


collect input on where to put the silent Sam monument. Here's my
input:

Send it to the scrap yard to be melted down. White supremacy has no


business on campus, or anywhere.
And drop the charges against the heroes who did what UNC
administrators should have done a long, long time ago.
Best,
Scott Trent
Message
From: Pat Delatte
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:16:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To whom it may concern,

Please return the monument to its original position. Failure to do so only rewards criminal behavior and
emboldens further acts of vandalism. It sends the message that the mob is a legitimate agent of social change.

Beyond that, Silent Sam represents brave young UNC students who went to war and endured extreme hardships
and privations to defend their homes. It's a shame that these men are being disrespected by today's student body
in the name of a political trend.

In addition to failing to uphold the memory of brave North Carolinians, we lose something by eschewing our
history, something that makes us distinct and not just an Ohio with a coastline. We are a Southern state and
should never shirk our past. I realize that there are many who feel that this past is hurtful and that our
Confederate veterans aren't worthy of veneration-as if the Union states were a beacon of racial egalitarianism
in the 1860s. History is nuanced and maybe it's time that it's taught as such and not as a black and white
morality play. If the student body isn't mature enough to handle that, there may be a need to re-evaluate the
admissions process.

When the Confederate monuments are gone the rest will go as well. Columbus committed genocide, American
Revolutionaries were slaveholders, Korean War vets were imperialists, Vietnam war vets were imperialist baby-
killers, etc.

I for one am tired of my people's history being used and manipulated for someone else's dialectical game.

I hope UNC does the right thing.

Sincerely,

- Patrick Delatte Jr.

P.S. If there is any demographic interest, I'm a millennial.


Message
From: Cathy and Mike Weaver
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:18:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

If Silent Sam must remain on campus, it must be in the most out of the way place possible, with educational displays
about the times in which it was originally erected. It is divisive and honors a time that should not be honored, instead
studied so it will not be repeated.

Cathy Weaver, BSBA 1983

Cathy and Mike Weaver


Holly Run Stables
Home for Retired Classroom Pets
= /\_/\=
Message
From: Zegre-Hemsey, Jessica [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recipients/ en=edac508d401e4ebfafeae 77a496c930f-Jessica Zeg]
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:19:42 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam - please do not return

Good morning,

As a faculty member and con11rn.mity rnernber, I strongly oppose the return of Silent Sarn to UNC Chapel Hill campus. It
represents a very dec isive and negative time in our history, one that we s h ould not aspire to resurrect. In the current
political climate, I am increasingly concerned for the safety of our campus community, as well as that of m y own children
who I am raising in this community. A s tatus like Silent Sam r aises the potential for more violence, and I vehemently
oppose the return of this statue.

Please respect what Chapel Hill leaders and many faculty/staff have asked for···· do not return Silent Sam to campus. It is
time to bury it and move on with 2018 and strive for an inc lusive future. There is no reason to be reminded of o ur ugly
and shameful past by such a status in the middle of our campus/town.

Th ank you for the opportunity to provide my thoughts,

Jessica Zegre-Hemsey, PhD, RN


Assistant Professor, UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Dep artment of Emergency Medicine, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine
work: REDACTED
fax: REDACTED
email: izhemsey@email.unc.edu

From: no_reply@email.unc.edu <no_reply@email.unc.edu>


Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 10:58 AM
To: Zegre-Hemsey, Jessica <jzhemsey@email.unc.edu>
Subject: [FORMAL NOTICE] Message from Chancellor Carol L. Falt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees
Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to UNC
System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument@unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Message
From: Mitchell S. McLean
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:22:12 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Reader:

As a life-long resident and taxpayer in North Carolina, and as the proud parent (and tuition payer) of two
UNC graduates, I think I qualify as a member of the UNC community.

The Silent Sam monument should be restored to its original location. It should remain there, unless and until
a duly authorized body determines to relocate it. Otherwise would be to acquiesce to mob rule.

UNC-Chapel Hill is a world-class public research university. However, it is also a university with a history,
that should not be erased.

The Silent Sam monument is a memorial to students and alumni who literally gave their all for their home
state. The memory of their dedication and sacrifice is what Silent Sam represents, and should not be
desecrated.

Sincerely,

Mitchell S. McLean

Law Office of Mitchell S. McLean


REDACTED
REDACTED
Ahoskie, NC 27910
Tel. No. REDACTED
Fax No. REDACTED
******************************************************************************************
******************************************************************************************
*****************************************************************************************
Notice: The information contained in this message is Attorney privileged and confidential information
intended for the use of the individual or entity addressed. If the reader of this message is not the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copy of this communication is strictly
prohibited.
Message
From: Terry Crayton CPA
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:24:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam At Mccorkle Place and Fire Carol Folt

We want Silent Sam back in his


original place on his pedestal at
Mccorkle Place.
Since the left wing chancellor
Carol Folt is trying to evade and
defy state law, she should be fired
immediately. State law demands
Silent Sam be placed at his exact
former location. To do otherwise
will guarantee lawsuit after lawsuit
against the university.
This is North Carolina it is not
Berkley, California.
Criminals who resort to violence
and destruction of public property
should not be given their way.
Is mob rule now the law in Chapel
Hill?
Restore Silent Sam to McCorkle
Place and fire Carol Folt today!
Terry Crayton, CPA
Concord, NC
Message
From: Larry Cormier
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:25:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

My understanding is that you are looking for input on what to do with the "Silent Sam" statue.
My input would be to melt it down, and use that metal to make a statue to honor the slaves that built NC, and to
the oppressed People of Color that have been forced to live in the shadow of racial discrimination since the
Civil War.
I would also implore that you would advocate for the dropping of all charges to those protesters that did what
should have been done long ago by the administration of UNC.

Larry Cormier
Guilford Counly Caucus
Message
From: Janet Clarke
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:27:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Must Not Be Reinstalled

I do not want to see silent Sam replaced. I moved to from the midwest to North Carolina in 1984 when I
was in high school, and I have attended both UNC and NC State. I don't have the context of a southern
heritage, however, I believe it is time to acknowledge that confederate symbols are nothing but an
endorsement of white supremacy and oppression. The statue shows the worst of humanity, as evidenced by
Julian Carr's dedication speech when the statue was first installed. If you'd like to place the statue in
a museum, off campus, where it is displayed with contextual information, that is likely acceptable to
many people.
Message
From: Marvin Mccann
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:28:55 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear chancellor Folt,


You came to our state of North Carolina to lead and manage the University of The People of North
Carolina. Now you are now asked t o do so. The choices you make will not please everyone. Perhaps the
criticism and anger that e nsues from any decision you make will be great and long lasting. It may cause
anger enough to pressure you to even leave your post for another where there are not such deep rooted
feelings in the history of a region. You accepted your assignment with a duty to represent all the
people, and not just a new come about generation that has only selected touch with all that went on
before them. These are my though t s on why the stature should be returned to i t 's place on the UNC campus.
! . The l ocation is not the front door of the University. There are many "front doors" to this university
that the citizens of North Carolina enter. Someone can find fa ult with any new location on campus to
further their agenda to completely erase the statue from our history. Is erasing history what your
storied History department on campus desires? I have always believed that when we are not confronted
with and aware of past history, we then have a greater tendency to remake and repeat that history. Leave
the stature in pl ace.
2. In it's plurality, the University belongs to all the people of North Carolina. Most people who want
the stature to stand in place wil l not shout, demonstrate, pour blood and paint on it, wrap the stature
in a shro ud , and while the police stand down and let anarchy rule the campus you are charged to protect,
pull it down with a rope, rather than with the vote of all the people of North Carolina. If you don't
feel the pulse of the majority of the citizens of North Carolina who want the stature in place, then I
suggest it be put to a vote in a state wide election. The result will leave the stature in place.
3. The people who erected the stature felt the feelings of their time, not our time. We have no right to
reinterpret the i r feelings and attitudes in our generation. Leave the statue in place.
4. A properly worded explanation should be added to the stature that highlights the statu re as a memorial
to the young students who left to fight in what they believed to be a j ust cause in their time. The text
could include the unrest and controversy that exists today. The protesters do not realize they are the
ones who are still fighting the war that should have ended al most 154 years ago. The rest of us have
moved on without the fight. ( Yes, I do have ancestors who fought and died during the conflict). Leave
the statue in place.
S. Your decision to leave t he stature in place will not be pop ular with most of t he academic community in
chapel Hill. Most of your faculty have been transported in from somewhere else. I can understand their
inability to know the deep feelings of North Carolinians about their past and how it is remembered. We do
not teach our American history with passion and patriotism to our students today. unfortunately, symbols
and monuments do remind t hem to at least look at what went on before th em. Leave the stat ue in place and
don't relegate it somewhere like the back yard of the campus motor pool.

Marvin Mccann
Apex, North Carolina
NCSU 1972
Father of 2 daughters who graduated form the University of North Carolina
Message
From: Mary Williams
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:31:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

Ms. Fol t,
I believe silent Sam needs to return to his original place where he was toppled illegally by a mob. To
do otherwise is to reinforce mob behavior and to condone destruction of public property.
I suggest, however, that UNC erect a monument that commemorates the integration of the UNC student body,
including when UNC began admitting women and racial minorities. Erect it somewhere on Mccorkle Place.
This would preserve history by allowing silent Sam to remain and would commemorate when UNC changed over
time.
Respectull y,
Mary Williams

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Daniel V., Jr Townsend
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:35:44 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: I support all Monuments, My great grandfather was a marksman in the Civil War from E. N.C.
Attachments: June 20 2018 picture in the shade.jpg

Memorial Statues are priceless. I have erected Civil War Memorial Crosses on my great grandfathers grave in
St Paul's NC many times, at my expense and some trouble. Men as far away as Latta, SC have built them, cut
them from steel, painted them and helped secure them in cement; however, still idiots have tom them from his
grave. No longer does any exist...tom from the ground .. .in St Pauls?

Wow, some protesters just see the world from their eyes not from "history's" perspective ... they may have never
really known about NC History, they may be from Conn. or Md. or someplace outside of NC ...I don't know but
they show no tolerance. I wonder if they would feel the same I've I'd wreck their hometown area?? Leave
the Memorials, please

Daniel V. Townsend
Message
From: emily keel
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:39:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

I am an alum 1972, old white woman. I have been embarrassed by the statue for years and hate its
representation. Please have it totally removed from campus. It belongs in a museum where a full explanation
of the facts surrounding the war can be related and not in any campus building where continual struggle will
disrupt everyone.
Message
From: Elizabeth Wood
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:39:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Put him back where he belongs, and arrest the individuals. what they did was so wrong, no matter what
statute was the subject!
Sent from my iPad
Message
From: Smitty
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:42:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

Put it back where it belongs .. lllegal NOT to put it back in SAME position ..

Smitty........~11
Message
From: Ben Alschuler
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:42:56 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Relocation Proposal

Hi there,

I believe that the ideal new location for Silent Sam should be exactly where it always was, except buried
underground in a trench with a clear glass cover accessible to all.

It should be a deep trench. The same massive, stone pedestal should be at the bottom of the trench. People
should be able to walk directly above Silent Sam's hat and musket and look down on the statue just beneath
their feet. There could be some subtle lighting inside the trench.

There should be a plaque embedded at ground level that provides the date that the statue was erected and by
whom, a visual representation of what the whole statue looks like (because you can't see the whole thing
underground), and the date that it was moved underground.

This would be powerful and meaningful. Leaving the statue in the same location "preserves history" by showing
exactly where the statue was placed, when it was put there, and who it was meant to communicate to. Placing it
underground leaves no moral ambiguity about what it once represented, and what has changed since then.
Doing so also removes the possibility of the statue becoming a pilgrimage site for hate groups. There is no
further need for a complicated explanation plaque that will inevitably please no one. Show them, don't tell them.

If the University was so inclined, it could erect some sort of small, restrained gazebo or pergola above this
memorial area, but it would have to be done at a near-identical scale to the original statue. This is not the place
to create something ostentatious.

Thanks for your consideration.

-Ben Alschuler
Message
From: Greg Fitts
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:45:33 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam To Bennett Place or Bentonvi lle

Thank you for making this address available to the community.

I believe the only logical place for Silent Sam to be relocated to would either be Bennett Place in Durham or on the
Civil War battlfield at Bentonville. The scene would be appropriate and with a good descriptive marker, would be a
great way to inform how the war was intrepreted 50 and 150 years later.

Anyplace on campus would keep Sam in the crosshairs and there would always be a movement to pull him down
again, causing fears of riot and damage to any building he would end up in. There are enough groups on campus
intent on eliminating him, somebody would do it, probably using more extreme methods next time.

Best,
Greg

Greg Fitts

Chapel Hill, NC
Message
From: McColman, Richard H [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDL T)/CN=RECI Pl ENTS/CN=2CE4E724FBD14D80B354BBDD6CF19CF7-RICHARD H M]
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:46:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDL T)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_comon]
Subject: future of Silent Sam

If silent Sam must be retained for future display, it seems like a good place for it would be the old
chapel Hill Cemetery, if space is available.

Most of the burials in the cemetery date back to the 1 9th century, so it would fit in from an historical
perspective. since the proponents of keeping silent Sam on display seem to be concerned about heritage
and commemoration of deceased participants in the Civil war, placement of the monument there would seem
to fit, thematically -- at least from one perspective.

Silent Sam should definitely be removed from its original location. Leaving it at the "front door" of the
University can be seen as implying that the University advocates long-outdated attitudes. Since the
cemetery constitutes a resting place for individuals from the past, including, I would imagine, some
confederate soldiers, the monument would seem to be better fitted to such a location.

