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CHAPTER-I

1. INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY:

In this project, I have done about Warehouse Operation in Import and Export.
This project consists of 5 chapters. In the first chapter we have Introduction of the study,
Company profile, Study about the topic, objectives and scope of the Study which explains
the company’s Norms .In the Second chapter we include Literature survey, which tells
about survey of each warehouse Operation. In the third chapter I included Data collections
method which is also known as Research methodology that tells about the primary and
secondary data collection and also we include Percentage Analysis with interpretation. In
Fourth chapter I included Observation and Findings which tells about the satisfaction of
Warehouse Operation. And finally I conclude the project included conclusion and
Questionnaire, which have given the good report of the Company.

I did my project report on CFS operation of Warehouse Management in Calyx.


In this project I came to know what are Warehouse Management Import & Export
operations, duties and responsibilities of each employee.

A warehouse is a large building where goods are stored and there may be
catalogued shipped, or received, depending upon the type. Though in the past, many
warehouses, often located in industrial areas sometimes next to major shipping ports were
teaming with workers, the modern warehouse may be either completely or totally
automated depending upon how advanced the company is. Sometimes a manufacturing
facility also has an attached warehouse, where their manufactured goods are stored until
shipped. It is a commercial building for storage of goods. Warehouses are used by
manufacturers, imports, exports, wholesalers, transports businesses, customs, etc.

Logistics management is that part of the supply chain which plans, implements
and controls the efficient, effective, forward and backward (reverse) flow and storage of
goods, services and information between the point of origin and the point of consumption
in order to meet customers related information from the point of origin to the point of
consumption for the purpose of conforming to customer requirements.

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Logistics services market India is on a growth trajectory owing to rapid
globalization and 100% FDI allowance. Logistics services broadly encompass courier
services, freight forwarding, third party logistics and reverse logistics. Growth in
international trade is providing huge impetus to the demand for the logistics services.
Growing competition in retail sectors transcends need of reverse logistics to handle returns
and store up gradation. Third party logistics providers need to customize their services and
charge competitive rates to benefit from retail boom in India.

One of the major segments contributing to a rapidly growing logistics Industry


is the warehousing business. The growth in international trade coupled with the rise in
containerization levels has led to high demand for warehouse. This creates tremendous
opportunity for the private sector. The market, which is valued at INR 20 bin, is expected
to grow due to the demand generated by importers and exporters for specialized services.
The report begins with an overview of the industry indicating market size, growth, current
state of the market and the infrastructural resources available. The report highlights various
type of warehouses, categorized on the basis of ownership and usage.

1.1 COMPANY PROFILE

Calyx Container Terminals Private Limited was incorporated in


the year 2006, as a part of the SG group. The company’s objective is to offer efficient and
cost-effective Container Freight Stations (CFS), Inland Container Deports (ICD) and other
allied services. Calyx, under the leadership of Mr. C D Goyal, the Group Chairman and
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Mr. Rajeev Goyal, the Group Managing Director aims to maximize the value for all
stakeholders.

Calyx surges ahead with the goodwill and backing of Associated Road
Carriers Limited (ARC), the 2nd largest ISO: 9001 certified surface transportation
company of India. Founded in 1972, ARC today serves all segments of the industry, with
its widespread network of 550 owned outlets at 350 locations across India. Mr. C D Goyal,
one of the founders and presently the Joint Managing Director of ARC Limited, is the
Chairman of Calyx Container Terminals Private Limited.

Driving Calyx is the energetic personality of our Managing Director,


Mr. Rajeev Goyal. He was the force behind the spectacular success of Speed age Express
Cargo Services which was one of India’s leading express cargo companies. For Speed age,
Mr. Rajeev Goyal envisioned an entirely new perception of services and created path
breaking processes that set them apart from other players. These processes included -
efficiency in delivery operations, strict me commitments, assured safety and security,
nationwide service network, provision of proactive information to customers, internet
based IT backbone, a CRM effort with continuous interaction with the customers ensuring
their satisfaction and many others. All these steps were implemented along with the
management’s fundamental core values of managing excellence in Human Resources.

Under Mr. Rajeev Goyal’s directorship, Speed age grew from 35


branches in 1995 to 514 branches and 26 transit depots by 2006. At this me, it became one
of the top 5 Express Cargo service providers of India. Impressed by company’s growth,
M/s TNT N.V. of Netherlands brought a 100% stake of Speed age during September 2006.

This transition created the impetus for a new business, which resulted in
the incorporation of Calyx. Here too, the company’s bright future is assured by new,
innovative offerings; holistic farsighted thinking and focused passion to excel. The aim is
to establish Calyx as a global brand. This includes recognition for the unique strategies and
showcasing of the powerful capabilities which will create unprecedented benchmarks for
the industry.

