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Module-10 http://www.aircrafttechtrng.

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1. Duplicate Inspections are a requirement of and defined in BCAR A5-3. Signing a duplicate
inspection is NOT signing a CRS. They are not a requirement of the ANO. Once the duplicate
inspection has been carried out a CRS is required. Away from base a pilot can sign one of the
duplicate inspections for single point disturbance only.

2. The Tech. Log, BCAR A7-8: Required for all aircraft in the Public Transport and Aerial
Work categories. The layout and content can be decided by the operator and elaborated to
meet his requirements provided that it meets the minimum requirements required by BCAR
A7-8.

3. Log Book: Not the same as the Tech. Log which travels with the aircraft, the Log Book is
usually kept in the Tech. Records Dept. Provided by the CAA and are mandatory for aircraft
not exceeding 2730kgs. The format of Log books for aircraft over 2730kgs. are left to the
operator provided they are written in English will normally be acceptable to the CAA. It is
NOT a requirement to keep a Log Book for helicopter main and tail rotors or APU's

4. B.C.A.R.s are published by the CAA and give the necessary minimum requirements to
comply with the A.N.O.

5. A.N.O: Air Navigation Order, consists of Articles and Schedules of Law, grouped under 11
separate headings, Parts 1 to 11. The ANO is the law of the land and failure to comply with
can lead to civil prosecution in court.

6. Part-66 Licences:
Part-66 A.1, Aeroplane, Turbine,
Part-66 A.2, Aeroplane, Piston,
Part-66 A.3, Helicopter, Turbine,
Part-66 A.4, Helicopter, Piston,
Part-66 B1.1, Aeroplane, Turbine,
Part-66 B1.2, Aeroplane, Piston, Part-66
B1.3, Helicopter, Turbine,
Part-66 B1.4, Helicopter, Piston,

7. Airworthiness Notices are published by the CAA and are used to circulate information, at
short notice, to all concerned with the airworthiness of civil aircraft. They are issued free of
charge to all owners of British registered aircraft, approved organisations and Licensed
Aircraft Engineers, (L.A.E.'s).
They were colour coded:
Pink, direct effect on airworthiness.
Yellow, cover administrative and technical procedures.
White, contain general information of administrative matters.

8. Air Navigation (General) Regs are regulations made by the Privy Council and enlarge
upon certain articles of the A.N.O. These regulations give the performance group of the
aircraft, which is normally stated on the C of A. They also give a list of ”Prescribed
Countries” mentioned in the ANO regarding signatories of overseas airworthiness
authority licenses, also operations that a pilot, who is the owner of a light aircraft in the
private sector, or special category under 2730kgs. may undertake.

9. B.C.A.R. and I.C.A.O: Both must be satisfied before an aircraft can operate
internationally.

10. Certificate of Registration: This must be carried on the aircraft. Becomes void when an
aircraft is sold because it is made out to, the then owner, with their name and address on.
The buyer has 28 days in which to inform the CAA. The seller must inform the CAA
immediately and return the old C of R to the CAA. The seller is responsible under the ANO
until the re-registration has taken place.

11. Aircraft Radio Licence is required because you can transmit from the aircraft, this too
becomes invalid when an aircraft is sold.

12. Essential Documents are those documents which are required to be carried on the
aircraft (not including the aircraft Technical Log Book). They are: Certificate of
Airworthiness, Certificate of Registration, Noise Certificate, Aircraft Radio Licence, Insurance
Certificate, Air Operators Certificate, Permissions and Exemptions, 'NO EXIT' label for an
inop. exit.

13. Type Certificates are issued by the National Authorities when the product shows
compliance with the requirements of the National Code, i.e. aircraft, engines and propellers
have demonstrated compliance with Certification Specification (CS) 23,25,27 or 29 for fixed
wing and rotorcraft and CS E and P for engines and propellers.

14. Air Operators Certificate is required by the operator who operates aircraft registered in
the U.K. used for public transport. Issued by the C.A.A. and continues to be in force
providing the C.A.A. are satisfied with regular audits carried out at the owner's premises.

15. Certificate of Airworthiness: An aircraft may not fly, unless it has a valid C of A issued or
rendered valid by the country in which it is registered, (from AD261), this includes the Flight
Manual.

16. Radio License: Because the radio on aircraft can receive and transmit it must have a
Certificate of Approval issued by the CAA and the operator must have a Radio Station
License issued by the Dept. of Trade and Industry.
17. A CofA for Export is issued by the CAA and is a statement that the aircraft will meet the
requirements of another country. Once issued, that aircraft does not meet UK requirements
and its CofA is invalid. A temporary CofA is then issued for the one ferry flight.

18. Permit to Fly: Where aircraft on the British Register have NOT been built to an
internationally recognised code a C of A will not be issued. These type of aircraft will fly
under the conditions of a Permit to Fly. A Permit to Fly is issued to ex-military, vintage and
amateur-built aircraft only, within UK airspace only. Issued by the CAA. and normally valid
for 1 year unless otherwise stated.

19. A Minor Mod is one that has no appreciable effect on weight, balance, structural
strength, reliability or any other characteristic affecting the airworthiness of the aircraft. All
other changes are Major.

20. Mandatory Aircraft Modifications and Inspections Summary is published by the CAA and
is for British manufactured products only. It summarises information distributed by
manufacturers with the terms of AWN36. The summary is divided into 3 parts: Part 1,
Aircraft, Part 2, Engines and Propellers, Part 3, Aircraft Radio Stations, Instruments and
Equip.

21. Foreign Airworthiness Directives: airworthiness directives produced by all Foreign


countries are mandatory for aircraft on the British register, they are known as FAD's.
It comes in three volumes:
Volume I, ADs for all aircraft constructed in the USA of 5700kgs. or less.
Volume II, ADs for all aircraft constructed in the USA more than 5700kgs.
Volume III, summary of ADs form all other foreign countries.

22. Log Book: Not the same as the Tech. Log which travels with the aircraft, the Log Book is
usually kept in the Tech. Records Dept. Provided by the CAA and are mandatory for aircraft
not exceeding 2730kgs. The format of Log books for aircraft over 2730kgs. are left to the
operator provided they are written in English will normally be acceptable to the CAA. It is
NOT a requirement to keep a Log Book for helicopter main and tail rotors or APU's

23. A.N.O: Air Navigation Order, consists of Articles and Schedules of Law, grouped under 11
separate headings, Parts 1 to 11. The ANO is the law of the land and failure to comply with
can lead to civil prosecution in court.

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