Richard

Richard Mccolman, Fulldome Theater Manager


Morehead Planetarium & Science Center
University of North Carolina
REDACTED
250 E Franklin Street
chapel Hill, NC 27599-3480

REDACTED (office)
REDACTED(fax)

rhm@email.unc.edu
Message
From: kynita stringer-stanback
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:47:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Facing our history

Good morning,
Right now, in this moment, UNC has a unique opportunity to face our history. Will the leaders have the
moral fortitude to dig down and talk about the indigenous nations that lived in chapel Hill first and who
were forcibly removed? Will we talk about the way NCU was built & the suffering that was caused for it to
come into existence?
I am a two time alumnus of UNC-Chapel Hill. My ancestors were enslaved by Joseph Caldwell & the swains. I
am a direct descendant of November Caldwell & Wilson swain Caldwell. Why is this important?
It's important because it was Wilson swain who was able to negotiate wit h the union soldiers on order to
keep them from burning NCU to the ground!
And yet, there is nothing on campus (outside of the obelisk that marks his grave) to honor him. Instead,
a confederate soldier statute was put up as a reminder to Black people in chapel Hill that we would never
obtain full citizenship. That the state sanctioned violence would never change and that people like us
did not matter-- - further inscribing & ossifying institutional racism.
My ancestors Rosa Burgess, Susan Kirby & Emma Kelly lived their lives during a time when their bodies
were not their own, right there, in orange county. They lived under the constant threat of violation---
and it was lega l for them to be treated that way.
silent Sam does not need to be replaced. silent Sam does not need a prominent spot on campus! what about
a monument to the indigenous people who were there first? what about a monument that honors those who
defended & preserved UNC?
The civil War was about slavery plain and simple. Any monument that honors confederate soldiers is
basically a monument that supports the enslavement of my people and the legal rape of my ancestral
grandmothers.
The people have spoken through their actions. Madam chancellor, tear that statute down!
Thank you,
kynita stringer-stanback
'98 & '09
Sent from atinyk
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:49:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: We Support Sam

Mrs. Falt,

I started this e-mail out with all of my historical facts, analogy's and political references in support of our
Confederate monuments. It wasn't long before I had written a book. Realizing that you probably aren't going to take the
time to read a book, I decided to delete it all and start over with this short summary of not only my thoughts, but most
of those within my community of North Eastern NC.

• It is currently the state law to restore & protect war memorials. IF, a violent mob had vandalized any other part
of the campus, repairs would have already been underway. If funds to make the repairs were not covered by an
insurance policy there would certainly be state funds or even private donations. If the campus needs money to
restore Silent Sam, our citizens will gladly send in the funds. It is my recommendation that Silent Sam be
restored & then protected by a decorative wrought iron fence as a protective barrier from other vandals.

• The monument known as Silent Sam as well as the University belongs to the citizens of NC and is not privately
owned. No one person, group or organization has the legal authority to hinder the restoration and preservation
of Silent Sam.

• If our country is a nation based on laws, then it is the responsibility of our elected officials to set an example and
uphold these laws. As of now, the laws in place protect monuments, like Silent Sam.

• Restore & Preserve Silent Sam.

Best Regards,
REDACTED

Camden County NC
Message
From: Shomaker, Carolyn [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=2b98266f6a ld4823a15b 78fe26bb05ec-Ca rolyn Sho]
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:53:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

I have worked for UNC for 15 years and used to be proud to say I was part of the University. That is no longer
true. Chapel Hill has become a hotbed of political activity that caters to a specific mindset and leaves others out, in spite
of the rhetoric claiming "diversity and inclusion". As a conservative and a Southerner, I have not felt safe or included
since the town of Chapel Hill, UNC, and Orange County decided that anything that doesn't go along with their way of
thinking must be removed. When they say that Silent Sam is an offense to the entire Chapel Hill community, including
university employees, they are wrong. They do not speak for me, and I know there are others who feel the same as I
do. Just because they declare a statue to be racist doesn't make it so, any more than declaring that Chapel Hill is a place
of inclusion makes it true. They only include those who agree with them, and those who disagree must be shouted
down and removed; there is an inability to agree to disagree. Silent Sam has stood for many, many years, and to let a
group of outsiders come onto campus and desecrate a memorial to those who gave their lives is a disgrace. Yes, Julian
Carr said some awful things, but removing Silent Sam won't change that. The memorial to the soldiers is separate from
the ideology that calls everything pro-slavery and pro-segregation, but it is all lumped together. I guarantee you that
until recently, hundreds of people walked by Sam every day and never even noticed him.
The danger that they claim is posed by Silent Sam's location is caused by the anarchists who refuse to honor the right of
an opposing group to show their support. If the anti-Sam liberals (including UNC professors, sadly) would stop trying to
prevent anyone from speaking out, both sides could demonstrate peacefully. Outsiders come here and stir things up,
and the result is chaos. The present mindset is that if you don't like something, you yell and scream until you get your
way, and that's the behavior that is encouraged because no one will stand up to this silliness and put a stop to it.
Sam needs to be returned to his rightful place and those who don't like it need to grow up and get over it. The current
crop of students who are against it will be gone from UNC in a few years and they'll never look back, as much as they
would like you to think their lives are irreparably damaged by Sam's presence on campus.
There are many, many more people who support Silent Sam than you are aware of, because they don't tend to make a
big scene - but never mistake their silence for weakness. They are proud, and they are strong. They are NOT white
supremacists or fascists - they are people proud of their heritage and they're willing to take a stand for it.
Carolyn Shomaker

Carolyn Shomaker
Federal Documents Coordinator/Microforms Supervisor
UNC-Chapel Hill
CB# 3912
Chapel Hill NC 27514
REDACTED
Message
From: Larry Bone
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:55:00 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monument

Please replace the monument of these brave soldiers from UNC.


Message
From: Bill G. Page
Sent: 9/25/2018 9:58:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Bill G. Page
Subject: Suggestions for the relocation of "Silent Sam"

In regards to ideas on where to put Silent Sam, the statue could be donated to Bennett Place or Bentonville
Battleground. As a person that studies civil war history and visits historical sites, I feel "Silent Sam" would be more
"revered" in these two places by visitors versus "reviled" by many on the campus of a public university.

If state law will not allow the statue to be relocated/donated to an appropriate historical site and must remain on the
UNC campus, perhaps the Old Cemetery would be a more suitable option. A possible location might be in-between the
old slave burial side and the newer graves to symbolize the linear progression/growth of the campus physically,
intellectually, and spiritually.

e.g.
African American side Silent Sam Newer Graves
Segregation Silent Sam/Civil War Integration
Slavery Fight to maintain segregation/slavery Freedom for all people

I personally would be opposed to putting Silent Sam back on its old pedestal. One of the purposes of studying history is
to learn from our mistakes so that we do not repeat the same hardships.

Sincerely,

Bill Page

~
~ Virus-free. www.avasLcom
Message
From: damian hriciga
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:07:36 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Let Sam Final ly Tell the Truth

The endurance of Silent Sam on the University campus is cause for shame. That UNC forced the people of
Chapel Hill to perform the inevitable removal of the symbol of racism and indifference to human life is also
scandalous.

There is no valid way to honor a statue of a Nazi soldier. Likewise, there is no valid way to honor a statue of a
treasonous secessionist fighting to preserve the institution of human slavery. Whatever dark comer the statue
eventually resides in, the signage should first and foremost explain the purpose the statue, which was to revise
history and advance the historical lie that is the Lost Cause of the Confederacy. Let Sam finally tell the truth.
The Civil War was fought so that white people could own black people.

Damian Hriciga
Chapel Hill
Message
From: Christine Abernathy
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:10:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Keep Pedestal Empty

Hello-

I am an alumnus ofUNC class of 2012. While on campus, I worked with groups on campus to petition the
administration to put a plaque on silent sam to provide the racist context of the monument. I stand with the
students who took action when the administration was petitioned and invited to many times and yet continually
took none. Please leave Silent Sam in the era he was erected.

If you were to re-instate Silent Sam anywhere outside of a museum, you would be a public higher education that
erected a symbol of violence towards black and brown people in the year 2018. As an alum, I implore you not
to do so. UNC faculty, staff, and students deserve better than that.

Thank you-
Christine
Message
From: Strain, Angela [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =d308e209ba 154c8ba3 7903654b59 le86-Angel a Stra]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:11:03 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: suggestion

Melt the statue down and use the metal to make plaques honoring populations that have historically been oppressed in
NC - African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, women, and LGBTQ citizens.

Angela Strain, M.D.


Chief, Division of Emergency Psychiatry
Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry
University of North Carolina
Message
From: Hannah Haymore
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:15:23 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

I would like to voice my opinion that Silent Sam should not be reinstalled. History is important, but building a
monument to racism is not the way to ensure we remember our history. I think it would be a mistake to put
Silent Sam back on a pedestal. You are sending a message that racism is more important than the safety and
comfort of your students. It is truly appalling to see how ready people are to defend confederate monuments. If
the people who say remembering history is important, then why not build a monument to someone who helped
slaves during the war? Or maybe even a memorial to the slaves that lost their lives, freedom, and family at the
hands of confederates?

Regardless of the point of telling our history, it is impossible to ignore the fact that symbols of the confederacy
are used by racist people and organizations in an effort to spread fear, hate, and white supremacy.

Thank you for reading,

Hannah Haymore
Message
From: Tony Gordon
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:19:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Ms. Falt ..... I would suggest Silent Same should be used as a teaching legacy as the Jewish world has protected the
concentration camps so the world would "never forget". Giving in to a minority of ignorance to remove a statue
supports re-writing history and actually counter-productive to what those that find fault with the statue. At the very
least, "appeasement" has never been a productive course of action by any leadership. It is a failed path that again,
history teaches.

On the more superficial side. If it is decided to move or remove the statue, that action would leave no defensible
position to retain the "Tarheel" logo. At that point, [any] name or symbol associated with the Confederacy should be
eliminated on the UNC campus. It would be the height of hypocrisy to be selectively politically correct.

Tony Gordon
Message
From: Jay Bradley
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:21:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As the father of two daughters who graduated from UNC and as an active UNC supporter, I wish to have Silent
Sam returned to the place on the UNC campus where he stood for decades. Silent Sam represents the young
men who lost their lives in a war that most fought not because they or their families owned slaves, but to defend
North Carolina. Must all history be rewritten to satisfy those who have no respect for the past?
Julius R. Bradley
Moncure, NC
Message
From: Xiong, Yue [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=3bc62598cd7a4d9992c7b06belb8ce26-Yue Xiong(]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:23:39 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: One idea

How about putting Michael Jordon's statue to where the Silent Sam was?

Yue Xiong, Ph.D.


Professor, Biochemistry and Biophysics
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
22-012 Lineberger Building, CB# 7295
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
T el: REDACTED / Fax: REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:27:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: As a parent ...

I have been concerned three times this fall as news of demonstrations filtered out - when the statue came down and
then in subsequent weeks, that the possibility of demonstrations surrounding where the statue had been - all
demonstrations from people who are not part of the university community trying to identify a place to demonstrate. As
a graduate of the University of Virginia, I know the impact of such gatherings and I have felt fear for and
other students at UNC. Respectfully, I suggest that the monument be placed in a Confederate museum with other
artifacts from the Civil War. Hopefully, it will no longer serve as a gathering space for people not associated with the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Message
From: Christopher Deschene
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:31:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: James Cates and the monument

No matter what spin you put on a confederate statue, it brings nothing but shame and continues the cycles
of racism in an otherwise superior university. My 3 children have all attended UNC and I will always be
grateful for their experience. One of my children is a person of color and I currently fear for her
safety at times, in the university and in this country.
But the kind of murder that happened to James Cates and the fact that the murderers were acquitted, is
unconscionable and is just a source of shame.
Just like Robert E Lee, who kept the war going and was on the side of enslaving human beings to other
human beings because they had more melatonin in their skin, is abhorrent.
If only to be a beacon of hope in this otherwise shameful, racist period in America, UNC should lead,
like it has always done, for equality, and justice, rather than making politics and money the only thing
that matters to anyone now.
Someone must speak for those that have been murdered and are currently being abused in this country, let
it be UNC!
Chris Deschene
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:35:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Confederate Monumment

Simply but long lasting quote:


"Those who forget their history are doomed to repeat it." Not sure who said it but it's the same as
destroyin g Christian churches in muslim countries. We have a right to preserve our heritage and it's a
blow to freedom to try an d destroy it.
REDACTED
UNC Dad
sen t from my iPhone
Message
From: Willliam D. Renton
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:36:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Ideas about the future of Silent Sam and all other monuments/memorials

We can't selectively erase the parts of our history that we don't like. Certainly, there are people out there trying to do
just that. I think Sam goes back up on the pedestal, or conversely, all memorials, monuments, statuary and artwork
around the campus be removed. I'm fine with either. The fact that the university can't afford a phantom security force
to "guard" Silent Sam means that the only solution is to put together a plan to methodically remove all figurative
representations from campus over the next 5-10 years.

On a related note - those responsible should not only be prosecuted but civil action should be taken against them as
well to fully reimburse the university for the costs related to the security and destruction of the monument.

William Renton

~
~ Virus-free. www.avastcom
Message
From: Walter Harris
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:36:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Disposition

Return it to its prior-to-being-toppled location. Fence it off and put up educational signs that explain its history
and why it is seen by some as controversial. Do not fall prey to the radical's tactics -- you are being
manipulated.