With Global ambitions, Calyx is nurturing the Port Sector that powers
the economy of any country. To create landmark in the selected sector, Calyx is venturing
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into the Containerization Vertical by way of establishing Container Freight Stations, Inland
Container Depots, Empty Container and Repair.
VISION AND MISSON:
Our vision is to continuously improve the customer’s profitability by providing
‘Inventory & Distribution ‘ solutions and services, thus changing the landscape of trade
forever.
CALYX-EMPOWERING THE FUTURE:
 Create an environment that fosters Life, Learning and Leadership.
 Transform the Business Information into a seamless stream with an efficient and
dynamic real time flow through innovative IT integration.
 Partner with customers and Suppliers to build a strong knowledge base for
providing innovative solutions.
 Build a country wide network of container freight stations and inland container
depots to get closer to customers.

INFRASTRUCTURE:
 Paved Container yard to handle 1,00,000 TEUs annually
 Dedicated yard for handling scrap
 Dedicated Space for the ‘Over Dimensional Consignment’ (ODC) Dedicated ‘Less
Than Container’ (LCL) import warehouse
 Dedicated administrative space for 'Custom House Agents' (CHA) and Agents
 Dedicated export warehouse
 Well equipped rest room for the vehicle drivers
 120 Ton Weigh Bridge Canteen Facility for Custom House Agents (CHA) and
Freight Forwarder (FF) Agents
 Lock Fast facilities
 High tech security
 24 X 7 operations
 Located on the NH5 highway, 14 kilometres from Chennai port

SERVICES:
 Less Than Container’ (LCL) De-stuffing and Storage facility
 ‘Full Container Load’ (FCL) De-stuffing, loading and delivery services

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 Mechanical cargo handling
 On-Wheel Inspection
 Container storage compliant to the stringent IMO standards
 Cargo carting and segregation
 Storage of empty container
 Transportation of loaded and empty containers
 Repacking of export cargo
 Fumigation services
 Cargo palletizing, lashing, choking and shrink wrapping services
 Inspection services
 Delivery service for loaded containers to the factory site
 Pick-up service for the factory- stuffed containers.

MULTIMODAL TRANSPORT OPERATIONS:

 LCL (Less Container Load)


 FCL (Full Container Load)

1.2 STUDY ABOUT THE TOPIC

WAREHOUSE:
A warehouse is a commercial building for storage of goods. Warehouses are used
by manufacturers, importers, exporters, wholesalers, transport businesses, customs, etc.
They often have cranes and forklifts for moving goods, which are usually placed on ISO
standard pallets loaded into pallet racks.

 Data warehouse
 Warehouse store
 Warehouse management system

DATA WAREHOUSE:

Computing, a data warehouse (DW or DWH), also known as an enterprise


data warehouse (EDW), is a system used for reporting and data analysis, and is considered.

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DATA WAREHOUSE APPLIANCE

Computing, the term data warehouse appliance (DWA) was coined by Foster
Handsaw for computer architecture for data warehouses (DW) specifically marketed.

WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

A warehouse management system (WMS) is a software application, designed to support


and optimize warehouse or distribution center management.

WAREHOUSING:
Warehousing refers to the activities involving storage of goods on a large
scale in a systematic and orderly manner and making them available conveniently when
needed. A warehouse is the point in the supply chain where raw materials , work in
progress or finished goods are stored for varying lengths of time. In other words, it means
holding or preserving goods in huge quantities from the time of their purchase or
production till their actual use or sale. It is one of the important to trade. It creates time
utility by bridging the time gap between production and consumption of goods.

Warehouses only add value if the benefits of storing products in a warehouse


enough to offset the additional cost associated with storage include the following time
bridging ,which allows products to be available when it is needed processing operation
because the product undergoes a required change during storage and securing.

CFS warehousing, distribution and transportation services are designed with


one goal in mind, to get your products to market safely, reliably and as cost-effectively as
possible. Our logistics specialists work closely with each customer to customize a solution
that not only meets their current business goals and requirements but also adapts to
changing market demands. CFS warehousing and distribution operations are supported by
our extensive transportation network and freight services to provide a single-source suite of
integrated supply chain services.

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WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION:

Logistics is a well-being supplier of Chennai-wide warehousing and


distribution solutions. They offer complete warehousing services including all modes of
distributions, FMCG import specialist services, customs services and an IT system for end-
to-end visibility. Most of their warehouses are located either on the port or at an inland port
location. By location alone, the ports-to-warehouse synergies are the best in the business.

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MODEL WAREHOUSE:

MULTI- MODAL TRANSPORTATION:

This is a service provided under the Supply Chain Management solution


tailored to the specific customers, using a combination of road and rail transportation
providing them with the most cost effective way of moving their raw materials or finished
goods. Currently they are transporting plastic resin, steel billet, feldspar, clinker and
gypsum board.

To support the inter-modal transportation services, Infinity operates a number


of terminals and yards at strategic locations for loading/unloading activities as well as
container storage, servicing and cleaning.

