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ABSTRACT

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THORACIC IMAGING AND THE RESULT OF


SPECIMENS CULTURE IN PNEUMONIA PATIENTS

Background : Community-acquired pneumonia is a major cause of the worldwide morbidity and


mortality. According to World Health Organization (WHO), there are an estimated 429.2 million
incidents of Community-acquired pneumonia and accounted for 94.5 million disabilities
worldwide. Clinical features obtained from patient’s history, physical examination, and
supportive investigation are required, in this case, the radiographic features of the thoracic
imaging are the primary support for the diagnosis.
Futhermore, to determining the etiologic diagnosis, examination of sputum culture, blood culture
and serology are required. We know that for a rational treatment in patients with pneumonia, the
culture result is very necessary, so the given antibiotic therapy is really appropriate.
Objectives : To know the correlation between thoracic imaging and the result of specimens
culture in pneumonia patients
Methods: The type of research is a retrospective descriptive analysis. The research was
conducted in January to April 2018 and the location of the study was RSUP Dr. Wahidin
Sudirohusodo Makassar, South Sulawesi.
Results: Based on the respondent's characteristic most ages in the age group 46-55 years, ie 29
samples (21.3%). By sex, the most were male, ie 70 samples (51.5%). Based on radiology
imaging of pneumonia most of which is bronchopneumonia group, that is 70 samples (51,5%).
Based on the location of bilateral groups, there were 82 samples (60.3%). While the highest
culture result is P. Aeroginosa, which is 35 samples (25,7%). Based on the radiological
association of pneumonia with culture results, there was a significant association between
radiological features of Bronchopneumonia type pneumonia with S. Aeroginosa cultures (p =
0.000)
Conclusion: There is a significant correlation between radiological imaging of
Bronchopneumonia type pneumonia with S. Aeroginosa cultures.
Keywords: CAP, Throracic Imanging, Cultural