Rules for Radicals (by Saul D. Alinsky "Rules for Radicals: A Pragmatic Primer for Realistic Radicals - 1971
book)

• "Power is not only what you have but what the enemy thinks you have."
• "Never go outside the expertise of your people."
• "Whenever possible go outside the expertise of the enemy."
• "Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules."
• "Ridicule is man's most potent weapon."
• "A good tactic is one your people enjoy."
• "A tactic that drags on too long becomes a drag."
• "Keep the pressure on."
• "The threat is usually more terrifying than the thing itself."
• "The major premise for tactics is the development of operations that will maintain a constant
pressure upon the opposition."
• "If you push a negative hard and deep enough it will break through into its counterside"
• "The price of a successful attack is a constructive alternative."
• "Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it."
Message
From: Christine Harradine
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:37:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for relocation of Silent Sam

I appreciate the opportunity to share ideas on the relocation of the statue . Silent Sam should be placed in the cemetery
near the Paul Green Theater. This would be an appropriate location for several reasons:

1. It is not the at front door of the flagship university of our state, where it provides a divisive and painful reminder of
hatred and lack of inclusivity. The statue cannot be allowed to remain in such a prominent place.

2. Placing it in the cemetery yields it accessible to all who wish to visit it, as it is a public, outdoor space .

3. The statue was originally installed as an honor to the fallen young men who were called to war. A cemetery is just
such a location. An additional monument representing the honor of the enslaved must be placed with Silent Sam. Plenty
of context in permanent sign age must surround both statues .

4. Placing Silent Sam in the cemetery adds an additional symbolic message that the hatred many people feel the statue
represents is being buried now.

Thank you for considering.


Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:37:26 AM
To: UNC M onument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam - please consider this.

Honestly, I have really tried to see both sides of this story.

On one side we have brave young students (some of whom paid the ultimate
price) gave up their schooling to go fight for what they thought was a
noble cause.

On the other side, that dedication in 1913 was horrendous and certainly
not welcoming of our African American brothers and sisters who should feel
VERY welcomed at this public university.

I am married to an alumnus of UNC-CH, and I co-own a business she


founded. I have one son who graduated from UN C-CH in 2015 and a REDACTED
who plans to graduate in 2021. I am grateful to what the university has
done for our family but also how they represent the state and the people
of this state. It would be tragic in my mind to put Silent Sam back on a
pedestal where he would continue to intimidate certain people and make
them feel unwelcome.

My suggestion would be to place the statue in a museum with the full


context of
- the representation of the students who went off to fight in the Civil
war placing schooling on hold (and halting it for those who never
returned)
- the very racist dedication (the speech should be included in the
display)
- the removal of the statue by protestors (pictures and video coverage of
this could be part of the display as well)
- the history (never to be forgotten) of these viewpoints preserved (in
the museum) for folks to read about 100 years from now.

Thanks for taking input on this. I hope that a civil discourse will
follow and that the best solution representing all sides is decided upon.
REDACTED
Message
From: Dennis Fink
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:38:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Staute

Dear Chancellor Falt,

Following is my suggestion with what to do with the Silent Sam statue. First of all I believe that the entire
situation could have been prevented had it been handled in a more responsible manner by the authorities.
Second, I resent using the Charlottesville incident in Virginia as a reason for why it happened at Chapel Hill.
That's pretty petty and lame in my opinion. Let the dead rest in peace.

My suggestion on how to handle Silent Sam:

1. The staute should be returned to it's original resting place in Chapel Hill.

2. A 12 foot electrically wired fence should be erected around the statue with warning signs that it is electrified
and you could be electrocuted.

3. If necessary place a smaller fence ahead of the electrical fence with warning signs on it as well.

4. Place survalence camera's on the statue to be monitored by campus security to catch any perpetrators.

Thank you for your time in this matter.

Sincerely,

Dennis Fink
Message
From: Matthew Arnold
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:40:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,

As an employee ofUNC, I would prefer not to be represented by confederate monuments on campus. I am a


Southerner; my ancestors fought for the confederacy. That being said, I despise what the old South stood for. It
is completely disrespectful to our African-American students and colleagues to lionize anyone who fought for
slavery.

While I understand the safety concerns regarding the toppling of the monument, civil disobedience has played
an important role in our country's progression. The topplers did something important; I feel they should not be
charged. If anything, we should take pride that residents of the Triangle are taking these actions against a
mindset that, unfortunately, still exists today. I'll take right-minded vandals over neo-confederates any day.

Thank you for soliciting my opinion.

Matthew Arnold
Message
From: Elms, Elena [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =a2a 7 e 7775e4e42ae9e27 c086368482f6-EI ena El ms]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:40:27 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh is the best pace for "Silent
Sam." They can put it in context without the extremism from either camp and
hopefully represent those of us who are somewhere in the middle.
Elena Elms
Chapel Hill NC
Message
From: Dixie Trading Co.
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:42:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Restore Silent Sam

Mrs. Folt,
It wasn't too long ago, that Americans had a clear understanding of what the Civil War was about.
Confederate memorials, names and symbols were all just a part of Southern Culture. This was humorously
displayed by the media in TV shows like the Dukes of Hazzard. Back then there was nothing offensive nor
controversial about it, but over the past 30 years or so, we've had extremist groups from both the left and the
right that have skewed public opinion of these symbols, monuments & names that were put into place to honor
these early Americans.
Hate groups like the Neo-Nazis, the KKK and sick individuals like Dylann Roof have re-imagined what the
Confederacy was all about. Other groups on the left, such as the NACCP and ANTIF A have supported them in
their historical revisionism of the Confederacy. Both groups and all of the little fractions of like minded parties
have created a new historical narrative that the Confederate States of America was a white supremacist
government hell bent on keeping the negro in slavery and would fight to the death to preserve their way of life.
While there is some truth to that narrative, it's not the whole story of economics and politics that lead up to the
Civil War. It does not mention that slavery & white supremacy was not exclusive to the southern states. Those
people that want to destroy all things related to the Confederacy do so only out of ignorance. If they choose to
destroy them because they think they represent a government of white supremacy, then don't stop with all things
Confederate, lets destroy everything American connected with white supremacy, starting with George
Washington on up to LBJ.
Some people would say that Confederate symbols and monuments are flash points that ignite unrest. I would
say it is not the Confederate images but the lack of understanding, the lack of education, the unwillingness to
learn and understand true historical facts that causes people, like the mob that destroyed Silent Sam, to act the
way that they do. These people have not taken the time to learn our American history and to judge those before
us within the context of their time in history and the culture in which they lived. Instead, they judge them by
todays standards or they gather what they think they know from groups like the Neo-Nazis or ANTIF A, who
have one sided, skewed historical narratives that spark the violence. It is truly not the monument that sparks the
violence but it is the ignorance that sparks the violence. This is where educational facilities across the country
should facilitate the whole story of our nations history and explain facts like, white supremacy and slavery was
not excusive to the south and did not start in 1861. They should teach our history based on a point of view from
both sides of the Mason-Dixon line. If these violent protesters really understood our American history in its full
context, they would see things from a different point of view. They would also understand that a war memorial
or monument does not honor the cause of the war, nor the politics that motivated it, but simply the lives that
were sacrificed within the conflict. I do not support our involvement in Vietnam. I do not support the selfish
politicians that prolonged and escalated the needless blood shed of 58,200 Americans, but I am not going off to
desecrate a Vietnam monument which honors those that died in that conflict.
Here's my thoughts summarized ...

• Restore & preserve Silent Sam for future generations.


• Allow Confederate names, symbols & monuments to be a flash point to ignite education not violence.
Message
From: tonydubois
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:43:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Move it to Raleigh
Museum of history would be a good idea because it is a part of history.

Tony
Message
From: Linda Butler
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:43:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

as a member of the UNC Friends of the Library Board, I am in agreement with not placing silent Sam at
Wilson Library-the library is not a museum and is not the mission of the library, plus it seems like huge
liability issues. Placing silent Sam in a Carolina Museum, in a building such as old Playmakers or a
floor that is not getting much use, would be a more appropriate and inclusive space for our Sam. I do
hope it stays on campus and so much wish it had not come down like it did.
Message
From: Greg Mondin I
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:46:26 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Disposition

I believe the statue of Silent Sam should be left in place, and protected.
I see it as a part of UNC's Campus and have fond memories of my step-daughters attendance there where it is one of
many historic fixtures.
The very bullying of others that our Country fought so hard and long to rectify is now being sanctioned with these kinds
of illegal and violent behaviors.
Protest is patriotic, mob-rule is not. When I was in school this behavior was called vandalism.
I believe the statue can teach far more about our past and how far our country has come by remaining in place, perhaps
with additional context to remind people about this very progress ...

Thank you for allowing me to present my perspective.


Sincerely,

Greg J. Mondin

rlJ Please consider the environment befiwe printing this email


Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:47:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]

To Whom it May Concern,

The confederate statue known as Silent Sam is not just a statue, it is a reminder of racism, violence, and
degradation inflicted upon people of color for hundreds of years (hard to deny that given the statue's dedication
speech). The Silent Sam statue should be destroyed or warehoused in perpetuity.

I advocate the destruction of Silent Sam; melt it down and make a statue that honors something or someone
positive in the African American community -- try to heal their wounds.

But I understand there are those who would have it back in it's original place, so, as a compromise, house it in a
museum if you must -- teach future generations how Silent Sam is a monument to racism, hate, and prejudice.
Just don't forget a plaque quoting the hate-filled speech that accompanied it's dedication.

Regards,

REDACTED

UNC parent
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:49:06 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Find a museum for Si lent Sam

As a parent of a student at UNC and a Chapel Hill resident, Silent Sam belongs in a history museum and not at a public
university open space.

Thanks,
Message
From: Ross, Marnie Elizabeth [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =e5523e0bb 1824122bdac9176fdf92159-Ma rn i e Eliz]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:49:29 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: the Confederate Monument's "disposition and preservation"

Good morning,

I personally would not care if this monument was melted down and made into something useful.

It is a symbol of a traitorous war to keep slavery legal, and should be an afront to anyone who believes that all humans
are equal, and that enslaving living beings is morally repugnant.

However, If you must preserve this for historical purposes, than donate it to a museum that has pieces of other Civil War
era artifacts, and put it in context.

It should not be in public space.

Sincerely,

Marnie Ross
Message
From: Steven Rogelberg [sgrogelb@uncc.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:49:54 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Fwd: ANNOUNCEMENT from UNC: Message from the Chancellor - September 24, 2018

The monument is an important part ofUNC history. Consider putting it (or a representation of it) in a building
and put an exhibit around it. In other words, treat it as an artifact of a past time. Talk about it. Learn about it.
Learn from it. Have students visit it, etc. But, it should never be put back. If you put it back, that is an explicit
sign that UNC is a racist institution.

---------- Forwarded message---------


From: UNC Family Experience <families@,unc.edu>
Date: Tue, Sep 25, 2018 at 10:45 AfvI
Subject: ANNOUNCEMENT from UNC: Message from the Chancellor - September 24, 2018
To: steven rogelberg <sgrogelb@uncc.edu>

Dear Carolina Community:

= As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System


Board of Governors gave the UNC-Chape! Hill Board
of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a for
the Confederate Monument's "disposition and
preservation." We have been asked to present our
plan to UNC System President Margaret Spellings and
the Board of Governors by November 15, 2018.

! know that many in our community and beyond fee!


passionately about the monument As a next step, we
have created a dedicated email address,
about the statue's future. While we will not be able to
provide individual responses, we will carefully review
and consider al! ideas as we prepare a plan to present
to the Board of Governors in November. Please note
that ail email submissions will be subject to disclosure
under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important


topic that will help shape the future of Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L Folt and the UNC-Chape! Hill


Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the


Chancellor

Steven G. Rogelberg, PhD


Chancellor's Professor
Professor, O1:ganizational Science, Psychology, and Management
Director, Organizational Science
Editor, Journal ofBusiness and Psychology
Associate Editor, Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice
Secretary General, Alliance for Organizational Psychology

Unive1:sity of North Carolina, Charlotte I Colvard 4025 I F1:iday 249


REDACTED I Charlotte, NC 28223
Phone: REDACTEDI Fa.x: REDACTED
\Vebsite: http,:// das-pages.uncc.edu/ steven-rogellx:rg/
Twitter: @stevenrogelberg I Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/ ro gelberg
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:49:56 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf37 49272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear all,
As a faculty member in the UNC system, a naturalized US citizen, a person born in Germany and keenly aware of the Nazi
past of my birth country, and the mother of a freshman enrolled at UNC-Chapel Hill, I suggest:

At the place of Silent Sam's monument, place an open structure that invites contemplation of the contemporary wounds
caused by the legacy of the Civil War. Not a monument to war, not a reminder for peace, but an invitation to stay open
to dialogue with those deemed as Others, to engage in actions that deconstruct the racial and ethnic barriers erected by
unfinished history, and to contradict those who wish us apart.

A starting point may be the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin: although it is much bigger than the
space available to you, its design invites a variety of interpretations that allow the visitors to respond individually to the
site, whether they be opponents or proponents of the meanings embodied by Silent Sam.

Sincerely,

REDACTED
Message
From: Stephanie McGarrah
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:50:29 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestion for Silent Sam

As an alumna and former lecturer at UNC-CH, I have watched and participated in the Silent Sam debate on
campus over several decades from different perspectives. While I agree that Silent Sam has some historical
value to the University, it also understandably offends many people because it glorifies slavery and
racism. Although it's not discussed as often, I think the more commonly understood meaning of the statue's
nickname among students - that no virgin female has ever walked by Sam on campus - also creates some
uncomfortable implications that women in Chapel Hill are and should be sexually promiscuous. I think UNC-
CH should consider the kind of messages the statue and its nickname send to students, faculty, staff, alumni and
visitors.

I think that the University should move the pedestal to the university cemetery to commemorate the students
who fought and died in the Civil War and the statue to a glass case in the North Carolina Collection in Wilson
Library with the appropriate documentation about the statue and its past. Then, the University should invest in
a new monument or work of art to grace McCorkle Place that recognizes the best of what our University has
been and can be.