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LIQUIDBULK PACKAGING:

At the Logistics Group, they realize the need for highly specialized tanks
for liquid bulk packaging. Liquids such as food-based or non-chemicals and even solids
require a packaging that is durable, convenient and cost-effective.

In a nutshell, our services include:

 Dedicated services, door-to-door shipments, JIT deliveries

 Short and long-term storage

 Providing Spacecrafts IBC with both domestic and export shipments of a wide
variety of solid and liquid products

EXPORT:

In Calyx Terminal Pvt Ltd, Export also has a better business compared with other
CFS. The necessary document for exports are letter of credit, shipping bill, commercial
invoice, packing list, CHA certificate (if needed). The Export are done in two way of
process.

 Direct Export (Stuffing in CFS)


 Self-Sealing (Stuffed from factory/company)

The Direct Export are done in CFS, the cargoes (carting trucks) ware gated in and
after the inspection is over, the empty container will be gated in placed and cargo will
be stuffed in under the view of surveyors in-charge, the no of quantities of cargo will
be stuffed in under the view of cargo in check list & shipping bill has to tally before
stuffing into the container. If there is any excessive cargo which cannot be stuffed are
treated as shut out cargo and special permission to CHA will be given by the CFS to
take them out. After stuffing the container the SSR copy will be given to CHA for
Billing by the Export department. Once the gate pass is generated the CHA’s will get
gate out time from PO (preventive officer) with duly signed.

In Export they issue Work-Order Export Cargo Carting using CFSMag3.0 and enter
truck number, driver name, surveyor, driving license number, select the equipment save
and print it.

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Carting tally sheet need to be provided if the agent name is not Calyx. The next
step is empty truck gate out. To do this step first need to save export carting tally updating
and then take empty truck gate out in CFSMag3.0.

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DOCUMENTATION:

THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR DELIVERING THE GOODS FROM CFS ARE

1. DELIVERY ORDER
2. BILL OF ENTRY
3. BILL OF LADING
4. INVOICE
 Bill of entry with appraisal officer seal.
 Out of charge is provided by the customs and then the passed out order is
given by the preventive officer of the customs.

IMPORT DELIVERY ORDER:

FCL AND LCL:

1. FOR FCL LINER DO AND FOR LCL CONSOLIDATED DO


2. ENDORSMENT
3. EXAMINATION ORDER-(AO SIGN)
4. SEAL CUTTING/JOB ORDER(PO SIGN)
5. After the process is CHA approach to the Examination Officer and Custom report
is provided and the AO Issues out of charge the transport.

TYPES OF WAREHOUSES: -
The various types of warehouses are as follows:

PRIVATE WAREHOUSE:
The warehouses which are owned and managed by the manufacturers or
traders to store, exclusively, their own stock of goods are known as private
warehouses. Generally these warehouses are constructed by the farmers near their fields,
by wholesalers and retailers near their business centers and by manufacturers near their
factories. The design and the facilities provided therein are according to the nature of
products to be stored.
PUBLIC WAREHOUSE:
The warehouses which are run to store goods of the general public are
known as public warehouses. Anyone can store his goods in these warehouses on payment
of rent. An individual, a partnership firm or a company may own these warehouses. To
start such warehouses a license from the government is required. The government also
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regulates the functions and operations of these warehouses. Mostly these warehouses are
used by manufacturers, wholesalers, exporters, importers, government agencies, etc.

GOVERNMENT WAREHOUSES:
These warehouses are owned, managed and controlled by central or state
governments or public corporations or local authorities. Both government and private
enterprises may use these warehouses to store their goods. Central Warehousing
Corporation of India, State Warehousing Corporation and Food Corporation of India are
examples of agencies maintaining government warehouses.

BONDED WAREHOUSES:
These warehouses are owned, managed and controlled by government as
well as private agencies. Private bonded warehouses have to obtain license from the
government. Bonded warehouses are used to store imported goods for which import duty is
yet to be paid. In case of imported goods the importers are not allowed to take away the
goods from the ports till such duty is paid. These warehouses are generally owned by dock
authorities and found near the ports.

CO-OPERATIVE WAREHOUSES:
These warehouses are owned, managed and controlled by co-operative
societies. They provide warehousing facilities at the most economical rates to the members
of their society.

FUNCTIONS OF WAREHOUSING:
RECEIVING:
Receiving is that activity concerned with the orderly receipt of all materials
coming into the warehouse. The necessary activities to assure that the quantity and quality
of materials is ordered and the payment to storage or to other organizational functions
requiring them.

PRE-PACKAGING:
Pre-packaging is performed in a warehouse when products are received in
bulk from a supplier and subsequently packaged singly, in merchandisable quantities or in
combinations with other parts to form kits or assortments. An entire receipt of merchandise
may be processed at once, or a portion may be held in bulk form to be done later. This may
be done when packaging greatly increases the storage cube requirements or when a part is
common to several kits or assortments.
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STORAGE:
Storage is the physical containment of merchandise while it is awaiting a
demand. The form of storage will depend on the size and quantity of the items in inventory
and the handling characteristics of the product or its container.
ORDER PICKING:
Order picking is the process of removing items from storage to meet a specific
demand. Its represents the basic service that the warehouse provides for the customer and
is the function around which most warehouse designs are based.

PACKAGING AND PRICING:


Packaging and/or pricing may be done as an optional step after the picking
process. As in the pre-packaging function, individual items or assortments are boxed for
more convenient use. Waiting until after picking to perform these functions has the
advantage of providing more flexibility in the use of on-hand inventory. Individual items
are available for use in any of the packaging configurations right up to the time of need.
Pricing is current at the time of sale Pre-pricing at manufacture or receipt into the
warehouse inevitably leads to some re-pricing activity as price lists are changed while
merchandise sits in inventory.

TRANSPORTATION:
In some cases warehouses provide transport arrangement to the bulk depositor.
It collects goods from the place of production and also sends goods to the place of delivery
on request of the depositors.

ADVANTAGES OF WAREHOUSING:

1. Protection and Preservation of Goods


2. Regular flow of Goods
3. Continuity in Production
4. Convenient Location
5. Easy Handling

DISADVANTAGES OF WAREHOUSING:

1. Administrative problems
2. High initial cost
3. Warehouse case high prices of goods
4. Rent charges by owners of the warehouse
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1.3 OBJECTIVES

 The main objective of this project report is to get the practical knowledge in
functions of logistics.
 To know the Significance of warehouse management in the logistics Industry.
 To find the strength, weakness, opportunities, threats of the warehouse
management system.

1.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY:


 The report covers the overview of Indian logistics industry.
 Study of marketing aspects of ICD (ppg).
 To understand the logistics process in CWE-ICD (ppg)
 Analysis of warehouse management of ICD (ppg).
 To analysis the marketing, Operational (export / import process), financial aspects,
MIS and record management of CWE-ICD (ppg).

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CHAPTER-II

2.1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE:

Theorists like EFL Brech and Peter Drucker (2010) also suggested that
management involved certain basic functions designed to bring system, order, rationality
and consistency to the organizational environment. Brech identified four main functions of
management, which includes planning, control, co-ordination and motivation. Peter
Drucker has also suggested five management functions: objective setting, organizing,
motivating & communicating, measuring and developing people.

Nowadays, managers are faced with the need to deliver a high service level
with minimal warehouse and inventory cost (Strack and Pochet, 2010). As mentioned in
the previous chapter warehouse managers have to decide where to assign the products
inside the warehouse (warehouse management issues) and manager must decide which
products, and how much of each product need to be stored in the warehouse (inventory
management).

Strack and Pochet (2010) change this traditionally decision process for
the planning of inventory models to evaluate the value of integrating tactical warehouse
and inventory decisions. The authors reported a mathematical model, whereby two
solutions methodologies were developed which offer different level of integration of
warehouse and inventory decisions. As a result, the authors concluded that the total cost of
the inventory and warehouse systems can be reduced drastically by taking into account the
warehouse capacity restrictions in the inventory planning decisions, in an aggregate way.
Moreover additional inventory and warehouse savings can be achieved by using more
sophisticated integration methods for inventory and warehouse decisions.

According to Strack and Pochet (2010) warehouse and inventory issues


are handled in a pyramidal top-down approach where the flexibility of decisions decreases
from top to bottom. Consequently, strategic decisions are taken first into account which
creates limits to decisions at the tactical and operational levels. As an example the authors
refer to a warehouse whereby the size and design are fixed. These decisions will have to be
respected when replenishment policies have to be designed as well as when the size of the
different warehouse areas has to be optimized.

Presutti et al. (2011) propose a decision support system to evaluate


the impact of geographical proximity on the processes of knowledge acquisition and
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exploitation of startups operating in high-tech industries. The authors evaluate in their
research the role of both the social and cognitive dimensions of geographical proximity.
The findings highlight how startups belonging to an industrial cluster acquire
knowledge from their customers and this aspect shows the importance of geographical
proximity between business partners

Maltz, (2014) Establish relative impact of cost and services on the


decision to outsource warehousing the study determined that organizations are reluctant to
use third party warehousing due to customer service considerations

Rao and Young, (2010) Identify the factors influencing outsourcing of


logistics functions the study identified factors such as:

 Centrality of the logistics function

 Risk and control

 Cost/service trade-offs

 Information technologies and relationships with logistics service providers

 Product-related (e.g. special handling needs), process-related (e.g. cycle times)


and network-related (e.g. countries served) drivers are believed to have an indirect
influence in the outsourcing decision