Respectful 1y,

Stephanie McGarrah

Class of 1996
Lecturer in Public Policy, 2013-14
Message
From: Crotts
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:50:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: get rid of the statue already

It's not that big a deal. Just get rid of it. It's a thing some racist people had made so they could remind future
generations how important it is to be racist. Silent Sam is a reminder of a terrible time in our history, a time
when we fought a war to preserve our right to torture, rape, and murder our fellow human beings. Slavery
and the Civil War shaped the racial politics of our state so profoundly that we may never escape their shadow.
Taking down public art that glorifies our disgraceful past is the literal least we can do.

In conclusion, throw the statue in a dumpster.

Thank you,

Sarah Crotts
Message
From: Jones, Keil Dash [/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=E4A8499CEDE54ECD98582FA371C8B155-KEIU]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:51:04 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam Disposition

Stop spending university and public money preserving this racist object. I am both an alumni and a current
employee, and it is shameful how the university has failed to act, other than preserving the status quo of
prominently displaying a symbol of white supremacy. And now you're going to spend more time, resources,
and money on this bygone and insulting statue? Are there any leaders at all at this university with backbone
enough to act on the side of victims of white supremacy instead of cowing to some mythologized and
whitewashed history

Keil Jones, Applications Specialist Programmer


FPG Child Development Institute - UNC-Chapel Hill
REDACTED
Message
From: Bruce Santhuff I
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:51:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: monumental ideas

Please melt it down and build a statue dedicated to the victims of American slavery.

Thank you,

Bruce

Bruce Santhuff

~
~ Virus-free. www.avastcom
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:51:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument Opionion

History should never be forgotten. That being said certain history should not be celebrated. Based on the story
of how and why Silent Sam came to be at UNC, I believe the statue and the story should be placed in a position
of less prominence in or around campus. Let visitors to UN C's historic campus read about why the statue was
created, who placed it in its original spot and what the connotations of that day and time truly meant to the
people of North Carolina. But then also let them read about this time, in 2018, when the students and people of
N.C. and UNC decided that now was the time to stop celebrating the past that divided us and move Silent Sam
to a place where he is not forgotten but is recognized for what he was meant to be. Destroying him isn't the
answer because we can't erase what happened then or the decades of time since, but we can tell the truth about
that time and recognize the hatred that went in to his creation. History is meant to teach us how to be better
today. Let Silent Sam do his part in that lesson.
Sincerely,

Proud Parent of a member of the Class of 2019


Message
From: Goldstein, Bob [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =0d758 7f145 7f4f33 b02ec66c245a 7 d93-Bob Gold ste]
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:52:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: relocating the Confederate Monument to a museum

To Chancellor Folt and the Board of Trustees,

I urge you to present in November the strongest possible case for relocating the Confederate Monument to a museum . I
have taught at the university for 19 years, and I have a deep love for the state of North Carolina and for this university. It
has long pained me to think of students of diverse backgrounds having to pass by the monument while walking to classes .
And that pain has only intensified as confederate statues have become rallying points for white supremacists.

As is now well known to many, at the 1913 unveiling of the Confederate Monument, Julian Carr announced that near the
site of the monument, "I horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds, because upon the streets of this
quiet village she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady .... "

Monuments glorify selected aspects of our shared history. And in the view of many reasonable people, monuments to the
Confederacy belong in museums, where their complex history can be appreciated in the rich context that they require.

Sincerely yours,
Bob Goldstein
James L. Peacock Ill Distinguished Professor
Message
From: Thomas Hassell
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:52:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Remove the monument

Please use this moment to remove the statue. I don't care how the apologists spin it; it's not about heritage,
states rights or any of the other excuses they have concocted. It's a monument to one man's desire to
own another man.
It was wrong then and it's wrong now. Do the right thing and remove the statue!

Thomas S. Hassell
Class of '67
Message
From: K. B. Ross
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:57:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I have struggled over the removal of Confederate statues.

At first, I thought they should be removed.


But then I remembered how ancient Egyptians removed evidence of past rulers.
Also, in the present-day Middle East, evidence of some cultures is being erased.
I suspect there are other examples, as well.

If/when Confederate statues are moved/re-erected, I feel they should have a plaque added that states the
facts about them.
Facts and only facts.
Not judgements.
Let people make those for themselves.

Let's not erase history.


Let's put a light on it.

K. Ross
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 10:59:15 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate statue

I was born in NC, live in Greensboro and love being a southerner!! My is currently enrolled at UNC
and our whole family couldn't be prouder of both him and the school.
There is only one thing to do with the statue, turn it into gravel or scrap metal or whatever. There is
no place on campus or in MY State where a statue that represents hate, bigotry, small minded, scared
thinking, oppression and cruelty should reside. It needs to be destroyed. We need to remember our hateful
past, learn from it so we may never repeat it, but we most definitely do not need to honor it.
Message
From: dan
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:00:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Sam

Put it back where it was located and arrest the people next time. The police should have never stood by
and and allowed the vandalism to happen. A lot of us wonder who instructed them to stand down. Political
correctness is tearing this country apart. Ideology seems to have replaced many people's intelligence
and common sense. Dan Batten '64

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: John Davidson [jcdavidson@parmco.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:02:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

I commend you for setting up this website. While I am not in favor of the Silent Sam statue, I am more opposed
to "mob rule". I don't like that lawlessness is being rewarded with the removal of the statue.

My preference would be to return the statue to someplace on campus and have it sit upon a base which is a
monument to free speech. The base could make a statement that while not all may agree upon what the statue
above represents, it is our history, and will remain in this place until such time as it is lawfully removed or
relocated.

JOHN DAVIDSONI Managing Principal


PARMENTER
REDACTED1 Atlanta, GA 30326
Tel REDACTED I Fax REDACTED I
Jcdavidson(ii}parmco.com I www.parmco.com
Message
From: johane hirschfield
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:04:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument in Museum

I suggest we put Silent Sam in a museum.

Johane Hirschfield
Message
From: danaakerr
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:05:08 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Ideas

Dear chancellor Folt and UNC Board of Trustees,


Taking this opportunity to combine historical remembrances-although, some controversial- and future
understanding is often a way of healing.
This is the time to combine all of the controversial statues ( Stalin, silent Sam, etc.) in t o a
reflection garden of sorts. History can not be changed and causes hurt, nor should we act as thoug h it
never happened. The best lessons use history as a stepping stone for growth and learning from mistakes.
By having multiple statues in one area, a garden, we could see just how far we've come and how much
further we have to go. Additionally, having all of these works of art corralled would also provide ease
on security. The art wou l d be pr otected. The window of lea r ning could be opened.
Maybe there could even be other additions to the garden like a piece representing hope and peace. Study
areas for professors and students to have necessary dialogues. Plaques asking the why & how to grow
questions with brief descriptions of the past. The additions would be endless.
There is a solution to this issue.
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Dana Kerr
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:05:48 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

All three of our kids are Tarheels, two still there. sil ent Sam bel ongs to history- an ugl y part- he
belongs in a museum. what does it say to the African American students who attend the school- especially
with the recent events and perhaps new knowledge that it really was erected to poke a nasty finger in
their eyes. The story of the dedication is now everywhere- the man bragging about beating an emancipated
woman- because he coul d. It is SHAMEFUL. Put it to rest.
REDACTED
Message
From: Stuart Krantz
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:06:49 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument

In order to recognize the pain that the reasons behind the Confederacy caused to many people's of our country,
put the monument in a Confederate History Museum.
Let's just all try to get along.
For the good of our country.
Stuart Krantz
Message
From: dianne miller
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:08:43 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam needs to be placed back where he was rip down from . There no other options . This resplendent the
young men who went to UNC during this era and fought in this war.

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: karen bessey
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:08:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I think the statue should reside in the NC Museum of History in Raleigh, perhaps in the section called Meet the Statues . It
should be displayed in a setting where its historical context can be explained. It no longer needs to be a free-standing
statue on the grounds of the UNC campus because it does not symbolize the welcoming environment UNC promotes .

Thank you.
Sincerely,
Karen Bessey
Message
From: Spoma Jovanovic
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:13:19 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thank yo for sol i citing input on where Silent Sam should be relocated .... off the campus is my vote, in some
historical museum maybe, but I'm not sure it's even deceiving of that considering its history, based on
propaganda and manipulation of our elected leaders.
Spoma Jovanovic
Greensboro, NC
Message
From: Gene Womble
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:13:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I would like to see lJNC's Confederate Monument, Silent Sam, reinstalled


in its former location abiding by the 2015 state law preventing altering or
moving historic monun1ents. Is it not possible to enclosed it in a clear
product that \vould be tamper proof and ,vith a camera? Any one that
chose to demolish it would be arrested and subjected to the fullest extent
of the law, otherwise the vandals are being revvarded for their criminal
behavior!

Sincerely,

Gene Womble
Message
From: BRIANN PARSON-BARNES
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:14:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7 49272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thank you so much for asking for input.


Anytime something causes such discord and pain for others, maybe it should be placed in a museum or a less
prominent area. You can put a plaque up that says "THIS PLACE REPRESENTS THE FACT THAT
EVERYONE IS IMPORTANT AND EVERY VOICE IS HEARD". That doesn't mean that we agree or
disagree, only that we hear.
We teach our children to be kind to others and try not to be offensive. Ifwe offend intentionally or
unintentionally, we have to be cognizant of others feelings. Though some people like that statue because of its
historical relevance, it is highly offensive to those who struggle daily with overt and covert racism. We can
never understand another's struggle until we walk in their shoes, but when they tell us that it hurts, we have an
obligation to stop hurting!!!

Sentfrom my Verizon lvfotorola 5'martphone


Message
From: Starmer, Josh [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =ld le 7332 72d24dfbb9fa3054bf95ae40-Josh Sta rme]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:14:58 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

Dear carol Folt et al.


Please put silent Sam in a museum where it can be considered a relic - perhaps as part of the Carolina
Hall Exhibit or something along those lines.
Josh Starmer
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:16:07 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea

Sorry for the short email. Going straight to the point: the one thing you must NOT do is keep a confederate monument
on campus. No dangerous protests, unwanted attention, cleaning cost or policing cost, are worth it. The only place that
can display it without evoking emotions and attracting the wrong crowds is a museum. It can go there along with all its
history, good and bad.
Donate it!

UNC Parent
Message
From: Katie Matthews
Sent: 9/25/2018 11: 17:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ ou=Exchange Adm inistrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ient s/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Civil Wa r Monument idea

What about the Raleigh Durham Airport?

Katie S. Matthews

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Message
From: Sara Dyson
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:17:51 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Re: Silent Sam

Please keep Silent Sam on campus as we should stop trying to change history. The Germans are not proud of Hitler but
he is not a solidary symbol of the history of Deutsch land. Just as a monument doesn't tell the complete story of the
many persons who willingly fought in this war or others.
Sara Dyson
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:18:30 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Future of Silent Sam

To Whom it May Concern,

I would like to share my opinion as to the future of Silent Sam. I would like to suggest moving Silent Sam into
an appropriate building and encase him in a display case or put the statue behind glass. As a parent of students
who attend UNC-CH, I have general knowledge as to the layout of the campus so I cannot really suggest which
building since I am not familiar with all of them.

Also, please make a new plaque and rededicate the statue to symbolize all students who live or have lived in
North Carolina especially those who attended UNC-CH who had enlisted and fought for our country in all wars.
We are grateful for their service and for their love of our country. Because of their unselfish sacrifice,
generations are able to pursue an education.

Thank you for considering my opinion.

Sincerely,
Message
From: Rick Statile
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:19:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Placement Ideas

Chancellor Falt and Board of Trustees,

I'd suggest donating the statue to the Orange County Historical Museum
https://orangenchistory.org

Or place it at Bennett State Historical Site


https://www.battlefields.org/visiUheritage-sites/bennett-place-state-h istoric-site

Best of luck on this difficult subject.

Rick Statile
UNC Undergrad - 1994
UNC JD -1997
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:23:10 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument suggestion from UNC parent

To committee members:

As a parent of 2 UNC students, I would like the statue to remain removed from campus, where it served as a
negative reminder of some or our state (and nations) divisive history.
However, Silent Sam is a valid part of both the State of NC and UNC heritage. He should be placed in a
museum for viewing within the proper context. Perhaps donated to the NC Museum of Art in Raleigh or placed
in the Ackland Art Museum on campus.

Respectfully Submitted,
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:24:27 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam idea

My understanding of the statue was to remember the students that left school to fight in a war. I
suggest creating more statues in a line starting with the silent Sam then WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam and
what ever we want to call the current issues in the middle east that has been happening since 9/11
We need to remember that our kids are leaving school to fight for our country. This will never end
My son put off college to serve. He gets out in March, some don't make it out

REDACTED

PS Leave room for future statues, hell to make a point, build more bases and leave them empty
Message
From: Dennis Draper
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:28:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: UNC Monument Placement

I vote to have the monument taken off site. Where ever it might be displayed it should be noted it was donated
by a white supremacists group and the racist connotations.

We do not want UNC labeled by the rest of the country as a racist southern university. We'll lose some of our
best applicants if the university insists the monument be put back.
Message
From: Mary Basnight
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:29:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument Relocation

Thanks for the opportunity to have input.


Would it be possible to have the monument returned to the Carboro man's family who was so instrumental in it's
construction and choice of locations? It could be placed on their private property and managed there.
Thanks
Mac
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:29:25 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Folt,

Thank you for asking for input on this topic. As an alum ('84) and the father of a current student, I feel strongly that the
monument should not be put back at its former location. It is symbol that carries racial overtones, going back to its
dedication. Having it on display in a museum-type setting would be an acceptable option if done so in a context that
highlights lingering racial prejudice in the years following the Civil War, but not in a public display that would imply that
UNC endorses its message.