Mathew et al. (2012) analyze the effects of post globalization in the


IT sector related to the “people” dimension of knowledge management initiatives in the
information technology industry. Varying dynamically the human dimension of
knowledge management, the authors study their influence on knowledge management
system performance in conjunction with the other success factors. The results of the
simulations underline how the support of the top management represents a critical
success factor for the adoption of knowledge management strategies.
Simchi-Levi et al. (2010) determine the effect of outsourcing of
logistics on the management of the supply chain. The most important reason for
outsourcing is that it allows a company to focus on its core competencies and hence on
customer requirements. Studies based on user firms appear to indicate that outsourcing
logistics activities is appropriate if it has an impact on one or more factors depicted

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Presutti et al. (2011) propose a decision support system to
evaluate the impact of geographical proximity on the processes of knowledge
acquisition and exploitation of startups operating in high-tech industries. The authors
evaluate in their research the role of both the social and cognitive dimensions of
geographical proximity. The findings highlight how startups belonging to an industrial
cluster acquire knowledge from their customers and this aspect shows the importance of
geographical proximity between business partners.
According to Jonsson (2010) there are four types of information
system: Planning and executing system, 2 communication system, identification system,
and electronic market place. The paper will discuss four kinds of information systems:
Warehouse Management System (WMS) from Planning and executing system, Electronic
Data interchange (EDI) from Communication system, Radio Frequency Identification
system (RFID) from Identification system, and Electronic marketplace system

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CHAPTER-III

3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 MEANING OF RESEARCH:


Research is common parlance refers to a search for knowledge.
Once can also define research as a scientific and systematic search for pertinent
information on a specific topic. In fact, research is an art of scientific investigation. A
careful investigation or inquiry especially through search for new facts in any branch of
knowledge.
Methodology is one of the main aspects of any research. It assumes
the characteristics of Descriptive Research; the study is based on primary data collection.
The secondary data was collected from the articles journals, Newspapers and Websites, the
study is conducted on the basis of a sample method of 50 respondents. The sample size
comprises of different types of products who are used CFS operation, Warehouse, LCL,
FCL, etc .Research Methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It
may be understood as a science of study how research is done in scientifically. In it we
study the various steps that are generally adopted by the researcher in studying his research
problem along with the logic behind them.
DATA SOURCES:

The study is based on both Primary and Secondary data as discussed below:

1. PRIMARY DATA:

Primary data is collected from the customer through warehouse Operation in CFS
through questionnaire

2. SECONDARY DATA:

Secondary data is collected from the company records, publications of journals,


Newspaper and Websites.

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RESEARCH DESIGN:

The research design is the specification of the method and procedure


for acquiring (getting) the information needed to solve the problem. For the purpose
applied research has been conducted and descriptive research design has been used. This
has to done describe the activities interest and opinion.
SAMPLE SIZE:

A Sample of 50 respondents from the different locations from the State of


TAMILNADU

SAMPLING METHOD:

Convenience sampling method is used.

ANALYTICAL TOOLS USED:-

PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS:
Percentage refers to a special kind of ratio. Percentages are used in
making comparison between two or more series of data. Percentage as also used to
describe relationship. It is also used to compare the relative terms of two or more series of
data. The percentage analysis is calculated as follows:

Percentage Analysis = No of respondent x 50 Total no of respondent

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3.2 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION:

TABLE NO: 1 SHOWING AGE OF RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

20-30 40 80

30-40 5 10

40-50 3 6

50 2 4

TOTAL 50 100

Chart No: 1 SHOWING AGE OF RESPONDENTS

Chart Title
60
50
50
40
40

30 NO. OF RESPONDING
% OF RESPONDENT
20

10 5
3 2
80% 10% 6% 4% 100%
0
20-30 30-40 40-50 50 TOTAL

INTERPRETATION

From the above chart it is clear that 80% of the respondents are in 20- 30 age group and
10% are in 30-40 age group and 6% are in 40-50 age group and 4% are in 50 age group

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TABLE NO: 2 SHOWING GENDER OF RESPONDENT

PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

MALE 40 80

FEMALE 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 2 SHOWING GENDER OF RESPONDENT

Gender

80
80
70
60
50 40
40
30 20
20 10
10
0
NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

MALE FEMALE

INTERPRETATION

From the above chart it can be seen that the organization has 80% male
workers and 20% female workers.

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TABLE NO: 3 SHOWING EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF
RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

MBA 20 40

MCA 15 30

BBA 10 20

BCA 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 3 SHOWING EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF


RESPONDENT

Educational Qualification
40
40
35 30
30
25 20 20
20 15
15 10 10
10 5
5
0
MBA MCA BBA BCA

NO. OF RESPONDDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION

From the above chart it can be known that 40% of the respondents MBA and
30 % of the respondents studied MCA and 20% studied BCA and 10% of
respondents studied MCA.

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TABLE NO: 4 SHOWING SIZE OF WAREHOUSE
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

SMALL 20 40

MEDIUM 15 30

LARGE 10 20

EXTRA LARGE 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 4 SHOWING SIZE OF WAREHOUSE

Size of Warehouse
45
40
40
35
30
30
25
20 20
20
15
15
10 10
10
5
5
0
SMALL MEDIUM LARGE EXTRA LARGE

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION
From the above chart it is clear that 40% of respondents says that their warehouse is small
and 30% of the respondents says that their warehouse is medium and 20% of the
respondents says that their warehouse is large and 10% of the respondents says that their
warehouse is extra large

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TABLE NO: 5 TABLE SHOWING PARCEL SERVICES
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

ANDRA PRADESH 10 20

TAMIL NADU 30 60

MAHARASHTRA 5 10

GUJARAT 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 5 TABLE SHOWING PARCEL SERVICES

Parcel Services
60
60

50

40
30
30
20
20
10 10 10
10 5 5

0
ANDRA PRADESH TAMIL NADU MAHARASHTRA GUJARAT

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it is clear that 60%of the respondents are in TamilNadu
Group and 20% of the respondents are in Andra Pradesh group and 10% of the respondents
are in 10 % and remaining 10% are in Gujarat.

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TABLE NO: 6 TABLE SHOWING TYPE OF CONSIGNMENT
RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

LCL 20 40

FCL 20 40

20 FEET 5 10

40 FEET 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 6 TABLE SHOWING TYPE OF CONSIGNMENT


RESPONDENT

Types of Consignment

40 40

40

30
20 20
10 10
20

10 5 5 % OF RESPONDENTS
NO. OF RESPONENTS
0
LCL FCL 20 FEET 40 FEET

NO. OF RESPONENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-

From the above chart it is clear that 40% of the respondents had chosen LCL
type of consignment and another 40% of the respondents had chosen FCL and
10% of the respondents had chosen 20 Feet and 10% of the respondents had
chosen 40 feet.

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TABLE NO: 7 TABLE SHOWING DRAWBACK DUTIES
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

AGRICULTURAL 20 40
PRODUCTS
GARMENTS PRODUCTS 10 20

PERISHABLE GOODS 5 10

MEDICINE PRODUCTS 15 30

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 7 TABLE SHOWING DRAWBACK DUTIES

Drawback Duties
45 40
40
35 30
30
25 20 20
20 15
15 10 10
10 5
5
0
AGRICULTURAL GARMENTS PERISHABLE GOODS MEDICINE PRODUCTS
PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-

From the above table it is observed that 40% of the respondents had chosen Agricultural Products
and 20% of the respondents had chosen garments products and 10% of the respondents had chosen
perishable goods and 30 % of the respondents had chosen medicine products

30
TABLE NO: 8 TABLE SHOWING PARCEL SERVICES PROVIDED
OF RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

SATISFIED 25 50

DIS-SATISFIED 10 20

HIGHLY SATISFIED 10 20

HIGHLY DIS-SATISFIED 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 8 TABLE SHOWING DRAWBACK DUTIES

Parcel Services by Respondent


60
50
50

40

30 25
20 20
20
10 10 10
10 5

0
SATISFIED DIS-SATISFIED HIGHLY HIGHLY DIS-
SATISFIED SATISFIED

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it is clear that 20% of the respondents are highly
satisfied with parcel services and 50 % of respondents are satisfied with parcel services and
20% of the respondents are Dis-satisfied and 10% of the respondents are highly Dis-
Satisfied.

31
TABLE NO: 9 TABLE SHOWING PROFITABLE OF RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

LCL 25 50

FCL 10 20

OTHERS 5 10

NONE 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 9 TABLE SHOWING PROFITABLE OF RESPONDENT

Profit of respondent
50
50

40

30 25
20 20
20
10 10 10
10 5

0
LCL FCL OTHERS NONE

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart s is clear that 50% of respondents had chosen LCL is
profitable and 20 % the respondents had chosen FCL is Profitable and 10% of the
respondents has other options and 20% of the respondents had chosen none

32
TABLE NO: 10 TABLE SHOWING LOGISTICS SERVICES OF
RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

FRIEGHT 10 20

WAREHOUSING 25 50

CROSS DOCKING 5 10

NETWORK DESIGN 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 10 TABLE SHOWING LOGISTICS SERVICES OF


RESPONDENT

Logistic services
60
50
50

40

30 25
20 20
20
10 10 10
10 5

0
FRIEGHT WAREHOUSING CROSS DOCKING NETWORK
DESIGN

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it can be understood that 20% of the respondents chosen
freight services group and 50 of the respondents had chosen warehousing services group
and 10 % of the respondents had chosen cross docking services group and 20 % of the
respondents had chosen network design.