There's the opportunity to replace the statue with a new monument, and it would be appropriate to commemorate
someone who is embraced by the university community and made strides towards racial progress. Perhaps a statue of
Dean Smith and Charlie Scott would be that.

We have grown as a university and now need to look to a positive, inclusive future. Publicly displaying Silent Sam should
not be part of that future.

Sincerely,
REDACTED
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:30:45 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: please put in a museum

Please put Confederate monuments in a museum with a plaque that can fully provide the historical context that led to
the creation of the monuments in the first place.
Message
From: Mary Klaff
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:31:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea for Confederate Statue

Greetings-
Let's put silent Sam to valuable educational use. I believe the statue should return to Mccorkle Place
along with permanent plaques and inscriptions placed alongside that describe the issues we face today
regarding confederate representations in public and why the monument has become so controversial.
showing all sides of the issue will make the monument relevant and available for people to learn and
understand the difficult history.
Mary Hooper Klaff
UNC class of 1987
Message
From: Ward, Joseph T (Joey)
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:31:28 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: El la Gil li am [ellagil liam@gmail.com]
Subject: Melt Si lent Sam and use the Bronze for a statue of Julius Chambers. Fitting and appropriate!

Julius Chambers 1959-1962

Lawyer and lifetime civil rights advocate Julius L. Chambers graduated from UNC School of Law in i 962. During his
time at UNC, he was selected as the first African-American editor-in-chief of The North Carolina Law Review and
graduated first in his class. During his long career as a civil rights attorney, he won many landmark cases including
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, which instituted a system to bus-in students of color from
distant neighborhoods to integrate Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools. Chambers later succeeded Thurgood Marshall
as president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Despite falling victim to
bombings and incredible racial opposition, Chambers did not stop fighting for civil rights until his death in 2013.

IN MEMC)RIAM
Julius Levonne Chan1bers
1936-2013
! knovv that many in our commurdty and beyond fee!
passionately about the monument As a next step, vve
have created a dedicated emal! address,
uncmonut11ent@unc,edtJ, for anyone to subrtllt ideas
about the statue's future. While we wH! not be able to
provide individual responses, we vvm carefuHy review
and consider an ideas as vle prepare a plan to present
to the Board of Governors in November. Please note
that al! emal! sUbmisslons vvm be subject to disclosure
t.mder North CamiirtB's pubHc records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this irnportant


top!c that vv'iH help shape the future of Carolina,

Sincerely,

Chanceiinr Caro! L Fo!t and the UNG-Chapel Hm


Board of Trustees

Thls mes.sage is sponsored by: Office of the

Joseph T Ward Jr AIC


Catastrophe Consultant
Nationwidei Proud Nationwide Member
Carolinas Claim Zone
Ss. ;~~n f{)U:f sidB
W 919-420-7045 F 866-660-6903
wardj 1@nationwide. corn

FORTUNE® and Time Inc. are not affiliated with, and do not endorse the products or seNices of, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.

an ~tern .
Message
From: Lori Fussa
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:33:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I'm not sure where silent Sam should go, since monuments that have to do with racism have no place in our
society. However, I do think that you need to address the issue of "what should replace Silent Sam?"
Many people thought of silent Sam as representing racism, but many saw it as a symbol of our history,
representing UNC students who went off and fought in the civil war. Why not make a monument that
represents all the students from the past and present who have fought in any war? Wars from the past all
the way to the present time. A nice water feature like a pond with a fountain in that courtyard would be
a pretty memorial. Nothing representing the Confederacy, just the United States as a whole, including
every war that has been fought which honors the UNC students who have played a role in those various
wars. A placard near the water feature would explain its significance while it also would serve as an
attractive focal point in the courtyard in the front of the school.
Thanks for opening up the discussion and listening to our opinions. -Lori Fussa
Message
From: O'Kane, Sam
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:34:10 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Move it to the Arboretum, thank you <end>

Sam O'Kane

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Message
From: MariaElena ruefle
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:35:16 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

I think the monument should be preserved. I will not get into details, but I do believe that preservation is vital to
history and your institution.
Message
From: Haber, Noah [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =0b5e6ead72c7 45 7599309dcca07163fc-N oa h Haber]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:36:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disappointed at your response

Dear Chancellor Folt,

I would like to express my disappointment and lack of faith in your office's abilities to make respectable
decisions in this regard. It took until protesters forcibly removed the statue for you to even acknowledge that the
origins of the statue were in 1913, 48 years after the civil war had ended, and that its very foundation was built
upon flagrant racism. As a university office, your primary task is the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and you
completely failed to do so. The "controversy" escalated predictably, and could have been resolved relatively
quietly had you and your office taken a knowledge-based approach to this issue.

Similarly, a knowledge-based approach to the placement of this statue is appropriate. Placing on display in a
museum, preferably face down, alongside an accurate historical description of the circumstances in which it was
built and then later pulled down, is perhaps the best response. Unfortunately, as expressed above, I am
somewhat doubtful of your office's abilities to make a respectable decision in this regard, though I would be
happy to be surprised. As such, a secondary option would involve donating the statue to a civil rights museum
for them to deal with appropriately.

I hope that your office takes its role as educators seriously this time around.

Best,
Noah Haber
Message
From: jack.redhead
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:37:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam placement

I recommend silent Sam be placed in chapel Hill Memorial Cemetery on south Rd.
John ("Jack") Redhead
UNC 1990
Message
From: El lison, Marcia [mellison@liberty.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:37:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

First of all, thank you for giving people of Chapel Hill to speak up because not everyone is on the same side of protesters or a
racist.

I prefer the statue goes back where it belongs because no one has a right to tear down the statue. It is unnecessary to pay a large
amount of salary to protect the statue; therefore, there should be a large tall iron gate (some type of fencing) surrounding it.

No one has a right to damage the property, and I believe in punishment according to the law. There will be a building, a street,
or town that they want to change next. Where \vill it end?

Sincerely,

Marcia Ellison
Message
From: Kevin Schultz [kevinls@us.ibm.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:38:13 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate Monument's "d isposition and preservation."

Thank you for taking this on, the faster the better. I believe the monument should be removed from campus
immediately, as it really is a reminder of a racist past. That said, it is a part of history and can only be learned from if
it is in a place that facilitates learning the whole of the story. I think it should be moved to NC Museum of History
and become part of "The Story of North Carolina", the good and the bad - where context for it can be explained with
all transparency and reasons for it not being appropriate as a centerpiece of a modern university can be thoroughly
explained as well.

Sooner or later it will be damaged or worse, will insite an event where harm will come to someone and that cannot
be, especially with the school knowing this already and sending out warnings that violence is likely - that is not
sustainable nor wise nor acceptable of a system that values the future, safety and welfare of NC and the world.

Thank you,

kevin

Dear Carolina Community:

As you likely are aware, recently the UNC System Board of Governors gave the UNC-
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and me a clear path to develop a plan for the Confederate
Monument's "disposition and preservation." We have been asked to present our plan to
UNC System President Margaret Spellings and the Board of Governors by November 15,
2018.

I know that many in our community and beyond feel passionately about the monument. As a
next step, we have created a dedicated email address, uncmonument@unc.edu, for anyone to
submit ideas about the statue's future. While we will not be able to provide individual
responses, we will carefully review and consider all ideas as we prepare a plan to present to
the Board of Governors in November. Please note that all email submissions will be subject
to disclosure under North Carolina's public records law.

Thank you in advance for your input on this important topic that will help shape the future of
Carolina.

Sincerely,

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees

This message is sponsored by: Office of the Chancellor


Powered by: Copyright© 2018 CampusESP. All rights reserved.

kevin I. schultz
experience designer
enterprise design thinking leader I master inventor
UXPA I IDSA

kevinls@us.ibm.com

"The only important thing about design is how it relates to people ." - Victor Papanek

IBM Design
Industrial Design Program
Message
From: Prinny Anderson
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:40:40 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: What to do with Silent Sam

Thank you for soliciting public input on what to do with the statue known as Silent Sam.

However, it is my understanding that UNC and other NC government entities have been receiving commentary and
recommendations for many years. It appears that the problem isn't *what* to do, it's to have the will and the courage
and the political power to actually *do* something.

That said, my first comment is that the university needs to have a public forum with the other entities in state
government who make the decision on this matter, to discuss what those entities are actually willing to consider. Let's
be politically honest (an oxymoron perhaps?) and realistic - don't get your constituents' hopes up that UNC will do
something if it can't and will be obstructed from other directions. But remind the politicians and bureaucrats that
there's an election going on this year and there will be more elections soon.

Second, assuming that UNC actually can take action, my recommendation is that the statue be placed elsewhere on
campus, as part of an installation that tells the story of the university and its connections to slavery and slave ownership.
Let the statue be part of telling the truth about NC, Chapel Hill, and the university. Let the statue be part of expressing
the changing views of slavery, the Civil War, and civil rights among the powers that be and in the surrounding
communities. Let the statue be a place where those who have been oppressed and harmed by what it stands for and the
people who erected and supported it can speak out about the oppression and the harm.

Thank you,
Virginia Anderson
Message
From: Giana
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:42:34 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Location Options

Places that honor students who have passed:


UNC Memorial Grove
Old Chapel Hill Cemetery

Places that honor past students that could provide greater historical context:
UNC Visitor's Center
UNC Alumni Assoc
Ackland Art Museum

Places that honor current, future, and past service members with UNC connection:
UNC ROTC units

I'm disappointed that you couldn't come up with a list on your own. I'm disappointed that you wouldn't
consider any of these locations to be of equal or greater places of prominence - it speaks more to your
interpretation of who is important in and around your campus than anything else.
Message
From: midjohnston@northstatesales.com [midjohnston@northstatesales.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:43:17 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf37 49272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

The Silent Sam Confederate Monument should be replaced where it has stood since 1913. The UNC Board of
Governors can not reinforce the destructive and illegal actions of a few individuals by not doing so.

I recognize the fact that it is controversial and offensive to some. If at some point the UNC Board of Governors
vote to remove the confederate monument, that is understandable. However, you can not allow "mob rules"
mentality to exist on campus.

Mid Johnston
North State Sales Co.
REDACTED
Greensboro, NC 27429

"The Tractor Weight People"


Message
From: Gene Costa
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:43:46 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Carol L Folt and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees:

During the past three years my wife and I have visited the site of Silent Sam after learning that it is a
monument to honor those UNC students who fought in the Civil War. We have been at the site when
there were protestors and again during Thanksgiving break when the protestors were gone. We find it
unfortunate that the words of Mr. Carr used at the dedication of the statue obfuscate the original
purpose of Silent Sam.

Around our great nation there are many statues and memorials to those men and women who have
fought in wars. Most of those statues are national, state, county, or town memorials. What makes
Silent Sam unique is that it represents students who left their studies to become soldiers, some,
never to return to UNC.

We do agree with the protestors that the words of Mr. Carr spoken publicly at the dedication
ceremony were despicable. Notably, we have not heard their cries and protests to change the name
of Carrboro. Therefore, if Silent Sam is not to stand where he has for over a hundred years, perhaps
he should stand guard at the entrance to the history department with a plaque to honor all UNC
students who have died fighting the wars of our country to date.

Gene and Jane Costa

Califon, New Jersey


Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:45:02 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: What to do with Silent Sam?

Dear Chancellor Falt and the UNC Board of Trustees:

I appreciate the opportunity to comment and contribute regarding the future of Silent Sam.

I believe strongly that there's no place for the public display of the statue on the campus ofUNC, Chapel Hill,
or any other university campus for that matter, especially considering its clearly racist and divisive intentions
when it was originally erected.

Perhaps there's a museum it could be kept in as a piece of United States history where it might be appropriately
contextualized and described. I understand the arguments of history and heritage that some folks are using to try
to keep the statue where it is, but in this case they simply don't hold water. The statue is no longer an
appropriate representation of the values of the University or its community (I'm pretty sure it never was). It's no
longer an appropriate representation of the values of any right minded US citizen, southern or otherwise (I'm
pretty sure it never was).

I appreciate UNC immensely. As a career educator and the father of a current senior, I'm thankful for the
thoughtful process you've undertaken. I'm thankful for the work the university does with its students every day.

To that end, and in the name of what's fundamentally right, the statue needs to be removed.

Sincerely,
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:46:05 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: statue

I am deeply saddened that the few violent protesters take precedence over the many historians and
general public who have enjoyed and understand this statues presence at UNC for many
years. Have we become a nation that surcombs to violent offenders? Is there no one who stands up
for the rites of the people? Would you move your campus because someone was offended by your
presence? Is this what you are teaching the young adults that attend the college you represent, that
to cower and give in to people who violently break the law is acceptable, in stead of obeying the
law? For a college of Law you certainly, shamefully, disrespect the laws of our country. While my
child attends UNC, we find ourselves constantly having to discuss the irradicle acceptance by UNC
vs. other colleges who do not allow such abhorent behavior. It is obvious the peoples voice does not
matter in the placement of the statue, because you are taking the opinion of radicals over the law.
The statue needs to be put back where it has been for years and the offenders need to be
prosecuted . You will do as you wish to support the illegal behavior of violence so I will say seek those
violent offenders for support and donations.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:46:24 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Suggestion for Silent Sam Statue

I am a Durham resident and my is a sophomore at UNC Chapel Hill. While I agree with the
statement that the statue represents an important part of North Carolina history and shouldn't be forgotten, public statues
are generally monuments to pay tribute & give honor to a person or a belief.. I think a more appropriate place would be in
a museum where the context and history can be explained and understood as a part of the evolution of race relations in
North Carolina instead of as a stand alone tribute to a racist ideology from the past.
Message
From: Scott, John [john.scott@gilbarco.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:46:36 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam monument

This is North Carolina history.