33
TABLE NO: 11 TABLE SHOWING LOCATION OF RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INDIA 20 40

US 15 30

EUROPE 10 20

ASIA 5 10

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 11 TABLE SHOWING LOCATION OF RESPONDENT

Location
45
40
40
35
30
30
25
20 20
20
15
15
10 10
10
5
5
0
INDIA US EUROPE ASIA

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From

34
TABLE NO: 12 TABLE SHOWING PREFERENCE IN
ORGANIZATION OF RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

YES 40 80

NO 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 12 TABLE SHOWING PREFERENCE IN


ORGANIZATION OF RESPONDENT

Chart Title
90
80
80
70
60
50
40
40
30
20
20
10
10
0
NO. OF RESPONENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

YES NO

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it is clear that 80% of the respondents had chosen yes for showing
preference in organization and 20 % of the respondents had chosen no for showing
preference in organization.

35
TABLE NO: 13 TABLE SHOWING MEASURE LEVEL OF
RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

KILOGRAMS (KG) 40 80

TONS 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 13 TABLE SHOWING MEASURE LEVEL OF


RESPONDENT

Chart Title

80
80
70
60
50 40
40
30 20
20 10
10
0
NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

KILOGRAMS (KG) TONS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it is clear that 80% of the respondents had chosen Kilograms
measure level group and 20% of the respondents had chosen tons measure level group.

36
TABLE NO: 14 TABLE SHOWING DELIVERY DEPARTMENT OF
RESPONDENT
PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

EXCELLENT 15 30

GOOD 15 30

VERY EFFECTIVE 10 20

AVERAGE 10 20

TOTAL 50 100

CHART NO: 14 TABLE SHOWING DELIVERY DEPARTMENT OF


RESPONDENT

Chart Title
30 30
30
25
20 20
20
15 15
15
10 10
10
5
0
EXCELLENT GOOD VERY AVERAGE
EFFECTIVE

NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS

INTERPRETATION:-
From the above chart it is clear that 30% of the respondents had chosen excellent and 30
% had chosen good and 20% had chosen very effective and 20 % of the respondents had
chosen average for delivery report

37
TABLE NO: 15 TABLE SHOWING PRICING FACTORS OF
RESPONDENT

FACTORS SATISFIED % HIGHLY % DISSATISF % HIGHLY %


SATISFIED IED DISSATISF
IED
FRIEGHT 15 30 10 20 5 10 4 8
CHARGE

HANDLING 5 10 8 16 15 30 10 20
CHARGE

SUR 7 14 5 10 14 28 5 10
CHARGE

PASS 13 26 12 24 6 12 16 32
CHARGE

WEIGHMENT 10 20 15 30 10 20 15 30
CHARGE

CHART NO: 15 TABLE SHOWING PRICING FACTORS OF


RESPONDENT

Chart Title
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

38
INTERPRETATION:-

Most of the respondents are in satisfied condition in the freight charge


pricing factors group that is 30% of total respondents.

Most of the respondents are in Dissatisfied in handling charge pricing


factors group that is 30% of total respondents.

Most of the respondents are in Dissatisfied in the Sur charge pricing


factors group that is 28% of total respondents.

Most of the respondents are in highly dissatisfied in the pass charge


pricing factors group that is 32% of total respondents.

Most of the responding are in Highly satisfied in the Weighment charge


pricing factors group that is 30% of total respondents.

39
CHAPTER-IV

4. OBSERVATIONS AND FINDINGS

OBSERVATIONS:

CFS is having its various functional departments like (Transportation,


Operations, in gate, Out gate, Warehouse) etc. and each functional department is handling
their functions in an efficient and effective manner, the transportation department handles
the major functions like handling the transportation. CFS is having its own vehicles for
transportation. And In gate and out gate section it handles FCL and LCL cargoes and filing
the IGM etc. In CFS all the employees are treated well the communication between whole
employees and manager is god which helps in production.

40
FINDINGS:
 Functions of logistics especially in warehouse management in an organization.
 Significance of warehouse in import and export operation.
 Activities and tasks performed by logistics sector organization.
 The logistics performance index shows the performance of country in the global
logistics industry, customs, trade-related infrastructure, inland transit, logistics
services, information system and port efficiency are critical to whether countries
can trade goods and services on time and at low cost. Here India L.P.I score is 3.07
and secure 39th position in the global logistics industry. As the share of Indian
logistics industry is more than the Mexico and less than the USA, UK and
Singapore witness that Indian logistics industry is one of the growth drivers for
Indian economy.
 In the global logistics sector India at the top position among the all the low income
group countries. That, Indian logistics sector perform better among all the low
income countries or developing countries.
 Logistics cost contribution of India in GPD is 13 % which shows the high logistics
cost of the Indian logistics industry and also higher than the developed countries.
Due to the poor infrastructure and other logistics service is not better than the
developed countries like USA and Japan.

41
SUGGESTION:

 The company should maintain the transport effectively.


 The warehouse in the company is too small they can increase the size.
 The documentation process for allowing a container to the company takes
time.
 P.O E.O A.O officers are important in the company but they are very much
disturbed while they are working.
 Yard is place where containers are stored in calyx container terminal.
 The yard is small so the management wants to improve yard.

42
CHAPTER-V

5. CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION OF THE STUDY:

Logistics have always been an important part of supply chain management that
plans implements and controls effective flow of storage of goods, services and related
information. Logistics in India is been evolving rapidly and growing at a good place. Even
the government of India is also putting great emphasis on the development of logistics in
country. Apart from that India is bearing huge losses due to poor logistics Infrastructure.

In the period of economic recession and era of challenges infield of logistics,


Calyx Logistics limited had kept their head up faced the challenges from the front and
shown the fantastic results in the business of logistics. Recently they have become the
India’s largest public listed company and they crossed the milestone of 1 billion dollars
Revenue Company. The following are the services that they offer across globe. Multimodal
Transport Operations (LCL ad FCL), Container Freight Station (CFS) and Inland
Container Deport (ICD), and warehousing services. In order to provide the logistics
services across the globe they have merged and acquisitioned many international
companies.

The internship exercise was mainly to enable me to acquire practical skills and I
have been able to acquire practical skills by the support and guidance of calyx team of
Chennai CFS. Thus my internship at Calyx Logistics Private Limited has made and with
the use of that study of percentage analysis was helpful. Personal talk done with the entire
department people has helped me to make some suitable solutions which would really help
to the organization.

43
ABBREVATIONS

CFS CONTAINER FREIGHT STATION

CCTL CHENNAI CONTAINER TERMINAL PVT LTD

CITPL CHENNAI INTERNSATIONAL TERMINAL PVT LTD

KICT KATTUPALLI INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL

CHA CUSTOM HOUSE AGENT

LCL LESS CONTAINER LOAD

FCL FULL CONTAINER LOAD

RFID RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION

PNR PUBLIC NOTOFICATION REQUEST

IGM IMPORT GENERAL MANIFEST

DRF DELIVERY REQUEST FORM

ISO INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR STANDARDIZATION


CODE

BOE BILL OF ENTRY

TEU TWENTY FOOT EQUAL UNITS

FEU FORTY FOOT EQUAL UNITS

UCC UN CLEARED CARGO

44
EIR EQUIPMENT INTERCHANGE RECEIPT

EDI ELECTRONIC DATA INTERCHANGE

PO PREVENTIVE OFFICER

EO EXAMINATION OFFICER

AO APPRAISING OFFICER

SB SHIPPING BILL

FOB FREE ON BOARD

POD PORT OF DISCHARGE

POL PORT OF LOADING

CLP CONTAINER LOAD PLAN

DO DELIVERY ORDER

45
ANEXURE

QUESTIONNAIRE

DEAR RESPONDENT:

I am DINESH. V Student of Dr. M.G.R. University I am carrying out a


research in the area of measuring a warehousing effectiveness of logistics. I need your kind
co-operation in this Endeavour.

PERESONAL DETAILS:-

NAME : ______________

1. AGE : 20-30 30-40 40-50 50 & above

2. GENDER : Male Female

3. EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION: ___________

4. What is the size of your Warehouse?

Small Large

Medium Extra Large

5. To which place do you use parcel service more?

Andhra Pradesh Maharashtra

Tamil Nadu Gujarat

6. What type of Consignment do you trade mostly?

LCL FCL

20 Feet 40 Feet

7. Which type of products has more drawback duties?

Agricultural Products Perishable Goods

Garments Product Medicine products

46
8. How do you punctuality of the parcel services provided

Satisfied Highly Satisfied

Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied

9. What type of container is more profitable?

LCL FCL

Others None

10. Which are the various logistics services you offer

Freight Cross docking

Warehousing Network design

11. What are the location to which your company carters

India Europe

US Asia

12. Is customer complaints given preference in organization

Yes No

13. Weight unit of measure level

Kilograms (kg) Tons

14. How do you rate the delivery activity of the department

Excellent Very effective

Good Average

47
15. Give your satisfaction level about the pricing factors of calyx logistics

FACTORS SATISFIED HIGHLY DISSAATISFIED HIGHLY


SATISFIED DISSATISFIED

FRIEGHT
CHARGE

HANDLING
CHARGE

SUR CHARGE

PASS
CHARGE

WEIGHMENT
CHARGE

48
BIBLIOGRAPHY

For the information I have referred to the following books and contacts in this
project and I am including all this details from the under mentioned books as well as
websites.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

 EPL Brech and Peter Drucker, Business management for the IB Diploma
coursebook

 Stack and Pochet, An Integrated Model For Warehouse And Inventory


Planning

 Simchi-Levi et al, Handbook Of Quantitative Supply Chain Management

 Mathew et al, Future Directions In Well-Bing

 Maltz, Psycho-Cybernetics

REFERENCE WEBSITES:

 www.wikipedia.org

 www.slideshare.com

 www.druckersociety.at

 www.researchgate.net

 www.ccsenet.org

 www.academic.oup.com

 www.jupitertheatre.org

49