Keep the monument in its original location .

John Scott

Please be advised that this email may contain confidential information. Ifyou are not the intended recipient, please notify us by email by replying to the sender and
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Message
From: Frances Furr I
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:48:42 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The monument

Hello,

I hope that it will be accessible if you wish to see the statue but no longer have to see in such a prominent
spot. It should be a choice to see. Move the statue and put a plaque explaining the context to why it was moved
to the new location to create that conversation. I don't believe that history can or should be wiped away. But as
often as we can revisit and reflect and create consecutive dialogue from the we learn. For those wishing to
engage in the past and learn from history it should be there. The University should stand for learning.

Frances Robicsek Furr '90 Art history


Message
From: tony burleson
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:50:09 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]

Please, put Sam back up and leave him alone. He was there before you and he neebs to stay. Put feance around
him so the haters can't take him down again. This statue is about our history, only commies tear down statues of
a country.
Message
From: Wendy Waugh
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:50:38 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: silent sam

The Confederacy was the definition of anti-America. Monuments to the Confederacy are anti-American and
unpatriotic. Confederate monuments may remain in public places if the anti-American and unpatriotic meaning of them
is made very clear. No tax money should be used to place, replace, or maintain them. Silent Sam may remain on the
UNC campus in a less prominent place if it is clearly shown to be a monument to anti-American history.

The Reverend Wendy R. Waugh


Hillsborough, NC
Message
From: Jay Strong
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:50:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Response

Statue to Alumni who died in the Civil War fighting for the Confederacy.

Put the statue back where it was. Put up a tablet explaining the context and difficult choices young Carolina
students made before, during and after the war. Put up other statues nearby to other students who fought in
1812, 1918, 1944, 1952, 1968, 1991, and 2005 for Lux Libertas.

Teach. Don't preach, reach, or bleach. The faculty or administration are not the "state." We are. Accept our
history, our frailty, and our weaknesses, however tainted and misdirected they were at times. What we are
today, this dialogue, is a product of that history.

This is not a proud chapter for many. It is a tragic tale of servitude, misdirected ideals of freedom (states'
rights), and the evolution of the United States. We are a great, incomplete experiment begun with a
commitment to protect individual freedom. The choices people made in 1861 are part of that experiment,
however tragic they might have been.

Finally, never yield to the mob. The mob scorns freedom. That is why they are a mob. Authoritarian states
always arise from such cleansing of history, institutions, and mores. First they topple the statues, eventually
they come for you.

Carol Folt, stand up, listen and show strength. "We the people" are not we the few who prefer chaos to get
what they want. If you yield, you lose what is good about UNC and the important lessons of the past mistakes
and choices made.

Lux libertas,

Jay N. Strong
UNC AB 1972
UNC MBA/JD 1976

Sent from my iPad


Message
From: Craig
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:53:57 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam thoughts

Chancellor Folt,

Per your request of receiving feedback on Silent Sam, I felt compelled as a North Carolina citizen to provide my
honest feedback. I think the actions exhibited by the protestors was terrible and is not the way to go about
change. This State and the systems related to our state run under the laws of this state. At no time should that be
forgotten regardless of political belief or affiliation. As such, my thought are as follows.

I) The only course of action available to the University under the law of our State is to restore and protect the
memorial.

2) There is no authority at the University allowed to move it so that it can be re-contextualize or curate it with
modem-day lies about white supremacy. The law is plain oncthis. The decision lies with the Hisotrical
Commission NOT the UNC Chancellor or Board.

3) The University belongs to the people of North Carolina and NOT an extremist minority of paid activists. We
will not let them take over our state university system. Please end this madness and get back to the mission of
educating students.

Please follow the rule of law and do what is the correct and legal thing to do, put Sam back up where he is
supposed to be.

Thank you
Craig Pippen

Get Outlook for iOS


Message
From: Richard Cobb
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:54:53 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor Falt,


I am a white male, age 76, a native North Carolinian and proud graduate of The University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. I am not, and have never been a racist nor an extremist of any kind. I am a
conservative person who fully supports the Constitution of the United States and the rule of law.
Based upon my extensive study of the history of our country, I believe the principal basis of the war
between the states was economics and that the issue of slavery was secondary. I hasten to add that
all of my ancestors were from North Carolina and southern Virginia and none of them either owned
slaves or condoned the practice. Many of my ancestors did fight in the war between the states,
however, written family history documents the fact that they did not do so to defend the practice of
slavery.
Having said all of the above, I am writing you to support the restoration and conservation of the statue
we know as Silent Sam . That statue is not, in my opinion, in any way a symbol of racism or white
supremacy. It is purely a memorial to the brave men who voluntarily fought to defend their families,
their homes and their sovereign freedoms during a truly horrible period in the history of our country. I
urge you, your administration and the Board of Governors to restore the memorial at its historical
location and to protect it from any further illegal and unethical acts of vandalism .
Most respectfully yours,
Richard H. Cobb, BS, Class of 1965
Message
From: Michael Dallmeyer
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:56:11 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Sir o r Madame,
I urge you to not be swayed by the history deniers and race baiters to remove the memorial to the
Confederate soldiers located on the UNC campus. This activist movement seeks only to foment more divisive
race relations for their own benefit and to further their purpose of dividing the co untry. Many confederate
memorials in Missouri are under attack as well, and even Confederate soldier cemeteries are prohibited from
displaying the Confederate flag except on Memorial Day and Confederate Memorial Day when small flags are
allowed on graves. The fact that there were slave holders in the US cannot be denied and is part of our history,
which cannot and should not be rewritten.

Michael A. Dallmeyer
Carver & Michael, LLC
REDACTED
Jefferson City, Missouri 65101
mike@carvermichael.net
Phone: REDACTED
Fax: REDACTED

CONFIDENTIALITY NO TICE: THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS E-MAIL IS PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL AND IS INTENDED ONLY FOR THE
USE OF THE ADDRESSEE(S) INDICATED ABO VE. IF YOU RECEIVED THIS E-MAIL IN ERRO R, PLEASE NOTIFY THE SENDER BY TELEPHONE IMMEDIATELY
AT 573-636-4215 AND DESTROY THE ORIGINAL MESSAGE.
Message
From: Jay Hayes
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:58:31 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Disposition of Si lent Sam

While I against moving the statue at all, I feel that the tide of change will not allow for the status quo to be
maintained. As the statue and base are a monument to students that have fallen in battle defending their beliefs
and country, I believe that the best location for the statue is in the University Cemetery. It should be
rededicated to all students lost in battle and not only confederates. A new dedication will erase the stain of the
original dedication.

Sincerely,

Jay Hayes '93


Message
From: Scott Sanner
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:58:59 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate monument

Hi.
Thank you for being open to thoughts and feedback on the monument.

My first recommendation would be disposal in an appropriate landfill or recycling of the materials if possible.
If disposal is not an option, then I would suggest the thing be placed at one of the state's battlefield
sites. Battlefield sites are useful for education and any monuments that recognize fighting seem best placed in
that sort of venue.

Thank you,

Scott G. Sanner
Message
From: Sweeney, John Matthew [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn= 79827e5a7394494d9c990ae3b842edc7-John M Swee]
Sent: 9/25/2018 11:59:23 AM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: comm ission idea

In the place of Silent Sam on campus, commission a sculpture that captures the tension between present day beliefs
and the ones that dominated in the past. The sculpture doesn't resolve the tension but captures it in an artistic way.

Silent Sam is accepted respectfully by a museum.

--John Sweeney, faculty member


Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:00:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam proposal

I proposed that the UNC Board of Trustees work with the Governor's office and establish a process by
which the statue can be given to another state park, specifically, one of the state's civil war
battlefields.
A short story - several years ago while working with Gov. Evan Bayh I got involved in a request to move a
congressman's papers that had been deposited to the Indiana State Library, who had poor archival
services, to the Ind. Historical Society, a private organization that had excellent archival services.
The Library balked at turning over any part of their collection, especially to a "rival: organization,
and claimed there was no statutory authority to do so.
However, we found that the State Library could turn over their property to the Ind. Dept. of Natural
Resources, who in turn had authority to turn it over to the Historical Society. so we created a paper
trail and the collection was moved. And I might add, archived and indexed.
Disclosure - the congressman was my grandfather, and I was the one who initiated the request. I worked
for Gov. Bayh at the time and had help navigating this with the governor's counsel.
so, while there might be statutory language preserving the stat ue , I suspect UNC has the ability to
convey property to the Dept. of Natural Resources, or whatever it is in NC, especially if it's done to
preserve and protect it. Ironical l y, I'm trying to preserve the statue I guess.
I hope this helps,
Message
From: Steve Trammell
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:01:19 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Monument

I urge you to return the statue honoring former UNC students who did their duty as they saw it to it's former and proper
location.

Although not a UNC graduate, I am a North Carolina citizen and on several levels a taxpayer. I graduated from East
Mecklenburg High School, have three children who graduated from South Mecklenburg High School. I have nieces,
nephews, daughters -in-law, friends, and co-workers who graduated from North Carolina high schools and UNC-Chapel
Hill. None of us either deny or are ashamed of our history. We certainly are not ashamed of either our ancestor's
struggles or their accomplishments. May the citizens of North Carolina continue to learn and build on our citizens
accomplishments and failures.

Sincerely,

H. S. Trammell
President
Livingstone Coating Corporation
REDACTED
Mt. Holly, NC 28120
strarrirnell(Wlivcoat.corn
REDACTED
Message
From: Jil I
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:02:06 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Where to place Silent Sam!

The original intent of the confederate statue, Silent Sam was designed and dedicated to honor the memory of all the
UNC Alums and Students who fought and gave their lives to the cause of the Civil War. The dedication speech of Julian
Carr at the Dedication of Silent Sam was tragic.

As with any war though, there are a multitude of motivations for those that fight: cause, defense of home, peer
pressure, family ties, economics, compulsion, etc. As Pulitzer Prize winning Princeton historian wrote" The Civil War
started because of uncompromising differences between free and slave states over the power of the national
government to prohibit slavery".

However it is simplistic and na"ive to view either the two million Union soldiers or the one million Confederate solders as
a hive mind. The average confederate solider was not risking his life to keep slaves in chain. There were men who
enlisted to defend their family livelihood but that was not a majority. Most studies state that less than one third of white
southern families owned one or more slaves. Most of the confederate soldiers came from the poorest families. Were
some of the confederate solders racist? Most likely. Some also may have had a conviction that owning people was
wrong, even though they may not have supported racial equality. It was truly a sad time in the history of our country.

Please consider finding a plot in the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery, a cemetery founded by the University, for Silent Sam. This
is where a memorial for those Tar Heels who died should be. A statue in memory of those students and alumni who
died during the Civil War, for whatever reason they had at that time period. A plaque should be added reading
something like the following:

"Silent Sam, a memorial to those UNC students and alumni who died during the Civil War, a time of great division in our
country which has lead us to this day to continue to work for justice and equality for all".

Jill Ridky-Blackburn, M.Ed, Ph.D


UNCAlum '85

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


Message
From: Roscoe Reeve
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:02:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Relocating Silent Sam

We agree that Silent Sam cannot be returned to his pedestal on the main entrance to campus. We believe he
should not be placed anywhere on campus, and his pedestal destroyed.

We believe the most relevant and respectful place for Sam would be at Bennett Place State Historic Park in
Durham where he can be placed in context to his meaning and to the place where a important historical event
occurred, the surrender of the last significant army of the Confederacy.

[ Perhaps if Sam is placed there the State would be willing to receive a statue of a Union soldier so that both can
reflect the service of ordinary men who served in the war, from farms and universities.]

Our alumni and our citizens, young and old, should experience these symbols, statues and monuments, as to
their full historical meanings in a place where history of that period occurred.

Respectfully yours, and thanks for asking for our input,

Mary Stuart Reeve, class of 61 Roscoe Reeve, Graduate work, School of Education and Sociology.
Chapel Hill residents since 58/65
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:02:12 PM
To: UNC M onument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I just read a story about Dr. Nora Dennis, an African-American alum of 2001. She wrote a letter demanding the
statue be taken down because "truth matters and facts still exist". That's interesting, because I would use the
same argument to demand restoration of the statue now. The truth is that the state of North Carolina seceded
from the Union. It was the last state to do so, and did so largely to avoid having to fight the southern states
that surrounded it. There was no great outcry to defend slavery, and the presence of the statue is not a
statement in support of slavery. It is a memorial to the 321 young men, also UNC alums, who fought and died
for their state. It is also a fact that 90% of Confederate soldiers did not come from slave-owning families. It is
impossible to know the mindset of men who lived in a different time, over 150 years ago. But it is doubtful
that the majority of these young men were fighting for slavery. Here are some more "facts that still exist". In
April of 1861, long after Lincoln took office and states had begun to secede, UNC had the second highest
enrollment among southern schools, with 465 students. But by the fall semester, when Lincoln had called for
the enlistment of 100,000 troops to invade the south, only 91 students enrolled. The rest enlisted to defend
their state. It is easy now to look back and say their cause was wrong. We can also look back 50 years and
question the morality of the Vietnam War. But is that justification for tearing down the memorial in
Washington that remembers the 58,000 souls lost in that war? Like Dr. Dennis, I am a UNC alum, but third
generation, and all three of my REDACTED are alums or currently enrolled. In my time at UNC, I went to hear
many speakers, some that I agreed with, others that I did not agree with. These included G. Gordon Liddy and
Madeline Murray O'Haire. I learned from all of them, and I did not try to squelch anyone's right to express
their opinion. The university encouraged diversity of opinion, and students were better for it. There were no
attempts to intimidate or chase off speakers, as I witnessed on campus a few years ago. And I learned from Dr.
James Leutze's class on military history about the incredible bravery and sacrifice of the Civil War soldiers on
both sides. I would suggest some of these mindless, ignorant anarchists who tore down the monument might
want to educate themselves similarly. I am disgusted by their actions, and by the inaction of the police and the
school administrators. Stalin tore down monuments and tried to rewrite history. So did Mao. So did the
Taliban. And now we see the same thing on our campus. The causes are different, but the hatred, ignorance
and denial of history are the same. And here's one more "fact that still exists". While 90% of Confederate
soldiers did not own slaves, George Washington did. So did Thomas Jefferson. So where does this stop? Are
we going to allow mobs to burn down Mt. Vernon and Monticello, or attack the memorials in D.C.? You
encourage just that if you let these people get away with the vandalism here. Nothing good ever comes from
allowing mob rule. And as I understand it, most of the perpetrators in the destruction of the monument were
not students. They were outside agitators, some of them possibly professional anarchists. Whole generations
passed though Mccorkle Place without feeling "threatened" or "unwelcome" around Sam (see the media
guide picture of Michael Jordan and Sam Perkins smiling at the base of the statue). It is only the current crazy
political "resistance" climate that bred this artificial rage that resulted in this situation. Put Sam back where he
belongs, educate people about what he actually represents, since education is the job of the school, and
punish those who do not respect the rule of law. Respectfully, redacted (Class of 1982)
Message
From: Wesley Harris
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:03:00 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Statue

I am against removing Sam. He has been a part of the UNC campus for such a long time. I really don't know anyone who
looks at these historical monuments are associates them with prejudice or hate. Most of us only know the story of silent
Sam, who fires his gun when ever a virgin walks by. We are raising an entire generation of offended youth . And in my
opinion, our universities are a big part of this. NO to removing Sam .
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:03:17 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Thank you for giving us a place to express our ideas

Chancellor Folt and the Board of 'Trustees,

First, and absolutely foremost, thank you for creating a way for voices to be
heard calmly and rationally. We will better formulate our opinions and
thoughts if we know they will be heard. We will also have increased trust in
the process. I<udos.

My dream of dreams would be that the people who feel strongly about the
monument could engage in a process that would allow them to agree on
signage that could accompany the statue at a site on campus away from its
former location. I would see it in the vein of restorative justice and the
ability for those involved to be and feel heard by each other and move
beyond demonstrations, ang11 rhetoric and violence. Pipe dream, clearly, but
I'll put it out there.

As a second best, I have wondered if there could possibly be a display of the


monument - again at a site dedicated for this purpose on campus, but not
where it has been located - a museum type display, with a range of
interpretive signage that seeks to educate, put the statue in context and allow
varied voices to be heard.

Including:
1. 1\ relatively neutral (good luck!) historical record (timeline) of events
surrounding the monument's history. Creation, installation, quotes from
what was said at the dedication (incendiary and otherwise), demonstrations
against it, responses to those, its removal, this very process we're in right
now, etc. Hard to please everyone, but staying towards factual for this
part. _i\ review (or even direct involvement) during the creation of this
document/ display by representatives of calm voices on either side of the
debate would be helpful, perhaps essential, to boil it down to the factual.
2. 1\ group of historians create a record to give perspective and background
on the context of the events listed above. Hard to not tilt towards some
level of bias or opinion here for sure. Perhaps this needs to be divided or
have multiple versions/perspectives to reflect varied viewpoints.

3. Curated statements of straight up opinion (with any factual inaccuracies


vetted) along a spectrum of viewpoints - with some ground rules around civil
discourse, lack of profanity and violent intent and more that I would have to
think about. Find voices along this spectrum to create words of explanation
that reflect their perspective and put all of them up around the statue to be
respectfully read and absorbed. Not going to please or satisfy everyone, but
maybe many people could feel like their current perspective was mirrored in
someone's words. And with that groundwork laid, perhaps an increased
willingness to read and absorb what others have said.

I'm remembering the book and documentary about the "unlikely friendship"
between a black woman and a I<]an member in Durham. Could we listen to
each other, find our voices and speak and use this opportunity to move
forward the entire conversation about race, history, slavery, discrimination,
Southernism and whatever else this statue and its unique history symbolize
for so many?

Returning it to where it has been with no explanation would miss this


opportunity and enrage those with legitimate complaints. Removing it and
melting it down or relegating it to some warehouse would satisfy some, but
enrage others, and also would miss out on an opportunity for current and
future deeper understanding. Could a carefully crafted process become an
opportunity to engage and allow for continued engagement with a piece of
our history?

1'v1aybe this is all pipe dream, too, but it is my vision and wish.

I hope for your clarity and wisdom in this important endeavor and
opportunity. At this moment, attention to the process itself is of critical
importance, perhaps as much as the concrete outcome. I sense from your
communications that those guiding this process recognize this fact, which
will serve us all.

Respectfully, and with no jealousy for the difficult position you find
yourselves in to help us heal and move forward,

()range County, NC
(daughter of an alumna, parent of an alumna and a current UNC student)
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:03:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

To the UNC Board of Governors,

As an alumnus of UNC and now a parent of a UNC student, I write to express my strong opinion on the fate of
Silent Sam. Please use this moment in the statue's history and refrain from placing it back to its incendiary
loca tion. It was placed in its original setting as a very deliberate racially ideological act. Let us not be complicit
in validating an unarguably racist project. Instead, let us take this opportunity to preserve its history by moving
it to an educational setting (perhaps the UNC museum) and NOT returning it to its place of pride on McCorkle
Pla ce. In making these decisions, you will put a new imprint of racial inclusivity on the history of the campus,
state, and nation.

We are all watching.

REDACTED
Message
From: Andrew Weniger
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:06:05 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

1) melt down and make commemorative coins for students currently enrolled
2) display in prone position in one of the museums on campus with description of its history

Andrew
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:07:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
CC:
Subject: A Monument to Education

Hi there,

I'm a seasoned marketing professional from San Francisco, now living in Mooresville, NC. My is a UNC
freshman. He loves it.

I've been following Silent Sam's fate and am grateful to share thoughts on a solution that would make most
reasonable adults satisfied.

In my family's travels we've visited former communist countries that were rife with reminders of their former
oppressive regimes. Some are still standing where they have always been. Some have corralled the statues that
weren't toppled in revolutions and isolated them in a special building or garden where they can be displayed as
educational relics of harder, more brutal, difficult times. The Museum of Communism in Prague, the Museum
of Terror in Budapest (I know, extreme name, but it's an incredibly serious and moving museum) ... there are so
many good examples of how to deal with difficult subjects.

My input - Place Silent Sam in a quiet, contemplative setting with adequate signage telling his small story in
context with the bigger picture of why he's there in the first place, and you give him a useful future while doing
what you do best - educate.

I'd be happy to discuss this idea further. Least I can do. My really does love it there and we're very grateful.
:-)

Good luck,
Message
From: Katherine Baldwin
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:07:32 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Confederate statue disposal

I am a long-time chapel Hill resident and not affiliated with the University. I can also count numerous
ancestors who fought and died for the Confederacy, including my great-grandfather, who was buried in
Columbus, Ohio after dying of pneumonia in a Union prison camp. Any statue that elevates the owners of
slaves and their treasonous war has no place on the campus of a public university. UNC should welcome all
and such a statue only puts a backward-thinking face on those who run the university. My son is
and if a school put up a statue "honoring" the soldiers who did their duty to incarcerate Asians in camps
in World War II, would I tell him it was just "history"? I like to shop in downtown chapel Hill but the
thought of leaving part of the statue for hate groups to congregate around and worship and possibly harm
my friends makes me avoid the downtown area completely. It is clear and clearly embarrassing that your
emails have shown that you would rather please big donors than listen to your own students. Your actions,
and yours alone, are tarnishing the reputation that chapel Hill has as a diverse and tolerant town.
Please remove the rest of the statue, and then remove yourself from any position in the UNC system.
Sincerely, Katherine Baldwin.
Message
From: Richard B. Weinberg [weinberg@wakehealth.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:09:25 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Future

Dear Chancellor Folt;

I propose that the "Silent Sam" monument be rededicated to its ostensible noble purpose: remembering the sacrifice of
Tar Heels who gave their lives in military service during the Civil War. History tells us that not all of them served in the
Confederacy; some served in the Union; most likely, both enslaved and freed African Americans from Chapel Hill did as
well.

What they all shared, as the bas relief on the pedestal idealizes, was that they answered a call to duty and service, as
they understood it at that moment in history. We can and should continue to examine the legacy of that cause in our
time, but does not their personal sacrifice lie at the core of the Tar Heel credo? Recall the origin of our name: a North
Carolina regiment that stuck fast to its position, when all others had fled.

I propose that the names of ALL these dead be etched into black marble plaques affixed to the pedestal base, in the
order that they died (such as can be ascertained), without any other notation, in a manner akin to the Vietnam War
Memorial. As our University historians and archivists (and students!) research and discover additional names, they could
be added. In this way the monument would become a living thing.

NC 100-2.l(b) states that a statue that is" ... temporarily relocated shall be returned to its original location within 90 days
of completion of the project that required its temporary removal." I submit that that "project" - a full reckoning and
reconciliation of the history and societal forces that created "Silent Sam" - is very far from complete.

Thus, I propose that a new casting be commissioned: two tattered, wounded soldiers at war's end - one Confederate,
one Union - brothers in arms - supporting each other as they find their way back home to North Carolina.

Finally, I propose that a Commission composed of faculty, students, and alumni be appointed and charged with the
oversight of the design, installation, and re-dedication of such a future monument.

Let a transformed and rededicated monument proclaim what is best about us.

Richard B. Weinberg
Message
From: REDACTED
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:09:54 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South_com on]
Subject: Teachable moment

I am not a fan of confederate monuments or anything else but I do feel strongly that silent Sam should be put
back in place while the process is going forward. For no other reason than people should not be rewarded for
vandalism. There are laws and procedures that should be observed. This needs to be made clear to everyone.
Thank you
REDACTED
Proud UNC Parent
Message
From: Nancy Bucknall [n_buckna@uncg.edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:12:10 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Do not return the monument to the quad

I respectfully ask that the monument not be returned to its original location. I propose placing it in the Old
Chapel Hill Cemetery.

Nancy Gray Bucknall, Director


College of Arts & Sciences Advising Center
https ://casa. uncg. edu/
103D Julius Foust Building
University of North Carolina Greensboro
voice 336 334 4361

c,.:;....-1 l~~I
1~~il5

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Message
From: Jeff Morgan
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:14:12 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

I am writing in regard to the Silent Sam statue and all of the controversy. In this day and age, it seems that half the
people are for something and half the people are against. Unfortunately, we are living in divided country at this
time. Hopefully, this will change in the near future.

I am an architect in Charlotte, NC and went to North Carolina State University and Georgia Tech. I also have an MBA
from New York University. I worked in New York City for eleven years and met my wife while there. She is also an
architect and went to Syracuse University. We moved to Charlotte in 1999. We have two sons who are recent
graduates of UNC Chapel Hill.

This Silent Sam controversy has been a topic of conversation between us recently. My wife and I would visit our children
a few times each year while they were students and we enjoyed our walks thru the campus. We have covered all areas
of the campus and have given some thought about where this statue could be placed that would not cause so much
angst and controversy.

First, realize what the true purpose of this statue should represent. In simple terms, it would be to honor the 287 UNC
alumni who lost their lives fighting the Civil War. Were these individuals heroes for fighting for their cause and beliefs or
were they traitors to the United States of America? This can still be debated. What cannot be debated is that they lost
their lives for something they felt was worth fighting and dying for.

When I saw that the UNC Board of Governors was seeking ideas on where this statue should be located, I started giving
this some thought. So, where are lost lives honored ? The answer is a cemetery. The Old Chapel Hill Cemetery on the
UNC campus is the ideal location for Silent Sam to be relocated to. A small pavilion should be created with brick
columns and iron gates and a solid roof that the statue would be placed in. Thus, the statue would be visible, but it
would also be protected from future vandalism. Silent Sam should not be placed on a giant pedestal as before, but on a
modest pedestal only a couple of feet high. On this pedestal, a simple inscription should read: "Silent Sam: this
monument is dedicated to the 287 University of North Carolina alumni that lost their lives during the Civil War".

Even in our family, there are differences in opinion on what should happen not only to Silent Sam but other Confederate
monuments in our country. But, we all have reached a consensus that honoring the dead in a cemetery is appropriate
and that if Silent Sam must be placed on the campus somewhere, then the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery is the least
controversial location. We are hopeful the he could find peace at this location and that both sides of this issue would
respect this decision, location and final resting place.

I would appreciate a response just stating that you have received and reviewed this suggestion.

Thank You.

Jeff Morgan
Message
From: Katherine Dreyer
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:17:04 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument NEEDS to go

Yes, a conferderate museum is a good idea, but this should NEVER have been left up so long on the UNC
campus. It is an insult and assault to anyone of African descent and the horrors they endeared (and frankly
continue to endure because of reminders like this).

Cannot wait til this has been cared for in a positive way.
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:17:07 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Statue

chancellor Holt,
First, thank you for your service to the school and the students. I currently have two children enrolled
and believe that you always put them first. As an alumni, I have complete trust that you will forge a
path forward that will represent the future of UNC to the town, state and nation.

My suggestion is to place the statue in the cemetery by Playmakers Theatre. The statue was always
designed to honor UNC students who died in the civil War. Essentially, the statue is a grave stone for
their lives. so place it with other gravestones on campus. Those who want to remember these soldiers will
visit a cemetery just as we visit Arlington to visit other fallen soldiers.
With deepest gratitude,
Message
From: Cameron Prevatte I
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:21:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent sam

I think the best place for silent sam is to be melted down and used as raw metal.
-Cameron Prevatte
Message
From: Southern Pride
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:22:44 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,
My name is Cooper. I'm originally from Kentucky but have been living in Minnesota for the past five-ish years
now.I found on his on Facebook and i just wanted to give my most honest opinion.

Here's what I found ---

Chancellor Falt at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill has opened a public forum email
(uncmonument@unc.edu) asking for suggestions on what to do with Silent Sam. There is no room for suggestions
here, there is only the fact that Silent Sam should be put back where he belongs.

The history of this monument was to remind the students, visitors and people of the "heroic" deed these young men
did for their newly founded country. 100+ students left campus to defend what they believed was right. Many never
came home.

The soul purpose of a monument is to spark reminder of what had happened. In this instance, young men, boys,
volunteered their lives. No reply is needed of course but imagine getting word that your son has just left college to
defend his home, state & country but to never return .. What would you do? In this case, a monument was erected
for these young men.

In the end, let it stand.


Message
From: Wanda Durham
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:23:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Thank you for this opportunity to share our opinions. I feel since silent Sam has stirred up divisive
feelings that are causing such a ruckus on campus that silent Sam would be better off in a museum of
American History.
Those who oppose silent Sam see it as a symbol of oppression & slavery that would make every person of
color who comes on UNC's campus feel unwelcome. Those who support the statue see it as a symbol of the
Confederate past which will be preserved in a museum. Thank you!
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Carter Gaj
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:27:47 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

As an alumnus of the university, I see absolutely no compelling reason for the statue to
remain on campus at all. It is an unfortunate remnant of a lingering ideology of white
supremacy, an ideology that empathetic, educated people should wholly reject.

Best,
Carter Gaj
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:30:46 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Memorial

Dear Carol Felt:


As the head of UNCCH you have a job, that job is to have your staff teach all subjects
truthfully. You failed in truth with all the students and the alumni on the day you invited the
"mob" to destroy the Memorial (Silent Sam) erected to the dead Confederate Soldiers that
attended UNCCH from 1860 to 1865. Not only did you, as a state employee fail to protect
State property, you violated the N. C. State law with your actions, or lack of any action.
You of all people should know that the Negro Race (slaves) was not the reason the
UNCCH Students took up arms against the North, they responded to the invasion of the
South. You should have known the true history that the UNCCH students that fought for
the South, did not own any Negro (slaves), nor fought to keep them as slaves, they
protected the Southern homeland.
The lack of your action in replacing the Memorial, and violating the N.C. State Law is
enough to have you replaced as Chancellor, and released of any state position.
Furthermore, your actions should be investigated by the SBI for violation of N.C. State
Law.
In closing, what if "your mob" pulled down statues of Michael King, aka "Martin Luther
King" throughout the South, that would cause riots resulting in malicious damage in every
Southern City. Unlike the quality and class of the people that resist your actions in a civil
non violent manner, without taking to the streets like "your mob" did.
As you should know, you can not erase history, nor can you change it, you can only
preserve it by teaching the true history.
Good luck in your next endeavor, away from N.C. State employment.
Thank you.
C. M. Mangum
Message
From: Melissa Timm [mtimm@humana.com]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:31:27 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/cn=Recip ients/ en=34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a75b-South_com on]
Subject: Save Silent Sam

Silent Sam is an important part of US history and UNC tradition. Keep Silent Sam on Campus ! !
Melissa Timm, BSN'88

Melissa Timm, RN, BSN


I-\udlt Professional 2 /
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Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:32:34 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: My thoughts

As the parent of a freshman UNC student, I would like to see this monument removed from campus. I am
willing to take the high ground and go with the assumption that the placing of this monument was 100%
based on a desire to honor the UNC students who lost their lives fighting in the Civil War. If that is the case,
then I also believe it is only fair to recognize ALL UNC students who have given the ultimate sacrifice to our
country, and I believe you have already met that honor with the installment next to Memorial Hall. With that
being done, I think it is time for "Silent Sam" to be moved to a location that has the sole purpose of
recognizing the sacrifice of any soldier fighting in the Civil War, and the UNC campus is NOT that place. I agree
with others who have commented that this statue deserves to be placed in a location such as one of our NC
Civil War battle site memorials.

Thank you for your careful consideration into this matter,


Message
From: David Sides
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:33:03 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument

The monument should be treated with respect regardless of how one feels. This monument has little to do
with people outside the State of NC and everything to do with the history of our state. People choosing
to come here should accept that or find somewhere that suites them better.
That monument represents a point in time that we all should be reminded of, reflect on and thank God for
the progress of everyone.
what changes next? If silent Sam is offensive just wait until those few offended discover who the first
Tar Heels were. You'll be chanting Go Rams before you know it.
UNC, silent Sam and all the good and bad belongs to the true Tar Heels and anyone else who chooses to
enjoy.

Sent from my iPhone


Message
From: Benninger, Kristen Ann [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/en =af6d8d24c830428d8ef5 lcc04452c43b-Kristen Ann]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:33:30 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ en=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South_comon]
Subject: Silent Sam

Dear Chancellor and Board of Trustees:

First, thank you for the call for submissions in regards to opinions on the Confederate Monument's disposition.
I will attempt to make my piece brief and relevant.

I believe it is our absolute responsibility as a free-thinking university to provide inclusive policy that represents
and reflects the current values of all of our students and employees. We must understand and accept that at
times, individuals' ancestral and personal histories and the meaning behind historic symbols will vary and the
feelings that individuals carry regarding Silent Sam, the Civil War, and the Confederacy and its reliance on
slavery will vary as well. I do, however, believe that we can and should find a way to honor the goals of
multicultural inclusivity and freedom that America is built on and ever striving towards.

I believe the Monument should not be displayed as celebratory or exemplary piece in a public outdoor forum,
but instead displayed as a historical piece in a venue which works to respectfully balance viewpoints. It should
be in a place where it can be contemplated with perspective, such as in one of the many NC history or military
museums. Or perhaps, as its toppling is part of its history, it could become a display in the UNC Ackland Art
Museum, and UNC art students from all walks of life could unite to create a design that centers around the
statue and incorporates the opinions, feelings, and stories of North Carolinians that reflect its varied meaning
to them. In this way, all viewpoints can be considered and contemplated, and the university can continue to
stimulate educated and meaningful conversation.

With much respect and the best of luck in creating an inclusive plan.
Best,
Kristen A. Benninger, M.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine,
University of North Carolina Hospitals
Physician I Central Prison Healthcare Complex
1 300 Western Blvd., Raleigh, NC 27699
Phone: (REDACTED I Pager: REDACTED
Email: kristen_benninger@med.unc.edu
Message
From: Kathryn M
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:35:31 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Idea

I'd like to see the statue moved to a museum. That way, it can be viewed by choice and with historical context.
Message
From: Buddy Miller
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:36:37 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Monument/ Let's Destroy History?

I am totally against denial of the worth of those soldiers that fought and sacrificed with their lives for their
STATES, not for slavery. That any academic or citizen would condone such violence against truth is abhorrent
to me. What's next...TOMBSTONES? Protect, honor and promote understanding of these monuments to
AMERICAN veterans.

Buddy Miller
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:37:15 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Take care of them

PLEASE DONT LET MOVE AND DESTROY ALL OUR HERITAGE

Sent.from my LG A1obile
Message
From: Matthew McMichaels
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:38:23 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam Relocation Proposal

I propose moving Silent Sam to the flagship Orange County Waste and Recycling Center located on Eubanks Road. They
accept Scrap Metal and Large Appliances (limit 2 per day), and are open every day from 7am-6pm (Sunday hours are
lpm-lpm). They are closed on Wednesdays. I have a truck and would be glad to provide transportation for your bulky
item.

Thanks!

Matt
Message
From:
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:39:18 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: location & dedication

As a Carolina parent - I think the Silent Sam monument should be relocated to Memorial Grove on the corner of
Country Club and South. It should be rededicated to clarify that it is to honor Carolina students who
died. There should be a plaque that makes it clear that it is the individuals who are being remembered, and not
their belief systems that are being honored. Maybe some information like: NC was the last state to join the
Confederacy; NC had the least number of slave holders by population; "Fighting age" men of NC were
required to join the military; NC had the most soldiers die of any state in the Confederacy.

Just my two cents.


Message
From: Laura Jerden
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:39:50 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/ en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hello,
I think the monument should be preserved and interpreted on the campus somewhere. Perhaps it should be
removed from its current location. It does specifically honor fallen UNC students rather than the
Confederacy as a whole. It should also be explained why some people find it offensive.
Sent from my iPhone
Message
From: Kohn, Harold L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=d04dadllfc7e4bcc897be7610f424319-Harold L Ko]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:43:36 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 7492 72a 75b-South _ com on]
CC: Kohn, Harold L [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/cn=Recipients/cn=d04dadllfc7e4bcc897be7610f424319-Harold L Ko]
Subject: Monuments

September 25, 2018

Dear Chancellor Falt:

Thank you and the committee for opening the process for soliciting suggestions on where to place and display
Silent Sam.

Here is a rough idea. I suspect that I do not fully understand the complexity of the situation and the
sensitivities that this issue has engendered. Thus, this is only suggestion, a springboard for more substantive
proposals.

I suggest that The University secures a plot either adjacent or on the on the grounds of the cemetery on
campus. I suggest that this plot be dedicated to those UNC students, staff and faculty who have given their
lives and their freedom in service for this country. This should include those who died in war (e.g., soldiers,
first responders, clergy, health care practitioners) or were enslaved. It is anticipated that this plot would need
to accommodate memorials for future events.

I suggest this be a self-contained plot with surrounding walls (glass?) allowing this place to become a quiet
sanctuary as well as to provide protection. It can be open-aired but it may need to be monitored by cameras
and closed in the evening. I would think it would be good to have separate memorials for all the major
conflicts that occurred during UNC's history with names listed for those who lost their lives, or the names
readily accessed by digital means. There should be a monument for African Americans who were enslaved in
service to the University and if their names are known these names should be recorded. I don't think any
monument should be on pedestal or dominate any other.

Finally, the University might consider reserving an adjacent plot to honor UNC students, staff and faculty who
lost their lives due to unnatural causes while in service or attendance at UNC.

Kind regards,

Hal Kohn
Message
From: Nannette Goodwin
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:44:42 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: My opinion

Please do not allow activist thugs to remove the statue from its rightful place on campus where it has always
been located. Their anarchist, misinformed and misguided attacks on Silent Sam are causing the community to
bow to wrongful pressure to move the statue. Stand strong and put Silent Sam back. Your UNC community has
always been inclusive but has a history of allowing the squeaky wheels to get whatever they want even to the
detriment of the university and its overall student population. The minority is not always right! Stand up and put
Silent Sam back.

Educate those that do not understand the symbolism and historical perspective of Silent Sam. Don't just cowtow
to a vocal and destructive minority!

Sent from my iPhone


Regards,
Nannette Goodwin, D VM
r,
Message
From: Susan King [skking3@ncsu .edu]
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:44:55 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: Silent Sam

Hi,

I will begin by saying I am proud to be a Yankee, misplaced to the south, when I enrolled in UNC in 1990. I
have lived in or around Chapel Hill for all but 4 years since.

In my opinion, memorials to the Civil War or those who fought in it do not tell the entire story, and unless these
monuments show all sides in equal light, they are not functioning as a reminder of our history at all. Regardless
of where the monument is placed, it should be accompanied by and incorporated into a narrative that explains
the horrors of slavery, and the values that we, as humans and Americans should hold dear: that ALL are created
EQUAL. There is absolutely no room for slavery in a society that holds these truths to be self-evident. The
monument to soldiers who fought to preserve slavery might attempt to explain why they thought their cause was
right (something I have yet to understand), but more importantly, it needs to show how society now understands
and has learned from these wrongs (yes, I hope we can all say now that slavery is wrong!). Ifwe can not show
that we learned from our past mistakes (yes, I believe taking up arms to preserve slavery is wrong), and have
moved forward in order to create a more perfect union, then we are doomed to repeat our shameful past. Civil
war monuments should show that we have moved away from slavery, bigotry, prejudices and now embrace the
vision that we are all worthy of respect and should be treated as equals.

Sue King
skking3@ncsu.edu
Message
From: Danny Dreyer
Sent: 9/25/2018 12:44:58 PM
To: UNC Monument [/o=Exchangelabs/ou=Exchange Administrative Group
(FYDI BO HF 23SPDLT)/ cn=Recip ients/en =34ade93d61564ff19c6bf3 749272a 75b-South _ com on]
Subject: The Confederate Statue at UNC

I suggest placing all Confederate monuments, historical images and documents into a "Museum of the
Confederacy" where people who are interested can go to find out about the history of the South's participation,
mentality and ideals that created the Civil War. This would be more informative, and not to glorify the driving
philosophy behind the Confederacy. It could also go into how the Civil War mentality is still alive in our
present day culture and politics.

This approach would not disparage anyone with Confederate ancestors, and would be an optional way for others
to learn the South's side of the history and mentality behind the Civil War. I would emphasize OPTIONAL
because many of the ideals that formed the Confederacy are not promoted in our constitution and should only be
viewed as a part of our past, and NOT how we as a nation intend to move forward progressively and humanely
into the future. Statues to the Confederacy, and any other publicly displayed items of